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Full text of "The California druggist"

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OLUME 7.] 



LOS ANGELES, JANUARY, 1898. 

TH F 



[NUMBER 




^TOIYJQlIiJ^lAlL KEVOTlEifS TO THE BKlfEl^ES7S®FTrHIS E^TAflL ^teeHSf 




F. W. BRAUN & CO., WHOLESALE DRUGGISTS 



OLUflBIAN SPIRITS 



TRADE MARK 



THE EQUAL of ALCOHOL for all 
PURPOSES EXCEPT INTERNAL use. 

MANHATTAN SPIRIT CO. 

Sole Manufacturers, BUFFALO, N. Y. 



The Prices to RETAILERS 

are as follows: 
$8. Case of 50 glass bottles 
$7. -Case of 100 glass % bottles 




See that the 
Labels bear the well known 
RED DIAMOND MARK of the 
APOLLINARIS COMPANY, LIMITED. 

SOLE EXPORTERS : 
TH6 APOLWNflRIS COMPANY, Ld. f London 

JOHN CAFFREY, 21 Sutter St., San Francisco 
Representing United Agency Co , 503 Fifth Ave., New York 



PRICE LIST*— * 

FEB. 1, 1890, AND FEB. 1, 1891. 

Beef Peptonoids 6 ozs., per dozen $ 8 OO 

Beef Peptonoids 1« " " 18 00 

Liquid Peptonoids 16 " " » OO 

Liquid Peptonoids with Coca 16 " " 9 00 

Peptonoids, Iron and Wine 16 " " » 00 

Phospho-Caffein Compound 2 " " 2 OO 

Phospho-Caffein Compound 4 " " 4 00 

Phospho-Caffein Compound 8 " " 8 OO 

Phospho-Caffein Compound S2 " " 24 00 

WE GUARANTEE THE SALE OF ALL OUR GOODS 



THE AHWNGTON GHEjMICflLt GO 

YONKERS, N. Y. 






*$^^S£4'*^*!^"W k " 



<ry .:. ?s! .:> gr .;. C!;! .:. gr .:;. c7r .:. gr t v 




CORRUGATED END. 



TUBE CONTAINING MENTHOL. 




THIS CUT ILLUSTRATES THE THREE PARVS OF 



Blanchard's Hard Rubber Pocket 

\t\Y\ i l/>t- This is positively the Finest Menthol Inhaler 
llUldlCI . — on the Mark 



Market 



WHY NOT SELL THE BEST? 



Retails for 50 Cents. 
Price, $4.00 per dozen. 



BLANCHARD'S INHALER is put up in handsome easel cartons, an 
attractive advertisement and an ornament to any drug store. 



BLANCHARD MANUFACTURING CO., Cincinnati, O. 

The Trade Supplied l>y F. W. BRAUN & CO., L,os Angeles and San Diego. 



50 YEARS' 
EXPERIENCE 




Trade Marks 
Designs 
Copyrights &c 

Anyone sending a sket ch and description may 
quickly ascertain our opinion free whether an 
Invention is prohnhlv patentable. Communica- 
tions strictly confidential. Handbook on Patents 
sent, free Oldest agency for securing patents. 

Patents taken through Mutm & CO. receive 
special notice, without o harg e. in the 

Scientific American. 

A handsomely illustrated weekly, I.areest clr- 
dilation of any scientific journal. Terms. »J a 
vcur; four months, IL Boldoyall newsdealers. 

MUNN &Co. 361Bfoadwar New York 

Branch Office, 625 K St., Washington, D. C. j 



The California Drutitfist. 

* * l atement in > / V • 



-ful at the ; 



A MONTHLY JOURNAL 



DEVOTED TO THE INTERESTS OF THE RETAIL DRUGGIST. 



Volume VII.] 



LOS ANGELES, CAL., JANUARY, 1898. 



[Number 



51?e ^aliforpia Dmo^ist 



PUBLISHED MONTHLY BY 



THE CALIFORNIA DRUGGIST PUB. CO. 

P. O. Drawer 406, Station C. - - LOS ANGELES, CAL. 

(To whom all Communications should be address-ed.) 



F. S. LANGDON, ........ President 

J. Q. BRAUN, ... .... Treasurer 

R. A. ALLEN, ......... Editor 

H. WICKIZER. ....... Associate Editor 

TERMS OF SUBSCRIPTION. 

Per Year $1 00 

Single Copies 10 

ADVERTISING RATES. 

One Page $100 00 

Half Page 60 00 

Fourth Page 35 00 

Eighth Page 20 00 

Cards (per month) 1 50 

8ST* Advertisements for positions or assistants, or to buy or sell Drug 
Stores, are inserted free of charge. 

Items of interest to Pharmacists are solicited. 
The official organ of the San Diego Retail Druggists' Association. 
The official organ of the Los Angeles County Pharmaceutical Associa- 
tion. 



1898. 

PHB old year is spinning rapidly behind us as we write, and 

* its memories will soon be dim. We have to do with the 

present only; for what is rightly done now helps to make 

easier the work of the future, when it in turn becomes the 

present. 

What particular branch or portion of our business operations 
give us the most trouble ? Does our book-keeping, our cash ac- 
count, our monthly bills afford us worriment ? Consult and 
take advice from an expert accountant. Does our stock 
seem out of shape and frequently present duplicates in unex- 
pected places ? Take an inventory at once ; learn exactly 
what we have, and systematize its arrangement. Have we a 
pile of uncollected bills, of only historical interest ? Get them 
off our hands and out of the way quickly. Brace up against 
the loafer and dead beat. Resolve to exercise a wise caution 
when a medicine man proposes to load us up with gross lots on 
an advertising scheme. Put our " patents that are dead " in 
plain sight where we can reach them easily and hand them out 
judiciously. 

Consider our clerks and their ways, and see on our part, if 



we have observed the "golden rule" in our dealings with 
them. Freshen up show windows and counter displays. Don't 
let insurance policies lapse. Advertise our attractions. Treat 
all our customers with equal politeness and avoid argument 
with them on merits of preparations. Discount bills purchased 
and insist on prompt payment for goods sold. Finally keep a 
cheerful countenance, a clear conscience and a balance in the 
bank, and next January we may look back upon '( 
banner year. 



as our 



j_f ASTILY scrambling out of his warm bed on New Year's 
A A morning, the broad daylight notifying him that he has 
overslept half an hour, and inwardly reviling the custom that 
breaks one's rest of ushering out the old year with shot guns, 
the drug clerk jumps into his corduroys, washes his hands 
and face in the basin of icy water, and after a hurried break- 
fast pushes off through the snow, a half-mile journey, to open 
the store. The nipping wind pinches his nose and ears as he 
wades through unbroken drifts which the snow-plow has not 
yet reached in its rounds. Arriving at his destination he kicks 
down an accumulated heap at the door, inserts the big brass 
key, and quickly stands inside. First taking down the 
wooden shutters, he next revives the fire in the big stove. The 
broad snow shovel is now brought into play, the sidewalk 
cleaned enough for traffic, and an opening made to the curb- 
stone to permit customers to alight from their sleighs. Now 
he carries out the string of big sponges and attaches it to the 
corner of the window, the sole and unattractive ornament re- 
lieving the monotony of frosted windows and icy sidewalk. 
Inside, the warm stove has kept the show bottles from burst- 
ing, though the windows are covered with snowy crystals, 
dense enough to shut off from the view of the passer-by the 
bright colors in the jars. A mingled smell of turpentine, var- 
nish and oils, combined with a hundred odors of drugs, fills the 
air, while sulphurous fumes from an open carboy of ' ' madder 
compound " add pungency to the combination. 

Against the wall in the back part of the store half a dozen 
sixty-gallon green-painted oil cans stand on a low platform, 
containing turpentine, various oils, and the inevitable "burn- 
ing fluid," or "spirit gas," latest predecessor of petroleum. 
Near by stands a tub of partly made putty, an old axe stand- 
ing upright in the mass inviting exercise at odd times. A short 
back counter, with a scoop-mounted scale thereon, is strewn 
with bits of dyestuff and powdered with dry paints. Here is 
where the thrifty countrywoman criticises your madder, and 
watches the weighing of her dye order. Piled alongside the 
counters are kegs of white lead and boxes of window glass. 
On a counter or table stands a lot of partly finished Godfrey's 
Cordial, waiting to be wrapped. Here are square packages of 



THE CALIFORNIA DRUGGIST. 



essences in long vials, ready for the call of the peddlers — 
wintergreen, hemlock, peppermint and lemon predominating. 
Almanacs are heaped in vacant spaces on the counter. Inside 
the scant show cases are piled promiscuously a general assort- 
ment, embracing everything from toothpicks to Cologne water, 
the solitary box of Curtis' Spruce Gum furnishing faint evi- 
dence of the coming fad. A Bank Note Reporter hangs by 
the money drawer, in the depths of which repose a pint or more 
of big copper cents and a number of smooth shillings and six- 
pences ready to be " worked off. ' ' 

Early in the day a stream of small boys pours into the store 
with clatter of feet and expectant looks, shouting " s happy new 
year," and receiving an almanac or whatever else is offered as 
a consideration. The forenoon is not very old when an elderly 
gentleman, with a Scottish cast of countenance, prominent 
nose, and ruddy skin, appears upon the scene and suggests a 
brew of hot rum, the compounding of which he cheerfully 
undertakes. Medford rum, water (not too much), sugar, but- 
ter, and allspice go into the kettle. The simmering mixture 
is offered to "man bodies" who call, good wishes are ex- 
changed, and thus the year is opened. 

The master of ceremonies — genial soul — has long gone to 
his reward, while his son has for years graced the Bench in the 
United States District Court. And now — as we arouse from our 
reverie and look out upon the gay procession of carriages with 
flowers, and ladies in summer costumes, hurrying to take part 
in the Tournament of Roses on this our California New Year's 
day, the picture we have called up seems a dream indeed ! 



morning and evening lessons from the prayer book of the 
Church of England, is a hint to the American mind of a devo- 
tion to prescribed religious observances not specially marked in 
the drug trade of his own country ^^ 

We note that in London, on Cb^r , the sun rises at 

8:7 and sets at 3:53 ; also that Fir<_ xi .ance expires at regu- 
lar intervals of three months. The Diary is certainly useful 
to an Englishman, and no doubt a big source of revenue to 
the enterprising publishers. 



THE pure Food and Drug Law of Ohio, which Commis- 
1 sioner Blackburn is endeavoring to enforce, is stirring up 
much ill feeling among the druggists of that State. The 
claim seems to be made by Commissioner Blackburn that the 
law requires a poison label to be placed upon every bottle of 
patent medicine (for example) which contains any detectable 
amount of a poison, no matter whether a harmful quantity 
or otherwise. 

Extensive examinations of patent medicines have been made 
by order of the commissioner, in consequence of which arrests 
have been made of dealers for violation of the law. The strict 
enforcement of the law will have one effect certainly, that of 
opening the eyes of the druggists of Ohio, and, for that mat- 
ter, in other States as well, to the necessity of looking more 
closely into all proposed legislation affecting their interests. 
Had the druggists of Ohio forseen the annoyance to arise from 
the statute in question, it is probable they would have secur- 
ed its defeat or modification in the legislature. Commis- 
sioner Blackburn gave fair warning of his intention to 
strictly enforce the law, and it seems hardly fair to charge to 
his account the hardship and inconvenience arising from his 
honest attempt to carry out its provisions. There is no way to 
test a law so justly as to enforce it to the letter. Moral : Make 
only such laws as we expect to have obeyed, and that we ex- 
pect to obey ourselves. 



A MONG the possibilities for California is the growing of 
*"*• Orris root. The subject has not be taken up as yet, so 
far as we are informed, in a practical way, but we now throw 
out the suggestion, hoping that experiments may be made that 
will demonstrate the practibility of the profitable produc- 
tion in our State, of this valuable drug. We print this month 
some interesting matter from Schimmel's Report relating to 
the manner of growing the root, which deserves the careful at- 
tention of our readers. 



/^\UR attention was directed recently to a misprint in an item 
^-^ published in the July issue of the Druggist, entitled 
" Metric System Plainly Stated," where 21 grams were given as 
equivalent to an ounce, troy. 31 grams is, of course the cor- 
rect figure. The corrected table is as follows : 

1000 milligrams make one gram. 

1000 grams or cubic centimeters make one kilo or litre. 

65 milligrams make one grain. 

\5}4 grains make one gram. 

31 grams make one ounce, troy 



r\IKA Oil, a vegetable fat which is extracted from the fruit 
^ of Irgingie Barteri, is said by the Chemical Trade Jour- 
nal to be well suited for culinary purposes. It has a decidedly 
agreeable taste, and is about the consistency of palm oil, 
though darker in color. It is used extensively by the natives 
of the Cameroons. 



THE only way to obtain a certificate under the Pharmacy 
law in Vermont is by examination by the State Board of 
Pharmacy. College graduates are on the same footing as 
others in this respect. If any of our drug friends are contem- 
plating a move to the Green Mountain State, they are hereby 
warned to prepare themselves. 



THE British and Colonial Druggist makes the statement that 
cows in Russia wear blue spectacles to protect their eyes 
from the glare of the sun on the snow, which causes blindness. 
One Moscow merchant has bought a million pairs from English 
manufacturerers in the past five years. 



THE Chemist and Druggist Publication Co., London, are on 
hand with their Diary for 1898, which is a big volume of 
640 pages, containing 485 pages of advertising and avaluable 
treatise on the Art of Pharmacy, with other information especial- 
ly valuable tp the British subject. The introduction of the 



PHE management of an Indianapolis pharmacy advertises 
free medical services ; a physician is sent to any home in 
the city, and the patient treated until cured, absolutely free of 
charge. This beats all previous cut rate records. 



(~~\N the mountain tops of British North America, at an alti- 
^-^ tude of 2200 feet, is found a diminutive pine tree only 
six inches in height, but bearing perfectly developed cones. So 
says president Brown of Torrey Botanical Club. 



THE CALIFORNIA DRUGGIST. 



As Directed. 

BY FRANCIS A. SEYMOUR, M. D., LOS ANGELES. 

In an editorial under this caption last month the types made 
a misfit. The statement in regard to cod liver oil should have 
been, "A teaspoonful at the proper time is beneficial, and that 
in some cases a tablespoonful at any time is harmful." 

Apropos of the title, the doctor said to the patient's wife, 
" The medicine I shall send must be taken in the recumbent 
posture." After he had gone, greatly puzzled, she kept re- 
peating, "A recumbent posture — I haven't got one." Finally 
she applied to a benevolent neighbor, " Have you a re- 
cumbent posture to lend me to put some medicine in for my 
old man ? " The neighbor, as ignorant as the applicant re- 
plied : " I had one, but to tell you the truth I have lost it." 

Said Esculapius to his Hibernian patient, "Take one of 
these pills three times a day." On inspecting the box at his 
next call, he was annoyed to find the number reduced but by a 
single pill. In reply to his inquiry for the reason, Mike said, 
" I tuk wan of them wanst, but the man doesn't live that kin 
take wan of them three times." 

The doctor left six powders for an insomnious patient with 
the directions, ' ' Give one powder every two hours while 
awake." At his call the next morning, greatly to his sur- 
prise, every powder had been taken. Expressing regret that 
the poor fellow should have passed another sleepless night, 
the wife made prompt and cheerful answer, ' ' Not at all wake- 
ful wuz Mike ; he slipt like a top." " Then how did he hap- 
pen to take all the powders ? " " Wasn't it ivery two hours 
he was to take wan ?" — " Yes ; while awake." — " Did ye 
think he cud take a powther while asleep ; sure an' I woke 
him ivery toime. ' ' 

Kentucky Bob had spent the last night wide awake and in 
great pain. At his evening call the physician left an anodyne 
solution, the directions for whose use read, " Give one table- 
spoonful every three hours when awake." In the morning 
but one teaspoonful was missing. The natural inference was 
that the first dose had proved a center shot. Congratulating 
himself on the success of his prescription, and Bob on his rest- 
ful night, his wife said, " Doctah, las night wuz de wustes' 
night ob dis spell." "Why didn't you give the medicine 
according to directions?" "Well, sah, I dun try awful hard, 
but I jis couldn't. I giv him a doste at perzac'ly seven 
o'clock, and in less'n no time he wuz sleepin' ez sweet an' 
snorin' ez loud's ef he nebber stole a chicken in his life. 
But 'twant for long. Pooty soon he began to roll an' grunt, 
an' he kep it up 'tell a quatah 'fore ten, when he snooze off 
agin fur haf an hour. An' so he snoozed a lettle, an' snored a 
heap, an' staid awoke nearly all de night froo. But ebery 
free hours dat niggah was sound asleep." — Practitioner. 

Mr. Brent Good, who was in Toronto for a few days this 
month, informs us that he has succeeded in ferreting out and 
capturing the perpetrator of most barefaced counterfeits of 
Carter's Little Liver Pills. The offender was D. B. Comer, of 
Atlanta, Ga., and he had succeeded in getting rid of at least 
1500 gross of his counterfeits, as well as about 1000 gross of 
Morse's I. R, Pills of the same character. — Canadian Drug- 
gist. 

Trying to stand upon one's dignity often results in a hard fall. 



A Fat yields a big profit of 62^ per cent. 



Some Comments on Chemical Formula;. 

BY WM. MITTELBACH, BOONVILLE, MO. 

The representation of chemicals, by their formulae, is, and 
always has been, a puzzle to the average student of chemistry. 
The trouble is in knowing what the exceptions are, to the gen- 
eral rule of combinations according to the valences of the 
respective elements or groups of elements. These exceptions 
are very confusing, especially because no positive reason exists 
why such exceptions should occur. 

According to the general rule, we are told that when an element 
and an acidic radical unite, to form a salt, they do so according 
to their value in chemical arithmetic, that is, one atom of a 
bivalent will require two of a univalent acidic radical ; two 
atoms of a trivalent element will require three of a bivalent radi- 
cal, etc., etc. We soon become master of the situation, and feel 
that we are able to express any salts instantly. Suddenly we 
come across one of the exceptions, and are told by some (not 
all) of our authorities on the subject, that in certain groups of 
formulae the atoms must be doubled or of an even number. We 
are told that the real valence of some elements is probably 
greater than their apparent valence, and formulae must be writ- 
ten accordingly. 

Attfield tells us that ferric chlorid upon first thought is ex- 
pressed by the formulae FeCl 3 , but according to the theory that 
equal volumes of gases and vapors contain equal numbers of 
molecules, the said formulas represents only a half molecule of 
the ferric chlorid. Hence, he says, Fe 2 Cl 6 must be the formula 
for one molecule of the salt — at all events at the temperature 
of the experiment. From the author's conclusions we may in- 
fer, that possibly at different temperatures different results may 
be obtained. Maisch gives the pupil his choice of HgCl or 
Hg 2 Cl 2 for mercurous chlorid. Whittman states the molecular 
weight_of some salts with a question mark, and so on. And 
now, in the Era Course in Pharmacy, under the auspices of 
the best array of American chemists and scientists, the same 
method of reasoning is adopted. The elements are grouped 
according to their values, and we are told that formulae of 
salts are written according to these valences, except mercurous, 
cuprous, ferric and a few other salts. The formulae for these 
exceptions are differently expressed, because there are some 
reasons for believing that the general rule does not hold good 
here. For example, it is assumed that the atom of iron in 
ferric compounds has four bonds, and its combining power is 
exhibited by the diagram — Fe-Fe — and consequently we have 
Fe 2 Cl representing one molecule of the salt. Although said 
formula is adopted by the U. S. Ph. and other standard works, 
the author of the lecture states further, that the subject is still 
open for discussion, and that excellent reasons exist for writing 
all formulae according to the general rule of valences, and thus 
making it an exact mathematical calculation. The very 
efficient corps of teachers and instructors of the Era Course 
are certainly in a position ta take a bold step forward, and posi- 
tively declare that no exceptions exist to the general rule, and 
that FeCl 3 represents one molecule of ferric chlorid ; HgCl, one 
molecule of mercurous chlorid ; Fe3HO, one of ferric hydrate ; 
AI3HO, one of aluminum hydrate, etc. Take the bull by the 
horns and stand firm on this platform. If you are wrong, let 
the other fellow prove it. With our present knowledge of 
chemical formulae, this theory is just as correct as any other. — 
Pharmaceutical Era. 



Tip Top Cough Syrup is wonderful. $4.00 a Fat. 



THE CALIFORNIA DRUGGIST. 



The Value of Good Credit. 

BY T. H. GREEN.* 

A good credit is something worth striving for, and when at- 
tained the possessor may rightfully feel a just pride in the fact 
that he possesses the confidence of those with whom he deals. 
A good credit standing properly used is an acquisition of un- 
limited value, but when abused it becomes one of the worst 
curses that can be entailed upon an individual. 

It should not be inferred because one is in good credit stand- 
ing that he is entitled to unlimited credit or that his honesty is 
called in question should the jobber or manufacturer place a 
limit on the amount he is willing the merchant should owe 
him. It must be borne in mind that honesty alone will not 
pay debts. One may be absolutely honest and not be able to 
pay. The fact that he does not pay is not an evidence that he 
is dishonest. It will readily be seen that one's ability to pay 
must be taken into account as well as his honesty. 

To obtain and maintain a good credit, it is essential that the 
merchant, in addition to having capital, be it large or small, 
should be honest, capable and industrious, and should have a 
just appreciation of the rights of those of whom he seeks 
credit. If he possesses these qualities he will have no trouble 
in obtaining all the credit his business demands. There is 
danger, however, that he may be led thereby to overstep the 
bounds of prudence and load himself with debt for goods on 
his shelves in excess of the legitimate requirements of his bus- 
iness, which state of affairs is likely to lead to effort by sales 
on credit, often injudiciously extended to relieve the pressure, 
or to establish branch stores for the same purpose, both of 
which means only add to the burden and usually lead to failure. 

If credit is extended at all by the retail merchant, it should 
be upon distinct terms as to the time of payment, and only to 
those who are known to be worthy of credit, and prompt pay- 
ment at maturity should be insisted upon. 

The retail merchant should pay his bills promptly at matur- 
ity, if he does not discount them. Otherwise the jobber of 
whom he buys on credit is in reality the one who bears the 
burden of the unpaid accounts of those who have no claims 
upon him and in whom he has no interest. The jobber's 
rights are thus invaded and the credit of the merchant suffers. 

It is very important to every retail merchant that he keeps 
his business well in hand, the details properly looked after, the 
stock well insured, expenses carefully guarded, his debts 
within easy control, and his collections promptly looked after. 
Failure is not likely to come to to those who appreciate the 
value of good credit and who take the proper means of merit- 
ing and retaining it. 

Mr. Green of Tolerton 6c Stetson Co., Sioux City, Iowa, is treasurer 
of the National Association of Credit Men, and also chairman of the 
Business Literature Committee. 



Tip Top Cough Syrup is wonderful. $4.00 a Fat. 
A Fat yields a big profit ol 62% per cent. 

A Kansas man one day recently bought some pills for in- 
somnia. Being unable to sleep that night, he groped around 
in the dark, found what he supposed to be the pills, swallowed 
them, then peacefully dropped off in slumber. Next day he 
discovered he had swallowed the buttons of his wife's shirt 
waist. This incident almost leads one to become a convert to 
the faith cure doctrine, that it is not the drugs that cure, but 
faith. — Era. 



Culture and Preparation of Orris Root. 

The digging of orris root (giaggiolo) yielded a large crop 
this year (1897). The principal places of production are the 
communities of Greve, Dicomano, Pelago, Regello, Bagno a 
Ripoli, Pontassieve, Galluzo, Santo Casciano in Val di Pesa, 
Montespertoli. The finest quality of root comes from the 
villages Santo Polo and Castellina of the community of Greve. 

Considerable cultures of orris have gradually been established 
in provinces bordering on Florence and furnishing roots of 
equally good quality. They are mainly located in Arezzo, 
Castelfranco di Sopra and in Lore Ciuffenna, all in the province 
of Arezzo, further in the province of Grosseto, in Faenza in 
the province of Ravenna, and in Terni in the province of Per- 
ugia. The estimated total yield of the crop of 1897 from these 
districts (Tuscany) is about 1,250,000 kilos, being an increase 
of 250,000 kilos over the crop of the preceding year. 

Next in quality to Tuscany (Florentine) orris root stands 
the Veronese root. This is, however, inferior in aroma and 
therefore unfit for the distillation of essential oil. This root is 
mainly cultivated in the communities of Tregnago, Cassano, 
Illasi and Monteforte in the province of Verona. The total 
yield of the Veronese root in normal years is estimated as 
amounting to 150,000 to 200,000 kilos. 

Statements made some years ago as to the extensive cultiva- 
tion of orris in Calabra in Southern Italy, especially in the 
neighborhood of Reggio, have proved to be unfounded. Orris, 
Iris fiorentina L. grows wild near Reggio and Gerace, but 
not by far in a quantity to make collection of the root com- 
mercially profitable, nor as yet has it been cultivated for this 
purpose. The culture of orris has been going on in Italy for 
more than two centuries. Although orris root is a special and 
an important factor in the commerce of Italy, and is of great 
importance to the perfumery industries in general, no govern- 
mental or municipal attention or statistics are directed to the 
culture and production of, and commerce in, this commodity. 
Orris is planted on hills and their declivities, never in valleys, 
mostly on sunny clearings, or lengthwise between rows of vines 
in vineyards, seldom in extensive fields. It grows only in dry, 
stony ground. When planted, the plants need no further care and 
are left undisturbed for two or three years. Then the gather- 
ing of the rhizomes commences and their cutting, cleaning and 
preparation for the market requires patient and tiresome labor. 
Generally the root is harvested in the third year, but when 
prices are high and profitable, it is frequently already cut in 
the second year of the growth of the plant. But when this is 
not the case, it is preferable to cut the root in the third year 
because it is then larger, fuller and of finer appearance than the 
meager biennial root. On the other hand 100 kilos of green 
biennial roots yield about 40 kilos of dry root, while the three 
years old root furnishes but 30 to 35 per cent of dry root. The 
age of the root may readily be recognized by the two or three 
fold joints. Half of the last joint remains on the living plant, 
as this is replanted after the roots have been cut off. The re- 
planting is done at once or within fourteen days in new ground. 
The old ground is left for recovery for at least one year, but 
may meanwhile be used for raising cereals. The freshly cut 
roots are first placed in water in order to facilitate peeling and 
then exposed to the sun for drying. This is generally accom- 
plished within fourteen days. 

Orris roots from Morocco and East India have lately been 
brought into the market in considerable quantities, but they 
are utterly unfit for distillation and perfumery. Their miser- 
able appearance bears evidence of the fact that no care is taken 
in the proper culture and preparation of the root. — SchimmeVs 
Report. 






THE CALIFORNIA DRUGGIST. 



Business Personals. 



F. E. Van Haren Drug Co. succeed Knox & Van Haren, 
San Diego, Mr. Knox having disposed of his interest in the 
business. Prosperity to the new house ! 



Harold Clark, with Pierce & Robbins, has been transferred 
from their Chino branch store to a position in their Porterville 
house. 

Frank N. Drake has bought out W. B. Thompson, Twenty- 
third street and Grand avenue. Mr. Drake has been for 
several years with C. Laux Co., this city, and is a compe- 
tent and popular pharmacist. We wish him success. 



Warren Brazelton, of this city, has accepted a position as 
manager of the drug department in the store of the Arizona 
Copper Co., Clifton, A. T. Mr. Brazelton has a practical 
knowledge of the drug business, and we do not doubt will fill 
his responsible position with credit to himself and satisfaction 
to his employers. 

Chas. H. Kelley, recently with Thomas Drug Co., took his 
departure on the ist instant for Seattle, expecting in a couple 
of months to cast in his lot with the seekers for gold in Alaska. 



J. A. MacLeod, late of Woodland, has accepted a position 
with J. T. Crane & Co., Santa Barbara. Mr. MacLeod is a 
graduate of Toronto College of Pharmacy, and it goes without 
saying, is a competent pharmacist. 



Harry F. Messer, lately with J. T. Crane & Co., Santa Bar- 
Barbara, and formerly of Merrell & Messer, Visalia, has bought 
out W. P. Carmau, Arroyo Grande. Mr. Messer has our best 
wishes for his prosperity in the new field he has chosen. 



The Williams Drug Company succeed Dr. C. F. Roberts, at 
Williams, Arizona. Dr. Roberts will hereafter make his 
headquarters at Seligman, where he has interests, and where 
his work as Railroad Surgeon will be conveniently centered. 



Mr. J. S Williams, of Bisbee, Arizona, spent a little time 
in Los Angeles early this month and gave us the pleasure of a 
call. Mr. Williams is one of the solid citizens of Cochise 
county. The report he gave us indicates that Bisbee, which 
is one of the finest copper camps in the country, is enjoying 
a period of prosperity. 

A Fat yields a big profit of 62^ per cent. 



John Wyeth & Bro. are putting out a very fine line of Gran- 
ular Effervescing Salts of their own manufacture, to which the 
attention of the trade is called. The splendid reputation of 
this firm's products gives assurance of the success of this new 
line. The list of salts, with prices, will be found in our ad- 
vertising pages, and should be consulted before making orders 
for this class of goods. 

Tip Top Cough Syrup is wonderful. $4.00 a Fat. 



Malt Nutrine was reduced in price from $2.25 to $2.00 per 
dozen on January ist. This excellent preparation is having a 
very large sale, and as may be seen, now pays the retailer a 
good profit. Order from F. W. Braun & Co. 



Pointed Paragraphs. 

The height of some men's ambition is to pull some other 
man down. 

Some men are so miserly that they won't even pay another a 
compliment. 

The things people want to kqow the most are usually none 
of their business. 

A man is never contented with his lot until he occupies one 
in the cemetery. 

It's the coal dealer's weigh of dealing with his customers 
that makes him rich. 

Contentment has one advantage over wealth — people don't 
try to borrow it from you. 

Some men are so sympathetic that they are willing to share 
your last dollar with you. 

When a man tries to get something for nothing, about the 
the only thing he succeeds in acquiring is experience. 

Some other fellow is applauded for saying the good things 
we might just as well have said had we only thought of them. 

Kings and queens are not always as good as they might be ; 
and they are simply no good at all when they are up against 
aces. — Chicago Daily News. 



A Fat yields a big profit of 62^2 per cent. 

Palatable Castor Oil. 

By dissolving pure saccharine in a small amount of hot al- 
cohol, then adding to castor oil and mixing thoroughly, then 
adding oil peppermint to flavor, a palatable castor oil is ob- 
tained. While hardly the equal of honey in palatability, it is 
more pleasant tasting than any other combination of castor oil 
the writer has ever seen. The following formula is the one 
used by the writer : 

Pure saccharine, half a drachm, 

Alcohol, half an ounce, 

Castor ol., q. s. ad O j., 

Ol. peppermint, 5 or 6 gtts. to flavor. 
Mix alcohol and saccharine and heat till the saccharine is 
dissolved ; then add to oil and shake well ; then add oil pep- 
permint. — Edel. 

Disinfection of Theaters. 

The fact that the management of the Academy and St. 
Charles theaters of this city have determined to disinfect their 
buildings after performances, " remarked Girault. Farrar last 
night, " is a very good thing, not alone because it is necessary 
just at present, but because it means that a new and commend- 
able custom has been instituted by Mr. Rowles, that will take 
hold in every city in the country. The theaters and big as- 
sembly halls are always more or less liable to germs and mi- 
crobes, and a little formaldehyde gas distributed after the 
buildings have been vacated will do much to create a better 
atmosphere and effectually prevent the danger of contagion or 
infection. This is not merely the case during a pestilential 
outbreak, but at all times. It is a good move at present, and 
a good one, for that matter, at any time. — New Orleans 
Times- Democrat. 



Tip Top Cough Syrup is wonderful. $4.00 a Fat. 



Among the many seasonable goods for which the druggist 
finds a ready sale, there is nothing more valuable during the 
winter months than Bradford's Menthol Inhaler, which is 
handy and efficient when colds begin to get in their insidious 
work. Sneezing, stuffed-up nose and dull pains in the head 
are symptoms which show the need of a prompt remedy, for a 
day of neglect means weeks or months of illness more or less 
serious. It is a remarkable fact that the inhalation of menthol 
at the beginning of above symptoms will almost certainly pre- 
vent the disease from going any further. Bradford's Inhaler, 
retailing for twenty-five cents, is just the thing to recommend 
to customers. 



THE CALIFORNIA DRUGGIST. 



OUR ADVERTISERS. 



It will be of interest and value to the trade to consult our 
advertising columns, in which will be found represented the 
followiug firms and goods : 



A. Gettleman Brewing Co. 

Allcock's Plasters. 

Ammonol Chemical Co. 

Antikarnnia Chemical Co. 

Apollinaris Co., Limited. 

Arlington Chemical Co. 

Armstrong Manufacturing Co. 

Batchelor Hair Dye Co. 

Beeman Chemical Co. 

Blake, C. E. & Co. 

Braun, F. W. & Co.'s Laboratory 

Products. 
California Fig Syrup Co. 
Centaur Company. 
Cal. Mission Eucalyptus Lozenges. 
Davol Rubber Co. 
Dement, W. E. 
Empire Mfg. Co. 
Etna Chemical Co. 
Fox, Fultz & Co. 
Gedney, L H. 
Goodrich, B. F. & Co. 
Gold Label Corks. 
Guild, J. H., M. D. 
Hayden Manufacturing Co. 
Hildreth, H. L. 
Hunyadi Salts Co. 
Jayne, Dr. D. & Son. 
Johnson, I. S. & Co. 
Kennedy, S. H. 



Kline, R. H., M. D. 

Kondon Manufacturing Co. 

Kuhns, Arthur Company. 

Leiner, M. 

Levy, B. & Co. 

Ludwick, G. M. 

Major Cement Co. 

Mariani & Co. 

Moore, H. H. & Sous. ■ 

Munn & Co. 

Norman Lichty Manufacturing Co. 

N. Y. Pharmacal Association. 

Omega Chemical Co. 

Planten,H. & Son. 

Pond's Extract Co. 

Pope Manufacturing Co. 

Portuondo Vicente. 

Principe de Gales Cigars. 

Richmond, Dr. S. A. 

Sharp & Dohme. 

Sterling Remedy Co. 

Taite, Jos. G. & Sons. 

T. B. Insect Powder. 

Tetlow, Henry. 

Thum, O. W. Co. 

Wells, A.J. Manufacturing Co. 

Whittemore Bros. & Co. 

Wilbur vSafety Packet Co. 

Wright, Chas. & Co. 

Wyeth, John & Bro. 



Tip Top Cough Syrup is wonderful. 



xo a Fat. 



Comparative Value of Various Disinfectants. 

COMPILED BY A. GAWALOWSKI. 

A y 2 p. c. solution of corrosive sublimate serves as stand- 
ard. 

Disinfectant. Antiseptic. Deodorizer. 

Corr. sublimate solution { l / z p. c.) 100 100 

Carbolic acid 50 50 40 

Sulphurous acid gas 50 50 50 

Thymol (solid) 50 50 40 

Kreosote (100 p. c.) 50 50 40 

Antimonium-Bayer 50 50 40 

Antimycelin.Gawalowski 50 50 40 

Ferrous sulphate (cryst.) 40 50 30 

Ferro-zinc sulphate (cryst.) 40 50 40 

Iron oxide 40 10 15 

Ferro-zinc-magnesium sulphate 40 30 30 

Copper-zinc sulphate 35 40 40 

Ferro-zinc-copper sulphate (cryst.) 35 35 40 

Zinc carbolate (dry) 30 40 45 

Sulphites (containing 10-40 p. c.) 15-25 15-25 15-25 

Permanganates (solid) 25 10 50 

Salicylates (solid) 25 25 25 

Kreolin 25 25 40 

Lysol 25 25 40 

Carbolates of lime 2^-20 2^-20 2-15 

Chlorine gas 15 50 

Ferro-zinc-calcium sulphate 15 30 40 

Raitzer's inodorous disinfecting powder 13 35-40 30 

Ferric salts (40-50 p. c. solutions) 10 10 5 

Zinc salts (cryst.) 10 40 

Chlorinated lime 5 15 

Gawalowski's sulphurous acid perfume (fluid 

alcoholic) 8 S 5 

—Phar. Post. 

A Fat yields a big profit of 62^ per cent. 



P acific Coast Drug Agen evj 

OFFERS FOR SALE 

First-Class Drug Stores 
and Medical Practices 

in all the Pacific States and Territories 

Clerks Registered, Prooided and Employed. Partnerships 
Negotiated. Lists Sent Free. Correspondence Solicited. 

G. M. LUDWICK, 

S. E. Corner Second St. and Broadway, Room 202, Los Angeles, Cal. 

WANTS, Etc., Etc. 

[Under this heading we will be pleased to publish FREE OF 
CHARGE, notices of clerks wanted, positions desired, stores for 
sale or exchange, propositions for purchasing, etc.] 

FOR SALE — Owing to press of other business, I would sell my Sixth 
and Olive street store at an extremely low figure, $600. $500 cash ; 
balance on time. G. A. CUTLER, M. D. 



FOR SALE — In Los Angeles, a centrally located drug store, doing a 
paying business. About $6500 will buy. Reason for selling — 
owner has two stores. Address F. C. W., care F. W. Braun & Co. 



FOR SALE — Set of shop bottles for small store, at a bargain, 
dress Pierce & Robbins, Pomona, Cal. 



Ad- 



FOR SALE — In coast city of Southern California, a drug business 
established over eight years. Stock about $2500 ; location first-class. 
Address M. H., care CALIFORNIA DRUGGIST. 



FOR SALE — Drug store in the most prosperous mining town in Cali- 
fornia; doing a good business ; price $2000. Good reasons for sell- 
ing. A full investigation desired. This is a splendid opportunity for a 
competent man. Population 6000 and only three drug stores. Address 
"GUARANA" care CALIFORNIA DRUGGIST, Los Angeles. 



FOR SALE — Drug store in suburbs of Los Angeles, worth $2000, stock 
clean and in good condition. Store has been established 18 months; 
will sell at invoice price. Inquire of F. W. BRAUN & CO. 

FOR SALE — Drug business in Los Angeles. Established eight years. 
Valuation about $1000. Good location for a single man. 

Address J. O. WHITE, 337 Aliso Street. 



FOR SALE — A city drug store. Fine location. Good business. Low 
rent. Good reasons for selling. Address L, care F. W. BRAUN & 
CO. 






FOR SALE — City drug business at a bargain. Stock about $1200, all 
clean and no dead stuff. Good location for a doctor. Inquire of F. 
W. BRAUN & CO., Los Angeles. 



FOR SALE — A well stocked drug store in busy interior city of South- 
ern California. No cutting in any line. Average daily sales $30. 
Expenses light. Inventory" $6000. Will sell for cash or part cash and 
good security. Good reason for selling. Address "Senna," care of 
F. W. BRAUN & CO. 



FOR SALE— Elegant clean stock in the most progressive suburb of 
Los Angeles. Only drug store within twenty blocks. Best reasons 
for selling. Value about $2000. Inquire of F. W. BRAUN & CO., 
Los Angeles. 



WANTED — Situation by drug clerk, married, age 26. Eight and a 
half years experience ; capable and reliable ; good habits ; best of 
references. Address A. F. Hyer, care Harry Bunting, Santa Cruz, Cal. 



THE CALIFORNIA DRUGGIST. 



PRICE LIST OF DRUGS, CHEMICALS, ETC. 

These prices are for quantities as ordinarily bought by average buyers, and include containers, unless 
otherwise indicated. Subject to market changes. 

For special quantities we will make special figures. 

F. W. BRA UN & CO., Los Angeles, Cal. 



ACETANILID lb 

ACID, Acetic No. 8 lb 

Acetic U. S. P ft 

Benzoic, Eng oz 

Benzo c, German oz 

Boracic ft) 

Boracic powd ft) 

Carbolic, crude gal 

Caroolic, cryst, blk label, l-ft> tin ft) 

Carbolic, cryst, blk label, 5-ft> tins... 
Carbolic, cryst, gold label, l-ft> bots.. 

Carbolic, cryst, gold label, 5-tt> tin ft) 

Citric ft) 

Gallic oz 

Hydrocyanic, dil oz 

Hydrocyanic, cone, Scheele's oz 

Hydrofluoric, 1-oz bots ea 

Hydrofluoric, 4-oz bots. ea 

Muriatic, coml., 6-ft>bots ea 

Muriatic, coml , carboy, $2 3b 

Muriatic, C. P., 1-ibbots lb 

Muriatic, C. P., 6-ft) bots lb 

Nitric, coml., 7-ft> bots ea 

Nitric, coml.. carboy, $2 ft) 

Nitric, C. P., 1ft) bots lb 

Nitric, C. P., 7-ft)bots ft) 

Oxalic ; ft) 

Pyrogallic, Merck's ft> 

Pyrogallic, Merck's oz 

Salicylic lb 

Salicylic oz 

Salicylic, from oil wintergreen oz 

Sulphuric, coml., 9-ft> bots ea 

Sulphuric, coml., carboy, $2 ft) 

Sulphuric, C. P., l-ft> bots ft) 

Sulphuric, C. P., 9-lb bots ft> 

Tannic lb 

Tartaric lb 

ALCOHOL, absolute, 1-qt bots ea 

Grain 

Wood, 5 gal. lot to bbl. lot ..".T.. "..".""..gal 
Wood, less quantity, can extra gal 

ALUM, chrome lb 

Dried (burnt alum) .'.!!!"& 

Lump ft) 

Ground ft) 

Powdered ;""°'".".,'ft 

AMMONIA, cone, 26°, 5-pt bots...." .'ea 

Cone, bulk, can extra gal 

Bromide , ft> 

Carbonate .'.."".....".ft 

Muriate, lump ..-....""lb 

Muriate, gran, coml "'ft> 

Muriate, gran, pure ib 

Muriate, powd ft 

Valerianate oz 

.NT1KAMNIA (10 oz, .90) ........'.'.'...'. oz 

NTIPYRIN (25 oz, $1.30). oz 

RISTOL (25 oz, $1.65) oz 

RROWKOOT, Bermuda ft 

RSENIO, powd, white ft 

SALSAM Copaiba ft 

Fir, Canada ft 

Peru ..'.".".'..■.".'.";".".""» 

folu ft 

ARK, Cinchona, red, true ft 

Cinchona, red, powd .."...""ft 

Cinchona, yellow, Calisaya " .'........"!ft 

Cinchona, yellow, powd ..ft 

Elm, slab ft 

Elm, ground ..".V.™.V"'..V™V.';.".".'.'.'.'.'B) 

Elm, powd "..!""'."".°."""lb 

Sassafras ...."." ""ft 

Soap, slab !.""".'."."" ] ""' "ft 

Soap, ground ..V.7.V."..'.V.'.V.".V.".''''.'.B» 

Soap pwd ft 

Soap, cut, 5c boxes ,.".". d z 

Soap, cut, 10c bozes "" doz 

Wild Cherry fh 

BAT RUM.. "S 

F. W. B. & Co., % pts .'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.V.'.'.'.'..'.'.'.'.doz 

F.W. B. &Co., pts doz 

BEANS, Tonka, Angostura ft 

Vanilla, Mexican ft 

Vanilla, Tahiti w, 

BERRIES, Cubeb .".'.". ft 

Cubeb, powd jt> 

Juniper .'."!!"."..'.'" ft 

BISMUTH, sub-carbonate ft 

Sub-gallate oz 

Sub-nitrate », 

BLUE MASS £ 

BLUE VITRIOL. Th 

BORAX, refined.. .,......."'..'. ft 

Powd m 

BUDS, Cassia ft 

CALOMEL, American ft 

English ; ft 

Stock ,». 

CAMPHOR .'. 5g 

CANT H ARIDES, c'hine'se\"powd"."".'.r'ft 
Russian, powd ft 



42@ 
10® 



40® 
30® 



ft 36® 
33® 
37® 
11® 
11® 



45 
25 
30 
16 
10 
20 
20 
50 
32 
30 
:js 
36 
42 
12 
12 
45 

45® 50 
75 

65® 75 

4 

40 

30 

1 00 



25® 



35® 
25® 
12® 



2^@ 



40 
30 
15 
3 25 
26 
70 
10 
54 
75 
2% 
40 

25® 30 

1 25® 1 50 

38® 42 

1 60 

market 

85® 1 00 

1 10 

13® 15 

12® 15 

3%@ 4 

5® 

6® 



12® 
13® 
11® 



10® 
60® 
45® 



85 
75 
75 
25 
15 
15 
20 
25 
27 
1 00 
1 40 
1 80 
35 
12 
75 

HI 



2 50® 2 75 
75® 
50® 
35® 
50® 
35® 
12® 
14® 
15® 
12® 
7® 
10® 



80 

55 

60 

oo 

60 

15 

18 

21) 

15 

10 

13 

20 

35 

60 

12® 15 

2 50® 3 00 

1 75 

3 50 

2 25® 2 50 
13 50@14 50 

3 25® 3 50 
25® 30 
30® 35 

9® 10 

1 60® 1 70 

19 

1 25® 1 35 

70® 75 

iVi® V 

1%® 10 

7^@ 10 

35® 38 

80® 85 

1 15 

65 

50 

65 

1 10 



55® 
45® 
60® 



CAPSICUM, African, pods ft 22® 25 

African, powd ft 20® 25 

CARAMEL (gal $150, can extra) ft 25 

CARBON, bisulphide, 1-ft bots doz 1 75 

Bisulphide, 2-ft bots doz 3 25 

Bisulphide, 1-gal cans ea 1 15® 1 25 

Bisulphide, 5-gal cans ea 4 00 

CARMINE, No 40 .....oz 35 

CHALK, French, powd ft 6%@ 8 

White, precip ft 10® 12 

White, prepared, drops lb 8® 10 

CHARCOAL, animal, gran ft 8® 12 

Animal, powd ft 8® 10 

Willow, powd , bulk ft 12® 15 

Willow, powd., 1-ft cartons ft 18 

Willow, powd., !4-ft cartons ft 20 

Willow, powd., $4-ft cartons ft 25 

CHLORAL HYDRATE, 1 fts ft 1 60® 1 65 

% fts ft 1 75® 1 80 

K ft>s ft 1 95® 2 00 

CHLOROFORM, 1-ft tins ft 60® 65 

7-fttins ft 57® 60 

Squibbs', 500-gm ea 1 25 

Squibbs', 250-gm ea 68 

Squibbs', 100-gm ea 31 

CLOVES ft 15 

Powd ft 25 

COBALT, powd ft 30 

COCAINE, hydrochlorate oz 3 75 

Hydrochlorate, % oz oz „ 3 85 

Hydrochlorate, Ya oz ea 60® 65 

COCOA BUTTER ft 50® 55 

CODEINE, alk., Ys oz , oz 5 30 

Sulphate, Ys oz oz 4 85 

COLOCYNTH APPLE lb 80 

Powd lb 75 

COMPOSITION POWDER, J/ 8 -ftpkgsft 35 

COPPERAS, bbls, 1% ft 2® 3 

CORROSIVE SUBLIMATE ft 80® 85 

Powd ft 90® 95 

CREAM TARTAR, pure ft 27® 32 

CREOLIN, 1-ft and 5-ft bots ft 50® 55 

CREOSOTE, beech-wood ft 99® 1 10 

Coml ft 45® 50 

CURCUMA, powd ft 12® 15 

CUTTLE BONE ft 30® 35 

DEXTRINE ft 8® 12 

DOVER'S POWDER ft 125 

EIKONOGEN oz 37 

EMERY, flour ft 8® 10 

ERGOT, powd ft 50® 55 

ESSENCE PEPPERMINT, 2-oz bot..doz 1 50 

ETHER, Nitrous, cone, 1-ft bots ft 1 20® 1 25 

Nitrous, cone , %-ft bots ft 1 35® 1 40 

Nitrous, cone, ^-ft bots ft 1 55® 1 60 

Sulphuric, U. S. P., 1880 ft 75® 80 

Sulphuric, cone, 1890 ft 80® 85 

Sulphuric, Squibbs', 500-gm ea 125 

Sulphuric, Squibbs', 250-gm ea- 66 

Sulphuric, Squibbs', 100-gm ea 30 

EUCALYPTOL, Merck's oz ' 24 

EXTRACT, Cascara, fluid, P. W. B. & Co..ft 70 

Cascara, fluid, F. W. B. & Co., 5-ft bots. ..ft 50 

Cascara, fl.,arom., F.W. B. & Co., 1-ft bot.ft 80 

Cascara, fl., arom., F.W.B. & Co , 5-ft bot..ft> 75 

Logwood, 15 and 25-lb boxes ft 12@ 13 

Logwood, 1-ft, %-ft and ^-ft boxes ft 15® 20 

Witch Hazel, distilled gal 65® 90 

Less than 5 gals, container extra. 
EXTRACTS, FLAVORING, 

Lemon, F. W. B. & Co., 2-oz doz 1 50 

Vanilla, F. W. B. & Co, 2-oz , doz 1 75 

FLOWERS, Arnica ft 18® 20 

Chamomile, Eng ft 28® 30 

Chamomile, Ger ft 28® 30 

Lavender ft 12® 15 

Rosemary ft 40 

FOIL, Tin, Heavy ft 20® 25 

Tin, Medium ft 25® 30 

Tin, Light ft 30® 35 

FORMALDEHYD ft 55® 60 

FRUIT JUICES, F. W. B. & Co., qts., doz 5 50 

FRUITS, Crushed, F.W.B. & Co., J^gals ,doz 10 80 

FULLERS EARTH ft 6® 10 

GELATINE,, Cox's, sml doz 1 50 

French, gold label ft 60® 65 

French, silver label ft 40® 45 

French, bronze label ft 35® 40 

GLUE, Carpenter's ft 9® 12 

White ft 15® Is 

GLYCERINE, 50-ft cans ft 14J^@ 15 

10-ftcans ft 20 

2-oz bots doz 1 25® 1 50 

Schering's 1-ft bots ft 45 

Schering's 10-ft bots ft 40 

GLYCOLINE (gal., $1.50, can extra) ft 35 

GUM, Aloes, Barb ft 25® 30 

Aloes, Barb., powd ft) 30® 35 

Aloes, Cape ft 20® 25 

Aloes, Cape, powd ft) 20® 25 

Aloes, Socotrine, true ft 45® 50 

Aloes, Socotrine, powd ft 50® 55 



ft 



Ammoniac 

Arabic, No. 1 

Arabic, No. 2 

Arabic, powd., No. 1 * 

Arabic, powd., French 

Arabic, sorts ft 

Asafetida ft 

Asafetida, powd ft 

Benzoin ft 

Benzoin, powd ft 

Catechu ft 

Catechu, powd lb 

Guaiac ft 

Guaiac, powd ft 

Myrrh ft 

Myrrh, powd ft 

Olibanum ft 

Opium ft 

Opium, powd ft 

Shellac, orange ft 

Shellac, orange, ground ft 

Shellac, white ft 

Shellac, white, powd ft 

Spruce, tears ft 

Tragacanth, flake.... ft 

Tragacanth, sorts ft 

Tragacanth, powd ft 

HOFFMAN'S ANODYNE ft 

HOPS, pressed, y 2 and %-lbs ft 

Pressed, oz ft 

HYDROGEN PEROXIDE, Mar- 

chand's, lbs doz 

Marchand's, %-lbs doz 

Marchand's, i^-lbs doz 

Marchand's, J^-lbs doz 

M. C. W., or P. & W., 1 lbs doz 

M C. W., or P. & W., %-lbs doz 

M. C. W., or P. & W., J4-Ibs doz 

Oakland, 1 lb doz 

Oakland, %-lbs doz 

Oakland, J^-lbs doz 

U.S. P., lib ft 

U.S. P., lib full doz 

HYDROZONE, 1-lb bots doz 

%-lb bots doz 

Yi-Vo bots doz 

J^s-lb bots doz 

ICHTHYOL oz 

Ichthyol ft 

INDIGO ft 

INSECT POWDER, Buhach, 6-lb cans.ft 

Dalmatian, bulk ft 

Hill's California, bulk ft) 

"T. B." 6-lb cans ft 

"T. B." lib cans doz 

" T. B," %-lb cans doz 

' T. B." small ...doz 

IODINE, re-subl : oz 

Re-subl -. ft) 

IODOFORM oz 

Iodoform ft 

IRON, carbonate precip ft 

Chloride, solution ft 

Iodide oz 

Sub-sulphate (Monsel) oz 

Sub-sulphate (Monsel) ft 

Sub-sulphate solution ft 

Sulphate, dried ft) 

Sulphate, pure cryst., bulk ft 

Sulphate, pure cryst., 1-lb bots ft) 

JUICE, Grape, Los Gatos, pts doz 

Grape, Welch's, % pts doz 

Grape, Welch's, pints doz 

Grape, Welch's, quarts doz 

LANOLIN, Leibreich's ft 

LEAD, acetate, coml ft) 

Acetate, powd ft> 

Acetate, C. P ft) 

Sub-acet. solu., Goulard's ft 

LEAVES, Bay ft 

Buchu, long ft 

Buchu, short ft 

Rosemary, bulk ft 

Sage, %s and i^s ft 

Sage, ozs ft 

Senna, Alex ft 

Senna, Alex., powd ft 

Senna, Tinnevelli ft 

Senna, Tinnevelli, powd ft 

Uva Ursi ft 

LEECHES, (25 or more, 8c.) ea 

LIME. Chloride, 35-ft cans „, ft 

Chloride, Acme, 1-lb cans doz 

Chloride, Acme, J^-lb cans doz 

Chloride, Acme, j^-lb cans doz 

Chloride, Electron, 1-lb cans doz 

Chloride, Phoenix, 1-lb cartons doz 

LITHARGE ft 

LONDON PURPLE ft 



70® 
50® 



32® 
45® 
50® 
60® 
9® 
32® 
38© 
45@ 



35® 

40® 

1 25® 

90® 



45 
75 
55 
75 

1 00 
45 
35 
50 
55 
70 
12 
35 
40 
50 
38 

38© 40 
25® 30 

3 15® 3 25 

4 00® 4 20 
32® 35 

38 
40 
45 
35 
95 
50 

1 00® 1 10 

65 

16® 20 

25 

7 50 

5 50 

3 75 

2 25 

4 80 

3 00 

1 80 

6 00 
3 75 

2 50 
35 

3 25 
10 50 

7 25 

4 75 

2 25 
50 

6 50 
75 
60 
40 
45 
40 

5 50 

3 25 
1 25 



70® 
50® 
28® 



3 60® 


3 80 




40 


4 15® 


4 40 


16© 


18 


25© 


35 




35 




8 


34© 


40 


25© 


30 


15© 


20 


8© 


10 


14© 


18 




4 00 




1 75 




3 10 




5 50 




1 00 


16© 


20 


20® 


25 


27® 


30 


30© 


35 


14© 


15 


30© 


33 


30® 


33 


18® 


20 


18® 


20 




25 


30® 


35 




30 


IS® 


20 


20® 


25 


12® 


15 




10 




iV, 




1 25 




80 




45 




1 20 




1 10 


8^@ 


10 


15® 


20 



THE CALIFORNIA DRUGGIST. 



LOZENGES, Licorice, alb boxes ft 

Licorice, "Acme," 5-lb boxes ft) 

Peppermint, 5-!b boxes lb 

LYCOEOUICM B> 

LYE. concentrated (case, $3 50) doz 

LYSOL, i-lbbots lb 

MAGNESIA, Calcined, 1-lbtin lb 

Carbonate, Jenning's, 2 and 4-oz ft> 

Carbonate, K. & M., 4-oz., 2 oz. and 1 oz..lh 

Carbonate, K. & M., powdered lb 

Carbonate, K. & M., S. S lb 

Eff. citrate, Herring's doz 

MANGANESE, black oxide ft) 

MANNA, large flake lb 

Small flake lb 

MENTHOL, (oz, 25c ) lb 

MEROUKY lb 

Bi-sulphate lb 

Iodide, green , oz 

Iodide, red oz 

MORPHINE, sulph., ]/s oz oz 

Sulph., y&oz., 2J^oz. bxs oz 

Sulph., 1 oz tins oz 

Sulph., 5-oz tins oz 

MOSS, Iceland ft> 

Irish B> 

MUSK, Canton, 1-oz bxs oz 

Tonquin, l /i oz bots ea 

MUSTARD Colburn's,6 lb cans lb 

Ground California lb 

NAPHTHALINE, balls, cakes or flakes..tt> 

NUTMEGS ft 

Ground *> 

NUTS, Areca lb 

Areca, powd lb 

Kola ft 

NUX VOMICA lb 

Powdered ft 

OIL, Almond, bitter oz 

Almond, sweet ft) 

Amber, rect ft) 

Anise ft) 

Bay oz 

Benne (can extra) gal 

Bergamot, Sanderson ft) 

Bergamot, Sicilian lb 

Cassia ft> 

Castor "A A" gal 

Castor, machine gal 

Castor, special cotn'l gal 

Less than 5 gals., can extra. 

Cedar, coml lb 

Cedar, pure ft) 

China nut (can extra) gal 

Cloves ft> 

Cocoanut lb 

Cod liver, Norwegian (can extra) gal 

Cottonseed gal 

Less than 5 gal., can extra. 

Crotou ft) 

Cubebs ft) 

Eucalyptus ft) 

Geranium Rose oz 

Hemlock, pure ft) 

Lard gal 

Less than 5 gal can extra. 

Lavender flowers ft) 

Lavender, garden ft) 

Lemon, Sanderson ft) 

Lemon, Sicilian ft) 

Mustard, Essential oz 

Neatsfoot (less than 5-gal. can extra) ...gal 

Olive, California, qts doz 

Olive, Italia, I gal cans gal 

Olive, Malaga, can extra gal 

Orange, bitter ft) 

Orange, sweet ft) 

Origanum ft) 

Pennyroyal ft) 

Peppermint Hotchkiss ft) 

Peppermint, Western ft) 

Pinus Sylvestris ft) 

Rhodium oz 

Rose oz 

Rosemary flowers... ft) 

Sandalwood, Eng oz 

Sandalwood, Ger ft) 

Sassafras lb 

Sewing Machine, Nye's, small doz 

Sewing Machine Nye's, large doz 

Sperm. Nye's crystal gal 

Sperm, pure, w. b gal 

Less than 5 gal can extra. 

Spike ft) 

Turpentine, rect., Merck lb 

Union salad gal 

Less than 6 gal can extra. 

Wintergreen ft) 

Wormwood ft' 

OIL CAKE, ground lb 

OINTMENT, Citrine ft) 

Mercurial, l A m lb 

Mercurial % rn lb 

Zinc, benz. oxide lb 

ORANGE PEEL th 

PAPOID, y 2 or 1-oz bots oz 

PARAFFIN lb 

PARIS GREEN lb 

l's, %'B, \i'a ft' 

PETROLATUM, ex. amber 11. 

Snow while lb 

PHENACETIN (25 ozs. .95) oz 

PHOSPHORUS, 11-lbcans lb 

Mb cans ft 

■^ and J^-cans lb 

PLASTER PARIS lb 

Dentist's lb 

POISON, purple lb 



18® 



6b 

14 

50@ 55 

90 

65 

65 

35 

25 

35 

65 

2 00 

6@ 8 

90@ 1 00 

60® 65 

2 35® 2 50 

68® 75 

65® 70 

25 

26 

2 30® 2 50 

2 25® 2 45 

2 05(5( 2 25 

2 00® 2 20 

15 

20 

35 

4 50 

28 

15 

8 

65 

70 

35 

40 

35 

20 

25 

65 

15 

55 

7(1 

50 

25 



14® 

4® 

COM' 

now 

30® 
3£® 

25® 
15® 
20(5'. 



50® 

2 50(» 
45(« 

1 15® 

3 40® 3 60 

3 00® 3 20 

2 25® 2 50 
1 25® 1 35 

45® 50 
75® 80 

40® 50 
75® 80 
65® 75 
80® 1 00 
20® 30 
1 10® 1 25 
55® 70 

1 35® 1 50 

1 50® 1 75 
65® 75 
65® 75 
75® 80 
75® 85 

2 25® 2 40 
75® 80 

2 00® 2 20 

1 25® 1 50 

65 

75® 80 

12 00 

1 85 

1 00® 1 25 

4 50® 4 75 

2 25@ 2 50 
50® 60 

i .->o<» i t;. 

2 10® 2 25 

1 40® 1 60 

1 20® 1 40 

40® 75 

7 50@10 00 

1 50® 1 65 

50 

:; mifri :: 25 

75(« 85 

45 

75 

75 

1 25 

25® 35 

45 

75® 80 

1 70® 1 90 

1 I III!,, 5 III) 

02]/ t ® 03 



65 
55 
68 

75 

18 

3 00 

15 

25 

BO 

12 

85 

1 00 

75 

86 

96<§ l 05 

02® 05 
04® 08 
08® 10 



50,,, 
60® 

15® 

in,,, 

20® 
25(§ 

7fri 
:i(K« 



POTASH, Babbift's, (case $3.50) doz 

Caustic, crude ft) 

Caustic, white, stick lb 

Bichromate lb 

Carbonate lb 

Chlorate ft) 

Cyanide, mining ft) 

Cyanide, pure grauular ft) 

Iodide lb 

Nitrate lb 

Permauganate ib 

Prussiate, red lb 

Prussiate, yellow ft) 

PUMICE STONE, lump lb 

Powd Ib 

QUASSIA, Chips lb 

QUININE, 1-oz bottle oz 

1-oz tin oz 

5-oz tin oz 

25-oz tin oz 

50-oz tin oz 

100-oz tin oz 

KED PRECIPITATE ft) 

RESIN, ft> 

ROOT, Aconite ft 

Althea, cut lb 

Blood ft 

Blood, powd ft 

Calamus, peeled ft 

Gentian ft 

Gentian, powd ft) 

Ginger, African _ ft 

Ginger. Jamaica ft 

Goldenseal ft 

Goldenseal, powd ft 

Ipecac, powd ft 

Licorice, select ft 

Licorice, cut ft 

Licorice, powd ft 

Orris, powd ft 

Rhubarb ft 

Rhubarb cubes ft 

Rhubarb fingers ft 

Rhubarb, powd ft 

Rhubarb, powd., Allen's, Eng ft 

Sarsaparilla, Hond ft 

Sarsaparilla, Hond, gro ft 

Sarsaparilla, Mex ft 

Sarsaparilla, Mex., gro ft 

Valerian ft 

Valerian, powd ft 

ROTTEN STONE, powd ft 

SACCHARIN, 25 gm. cartons ea 

SAFFRON. American.. ft 

Spanish oz 

SAL EPSOM ft 

Epsom 4-oz cartons doz 

Glauber ft 

Nitre, cryst ft 

Nitre, powd ft 

Rochelle ft 

Soda lb 

SALOL, (oz30) ft 

SEED, Anise, Ital ft 

Anise, powd ft 

Bird, mixed, 1-lbs., 60-lb case case 

Bird, mixed, 1 ft doz 

Canary ft 

Caraway ft 

Cardamom ft 

Celery ft 

Coriander ft 

Flax, cleaned ft 

Flax ground ft 

Hemp ft 

Millet ft 

Mustard ft 

Poppy, blue ft 

Rape ft 

Sabadilla, powd <. ft 

Worm, American ft 

Worm, Levant ft 

SEIDLITZ MIXTURE ft 

Powders, single, 100s box 

Powders, 3's doz 

Powders, 6's doz 

Powders, 10s doz 

SHEEP DIP, Carbolic gal 

Little's 1 gal cans gal 

Little's 5 gal cans gal 

SNUFF, Garrett's Scotch, blads ft 

Garrett's Scotch, 1 oz tins doz 

Garrett's Scotch, 2-oz tins doz 

Garrett's Scotch, 4-oz tins doz 

Garrett's Scotch, 6 oz bots doz 

Lorillard's Maccahoy. 4-oz bots doz 

Lorillard's Rappee. 4 oz bots doz 

SOAP, Castile, Conti white ft 

Marseilles, white lb 

Mottled, coml ft 

Mottled, pure lb 

Turkish, green or white ft 

Powdered th 

German green, Stiefel's th 

Whale Oil ft 

SODA ASH ft 

Caustic, 98 per cent ft 

Causlic, 70 per cent (Drums) lh 

Caustic, white, sticks th 

Bicarbonate lh 

Bromide lh 

Hyposulphite lh 

Hyposulphite, new process It. 

SOLUTION, Donavan's ft 

Fowler's It. 

Goulard's lb 

SPERMACETI ft 

SPIRITS. Brooklyn and Columbian gal. 

Less than 5 gals, can extra. 

Nitre, U. S. P ft 

Nitre, 2-oz bots doz 



7),<5 
45® 
15® 
15<« 
14(5 
3U(n 



65 



10 



90 

13 
70 

'JO 

25 

17 
35 
65 
2 55® 2 65 

08(5 12 

40® 60 

0ti<» 

32® 

09® 

06® os 
10 
38 
36 
33 
31 
30 
30 
1 10 
OIJ^ to 03 

30® 35 

35® 

25® 

30® 



35® 
33m 
30® 
28® 

27® 
27® 



13® 



25® 
65® 
70® 
2 50© 2 75 
13® 15 



14® 
35@ 



1 25® 1 50 
1 50® 1 75 
75 
175 
45 
45 
30 
30 
35 



40® 
40® 
25® 
25® 
30® 
35® 
07® 

40® 

02J4® 

01%® 
08® 



40 
10 

1 00 
45 

1 00 
04 
35 
03 
12 
12 
30 
03 



26® 

OVA® 

2 50® 3 65 

16® 18 

20® 25 

3 50 

75 

05 

12 

40 

25 

12 

05 

0.5 

06 

06 



03',® 

10® 

1 35® 

18® 

10® 

03-' 4 ® 

033 4 @ 

03'; @ 

04® 



10® 
04® 
40® 



28® 



12 
06 

50 

20 

25 

30 

2 50 

60 

1 45® 1 50 

1 @ 2 00 

1 10 

1 35 

1 20 

50 

60 

1 00 

1 75 



13,5 
10® 
07', w 
08® 
10® 



lib,/ 

06® 

04 H® 



2 50 
2 75 
16 
13 
10 
12 
11 
35 
30 
06 

os 
08 



l)3w 03', 
42® 45 
02 'A® 



01 
65 
05 
06 

10 

85 
85 

55 
1 m« 1 75 

55® 60 
1 50 



03K® 
04® 

25® 
80@ 



STRONTIUM, nitrate ft, 14® 17 

STRT CHINE., cryst., J/ 8 -oz bots oz 1 20® 1 25 

Ciyst., 1-oz bots oz 95® 1 00 

Powd., '3-oz bots oz 1 15® 1 20 

Powd., 1-oz bots oz 90® 95 

SI' GAR MILK, powd ft 20(51 25 

SULFONAL oz 1 35 

SULPHUR, crude, ground, Cal .....ft 02® 03 

F'cur ft 02'4@ 0334 

Flowers ft 02%@ 04 

„ Ron ft) 0234® 04 

SYRUP. Iodide Iron, F. W. B. & Co ft 57® 60 

Rock Candy, bbls and % bbls gal 70® 75 

TAR, Pine, y 2 pints doz 75 

Pine, pints doz 90 

'Pine, quarts doz 1 50 

WATER, distilled, containers extra gal 10 

Orange Flower, containers extra gal 2 00® 2 25 

Rose, containers extra gal 2 00® 2 50 

WAX, Floor, powd lb 40 

Yellow, pure ft 27® 30 

White, pure ft 50® 55 

White, No. 1 ft, 35® 40 

WHITE PRECIPITATE ft 1 20 

ZINC, metallic, shavings ft 20® 35 

Oxide, com'l ft 14® 15 

Oxide, Hubbuck's ft 45® 5C 

Sulphate, com'l ft 06® 08 

Sulphate, chem. pure ft 17® 20 

PROPRIETARY ARTICLES 

Controlled by F. AY. Braun & Co. 

Braun's Carbolic Salve doz $1 25 

" Carbolic Soap doz 75 

" Condition Powder doz 1 00 

" Essence Jamaica Ginger ...doz 150 

•' Florida Water, lge doz 3 50 

" Florida Warer, small doz 150 

" Sarsaparilla doz 4 00 

" Syrup Tar and Wild Cherry doz 150 

Cal. Mission Eucalyptus Lozenges doz 150 

Cal. Mission Eucalyptus Plasters doz 1 50 

Cal. Mission Poison Oak Remedy doz 1 50 

Cal. Root Beer doz 80 

Cal. Mocking Bird Food doz 3 00 

Corouado Sea Salt doz 80 

Hayden's Sachet Powder, \i ft bots ft 3 00 

Hunter's Witch Hazel doz 1 75 

Matchless Sarsaparilla doz 5 00 

Matchless Wild Cherry Phosphates doz 1 75 

Swain's Carbolic Powder doz 1 50 

Tarine doz 1 75 

" T. B." Insect I owder, 6-ft can ft 40 

" " " 1-ft " doz 5 50 

}4-fb- doz 3 25 

" " " sml " doz 1 25 



BRAUN'S... 

California 
Condition Powder 



IS A 



Well Established Remedy 



Having a good sale throughout Southern 
California and the Territories 



It is used for 

Horses, Cattle, sheep and Poultry 

IT IS GOOD 

It Retails for 25 cents 
It Costs .$1.0() Per Dozen 

You need it in your business ! 



MANUFACTURED 
AND SOLD BY 



F. W. BRAUN & CO. 



LOS ANGELES, CAL. 



vv^L f >: j^j 



\/OLUME 7.] 



LOS ANGELES, FEBRUARY, 1898. 



[NUMBER 2. 




weitoajLY jqIh^IXl ideVoter to 



GUESTS©? THE ^ETAQL ^teens'? 







F. W. BRAUN & CO., WHOLESALE DRUGGISTS 



COLUMBIAN SPIRITS 



TRA.DK mark 



THE EQUAL of ALCOHOL for all 
PURPOSES EXCEPT INTERNAL use. 

MANHATTAN SPIRIT CO. 

Sole Manufacturers, BUFFALO, N. Y. 



The Prices to RETAILERS 

are as follows: 
$8— Case of 50 glass bottles 
$7.— Case of 100 glass % bottles 




See that the 
Labels bear the well known 
RED DIAMOND MARK of the 
APOLLINARIS COMPANY, LIMITED. 



SOLE EXPORTERS: 
The APOLLlNflRIS 60MPANY, Ld., 



London 



JOHN CAFFREY, 21 Sutter St., San Francisco 
Representing United Agency Co., 503 Fifth Ave., New York 





LACTOPEPTINE Powder, in ounces, per dozen $8 00 

LACTOPEPTINE Powder, in half-pound bottles, per pound 9 60 

Lbs. per doz. 5-lb Bot. Ea. 

LACTOPEPTINE Elixir $12 00 $4 50 

LACTOPEPTINE Elixir with Bismuth 12 00 4 50 

LACTOPEPTINE Elixir with Strychnia and Bismuth 12 00 4 50 

LACTOPEPTINE Elixir with Calisaya 12 00 4 50 

LACTOPEPTINE Elixir with Calisaya, Iron and Bismuth 12 00 4 50 

LACTOPEPTINE Elixir with Gentian and Chloride of Iron 12 00 4 50 

LACTOPEPTINE Elixir with Phosphate of Iron, Quinia and Strychnia 12 00 4 50 

LACTOPEPTINE Liquid 12 00 4 50 

LACTOPEPTINE with Beef, Iron and Wine 9 00 3 25 

Per Doz. 6-lb Bot. 

LACTOPEPTINE Syrup with Phosphates $12 00 $5 50 



NEW YORK PHARMACAL ASSOCIATION, Yonkers, N. Y. 



CAP. 



CORRUGATED END. 



TUBE CONTAINING MENTHOL. 




THIS CUT ILLUSTRATES THE THREE PARTS OF 



Blanchard's Hard Rubber Pocket 

Inh-^lor* This is positively the Finest Menthol Inhaler 
Illlldiei . - on the Market 



Retails for 50 Cents. 
Price, $4.00 per dozen. 



WHY NOT SELL THE BEST? 

BLANCHARD'S INHALER is put up in handsome easel cartons, an 
attractive advertisement and an ornament to any drug store. 



BLANCHARD MANUFACTURING CO., Cincinnati, O. 

The Trade Supplied by F. W. BRAUN & CO., Los Angeles and San Diego. 



50 YEARS' 
EXPERIENCE 




Trade Marks 
Designs 
Copyrights Ac 

Anyone sending a sketch and description may 
quickly ascertain our opinion free whether an 
invention is probably patentable. Communica- 
tions strictly confidential. Handbook on Patents 
sent. free. Oldest agency for securing patents. 

Patents taken through Munn & Co. receive 
special notice, without c harg e, in the 

Scientific American* 

A handsomely Illustrated weekly. Largest dr. 
dilation of any scientific journal. Terms, t3 a 
year; four months, $L Sold by all newsdealers. 

MUNN&Co. 36 ' 8 ™^- New York 

Branch Office, 625 F St., Washington, D. C. 



Jfye Qaliforpia Drti^ist. 

A MONTHLY JOURNAL 

DEVOTED TO THE INTERESTS OF THE RETAIL DRUGGIST. 



Volume VII.] 



LOS ANGELES, CAL., FEBRUARY, 1898. 



[Number 2. 



51?e ^aliforpia Dm^ist 



PUBLISHED MONTHLY BY 



THE CALIFORNIA DRUGGIST PUB. CO. 

P. O. Drawer 406, Station C. - - LOS ANGELES, CAL. 
(To whom all Communications should be addressed.) 



F. S. LANGDON, ........ PRESIDENT 

J. Q. BRAUN, ... ..... Treasurer 

R. A. ALLEN Editor 

H. WICKIZER. . . . . • • Associate Editor 

TERMS OF SUBSCRIPTION. 

Per Year $1 00 

Single Copies 10 

ADVERTISING RATES. 

One Page $100 00 

Half Page 60 00 

Fourth Page 35 00 

Eighth Page 20 00 

Cards (per month) 1 50 

8^° Advertisements for positions or assistants, or to bny or sell Drug 
Stores, are inserted free of charge. 

Items of interest to Pharmacists are solicited. 
The official organ of the San Diego Retail Druggists' Association. 
The official organ of the Los Angeles County Pharmaceutical Associa- 
tion. 



"PJ W. BRAUN & CO. are now located in their new quar- 
*■ • ters, having opened the doors of 501-505 North Main 
street for business Monday morning, February 7th, and will 
henceforth be happy to greet their friends and customers 
under their own roof. 

It will be yet a little while before every portion of their 
large stock is transferred to the new building and all office 
arrangements perfected, therefore we defer to a subsequent 
issue a detailed description of the interior. It will suffice at 
this writing to say that few, if any, wholesale houses in Uncle 
Sam's domain are more conveniently housed or better prepared 
to handle a large business than F. W. Braun & Co. It will 
be well to note that the present quarters are but 200 feet dis- 
tant (a short half block to the north) from the firm's old 
location. 

'"THE Pharmacal Digest for December comes to us with a 
*■ mourning cover and a death wail — the latter being of a 
decidedly humorous character, a la Dietrich, and designed to 
mitigate the grief of the afflicted survivors. (It worked all 
right in our case.) Isn't it unusual, though, to put on so 
much agony at one's own funeral ? 



J\fl R. J. W. COX, secretary of the Anti-Kamnia Chemical 
* ' * Company, made us a pleasant call a few days ago, and 
took occasion to inform us that he was out here to look after 
the interests of his company which were being jeopardized in 
this market by local counterfeiters. Mr. Cox was fortunate 
enough to run the guilty parties to earth, and also to obtain a 
list of the. dealers who had purchased the spurious tablets, 
which, by the way, were sold in bulk, and were a close imitation 
of the genuine, having the "A. K." stamp upon each tablet. 
After capturing the dies and plant, Mr. Cox generously re- 
frained from visiting the penalty of the law upon the counter- 
feiters, upon their assurances that they would do no more of 
the business. Some twenty of the local trade are implicated 
as dealing in the spurious tablets ; but as the goods have been 
gathered in and destroyed, there may be no further action 
taken by the Anti-Kamnia Company, unless the offense should 
be repeated. Those who have been involved in the crooked 
business are certainly fortunate in escaping so easily, for the 
offense is against the Federal laws, and it is practically impos- 
sible to escape heavy penalties or imprisonment where cases 
are prosecuted. We earnestly counsel our friends of the drug 
trade to take no chances on crooked goods. Dealers are not 
taken in under false pretenses of genuineness, for they know 
what they are doing. Those who buy imitation "patents " or 
smuggled phenacetin and the like, have only themselves to 
blame if caught in the toils. Detectives are at work on this 
coast gathering proofs, and when the druggist finds the " drop " 
is on him, and has to " dig up " a big penalty, he will find he 
has been engaged in the most unprofitable deal of his life. 



WK note the death, on the 20th of January, of Mr. L. L- 
Peet, at his residence in Lincoln Park, at the age of 82 
years. Mr. Peet came to this coast several years ago from 
Cleveland, O., to get the advantage of a milder climate, bring- 
ing with him the stock and apparatus of his business, and re- 
engaged in the manufacture and sale of flavoring extracts and 
domestic medicines which he sold from house to house, becom- 
ing in time a familiar figure in Southern California, as he had 
been for nearly a generation in Northern Ohio. He was up to 
the time of his death a pensioner of the Seminole Indian War, 
in which he served as Sergeant of Cavalry, and concerning 
which he was a well informed and entertaining raconteur, his 
sympathies going out strongly toward the wronged and cheated 
red men of the Everglades. A free lance in politics and reli- 
gion, our friend was never so much in his element as when dis- 
cussing the principles and actions of leaders who were the sub- 
ject of his criticism, the Roman Catholic Church coming in for 
a large measure of his wrath, and the liquor traffic receiving 



THE CALIFORNIA DRUGGIST. 



his unmerciful scorings as well. Mr. Peet was honest and 
square in his business transactions, and his preparations were 
as good as he could make them. He left a wife and two sons, 
one of the latter, Mr. L. A. Peet, succeeding him in business. 



Y\ 7E noticed a one-legged girl on crutches kicking football in 
*" the street the other day, which struck us as a fine in- 
stance of fun under difficulties. Mark Tapley could hardly 
have improved upon it. 



Liquorice and a WelLknown Firm Who riake It. 

Not one person in a thousand, who sell it, have the remotest 
idea as to what liquorice is, how it is prepared for the market, 
or where it comes from. At the same time the preparation of 
it for commercial ends, in other words, the manufacture of the 
crude product into the refined substance that the public are in 
the habit of purchasing, comprises one of the world's most 
important industries, being used medicinally chiefly as a de- 
mulcent, especially in bronchial affections, while it is also con- 
sumed in vast quantities in the manufacture of confections, 
tobacco, and for brewing purposes. 

Licorice (liquorice) was in former times spelled lickorice, 
lickerice and licourize respectively ; and licorice-plant, to give 
the literal Greek meaning, signifies "sweet-root." The plant 
is leguminous, and it is from the root that the licorice of com- 
merce is taken. It is a perennial herbaceous plant, whose 
growth reaches from four to five feet ; the branches are spar- 
ing, and bear pinnate leaves and bluish, pea-like flowers which 
grow in spikes. The length of the root is three to four feet. 
It will be remembered that Chaucer, in the " Miller's Tale,'' 
1,504, says: 

" But first he cheweth grey 11 and lycorys, 
To siuellen sweete." 

The poet's familiarity with the plant was due to the fact 
that licorice was and is a product of Yorkshire, England, 
where it is made into a confection known as Pontefract cakes ; 
and it is also an industry cultivated in Surrey, England. It is, 
properly speaking, however, a Southern European industry, 
the plant growing especially on the Mediterranean coast, and 
its geographical limits travel eastward throughout central Asia 
and China. The quality best appreciated in England is made 
in Calabria, and is sold under the names of Solazzi and Corig- 
liana juice. Spain, on account of its soil, and climatic con- 
ditions, is peculiarly adapted to the cultivation of licorice. 
The Spanish root is used entirely by the best manufacturers of 
stick licorice, as it is sweeter and more delectable, while the 
Greek and kindred species of root are employed for making 
the mass used in the manufacture of tobacco, etc. 

Nothing but the root of the plant is utilized and its quality 
varies according to the soil. The root is pulled at intervals of 
three, four or five years, according to circumstances, by digging 
trenches and pulling the root until it breaks. After a year or 
two a stem appears above the ground and in the spring it 
flowers. From the time the stem shows, until the flowers 
have fallen, the root is not in condition to extract as the sap 
does not return to the root until then. From September to 
March the crop is gathered and is then cured or dried. It re- 
quires from four to five months to properly "cure" before 
becoming marketable, and a dry climate is necessary for this 
purpose. Asiatic Turkey, Greece, Italy and the Sicilies pro- 



duce this plant as well, but with varying quantity and flavor 
in the extract. 

Among the pioneer licorice manufacturers on the North 
American continent are Young & Smylie, of Brooklyn, N. Y. 
The business of this firm was established in 1845, just 53 years 
ago, and it has gradually developed until it is today the largest 
of the kind in the world. The output of the firm is from 
25,000 to 30,000 pounds daily, and the number of hands em- 
ployed is from 125 to 190. 

The founder of the firm was Mr. Abel Smith, a brother-in- 
law of Mr. C. A. Smylie, deceased. In addition to Mr. 
George Young, the present head of the firm, its members 
comprise Mr. Thomas H. Bauchle, and Messrs. Charles A. 
and Adolphe E. Smylie, sons of the late Mr. Smylie. 

The fact that the business has grown to what it is today is 
not due to the mere fact of age. It is because the firm has 
made quality the aim of its products. Even the very cheapest 
line the firm turn out is made of good, pure ingredients. 
Licorice in all its forms and specialties is manufactured by the 
firm, and it is sent to every city in America, and to many of 
the South American and European centers of trade. — Canadian 
Druggist. 

riarvelous Uses of Coal Tar. 

No tale in " The Arabian Nights," no story of the wondrous 
treasures taken by mystic power Irom magic nutshells, sur- 
passes what science is doing today. Science, the wizard of 
the century, touches with his fairy wand the black, viscid coal 
tar from the gas retorts, and the coal becomes not only a source 
of light and heat, but an arsenal of colors, a buffet of dainty 
tastes, a medicine chest for suffering humanity, a storehouse of 
new foods and exquisite perfumes, a source of powerful ex- 
plosives for war, and so many other miraculous powers that 
the telling challenges credence. From the 140 pounds of gas 
tar in a ton of coal, science today makes aniline dyes, number- 
ing over 2000 distinct shades, many of them being of exquisite 
delicacy, so that vegetable dyes are almost displaced. Of 
medicines, antiseptic, hj^pnotics and fever-allaying preparations, 
it furnishes quinine, antipyrine, atropine, morphine, exalgiue, 
somnal, salol, chloralamide, hypnol and a host of others. It 
furnishes perfumes — helitropine, clove, queen of the meadows, 
cinnamon, bitter almonds, vanillin, camphor, w r intergreen, 
thymol. It has given the world bellite and picrite, two power- 
ful explosives. It supplies flavoring extracts that duplicate 
the tastes of currants, raspberries, pepper, vanilla, etc. It is 
the housekeeper's ally, with benzine and naphtha, the insecti- 
cides. It supplies the farmer with ammoniacal fertilizers. It 
has given to the photographer his two developers, hydroquinone 
and eikonogen. It makes the anatomist its debtor for a most 
wonderful stain for tissues. It contains the substance which 
tints the photographer's lens. It yields paraffine, creosote, 
pitch ; material for artificial paving ; saccharin, a substance 
300 times sweeter than sugar, sacchariuamide, still sweeter ; 
lampblack, material for red ink, lubricating oils, varnish, resin 
almost our entire supply of ammonia, and hundreds of other 
things — all these science brings forth from coal tar. By means 
of its products — this waste that surpassed its usefulness only 
by its offensiveness — we can make preserves without either 
fruit or sugar, perfumes without flowers, and coloring matter 
without animal or vegetable aid of any description. — National 
\ Claimant. 



THE CALIFORNIA DRUGGIST. 



A Model Druggist. 

BY M. yUAU. 

There may be another druggist in this world the equal of 
Hazen, who departed this life the other day, but I know I shall 
never find him. There are druggists and druggists. Hazen 
wasn't born for a minister, lawyer, doctor, plumber, or black- 
smith, but for a druggist. He was suave, courteous, cheerful, 
calm and nervy. He never took sides in politics, had no religion 
to dispute about, and nothing ever rattled him. 

The beginning of our acquaintance was a pleasant incident. 
I had been lured into the store by a bargain in toilet soap, and 
Hazen had entered into a lengthy, but interesting, discussion 
on the subject of fly-specked toilet soap at 3 cents per cake, 
when a man came rushing into the store and exclaimed : 

" My God, man, but you sold me morphine for quinine and 
have killed my wife !" 

I jumped a foot high, and felt my hair trying to stand up ; 
but not so with Hazen. He finished his harangue by warning 
me that sassafras-scented soap was not made from sassafras 
root — not by a jugful — and then calmly turned to the man, and 
said : 

" Let's see ! Your name is Dover, isn't it ?" 

" Yes ; and my wife has taken two of your morphine capsules 
and won't live an hour !" shouted the man. 

"Just so — just so. Will you have a glass of soda water, 
Mr. Dover?" 

" My God — my God ! but what an awful mistake !" groaned 
the man. 

"You see," continued Hazen, as he toyed with a tooth- 
brush from the basketful on the show-case, " you were in here 
about half an hour ago. You asked for quinine capsules. I 
put them up for you. Had your wife taken two after you got 
home she would not be in a dying condition now. It takes 
morphine longer to act than that. A doctor and a stomach- 
pump will save her. She doesn't want to be saved, however. 
It so happened that I sold the last speck of morphine in the 
store this morning, and though I telephoned for more it has 
not arrived yet." 

" Then — you — you — ?" 

"Then I put up quinine — only quinine, Mr. Dover." 

" Thank God — thank God !" almost sobbed the excited 
man as he rushed from the store. 

"You see," said the druggist to me, as he ran his finger 
over the tooth-brush in an absent way, " I am not contending 
that fly-specs add to the virtue of toilet soap ; but neither will 
I admit that they detract. It is an open question — a problem 
which may be unsolved for years to come !" 

On another occasion I had made the purchase of a five-cent 
sponge as an excuse to enter the store and admire Hazen for a 
few minutes, and the purchase had almost been concluded, 
when a wild-eyed man with a gun in one hand and a letter in 
the other kicked the door open and almost yelled : 
. " Perfidious wretch, but I have caught you at last, and now 
you shall feel my vengeance ! I suspected that my wife re- 
ceived this letter today, and holding this pistol to her head I 
made her give it up ! " 

' ' Your — your name is Jones, I believe ? ' ' replied the drug- 
gist, in an absent way as he continued to look over the 
sponges. 

" No, sir — its Philbrick ! " shouted the man. 



" Oh ! I see. Well, Mr. Philbrick, what can I do for you 
this evening ? " 

" Do ! Do ! You can explain this letter and then die ! " 

"A letter? Ah! yes— a letter to Mrs. Philbrick. I did 
not write it. I never even saw her. There are several corner 
drug stores in this town, and you have got us mixed up." 

"Do you pretend — ! ' ' shouted the man with the gun, as he 
waved it on high, when Hazen suavely interrupted with : 

"Some other corner drug store, please, as I'm very busy 
just now." 

Then he turned to me and explained that sponges were a 
marine growth found in tropical seas — that they were bleached 
before coming into market — that 5 cents was less than the 
original cost of a clothes-cleaning sponge, and I don't believe 
he even heard the man with the gun back out and slam the 
door. 

Again, as I hypocritically purchased a 5-cent box of chloride 
of lime in order to have an excuse for hanging about the store 
a few minutes, a woman with bare head and woe-begone ex- 
pression entered and exclaimed : 

" Mr. Hazen, my husband has struck me again ! " 

" Struck you again ? I see," replied the druggist, without 
looking up from his work of filling a prescription. 

"And I don't care to live a day longer — not a day ! " 

"Not a day," he repeated. 

" He shall come home in the morning and find me dead and 
cold, and I don't care if it breaks his heart. The idea of his 
daring to strike me ! " 

"Yes, the idea." 

" I want some poison, Mr. Hazen. What would you recom- 
mend ? ' ' 

" Why we have arsenic, strychnine, morphine, and several 
other sorts, all warranted to do the business. I think arsenic 
will suit you best of all. Here are ten grains. Good-bye, 
Mrs. Taylor." 

And he handed her a package of chalk and began telling me 
about chloride of .lime and other disinfectants, and he didn't 
see the woman fling the package into a soap-box and sail out 
in a huff. These and scores of similar incidents endeared 
Mr. Hazen to me and made me his staunch admirer. He was 
not rattled even when the doctor told him that death was only 
a few hours away. On the contra^, he smiled and sought to 
rub his hands, as if greeting a lady customer at the store, and 
cheerfully whispered : 

Just so, doctor — just so. Hope the public will not fail to 
take advantage of my cut-down sale next week — all cough 
medicines cut half in two, and genuine castile soap for less than 
the cost of importation.'' — American Druggist. 



Sarah's Soother. 



The following, according to the Practitioner, is the formula of 
a "rejuvenator " from which Mme. Sarah Bernhardt is said to 
get unfailing refreshment. It is a liquid in which she is 
bathed from head to foot — an eau sedative Madame Bernhart 
calls it. The prescription is as follows : Two ounces spirits 
of ammonia, two ounces spirit of camphor, one cup and a half 
of sea-salt, two cups of alcohol. Put all into a quart bottle, 
and fill it with boiling water. Shake before using. The body 
is bathed with a soft sponge dipped in the undiluted liquid, 
and dried with the slight friction of a smooth towel. After 
the bath the stiffness and soreness of fatigue are all gone, the 
circulation is stimulated, and a gentle languor is induced, fol- 
lowed by a desire to sleep. 



THE CALIFORNIA DRUGGIST. 



A Death Blow to Department Stores. 

James H. Brown, Esq. , the Denver attorney, has been en- 
gaged by various retail trades associations to prepare an ordi- 
nance, having for its object the licensing of all kinds of mer- 
cantile business in the city of Denver. A peculiar feature of 
the ordinance is the doubling, in geometrical progression, of 
the license fee for each additional department or class of busi- 
ness. 

Every firm doing business in this city will pay as a license 
one-eighth of i per cent upon the sum invested in stock and 
fixtures for one class of business. Another class of business, 
at the same place and by the same firm, will add to that license 
fee a double amount, and so on. 

A business in which $100,000 is invested would pay one- 
eighth of 1 per cent on that sum as a license, which would be 
$125. For a second class or department, $250 more. For a 
third class or department, $500 more. 

It will thus be seen that the license fees for ten or more de- 
partments would be practically prohibitory. And yet the 
rate charged is the same to everybody. 

A $5,000 business obviously could not embrace many de- 
departments, the capital being insufficient. Three classes 
would probably be the limit that the average druggist would 
handle. The first of these, drugs, for example, would cost 
$6.25 annually. For cigars, add $12.50; and stationery, $25, 
making a total of $43-75 the license charges for a drug store 
of $5,000 capital. 

The Brown ordinance certainly treats every merchant alike, 
and according to his wealth and ability to contribute to the 
support of the government. 

It is not framed in the interest of corporations or large ag- 
gregations of wealth, and this must constitute its main weak- 
ness before lawmakers and courts. 

Every merchant in the city is interested in seeing that his 
particular line of business is correctly defined and classified, 
in order to prevent the encroachment of other lines, and we 
therefore hope that the Denver Pharmaceutical Association 
will take an active part in the work of preparing the ordi- 
nance and securing its enactment — Rocky Mountain Druggist. 



The Toxic rtaterial of Poison Ivy. 

It has long been a generally accepted belief that the material 
upon which poison ivy (Rhus Radicans, L,-) depends for its 
poisonous action was of a volatile nature, and that persons 
specially susceptible would become poisoned by simply coming 
into close proximity to the plant without really touching it. 
This theory, the Pennsylvania Medical Journal says, has re- 
cently been proved to be founded on wrong premises, for the 
poisonous principle has been shown to be a non-volatile sub- 
stance. Its true nature was discovered by Dr. Franz Pfaff, of 
Harvard University, who, in 1895, demonstrated it to be a 
fixed oil, which he named " Toxicodendrol " It occurs in all 
parts of the plant, and is retained in the woody portion long 
after drying. Mr. V. K. Chestnut, Assistant Division of Botany 
U. S. Department of Agriculture, has an article on some common 
poisonous plants in the Year-Book of the department for 1896, 
in which he refers to this plant and makes the following state 
meuts regarding toxicodendrol : " Like all oils, it is insoluble 
in water, and therefore cannot be washed from the skin with 
water alone. Alcohol dissolves it readily. Alkalies saponify 



it, and thus render it inert, but this result is more easily ob- 
tained by an alcoholic solution of the sugar of lead (lead ace- 
tate). Numerous experiments show that when the smallest 
amount of this oil is applied to the skin it is very gradually 
absorbed in the course of a few days, and that within certain 
limits the longer it remains upon the skin the greater will be 
effect produced." 

The discovery of the true chemical nature of this irritant in- 
dicates the mode of action of many remedies, used empirically in 
the treatment of the dermatitis produced by the ivy. The 
well known beneficial effect of a strong solution of aqua am- 
monia necessarily depends on the same saponifying action as is 
produced by solutions of lead acetate. Other popular reme- 
dies, such as fluid extract of grindelia or serpentaria, doubtless 
depend upon the alcohol which they contain for the relief they 
give — N. Y. Med. Times. 



Articles of Food Suitable to a Child From One to 
Three Years. — Milk. — Fresh cow's milk, two pints daily ; 
always warm. Canned condensed milk is objectionable on ac- 
count of the cane sugar it contains. 

Eggs. — Soft boiled or poached, never fried. 

Meats. — When the child is about eighteen months old, 
once daily ; roast beef, beef steak, both rare ; boiled mutton 
chops, white meat of chicken, well cooked ; fresh fish boiled 
or broiled, never fried ; neither salr fish nor fried meats should 
ever be given to young children under three years. 

Broths. — Beef tea, mutton, chicken or beef broth. 

Cereals. — Rice, hominy, oat meal, farina, arrowroot, 
wheaten grits. All should be well cooked, and given with 



milk, well salted, but without sugar. 

Bread and Crackers. — Stale bread, toast, graham, soda 
biscuits, oatmeal and gluten crackers ; some one of these 
should be given with each meal. 

Fruits. — Pears, oranges, grapes, with seeds removed ; 
apples, peaches. All must be ripe and in season. 

Desserts. — Plain rice pudding, plain custard, baked ap- 
ples, stewed prunes, ice cream, all in moderation. 

Water should be allowed with meals, but water that has first 
been boiled, should be preferred. 

Articles of Food Not Suitable. — Any of the following 
articles of food is unsuitable to a child under three years of 
age: 

Meats. — Pork, salt fish, ham, sausage, kidney, corn beef, 
liver and bacon, meat stew, dried beef. 

Vegetables. — Cabbage, celery, cucumbers, tomatoes, beets, 
carrots, green corn, potatoes, except when roasted. 

Drinks. — Tea, coffee, wine, beer, cider. 

Desserts. — Candies, dried fruits, canned or preserved fruits, 
pastry and sweetmeats of all kinds. 

Fruits. — Stale fruits, unripe fruits, and fruits out of season, 
bananas, particularly during the summer months. 

A child from the twelfth to the eighteenth month ordinarily 
requires five meals a day, which ought to be given at the fol- 
owing hours : 7 A. M., 10 A. m., i p. m., 4 p. m., 7 p. m. 






THE CALIFORNIA DRUGGIST. 



Observe the Following Rule. 

i . Never tempt the appetite when disinclined. 

2. Insist on thorough chewing ; a child who eats too fast, 
eats too much. 

3. Vary the food from day to day, but avoid variety at one 
meal. 

4. Take care that the child's food is well cooked. 

5. Wine, beer and confections should never be given to a 
young child. 

6. Give no food between meals ; the stomach requires rest, 
like any other organ of the body. 

7. Remember that over-feeding and the use of improper 
food kills more children than anything else. 

8. Give no laudanum, no paregoric, no soothing syrup, no 
teas. 

9. Remember that the summer complaint comes chiefly 
from over-feeding, and the use of improper food, but never 
from teething. 

10. When children vomit and purge, give them nothing to 
eat for four or five hours. 

1 1 . Do not bring a child under three years of age to your 
table to eat. — J. J. Sullivan, M. D. , in Public Health Journal. 



ONTARIO COLLEGE OF PHARMACY. 



Junior Examinations, December, 1897. 



PRACTICAL CHEMISTRY. 

Examiner : Graham Chambers, B.A., M.B. 

Time allowed, 2)4 hours. 

1. Detect Acid and Metal in substances " A " and " B." 

2. Detect Acid in substance marked " C." 

3. How would you distinguish — 

(a) Nitrous Oxide from Nitric Oxide. 

(b) A Chloride from a Bromide. 

(c) A Bicarbonate from a Carbonate. 

(d) Sulphite from Thio-sulphate? 

4. Write equations illustrating the action of : 

(a) Hot Sulphuric Acid on Copper. 

(b) Hot Sulphuric Acid on Oxalic Acid. 

(c) Chlorine on Hydrogen Sulphide. 

(d) Chlorine on Caustic Potash. 

(e) Hydrogen Sulphide on Copper Sulphate. 

(/) Sodium Thio-sulphate on a Solution of Iodine. 

5. Write equations illustrating the action of heat upon : 

(a) Ammonium Nitrate. 

(b) Orthophosphoric Acid. 
(<r) Nitric Acid. 

PHARMACAL LABORATORY. 

Examiner : Chas. F. Heebner, Ph. G., Phm. B. (Tor.) 

Time allowed, 2^ hours. 

N. B. — Neatness of work, order of arrangement, and clean- 
liness of working desk and outfit, will enter as important 
factors in your ratings. 

1. Determine the extractive in the liquid preparation (in 
(smaller bottle) and report according to the following form : 
(a) Quantity of liquid taken for investigation. 
{b) Amount of extractive found. 



(c) Percentage indicated." 

(d) Write out method used in determining extractive, 

and exhibit all figures used. 
3. Determine the specific gravity of the substance (in large 
bottle) and submit a report of your results in accordance with 
the subjoined form : 

(a) Substance labeled 

(b) Weight taken for investigation. 

(c) Weight of an equal volume of water. 

(d) Specific gravity of substance. 

Exhibit all figures used in the above determination. 

PHARMACY. 

Examiner ; Chas. F. Heebner, Ph. G., Phm. B. (Tor.) 

Time allowed, 2 l / 2 hours. 

1. Metric System. — (a) — Give the derivation of the unit 
of weight from the lineal unit ; (b) show the relation existing 
between the units of capacity and length. Give the equivalent 
for each of the following in customary weights and measures : 
(c) Meter, (d) Gram, (e) Litre. Give the approximate 
metrical equivalents for : (/) Grain, (g) drachm, (h) fluid 
ounce, (z") inch. 

2. Add the following and reduce the amount to ounces: 
Apoth. Weight — 2^£ kilos, 25^ d. gm., 430 d. gm., 32 c. gm., 
8005 m. gm., 65^ h. gm., 3 m. gm., 68^ gms. 

3. Specific Gravity. — (a) Explain the principle of Spe- 
cific Gravity Beads. What weight of each of the following 
official liquids will a Litre flask contain, and what is the per- 
centage strength of each : (b) Pure Ether, (c) Rectified 
Spirit, (d ) Sulphuric Acid, (e) Strong Solution Ammonia. 
(/) A glass rod weighing 300 grains, weighs when immersed 
in distilled water 225 grains, and when immersed in 
Oleoresin Copaiba 225^ grains; what is the specific gravity 
of the latter liquid ? 

4. Plant Drugs. — (a) State the objects gained by desic- 
cation, (b) Define Garbling. A drug contains cellulose, albu- 
men, sugar, volatile and fixed oils, gum, resin, chlorophyll, 
starch, and tannin ; state which of these constituents may be 
extracted with (c) Rectified Spirits, (d) Hot Water, (<?) Ether, 
(/) Cold Water. 

5. Wanted 50 ozs. Powdered Red Cinchona Bark to con- 
tain 6 per cent of total alkaloids ; estimate the quantity of each 
of the following powders assaying: 3^, 5, 6%, and 7 per 
cent alkaloids, to be mixed to meet these requirements. 

Ammonium Chlorid. — State (a) source, (b) impurities to 
be expected in the commercial salt, (c) how purified, (d) Ex- 
plain how each impurity is removed. A solution of pure am- 
monium chlorid saturated at 15 C. has the specific gravity 
i" 200 and measures 100 cm 3 ., (e) how much salt is there in 
solution, (/) what is the percentage strength of the solution? 

7. Define (a) Deliquescence, (b) Efflorescence, (c) Water of 
Hydration, (<tf) Water of Crystallization, (e) Interstitial Water, 
(_/") How may Interstitial water be avoided ? 

8. State method of using and principle involved in the 
utilization of albumen as a clarifacient. 

chemistry. 

Examiner : A. Y. ScoTT, B.A., M.D., CM. 
Time allowed, 2 hours. 
1. State Dalton's atomic theory, and show how atomic 
weights are obtained. 



THE CALIFORNIA DRUGGIST. 



2. What is the composition of air? Is it a mechanical 
mixture or a chemical compound, and why ? 

3. How is the composition of water shown ? What are the 
ordinary impurities of well water, and how would you test for 
these qualitatively ? 

4. Describe fully the chemistry of ammonia. 

5. (a) How much phosphorus can be obtained from 100 lbs. 
of bone-ash containing 90 per cent of calcium phosphate ? 

(b) what is the weight of 100 litres of chlorine collected 
at 2 5 C and 790 mm pressure? 

6. How is hydrogen sulphide prepared — state its use in 
qualitative analysis. 

7. Give fully the tests for arsenic. 

8. Complete the following reactions, giving equations : 
(a) Chlorine + potassium hydrate= 

(bj Sulphur dioxide + nitric acid + water = 

(c) Bromine -f- phosphorus + water = 

(d) Ferrous sulphate + sulphuric acid -+- potassium ni- 
trate= 

(e) Oxalic acid + sulphuric acid= 

9. Describe the hydraulic press. 

Note. — Equations and drawings to be given when possible. 

BOTANY. 

Examiner: Dr. A. Y. ScoTT. 

Time allowed, 2 hours. 

1. Describe fully a Transverse Section of a Dicotyledonous 
Stem. 

2 Describe the following : Pilcorhiza, Trichome, Tricho- 
blast, Monoecious, Corm. 

3. What is Dehiscence? Classify and describe Indehiscent 
Dry Fruits. 

4. Give fully the process of Pollination and Fertilization 
from the ripening of the essential parts of the flower to the 
maturing of the seed. 

5. Describe Specimen A. 

6. Describe Specimen B. 

7. Describe Specimen C. 

LATIN, ETC. 
Examiner: J. T. FoTheringham, B.A., M.B., M.D., CM. 
Time allowed, 2 hours. ' 

i. Divide the following prescription into its essential parts 
and sub-divisions, giving to each its name : 
g Sp. Terebinth. Rectif. 
Vin. Ipecac. 
01. Sassafras. 

Mucil. Tragacanthae, ad 2 ozs. 
Fiat Mist. 

Sig. 1 drachm ex aq. p.c. et h.s. 

2. Explain Latin directions of above prescription into full 
Latin, and translate into English. 

3. Fill in quantity of each ingredient as required for a 
child of 12 years. Give rule for finding dose. 

4. Give regular dose of following preparations : Agues, 
Misturee, fri/usa, Syrupi, Olea (essential). 

5. Give maximum dose of each of the following : Acct. 
Scillcc, Ac. Carbo/., Ac. Mur. Dil., Bats. Tolut., Decoct. Sarsa, 
Ext. Nuc. Vo/ii., Ext. Bellad., Ext.Filicis Liq., Inf. Digitalis^ 
Liq. Atrop. Sulph., Liq. Hydrarg. Perchlor., Liq. Triniirini, 






01. Phosphorat, 01. Ricini, Tr. Ferri Mur., Tr. Opii. Tr. 
Cinch. Co., Tr. Digital., Tr. Nuc. Vom., Vin. Ipecac, Pit. 
Hydrarg. 

6. Write short notes on the main Excreting Organs of the 
body and their products. 

7. Discuss shortly, with three examples of each, the follow- 
ing Drug-classes : Alteratives, Stimulants. — Canadian Drug- 
gist. ' 

State Board of Pharmacy. 

A meeting of the California State Board of Pharmacy was 
held at the College of Pharmacy, 113 Fulton street, San Fran- 
cisco, on the 13th of January, 1898. 

There were 1 2 applicants for registration as Graduates ; 1 1 
applicants for examination as Licentiates ; 6 applicants for ex- 
amination as Assistants. 

Registration was granted to the following as "Graduates": 
W. C. Powell, H. F. Jones, R. F. Welliver, W. E. Neblett, 
W. H. Butler, F. P. Theller, and E. J. Huxtable. 

The following having passed a satisfactory examination, 
were registered as Licentiates : S. A. Byrne, G. W. McKim, 
F. A. Hunter, and C. F. Holman. 

And as Assistants : H. C. Moore and W. C. Hannum. 

A. Raymond was granted a certificate as Assistant on his 
Licentiate examination. 

C. E. Freitas was registered as Assistant on his diploma 
from the California College of Pharmacy. 

A certificate was granted as Licentiate to J. H. McHaflfie, 
graduate of the Ontario College of Pharmacy. 

An investigation was ordered of the druggists employed in 
the public institutions of San Francisco, Mr. Waller and the 
secretary to visit them. 

The secretary was instructed to visit several towns in the 
State, to inquire into standing of druggists. 

The next meeting of the Board for the examination of candi- 
dates will be held at Los Angeles on the 6th of April, 1898, to 
be followed by a meeting at San Francisco on the 13th. 

John Calvert, Sec'y. 



A lively controversy is in progress in Ohio between Com- 
missioner Blackburn and Scott & Bowne. Samples of Scott's 
Emulsion which the Commissioner had caused to be analyzed 
were declared by the chemists to contain morphine, where- 
upon Scott & Bowne were advised to withdraw their product 
from the State, as it was illegal to dispose of it in Ohio. The 
proprietors, on the other hand, make affidavit that no morphine 
or other salt of opium was ever used in the manufacture of 
Scott's Emulsion, and claim that if morphine was actually 
present in samples as charged, it was put there by some person 
for an evil purpose. From this distance it looks like a plot to 
" do up" Scott & Bowne by some disgruntled competitor. 

To Deodorize Iodoform. 

Among the numerous substances heretofore used by physi- 
cians to free their hands of the odor of iodoform none 
seems really to merit the name of deodorizer. Dr. Coustan, ot 
Montpelier, has discovered that it is only necessary to wash 
the hands in orange flower water to remove the odor in a very 
short time. -L. Union Ph. 



THE CALIFORNIA DRUGGIST. 



Business Personals. 



J. D. Se Brell, Riverside, now occupies his new quarters, 
corner Main and Eighth streets, where he has greatly improved 
his business facilities, having a large and finer store than at 
his old location, and an up-to-date front. It goes without say- 
ing that Mr. Se Brell will have his hands full of work and do 
his full share of the business of that lively trading point. 



We have to congratulate Mr. S. S. Rogers, Escondido, on 
the advent of a daughter, on (or about) February ist. The 
fact of our having to chronicle the arrival of three boys to one 
girl in this issue of the Druggist seems to denote a possible 
war in the future. We hope it isn't to be in the " cut rate " 
line. 

Our ever happy friend Ben Virden, of Saticoy, is in extra 
jolly condition since becoming the father of a robust boy last 
month, and congratulations are in order. 



Mr. Sam Sollenberger has taken the position with A. W. 
Ellington, this city, made vacant by the resignation of Carlisle 
D. Moore, who has taken his departure for San Francisco. 



Mr. N. E. Ferguson, who represents F. W. Braun & Co. in 
Arizona and New Mexico, was busy passing out cigars to the 
boys on the 8th inst, the occasion being the advent of a boy 
— the finest baby in the world thinks Ferguson (being his first 
experience). " May he live long and prosper !" 



F. W. Hyer, late with Dement Drug and Chemical Co., 
Spokane, Washington, has accepted position as manager of the 
Gem Pharmacy (Wood & Royer), Orange. Mr. Hyer comes 
to Southern California with excellent recommendations, and 
we trust will find no reason to regret his change of location. 



L. J. Huff, Pasadena, is the happy father of a nine-pound 
boy, whose advent into the land of sunshine was announced 
January ioth. 

J. W. Hurst, late of Wichita, Kansas, has accepted a posi- 
tion with W. H. Baldridge, Escondido. 



Chas. W. Baldridge, son of W. H. Baldridge, Escondido, has 
purchased the drug business of J. B. Baker, Fallbrook. Mr. 
Baldridge has our best wishes for his prosperity in the pleasant 
little town where he has hung out his banner. 



Pacific Drug Topics is the name of a new venture in the way 
of a monthly publication, under the management of F. C. Mc- 
Kinnie of this city. Mr. McKinnie is an old druggist, and 
should be able to get up matter of interest to the trade. The 
field is a wide one, geographically at least. 



We were pleased to receive a call on the 17th inst., from Mr. 
Harry Brisley", of Prescott, Arizona, who was on his first visit 
to California. Mr. Brisley reports an unusually severe winter 
in his section, but a good condition of business. 



Geo. J. Little representing Frederick Stearns & Co. is push- 
ing his firm's products in Southern California. 



Chas. S. Ruggles is working the Los Angeles field at pres- 
ent in the interest of his firm, and selling more " Frog in your 
throat" than ever. 

R. S. Hawley is doing a large amount of work for the N. 
Y. Pharmacal Association in this part of the State. The pre- 
parations made by his house are staple with all druggists. 



Dr, W. S. Wallace, the genial representative of Mellin's 
Food Co., is again in Los Angeles after a year's absence, and 
will stir up the business of his house in his usual efficient 
fashion. 

Sam W. Pearce is again in the city, and Wampole's goods 
are receiving due attention. It is said that Sam had a life and 
death struggle with a folding bed at his hotel some weeks ago, 
the same having closed upon him. '"Look before you leap" 
is a good motto to hang up over these deadly machines. 



Easter egg dyes are now to be put in for the benefit of the 
little folks. J. J. Fleck makes his offer in our advertising pages. 
F. W. Braun & Co. supply the Fleck's German and the Paas 
Dyes. Order in time. 

The old wholesale drug house of T. H. Hinchman Sons & 
Co., Detroit, Mich., together with the house of Williams, 
Davis, Brooks & Co., of the same city, united January ist 
under the name of Williams, Davis, Brooks & Hinchman 
Sons Co. 



The Universal Poison Register, a copy of which has been 
received by us from the publishers, the Chicago Medical Book 
Co., is a compact and convenient little book of 160 pages, 7X 
8% inches in size, and containing, besides ample blank space, 
a great deal of useful information, as the Poison Acts of the 
various States, List of Poisons, in groups, with Antidote Treat- 
ment, Table of Maximum Doses, etc. It is sold at the modest 
price of $1.00, and is well worth the money. 



The Alpha and Omega bulb syringes are specially com- 
mended by physicians, for the reason that in their use no air 
is introduced with the enema. In cases of great weakness, 
the patient is caused much unnecessary suffering when air is 
injected. Through all the sharp competition of late years the 
Alpha and Omega brands have maintained their full money 
value and have had an increasing sale as well. 



Congress will not consent to give free alcohol at the present 
time, as we note from reports of the Senatorial committee's 
action upon the question. There has been a strong influence 
brought to bear to bring about the desired change in the law, 
but the conservative minds of the committee could not be 
brought to consent to so great a loss of revenue ($10,000,000 
per year, it was stated) as would thereby result. We believe 
this decision a wise one under present conditions of our 
country's revenues and expenses. Possibly at some future 
time, when we are again confronted with a burdensome surplus, 
the experiment may be opportune. 



THE CALIFORNIA DRUGGIST. 



A Poison Factory. 

Packed away behind a wilderness of gigantic warehouses 
and tumble-down tenements, in a remote suburb of South 
London, is one of the strangest establishments in the world. 
It is a factory — but what a factory ! From morning till night, 
its great chimneys are continuously belching forth clouds of 
fetid-smelling smoke. Occasionally a great column of steam 
will shoot high into the air ; not honest, white steam, but 
purple and green and yellow, reminding one of some bloated 
and gigantic serpent. During the hours of darkness its loca- 
tion is betrayed to the most casual observer by the red glare in 
the sky from its innumerable furnaces. 

The massive gates leading to this strange establishment are 
locked and jealously guarded, for inside them lurk danger and 
death to the unwary trespasser. Poisons of such terrific 
strength as would suffice to send an army of men to eternity 
in the fractional part of a second lie around loose, and are 
handled with as little apparent care as if they were the most 
harmless substances in the world. 

As has already been intimated, this factory is a dangerous 
place to visit. It is not enough for the casual comer to be care- 
ful where he steps and to refrain from touching. He must, in 
addition, refrain from using his olfactory powers without special 
permission, for there are poisons there which it is death even 
to smell. One of these is the pure or anhydrous prussic acid — 
a terrible preparation, which is seldom or never seen outside a 
chemical laboratory. The original discoverer of this, the dead- 
liest of all known poisons, was stricken dead through acci- 
dentally inhaling its fumes, and scores of other deaths have 
happened from the same cause. It is this anhydrous acid from 
which the ordinary, and infinitely weaker, prussic acid of com- 
merce is made, by diluting it with from 95 to 97 per cent of 
water. Even in this form, however, it is sufficiently strong to 
cause almost instant death, even when taken in exceedingly 
minute doses. 

" Next to anhydrous acid," remarked the proprietor of the 
works in question, while piloting the writer round the factory 
one day recently, "the most deadly stuff we make is cyanide 
of potassium. Last year we turned out, over one thousand tons 
of it, and five grains being a fatal dose, it follows that our out- 
put of this chemical alone would have been sufficient to kill 
2,500,000 people. Altogether, we manufacture, in the course 
of each twelvemonth, enough deadly poison to depopulate the 
United Kingdom. This may seem a somewhat startling asser- 
tion, but it is, nevertheless, well within the truth." 

While we were conversing, we had entered one of the work- 
rooms, where a number of men were engaged round a sort of 
gigantic witch's cauldron containing over a hundred-weight of 
molten cyanide. It was a picture such as would have delighted 
the heart of a Rubens or a Titain. The glare reflected from 
the seething mass of white-hot liquid poison. The lambent 
play of the furnace fires. And ever and anon a phantom face, 
enveloped in an uncanny-looking glass mask, peering through 
the thick, unctuous fumes, right into the heart of the horrible 
mixture. 

In another room were tons upon tons of the finished product, 
looking for all the world like white crystallized sugar. 

"It looks good enough to eat," I remarked jocularly. 

"Ah," replied my guide, gravely, "that is just one of the 
dangers we have to guard against. For some inexplicable 












reason, cyanide of potassium exercises remarkable fascination 
over the men engaged in its manufacture. They are haunted 
by a constant and ever-recurring desire to eat it. They are 
perfectly alive to the fact, however, that to give way to the 
craving would mean instant death, and are consequently 
usually able to resist it. But not always. During the time I 
have been here, three of our best and steadiest workmen have 
committed suicide in this strange manner, impelled thereto 
apparently by no cause save this mysterious, horrible longing. 
I myself have felt the same strange lust when I have been 
exposed to the cyanide fumes, and have had to leave the works 
for a time in consequence. So well is this curious fact recog- 
nized that there are always two men at work together in this 
branch of our business, and a jar of ammonia which, as you 
may know, is the antidote to the poison, is kept constantly near 
at hand . 

Apart from this remarkable infatuation, which may be likened 
to the desire experienced by many people when standing on the 
brink of a precipice to throw themselves down, the manufac- 
ture of potassium of cyanide is not particularly dangerous. 
Neither is it unhealthy. In fact, it is asserted that men have 
gone into the cyanide house ill and debilitated, and in a short 
time have been restored to robust health. 

The same cannot, however, be said of corrosive sublimate 
This frightful poison, in common with almost all mercurial 
preparations, is exceedingly treacherous, and prolonged ex- 
posure to the fumes is often attended by very dangerous conse 
quences. 

The persons unaccustomed to its proximit}', even a com 
paratively short sojourn in that part of the works devoted to 
its manufacture sometimes gives rise to various unpleasant 
symptoms, as the writer can testify. In my case, ten minutes 
exposure to the fumes sufficed to induce profuse running at 
the eyes, nose and mouth, accompanied by a constant desire to 
expectorate, and followed by shivering, nausea and headache. 
The room in which this particular poison is prepared, with its 
vast collection of strangely shaped stills and its maze of pipes 
and retorts, resembles an alchemist's laboratory. 

Of course, not all the products of this weird factory are 
poisonous. Neither are all the smells nauseous, nor all the 
sights uncanny. In one department, for instance, my nostrils 
are saluted with an exceedingly sweet savour, reminding me 
of "peardrops," sweet beloved of my youth. It is acetate of 
amyl, the precise drug used to give to the confection in quese 
tion its peculiar flavor. Another smaller chamber, from which 
emanates a strong odor of camphor, is a veritable fairy palace 
of pure white crystals. Facsimilies of palms, ferns and masses 
of tropical vegetation droop in graceful festoons, from the roof 
and completely cover the walls. A reproduction of the in- 
terior of this wondrous chamber on the stage of Drury Lane 
would be sufficient to assure the success of next year's pan- 
tocaine. Of course, the flowers and ferns are composed of 
neither ice nor snow, but pure white camphor crystals. 

Some of the substances are so exceedingly volatile that dur- 
ing the process of manufacture they must never be permitted 
to come into contact with the outside air. A typical case is 
that of ether, which is passed from still to still and from retort 
to retort by means of long copper pipes, until at last it emerges 
the finished article of commerce. It produces, when swallowed, 
an almost immediate exhilaration of spirits, followed by un- 



THE CALIFORNIA DRUGGIST. 



steadiness of gait, thickness of utterance, confusion of ideas — 
in fact, all the typical symptoms of ordinary intoxication. The 
effect passes away quickly, however, so that an ether drinker 
can get drunk three or four times in an hour. 

My last visit before quitting the works was to the testing 
room, where, surrounded by hundreds of samples of the 
deadliest poisons known to science, sat a tall, slender and 
pretty young girl. Ranged in front of her was a collection of 
tubes of various shapes and sizes ; thermometers graduated to 
the one-hundredth part of a degree centigrade, and scales so 
delicately poised that an eyelash laid upon one of the balances 
deflected the indicator nearly half an inch. By the aid of these 
and other strange and beautiful pieces cf apparatus, she was 
enabled to record the exact strength of the various products of 
the factory. — Boston Drug Market. 



Dr. Behring is said to receive nearly $18,000 monthly 
revenue from the manufacture of his anti-diphtheric serum, in 
the way of royalty on the product. 

If you are afflicted with a desire to give advice at every op- 
portunity, become a lawyer or a doctor and sell it. 



The time to fight moths is when they first begin to fly about 
the house. It is the preventative treatment that is the effec- 
tive one. After the miller deposits its eggs things are quiet 
enough, but presumably the moth is eating his way 
through your woolen. Keep the miller away from your gar- 
ments by the liberal use of naphthalin (moth balls), and save 
your clothing. For camels-hair and other soft brushes, feather 
dusters, etc., it is often preferable to use camphor instead of 
napthalin, as it has a more agreeable odor. The use of cedar 
shavings is common where -they are obtainable, and cedar 
chests and drawers are also used as a measure of protection 
from the destroyer. Trunks and chests of camphor-wood 
should be more commonly found among household supplies 
than they now are, for they probably furnish the best safeguard 
against insect pests available to us. Why our coast is not sup- 
plied with these valuable articles by the enterprising Japanese, 
who control the great camphor forests, is more than we can 
unperstand. 

Prof. Crookes estimates as to the size of molecules, that in a 
body the size of a pin's head there are so vast a number, that, 
counting ten millions per second, it would require 250,000 years 
to count them ! And Prof. Tait estimates that the molecule 
occupies no more than five per cent of the space in which it 
vibrates. 

There is an amazing amount of food for thought in that 
pin-head. 

Process for Syrup of Senega. 

Take of senega root, 10 troy ounces ; stronger ammonia- 
water, 3 fluid drams; alcohol, 4 fluid ounces; water, 20 fluid 
ounces. Macerate in a closed vessel for three days, express 
and strain, return the dregs and remacerate with stronger am- 
monia, 1 fluid dram; alcohol, 4 fluid ounces; water 16 fluid 
ounces. Express and strain as before. Mix the two decan- 
tates, add 1 ounce of precipitated chalk, filter, and pass enough 
water to complete 25 fluid ounces. Percolate this through 38 
troy ounces of sugar, and make up to 48 fluid ounces. 



Patents and Trade-marks of Nov. 2d, 9th, 16th and 23d, 
Relating to Pharmacy. 

George Storie and J. Moss, Detroit, Mich.: Device for hold- 
ing and dipping pills or tablets, 592,839. 

Henry Waite, New York, N. Y. : Apparatus for electrically 
treating diseases, 592,844. 

James D. Bacon, Boston, Mass.: Rectal applicator, 593,318 

Geo. V. House, Mount Vernon, N. Y. : Truss pad, 593,473 

Truss 593.474 

George C. Marks, London, England: Atomizer, 593,750. 

Thomas H. McDonald, Potomac, Mont.: Fumigator, 593-, 
777- 

Sidney H. Gardiner, Brooklyn, N. Y.: Surgical splint, 
594,076. 

John M. Jenkins, Palmer, Texas: Medicine glass, 594,087. 

Herman A. Kochler, Chicago, 111.: Tung- testing appara- 
tus, 594,351- 

Henry L. Sayen, Philadelphia, Pa.: Roentgen-ray tube, 
594.036. 

George B. Underwood, New York, N. Y.: Inhaler, 594,302, 

Herman Wolferman, Strasburg, Germany, Truss, 594,307. 

TRADE-MARKS. 

Burrough Brothers Manufacturing Company, Baltimore, 
Md.: Gastro-intestinal antiseptics, 30,787. 

Farbenfabriken of Elberfeld Company, New York, N. Y. : 
Specific for dandruff, 30,789. 

Wm. F. Green and F. P. Jaques, Boston, Mass.: Powder for 
the cure of headache, neuralgia, etc., 30,790. 

Kahn-Miller Drug Co., Baltimore, Md.: Remedy for catarrh, 
etc., 30,791. 

Geo. W. Lewis, New Haven, Conn.: Remedy for colds, 
30,792. 

Vlakfantine Toilet Co., Riverside, 111,: Salve for wounds 
or sores, 30,788. 

Geo. W. Heyer, Houston, Texas: Powder for the skin, 
30,807. 

Theodore A. Metz, New York, N. Y. : Complexion beau- 
tifier, 30,808. 

John B. Danis, Chicago, 111.: Remedies for diseases of 
women, 30,858. 

Frank B. Morgan, Brooklyn, N. Y. : Remedy for bunions, 
etc., 30,860. 

Seabury & Johnson, New York, N. Y.: Plasters, 30,855. 

Adaline Wood, De Lassus, Mo.: Remedies for eczema and 
skin diseases, 30,859. 

Alfred Bishop & Sons, Limited, London, England: Effer- 
vescent medicinal preparations for the treatment of liver, head, 
stomach, and like affections, 30,883. 

Daniel E. Aunkst, Milton, Pa.: Medical ointment, 30,880. 

Farbenfabriken of Eberfeld Company, New York, N. Y. : 
Remedy for gonorrhea, 30,882. 

Wm. S. Kaiser, Philadelphia, Pa.: Mineral water, 30,892. 

Valentiner & Schwarz, Leipsic, Germany : Salves, 30,881. 



"Tell me, doctor," asked the ambitious young disciple of 
Galen, eagerly, " what was the most dangerous case you ever 
had ?" "In confidence, now that I am about to retire from 
practice," answered the veteran physician, frankly, "I will 
confess that it was my medicine case." — Puck. 



IO 



THE CALIFORNIA DRUGGIST. 



OUR ADVERTISERS. 



It will be of interest and value to the trade to consult our 
advertising columns, in which will be found represented the 
following firms and goods : 



A. Gettleman Brewing Co. 

Allcock's Plasters. 

Ammonol Chemical Co. 

Antikamnia Chemical Co. 

Apollinaris Co., Limited. 

Arlington Chemical Co. 

Armstrong Manufacturing Co. 

Batchelor Hair Dye Co. 

Beeman Chemical Co. 

Blake, C. E. & Co. 

Braun, F. W. & Co.'s Laboratory 

Products. 
California Fig Syrup Co. 
Centaur Company. 
Cal. Mission Eucalyptus Lozenges. 
Davol Rubber Co. 
Dement, W. E. 
Empire Mfg. Co. 
Etna Chemical Co. 
Fox, Fultz & Co. 
Gedney, L. H. 
Goodrich, B. F. & Co. 
Coronado Corks. 
Hayden Manufacturing Co. 
Hildreth, H. L. 
Hunyadi Salts Co. 
Jayne, Dr. D. & Son. 
Johnson, I. S. & Co. 
Kennedy, S. H. 



Kline, R. H., M. D. 

Kondon Manufacturing Co. 

Kuhns, Arthur Company. 

Leiner, M. 

Levy, B. & Co. 

Ludwick, G. M. 

Major Cement Co. 

Mariani & Co. 

Moore, H. H. & Sons. 

Munn & Co. 

Norman Lichty Manufacturing Co. 

N. Y. Pharmacal Association. 

Omega Chemical Co. 

Planten,H. & Son. 

Pond's Extract Co. 

Portuondo Vicente. 

Principe de Gales Cigars. 

Richmond, Dr. S. A. 

Sharp & Dohme. 

Sterling Remedy Co. 

Taite, Jos. G. & Sons. 

T. B. Insect Powder. 

Tetlow, Henry. 

Thum, O. W. Co. 

Wells, A.J. Manufacturing Co. 

Whittemore Bros. & Co. 

Wilbur Safety Packet Co. 

Wright, Chas. & Co. 

Wyeth, John & Bro. 



Druggists and Flower Seeds. 

Flower seeds afford a very handsome profit, if purchased 
outright. F. W. Braun & Co. have received some of May & 
Co.'s packing — the retail value of which is $12.50 per box — 
and these are sold at $4.00 per box to the trade. Owing to 
the fact that ladies are constant patrons of the drug store, it is 
just the place to sell flower seeds. Early orders solicited. 



New Goods Received by F. W. Braun & Co. 

Scotch Embrocation doz 

Sun Oval Prescription Bottles Full line 

Formalin Lamps each 

Formalin Pastilles doz 

Just's Food, small doz 

" large ■ doz 

Somatose Biscuit doz 

Lanolin, our own importation, y 2 kilo pkg each 

Simmons' Regulator, Liq., 50c doz 

Bowen's Kidney Balm doz 

Hemaboloids doz 

Ozojel (Slocum's) doz 



5 3 75 

1 35 

2 65 
4 00 
8 00 
4 25 

75 

3 75 
8 00 

12 00 

4 00 



The proprietors of 

Cushman flenthol Inhaler 

Offer to supply the trade with calendar's for distribution on 
the following basis : 

With one dozen Inhalers 250 calendars 

With two dozen Inhalers 500 calendars 

Orders sent to F. W. Braun & Co. will receive immediate 
attention, and the calendars supplied promptly from the manu- 
facturers. 



Pacific Coast Drug Agenet) 

OFFERS FOR SALE 

First-Class Drug Stores 
and Medical Practices 

in all the Pacific States and Territories 

Clerks Registered, Prodded and Employed. Partnerships 
Negotiated. Lists Sent Free. Correspondence Solicited. 

G. M. LUDWICK, 

S. E. Corner Second St. and Broadway, Room 202, Los Angeles, Cal. 



WANTS, Etc., Etc. 

[Under this heading we will be pleased to publish FREE OF 
CHARGE, notices of clerks wanted, positions desired, stores for 
sale or exchange, propositions for purchasing, etc.~\ 

FOR SALE — Owing to press of other business, I would sell my Sixth 
and Olive street store at an extremely low figure, $600. $500 cash ; 
balance on time. G. A. CUTLER, M. D. 



FOR SALE — In Los Angeles, a centrally located drug store, doing a 
paying business. About $6500 will buy. Reason for selling — 
owner has two stores.. Address F. C. W., care F. W. Braun & Co. 



FOR SALE — Set of shop bottles for small store, at a bargain, 
dress Pierce & Robbins, Pomona, Cal. 



Ad- 



FOR SALE — In coast city of Southern California, a drug business 
established over eight years. Stock about $2500 ; location first-class. 
Address M. H., care CALIFORNIA DRUGGIST. 



FOR SALE — Drug store in the most prosperous mining town in Cali- 
fornia; doing a good business ; price $2000. Good reasons for sell- 
ing. A full investigation desired. This is a splendid opportunity for a 
competent man. Population 6000 and only three drug stores. Address 
" GUARANA" care CALIFORNIA DRUGGIST, Los Angeles. 

FOR SALE — Drug store in suburbs of Los Angeles, worth $2000, stock 
clean and in good condition. Store has been established 18 months; 
will sell at invoice price. Inquire of F. W. BRAUN & CO. 



FOR SALE — Drug business in Los Angeles. Established eight years. 
Valuation about $1000. Good location for a single man. 

Address J. O. WHITE, 337 Aliso Street. 

FOR SALE — A city drug store. Fine location. Good business. Low 
rent. Good reasons for selling. Address L, care F. W. BRAUN & 
CO. 

FOR SALE — City drug business at a bargain. Stock about $1200, all 
clean and no dead stuff. Good location for a ^octor. Inquire of F. 
W. BRAUN & CO., Los Angeles. 

FOR SALE — A well stocked drug store in busy interior city of South- 
ern California. No cutting in any line. Average daily sales $30. 
Expenses light. Inventor $6000. Will sell for cash 'or part cash and 
good security. Good reason for selling. Address "Senna," care of 
F. W. BRAUN & CO. 



FOR SALE— Elegant clean stock in the most progressive suburb of 
Los Angeles. Only drug store within twenty blocks. Best reasons 
for selling. Value about $2000. Inquire of F. W. BRAUN & CO., 
Los Angeles. 



FOR SALE — A good, long established drug business in this city 
Price. *2500. Address " ADVANTAGEOUS." care CALIFORNIA 



Price, $2500 
DRUGGIST. 



FOR SALE CHEAP— Six-syrup Green's Soda Fountain, Tenu. marble, 
with steel tank, gauge, and six tumbler holders; all in good order. 
Address H. FAIRBANKS & SON., Santa Ana, Cal. 



THE CALIFORNIA DRUGGIST. 



1 1 



PRICE LIST OF DRUGS, CHEMICALS, ETC. 

These prices are for quantities as ordinarily bought by average buyers, and include containers, unless 
otherwise indicated. Subject to market changes. 

For special quantities we will make special figures. 

F. W. BRA UN & CO., Los Angeles, Cal. 



ACBTANILID ft 42® 45 

ACID, Acetic No. 8 ft 10® 25 

Acetic U. S. P ft 30 

Benzoic, Eng oz 16 

Benzoic, German oz 10 

Boracic ft 14® 20 

Boracic powd ft 14® 20 

Carbolic, crude gal 40@ 50 

Carbolic, cryst, blk label, 1-ft tin ft 30® 32 

Carbolic, cryst, blk label. 5-ft tins ft 28® 30 

Carbolic, cryst, gold label, 1-ft bots ft 36® 38 

Carbolic, cryst, gold label, 5-ft tin lb 33® 36 

Citric ft 37® 42 

Gallic oz 11® 12 

Hydrocyanic, dil oz 11® 12 

Hydrocyanic, cone, Scheele's oz 40® 45 

Hydrofluoric, 1-oz bots ea 45® 50 

Hydrofluoric, 4-oz bots ea 75 

Muriatic, coml. , 6-ft bots ea 65® 75 

Muriatic, coml, carboy, $2 ft 3%@ 4 

Muriatic, C. P., 1-ft bots ft 35® 40 

Muriatic, C P., 6-ft bots ft 25® 30 

Nitric, coml., 7-ft bots ea 1 00 

Nitric, coml., carboy, $2....; ft 8® 9 

Nitric, C P., 1-ft bots ft 35® 40 

Nitric, C P., 7-ft bots ft 25® 30 

Oxalic ft 12® 15 

Pyrogallic, Merck's ft 3 25 

Pyrogallic, Merck's oz 26 

Salicylic ft 60® 70 

Salicylic oz 8® 10 

Salicylic, from oil wintergreen oz 54 

Sulphuric, coml., 9-ft bots .. ea 65® 75 

Sulphuric, coml., carboy, $2 ft 2^@ 2% 

Sulphuric, C. P., 1-ft bots ft 35® 40 

Sulphuric, C P., 9-ft bots ft 25® 30 

Tannic ft 1 25® 1 50 

Tartaric ft 38® 42 

ALCOHOL, absolute, 1-qt bots ea 1 60 

Grain market 

Wood, 5 gal. lot to bbl. lot gal 90® 1 00 

Wood, less quantity, can extra gal 1 10 

ALUM, chrome ft 13® 15 

Dried (burnt alum) ft 12® 15 

Lump ft 3^@ 4 

Ground ft 5® 6 

Powdered ft 6® 8 

AMMONIA, cone, 26°, 5-pt bots ea 85 

Cone, bulk, can extra gal 75 

Bromide ft 75 

Carbonate ft 12® 25 

Muriate, lump ft 13@ 15 

Muriate, gran, coml ft 11® 15 

Muriate, gran, pure ft 16® 20 

Muriate, powd ft 20® 25 

Valerianate oz 27 

ANT1KAMNIA (10 oz, .90) oz 100 

ANTIPYRIN (25 oz, $1.30) k oz 1 40 

AKISTOL (25 oz, $1.65) oz 180 

ARROWROOT, Bermuda ft 35 

ARSENIC, powd, white ft 10® 12 

BALSAM Copaiba ft 60® 75 

Fir, Canada ft 45® 50 

Peru ft 2 50® 2 75 

Tolu ft 75® 80 

BARK, Cinchona, red, true ft 50® 55 

Cinchona, red, powd ft 35® 60 

Cinchona, yellow, Calisaya ft 50® 55 

Cinchona, yellow, powd ft 35® 60 

Elm, slab ft 12® 15 

Elm, ground ft 14® 18 

Elm, powd ft 15® 20 

Sassafras ft 12® 15 

Soap, slab ft 7® 10 

Soap, ground ft 10® 13 

Soap pwd ft 18® 20 

Soap, cut, 5c boxes doz 35 

Soap, cut, 10c bozes doz 60 

Wild Cherry ft 12® 15 

BAY RUM gal 2 50® 3 00 

F. W. B. & Co., ^ pts doz 1 75 

P. W. B. & Co., pts doz 3 50 

BEANS, Tonka, Angostura ft 2 25® 2 50 

Vanilla, Mexican ft 13 50@14 50 

Vanilla, Tahiti ft 3 25® 3 50 

BERRIES, Cubeb ft 25® 30 

Cubeb, powd ft 30® 35 

Juniper ft 9® 10 

BISMUTH, sub-carbonate ft 1 60® 1 70 

Sub-gallate oz 19 

Sub-nitrate ft 1 25® 1 35 

KLOE MASS ft 70® 75 

BLUE VITRIOL ft 4^© 7 

BORAX, refined ft 7%@ 10 

Powd ft iy„@ 10 

BUDS, Cassia ft 35® 38 

CALOMEL, American ft 80® 85 

English ft 1 10® 1 15 

Stock ft 55® 65 

CAMPHOR ft 45® 50 

CANTHARIDES, Chinese, powd ft 60® 65 

Russian, powd ft 1 00® 1 10 



CAPSICUM. African, pods ft 

African, powd ft 

CARAMEL (gal $1 50, can extra) ft 

CARBON, bisulphide, 1-ft bots doz 

Bisulphide, 2-ft bots doz 

Bisulphide, 1-gal cans ea 

Bisulphide, 5-gal cans ea 

CARMINE, No 40 oz 

CHALK, French, powd ft 

White, precip ft 

White, prepared, drops ft 

CHARCOAL, animal, gran ft 

Animal, powd ft 

Willow, powd , bulk ft 

Willow, powd., 1-ft cartons ft 

Willow, powd., %-ft cartons ft 

Willow, powd., 5^-ft cartons ft 

CHLORAL HYDRATE, 1 fts ft 

% fts ft 

M fts ....ft 

CHLOROFORM, 1-ft tins ft 

7-ft tins ft 

Squibbs', 500-gm ea 

Squibbs', 250-gm ea 

Squibbs', 100-gm ea 

CLOVES ft 

Powd ft 

COBALT, powd ft 

COCA.INE, hydrochlorate oz 

Hydrochlorate, % oz oz 

Hydrochlorate, Ya oz ea 

COCOA BUTTER ft 

CODEINE, alk., '/s oz oz 

Sulphate, % oz oz 

COLOCYNTH APPLE ft 

Powd ft 

COMPOSITION POWDER, /s-ftpkgsft 

COPPERAS, bbls, 13/ 8 ft 

CORROSIVE SUBLIMATE ft 

Powd ft 

CREAM TARTAR, pure ft 

CREOLIN, 1-ft and 5-ft bots ft 

CREOSOTE, beech-wood ft 

Coml ft 

CURCUMA, powd ft 

CUTTLE BONE ft 

DEXTRINE ft 

DOVER'S POWDER ft 

EIKONOGEN oz 

EMERY, flour ft 

ERGOT, powd ft 

ESSENCE PEPPERMINT,2-ozbot..doz 

ETHER, Nitrous, cone, 1-ft bots ft 

Nitrous, cone, %-9> bots ft 

Nitrous, cone, J^-ft bots ft 

Sulphuric, U. S. P.. 1880 ft 

Sulphuric, cone, 1890 ft 

Sulphuric, Squibbs', 500-gm ea 

Sulphuric, Squibbs', 250-gm ea 

Sulphuric, Squibbs', 100-gm ea 

EUCALYPTOL, Merck's oz 

EXTRACT. Cascara, fluid, F. W. B. &Co..ft 
Cascara, fluid, F. W. B. & Co., 5-ft bots... ft 
Cascara, fl.,arom., F.W.B. & Co., 1-ft bot.ft 
Cascara, fl., arom., F.W.B. & Co , 5-ft bot..ft 

Logwood, 15 and 25-ft boxes ft 

Logwood, 1-ft, Yz-9) and %-ft boxes ft 

Witch Hazel, distilled gal 

Less than 5 gals, container extra. 
EXTRACTS, FLAVORING, 

Lemon, F. W. B. &Co., 2-oz doz 

Vanilla, F. W. B. & Co., 2-oz doz 

FLOWERS, Arnica ft 

Chamomile, Eng ft 

Chamomile, Ger ft 

Lavender ft 

Rosemary ft 

FOIL, Tin, Heavy ft 

Tin, Medium .ft 

Tin, Light , ft 

FORWALDEHYD ft 

FRUIT JUICES, F. W. B. & Co., qts., doz 
FRUITS, Crushed, F.W.B.&Co.,^gals ,doz 

FULLERS EARTH ft 

GELATINE,, Cox's, sml doz 

French, gold label ft 

French, silver label ft 

French, bronze label ft 

GLUE, Carpenter's ft 

White ft 

GLYCERINE, 50-ft cans ft 

10-ft cans ft 

2-oz bots doz 

Schering's 1-ft bots ft 

Schering's 10-ft bots ft 

GLYCOLINE (gal., $1.50, can extra) ft 

GUM, Aloes, Barb : ft 

Aloes, Barb., powd ft 

Aloes, Cape ft 

Aloes, Cape, powd ft 

Aloes, Socotrine, true ft 

Aloes Socotrine, powd ft 



22® 25 

20® 25 

25 

2 00 

4 00 

1 15® 1 25 

4 00 

35 



6&@ 



12 
10 
12 
10 
15 
18 
20 
25 

1 65 

1 



1 95® 2 00 

60® 65 

57® 60 

1 25 

68 

31 

20 

25 

30 

3 75 

3 85 
60® 65 
50® 55 

5 20 

4 75 
80 
75 
35 

2® 3 
80® 85 
90® 95 
27® 32 
50® 55 
89® 1 10 
50 
15 
35 
12 
1 25 
37 
10 
55 
1 50 
1 25 



12® 
30® 



1 35® 


1 40 


1 55® 1 60 


75® 


80 


80® 


85 




1 25 




66 




30 




24 




70 




50 




80 




75 


12® 


13 


15® 


20 


65® 


90 




1 50 




1 75 


18® 


20 


28® 


30 


28® 


30 


12® 


15 




40 


20® 


25 


25® 


30 


30® 


3b 


55® 


60 




5 50 


10 80 


6® 


10 




1 50 


60® 


65 


40® 


45 


35® 


40 


9® 


12 


15® 


18 


14® uy 2 




18 


1 25® 1 50 




45 




40 




35 


25® 


30 


30® 


35 


20® 


25 


20® 


25 


45® 


50 


50® 


55 



Ammoniac ft 40® 45 

Arabic, No. 1 ft 70® 75 

Arabic, No. 2 ft 50® 55 

Arabic, powd., No. 1 ft 70® 75 

Arabic, powd., French ft 90® 1 00 

Arabic, sorts ft 40® 45 

Asafetida ft 32® 35 

Asafetida, powd ft 45® 50 

Benzoin ft 50® 55 

Benzoin, powd ft 60® 70 

Catechu ft 9® 12 

Catechu, powd ft 32® 35 

Guaiac ft 38® 40 

Guaiac, powd^ ft 45@ 50 

Myrrh ft 35® 38 

Myrrh, powd ft 38® 40 

Olibanum ft 25® 30 

Opium ft 3 15® 3 25 

Opium, powd ft 4 00® 4 20 

Shellac, orange ft 32® 35 

Shellac, orange, ground ft 35® 38 

Shellac, white ft 35® 40 

Shellac, white, powd ft 40® 45 

Spruce, tears ft 1 25® 1 35 

Tragacanth, flake ft 90® 95 

Tragacanth, sorts ft 45® 50 

Tragacanth, powd ft 1 00® 1 10 

HOFFMAN'S ANODYNE ft 65 

HOPS, pressed, y 2 and 5^-lbs... ft 16® 20 

Pressed, oz ft 25 

HYDROGEN PEROXIDE, Mar- 

chand's, lbs doz 7 50 

Marchand's, J^-lbs doz 5 50 

Marchand's, 5^-lbs doz 3 75 

Marchand's, J^-lbs doz 2 25 

M. C. W., or P. & W., 1 lbs doz 4 80 

M. C. W., or P. & W., %-lbs doz 3 00 

M. C. W., or P. & W., J4-lbs doz 1 80 

Oakland, 1 lb doz 6 00 

Oakland, '^-lbs doz 3 75 

Oakland, 5^-lbs doz 2 50 

U.S. P., lib ft 35 

U.S. P., lib full doz 3 25 

HYDROZONE, 1-lb bots dcz 10 50 

%-lb bots doz 7 25 

5£-lb bots doz 4 75 

Yi-Xb bots doz 2 25 

IOHTHYOL oz 50 

Ichthyol ft 6 50 

INDIUO ft 70® 75 

INSECT POWDER, Buhach, 6-lb cans.ft 50® 60 

Dalmatian, bulk ft 28® 40 

Hill's California, bulk ft 35® 45 

"T. B." 6-lb cans ft 40 

" T. B " 1-lb cans doz 5 50 

"T. B," y 2 -\ b cans doz 3 25 

' T. B." small doz 1 25 

IODINE, re-subl oz 36 

Re-subl ft 3 60® 3 80 

IODOFORM oz 40 

Iodoform ft 4 15® 4 40 

IRON, carbonate precip ft 16® 18 

Chloride, solution ft 25® 35 

Iodide oz 35 

Sub-sulphate (Monsell oz 8 

Sub-sulphate (Monsel) ft 31® 40 

Sub-sulphate solution ft 25® 30 

Sulphate, dried ft 15® 20 

Sulphate, pure cryst., bulk ft 8® 10 

Sulphate, pure cryst., 1-lb bots ft 34® 18 

JUICE, Grape, Los Gatos, pts doz 4 00 

Grape, Welch's, y 2 pts doz 1 75 

Grape, Welch's, pints doz 3 10 

Grape, Welch's, quarts doz 5 50 

LANOLIN, Leibreich's ft 1 00 

LEAD, acetate, coml ft 16® 20 

Acetate, powd ft 20® 25 

Acetate, C. P ft 27® 30 

Subacet. solu., Goulard's ft 30® 35 

LEAVES, Bay ft 14® 10 

5uchu,long ft 30® 33 

Buchu, short ft 22® 25 

Rosemary, bulk ft 18® 20 

Sage, y 2 s and &s ft 18® 20 

Sage, ozs ft 25 

Senna, Alex ft 30® 35 

Senna, Alex. , powd ft 35 

Senna, Tinnevelli ft 18® 20 

Senna, Tinnevelli, powd ft 20® 25 

UvaUrsi ft 12® 15 

LEECHES, (25 or more, 8c.) ea 10 

LTME. Chloride, 35-ft cans ft i)4 

Chloride, Acme, 1-lb cans doz 1 25 

Chloride, Acme, J^-lb cans doz 80 

Chloride, Acme, %-lb cans doz 45 

Chloride, Electron, 1-lb cans doz 1 20 

Chloride, Phoenix, 1-lb cartons doz 1 10 

LITHARGE ft 8^@ 10 

LONDON PURPLE ft 15® 20 



12 



THE CALIFORNIA DRUGGIST. 



L.OZENGES, Licorice, 5-lb boxes ft 24 

Licorice, "Acme," 5-lb boxes ft :;5 

Peppermint, o-lb boxes ft 14 

LYtorODIUM ft 50® 55 

LYE, concentrated (case, 53 5UJ doz 90 

LYSOL, 1-lbbots ft 65 

MAGNESIA, Calcined, 1-lb tin ft 65 

Carbonate, Jenniug's, 2 and 1-oz ft 35 

Carbonate, K. & M., 4-oz., 2 oz. and 1 oz..ft 18@ 

Carbonate, K. & M., powdered ft 35 

Carbonate, K. & M., S. S ft 60 

Eff. citrate, Herring's doz 2 00 

MANGANESE, black oxide ft 6@ 8 

MANNA, large flake ft 90® 1 00 

Small flake ft 00® 65 

MENTHOL, (oz. 30c ) ft 2 s5@ 3 10 

MERCURY ft 68@ 75 

Bi-sulphate ft 65(g 70 

Iodide, green oz 25 

Iodide, red oz 20 

MORPHINE, sulph., '/a oz oz 2 30<@ 2 50 

Sulph., % oz., 2J^oz. bxs oz 2 25® 2 15 

Sulph., 1-oz tins oz 

Sulph., 5-oz tins oz 2 00(§ 2 20 

MOSS, Iceland ft 15 

Irish ft 20 

MUSK. Cantou. 1-oz bxs oz 35 

Tonquin, l /s oz bots... ea 4 50 

MUSTARD Colburn's.O lb cans ft 28 

Ground California ft 14® 15 

NAPHTHALINE, balls, cakes or flakes..ft 4® 8 

NUTMEGS ft 60® 65 

Ground ft 65® 70 

NUTS, Areca ft 30® 35 

Areca.powd ft 35® 40 

Kola ft 25® 35 

NUX VOMICA ft 15<§ 2n 

Powdered ft 20® 25 

OIL, Almond, bitter oz 65 

Almond, sweet ft 25(g 15 

Amber, rect ft 50® 55 

Anise ft 2 50@ 2 70 

Bay oz 45(3 50 

Benne (can extra) gai 1 15® 1 25 

Bergamot, Sanderson ft 3 40(3 ! 60 

Bergamot, Sicilian ft :: uur£ :■; 20 

Cassia ft 2 25@ 2 50 

Castor "A A" gal 1 25® 1 35 

Castor, machine gal 45® 50 

Castor, special com'l gal 75® 80 

Less than 5 gals., can extra. 

Cedar, coml ft 40(« 50 

Cedar, pure ft 75® 80 

China nut (can extra) gal 65® 75 

Cloves ft 80® 1 00 

Cocoanut ft 20® 30 

Cod liver, Norwegian (can extra) gal 1 10@ 1 25 

Cottonseed gal . 55® 70 

Less than 5 gal., can extra. 

Croton ft 1 35® 1 50 

Cubebs ft 1 50r« 1 75 

Eucalyptus ft Go® ?•> 

Geranium Rose oz 65® 75 

Hemlock, pure ft 75® 80 

Lard gal 75® 85 

Less than 5 gal can extra. 

Lavender flowers ft 2 25® 2 40 

Lavender, garden ft 75(5 sl1 

Lemon, Sanderson ft 2 00<„ 2 20 

Lemon, Sicilian ft 1 25(n. 1 50 

Mustard, Essential oz 65 

Neatsfoot (less than 5-gal. can extra) ...gal 75(o 80 

Olive, California, qts doz 12 00 

Olive, Italia, 1 gal cans gal 1 85 

Olive, Malaga, can extra gal 1 00@ 1 25 

Orange, bitter ft) 4 50(3 4 75 

Orange, sweet ft 2 2"< 2 50 

Origanum ft> 50® 60 

Pennyroyal ft 1 50<§ 1 75 

Peppermint, Hotchkiss ft 2 10(§ 2 25 

Peppermint, Western ft 1 10(5 1 60 

PinusSylvestris ft) 1 20@ 1 10 

Rhodium oz I0(» 75 

Rose oz 7 50@10 00 

Rosemary flowers lb 1 50(3. 1 65 

Sandalwood, Eng oz 50 

Sandalwood, Ger It) 3 00® 3 25 

Sassalras ft 75® 85 

Sewing Machine, Nye's, small doz 45 

Sewing Machine, Nye's, large doz 75 

Sperm, Nye's crystal gal 75 

Sperm, pure, w. b..... gal 1 25 

Less than 5 gal can extra. 

Spike ft, 25<§ 35 

Turpentine, rect., Merck ft) 15 

Union salad gal 75® 80 

Less than 5 gal can extra. 

Wintergreen ft. I 70<§ 190 

Wormwood ft. I 00(3 00 

OIL CAKE, ground ft. 025£<3 03 

OINTMENT, Citrine II, 

Mercurial, ', m It, 

Mercurial Jim II, 60® 65 

Zinc, benz. oxide It) 75 

ORANGE PEEL II, If,® 18 

PAPOID, !4 or 1-oz bots oz 00 

PARAFFIN ft, L0(g I 

PARIS GREEN It, jo„, 

l's, Ws, Vt's ft, 25(§. 80 

PETROLATUM, ex. amber II, 1G 

Snow while II, :;u„, 86 

PHENACKTIN (25 OZ8. .95) oz 1 00 

PHOSPHORUS, 11-ft cans ft 75 

1-It, cans It, f .i 

% and ',' -cans It, i i, , 

PLASTER PARIS It, 02(3 05 

Dentist's ft , nx 

POISON, purple It. 08 



POTASH. Babbift's, (case $3.50) doz 

Caustic, crude ft 

Caustic, white, stick ft 

Bichromate ft 

Carbonate ...ft 

Chlorate ft) 

Cyanide, mining ft 

Cyanide, pure granular ft 

Iodide ft 

Nitrate ft 

Permanganate ft 

Prussiate, red ft> 

Prussiate, yellow ft 

PUMICE STONE, lump ft. 

Powd ft, 

QUASSIA, Chips ft 

QUININE, 1-oz.bottle oz 

1-oz tin oz 

5-oz tin oz 

2,-oz tin oz 

50-oz tin oz 

100-oz tin oz 

RED PRECIPITATE ft. 

RKSIN , ft) 

ROOT, Aconite ft 

Althea, cut ft 

Blood ft 

Blood, powd ft 

Calamus, peeled ft 

Gentian ft 

Gentian, powd ft 

Ginger, African _ ft 

Ginger, Jamaica ft 

Goldenseal ft 

Goldenseal, powd ft 

Ipecac, powd ft 

Licorice, select ft 

Licorice, cut ft 

Licorice, powd ft 

Orris, powd ft 

Rhubarb ft 

Rhubarb cubes ft 

Rhubarb fingers ft 

Rhubarb, powd ft 

Rhubarb, powd., Allen's, Eng ft 

Sarsaparilla, Hond ft 

Sarsaparilla, Hond, gro ft 

Sarsaparilla, Mex ft 

Sarsaparilla, Mex., gro ft 

Valerian ft 

Valerian, powd ft 

ROTTEN STONE, powd ft 

SACCHARIN, 25 gm. cartons ea 

SAFFRON, American ft 

Spanish oz 

SAL EPSOM ft 

Epsom 4-oz cartons doz 

Glauber ft 

Nitre, cryst ft 

Nitre, powd ft 

Rochelle ft 

Soda ft 

SALOL, (oz30) ft 

SEED, Anise, Ital ft 

Anise, powd ft 

Bird, mixed, 1-lbs., GO-lb case case 

Bird, mixed, 1 ft doz 

Canary ft 

Caraway ft 

Cardamom ft 

Celery ft 

Coriander ft 

Flax, cleaned ft 

Flax, ground ft 

Hemp ft 

Millet ft 

Mustard ft 

Poppy, blue ft 

Rape ft 

Sabadilla, powd ft 

Worm, American ft 

Worm, Levant ft 

SEIDLITZ MIXTURE ft 

Powders, single, 100s box 

Powders, 3's doz 

Powders, ti's doz 

Powders, 10s doz 

SHEEP DIP, Carbolic gal 

Little's 1 gal cans gal 

Little's 5 gal cans gal 

SNUFF, Garrett's Scotch, blads ft 

Garrett's Scotch, 1-oz tins doz 

Garrett's Scotch, 2-oz tins doz 

Garrett's Scotch, 1-oz tins doz 

Garrett's Scotch,!") oz bots doz 

Lorillard's Maccaboy, 4-oz bots doz 

Lorillard's Rappee, 1-oz bots doz 

SOAP, Castile, Conti white ft 

Marseilles, white ft 

Mottled, coml ft 

Mottled, pure ft 

Turkish, green or white ft 

Powdered It, 

German green, Stiefel's.. It) 

Whale Oil It, 

SODA ASH ft 

Caustic, 98 per cent ft, 

Caustic, To per cent (Drums) ft 

Caustic, white, sticks ..It, 

Bicarbonate It, 

Bromide ft, 

Hyposulphite ft 

Hyposulphite, new process ft 

SOLUTION, Donavan's II, 

Fowler's ft 

Goulard's ft 

SPERMACETI ft 

SPIRITS. Brooklyn and Columbian gal. 

Less than 5 gals, can extra. 
Nitre, U.S. P ft 

| Nitre, 2-oz bots doz 



754® 
45® 
15® 
15® 
14® 
30(3 



17 
35 

65 

2 55® 2 65 

OS(« 12 

III,,, 

l ill,,, 

:-',2 ( r, 
09® 
06® 



110 
65 
35 
10 
08 
10 
36 
34 
31 
29 
28 
2S 
1 10 
01% to 03 

30® 35 

35® 

25® 

30® 



33® 

31® 

28„> 

2l',!<! 

25® 



40 

30 

35 

60 

13® 16 



14® 
20® 

•J.V, 
65® 



14® 



2 50® 2 75 

13® 15 

30 

18 

40 

75 

1 25® 1 50 

1 50® 1 75 

75 

1 75 

40® 45 

40® 45 

25® 30 

25® 30 

30® 35 

35® 40 

07® 10 

1 00 

40® 45 

90 

02^® 04 



01 1 /® 03 
08® 12 
09® 12 
26® 30 

01%® 03 

3 50® 3 65 

16® 18 

20® 25 

3 50 

75 

03%® 65 
10® 12 

1 35® 1 40 
18® 25 



10„, 


12 


03 


Oo 





Oo 


03 y 2 ® 


06 


04® 


06 


06® 


08 


10® 


12 


M|„, 


06 


40.,-, 


50 




20 




25 


28® 


30 




2 50 




60 


145® 


1 50 


1 @ 


2 00 




1 10 




1 35 




1 20 




50 




60 




1 00 




l 75 




2 7.", 




2 50 




2 75 


13® 


16 


l 


13 


07' ,,„> 


10 


08® 


12 


10® 


11 




85 




40 


ol,-„ 


06 


06® 


(IS 


oi ;<§ 


ON 


03® 


03', 


42® 


45 


02H® 


01 

65 

05 


03^® 
04® 


00 




40 


25® 


85 


30® 


15 


i0| 


55 


1 .',!„,, 


1 7.', 


55® 


60 




1 50 | 



STRONTIUM, nitrate ft 14® 17 

STRVCHINE., cryst., ' s oz bots oz 1 25 

Ci3'st., 1-oz bots oz 1 00 

Powd., ' -s-oz bots oz 1 20 

Powd., 1-oz bots oz 95 

SUGAR MILK, powd ft 20® 25 

SULFONAL oz 1 35 

SULPHUR, crude, ground, Cal ft 02® 03 

Flour ft 02', @ 03% 

Flowers ft 02?5@ 04 

Roll ft 02&@ 04 

SYRUP. Iodide Iron, F. W. B. & Co ft 57® 60 

Rock Candy, bbls and 'i bbls gal 70® 75 

TAR, Pine, % pints doz 75 

Pine, pints doz 90 

Pine, quarts doz 1 50 

"WATER, distilled, containers extra gal 10 

Orange Flower, containers extra gal 2 00® 2 25 

Rose, containers extra gal 2 00® 2 50 * 

WAX, Floor, powd ft 40 

Yellow, pure ft 27® 30 

White, pure ft 50® 55 

White, No. 1 ft 35® 40 

WHITE PRECIPITATE ft 1 20 

ZINC, metallic, shavings ft 20® 35 

Oxide, com'l ft 14® 15 

Oxide, Hubbuck's ft 45® 5C 

Sulphate, com'l ft 06® 08 

Sulphate, chem. pure ft 17® 20 

PROPRIETARY ARTICLES 

Controlled by F. W. Braun & Co. 

Braun's Carbolic Salve doz $1 25 

" Carbolic Soap doz 75 

" Condition Powder doz 1 00 

" Essence Jamaica Ginger doz 150 

■' Florida Water, Ige doz 3 50 

" Florida Warer, small doz 1 50 

" Sarsaparilla doz 4 00 

" Syrup Tar and Wild Cherry doz 150 

Cal. Mission Eucalyptus Lozenges doz 150 

Cal. Mission Eucalyptus Plasters doz 1 50 

Cal. Mission Poison Oak Remedy doz 1 50 

Cal. Root Beer doz 80 

Cal. Mocking Bird Food doz 3 00 

Coronado Sea Salt doz 80 

Haydeu's Sachet Powder, ji ft bots ft 3 00 

Hunter's Witch Hazel doz 1 75 

Matchless Sarsaparilla doz 5 00 

Matchless Wild Cherry Phosphates doz 1 75 

Swain's Carbolic Powder doz 1 50 

Tarine doz 1 75 

" T. B." Insect Towder, 6-ft can ft 40 

1-ft " doz 5 50 

" " " %-ft " doz 3 25 

" sml " doz 1 25 



BRAUN'S... 

California 
Condition Powder 



IS A 



Well Established Remedy 



Having a good sale throughout Southern 
California and the Territories 



It is used for 

Horses, Cattle, Sheep and Poultry 

IT IS GOOD 

It Retails for 25 cents 
It Costs .$1.00 Per Dozen 

Yon need it in your business ! 



MANUFACTURED 
AND SOLD BY 



F. W. BRAUN & CO. 



LOS ANGELES, CAL. 



o 



VOLUME 7.] 



LOS ANGELES, MARCH, 1898. 

THE- 



[NUMBER 3. 




XL DEVOTE TO 



^STSQFTHE ^ETABL Rj^lUeeilg'f ? 




F. W. BRAUN & CO., WHOLESALE DRUGGISTS 



COLUMBIAN SPIRITS 



TRADE MARK 



THE EQUAL of ALCOHOL for all 
PURPOSES EXCEPT INTERNAL use, 

MANHATTAN SPIRIT CO. 

Sole Manufacturers, BUFFALO, N, Y. 



The Prices to RETAILERS 

are as follows: 
$8— Case of 50 glass bottles 
$7— Case of 100 glass % bottles 




See that the 
Labels bear the well known 
RED DIAMOND MARK of the 
APOLXINARIS COMPANY, LIMITED. 

SOLE EXPORTERS : 
TH6 flPOLWNflRIS COMPANY, Lfl., London 

JOHN CAFFREY, 21 Sutter St., San Francisco 
Representing United Agency Co., 503 Fifth Ave., New York 



PRICE LIST 



FEB. i, 1890, AND FEB. 1, 1891. 

Beef Peptonoids (> ozs., per dozen $ 8 OO 

Beef Peptonoids 16 " " 18 00 

Liquid Peptonoids 16 " " 9 00 

Liquid Peptonoids with Coca 16 " " 9 OO 

Peptonoids, Iron and Wine • 16 " " » 00 

Phospho-Caffein Compound 2 " " 2 OO 

Phospho-Caffein Compound 4 " " 4 00 

Phospho-Caffein Compound 8 " " 8 OO 

Phospho-Caffein Compound 32 " " 24 OO 

WE GUARANTEE THE SALE OF ALL OUR GOODS. 



THE ARLINGTON CHEMICAL* GO. 



YONKERS, N. Y. 









CAP. 



CORRUGATED END. 



TUBE CONTAINING MENTHOL. 




THIS CUT ILLUSTRATES THE THREE PARTS OF 



Blanchard's Hard Rubber Pocket 

I nit ~\ \or This is positively the Finest Menthol Inhaler 
IllliaiCI • ■ on the Market 



Retails for so Cents. 
Price, $4.00 per dozen. 



WHY NOT SELL THE BEST? 

BLANCHARD'S INHALER is put up in handsome easel cartons, an 
attractive advertisement and an ornament to any drug store. 



BLANCHARD MANUFACTURING CO., Cincinnati, O. 

The Trade Supplied by F. W. BR A UN & CO., Los Angeles and San Diego. 




Trade Marks 
Designs 
Copyrights &c 

Anyone sending a sketch and description may 
quickly ascertain our opinion free whether an 
invention is probably patentable. Communica- 
tions strictly confidential. 1 1 and book on Patents 
scut free. Oldest agency for securing patents. 

Patents taken through Muiin ft Co. receive 
special notice, without c harg e, in the 

Scientific American, 



A handsomely illustrated weekly. 
dilation of any scientific Journal 



Largest ch> 
Terms, $3 a 



year; four months, $L Sold by all newsdealers. 

MUNN&Co. 36 ' B - d ^ New York 

Branch Office, 625 V St., Washington, D. C. 



A MONTHLY JOURNAL 

DEVOTED TO THE INTERESTS OF THE RETAIL DRUGGIST. 



Volume VII.] 



LOS ANGELES, CAL., MARCH, 1898. 



[Number 3. 



51?e <?aliforpia Dm^ist 

PUBLISHED MONTHLY BY 

THE CALIFORNIA DRUGGIST PUB. CO. 

P. O. Drawer 406, Station C. - - LOS ANGELES, CAL. 

(To whom all Communications should be addressed.) 



F. S. LANGDON, ........ President 

J. Q. BRAUN, ... .... Treasurer 

R. A. ALLEN, . . . - . • • • Editor 

H. WICKIZER- • ■ • ■ • ■ • Associate Editor 

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Half Page 60 00 

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. Items of interest to Pharmacists are solicited. 
The official organ of the San Diego Retail Druggists' Association. 
The official organ of the Los Angeles County Pharmaceutical Associa- 
tion. 



IT is a curious instance of the persistence of an idea once 
strongly planted in the minds of men, that the production 
of gold by transmutation from baser metals still holds place 
among us. Perhaps this very fact may argue in favor of its 
probability. At all events, the remarkable fact remains, that 
now, after fourteen centuries have elapsed since the first records 
of the early alchemists, positive claims of success are made, at 
about the ' same time, by two men, using widely differing 
processes, both claiming that they can and do make gold from 
other metallic substances. 

The alchemists cherished the belief that a substance which 
they named the philosopher's stone was a chief requisite in the 
process of transmutation of baser metals into gold and silver, 
and their efforts were directed toward the production of this 
unknown material. Ages elapsed in the search, men of the 
deepest minds and most profound acquirements giving their 
lives to the study of elementary substances, while every pos- 
sible combination of material was made, by the help of furnaces, 
crucibles, retorts, alembics, etc., in the vain hope of discover- 
ing the wonderful secret. Some of the alchemists held fanatical 
beliefs in the influence of the planets and other heavenly bodies 
and directed their researches at times and in a manner supposed 
to secure their powerful assistance. 



We are told that the name " adept " was given to those who 
had mastered the secret of alchemy, although no evidence 
exists that the secret ever was mastered. It must be con- 
cluded, then, that the name was applied to the acknowledged 
masters or leaders in the studies. It is believed that decep- 
tion was often practiced through the introduction of amalgam 
containing the precious metals among the materials treated, 
thus seeming to demonstrate the truth of their theories by 
showing the gold resulting from the experiments. No longer 
ago than in 1782, Dr. Price, of Guildford, England, who 
claimed to turn mercury into gold, committed suicide to avoid, 
it is supposed, the detection of his deceptions. The alchemist 
L,ully obtained large sums of money from Edward III of 
England in payment for his alleged discoveries, the king being 
duped by his representations. Henry VI, also, in 144c, was 
induced to give several patents for the making of gold . 

It thus appears how persistent has been this search and 
for what a great length of time, and likewise how much decep- 
tion, self-deception too, has accompanied its history. But it 
has not been in vain that alchemists wrought in their labora- 
tories, their caves and monastic cells, for from their work came 
the beginning of the science and art of chemistry, of all arts 
and sciences the profoundest and the most useful to mankind. 
It was 1000 years before the time of Lavoisier that the alchemist 
Jaffer discovered and described nitric acid and aqua regia, the 
production of the solvent of gold being a brilliant triumph of 
his labor, raising, as it did, extravagant thoughts of its con- 
nection with the secret of transmutation. 

Jaffer held the belief that all metals are compound bodies, a 
belief which was held in 1856 by Fiffereau, who also affirmed 
that silver could be changed into gold. At the present day 
some advanced theorists hold, likewise, that metals are com- 
pound bodies, and scientists are found who advocate the theory 
that all things are but modifications of one element alone — 
hydrogen. 

During the past year the attention of the public has been 
called to the claims of Mr. Briceof Chicago, and Mr. Emmens 
of New York, each of whom makes absolute claim that he can 
make, and is making, gold out of silver and other baser metals 
by processes which they have divulged to a greater or less ex- 
tent. Mr. Brice, indeed, made application to the United States 
government for a patent upon his process, though without 
success, the government tests not giving the results claimed by 
the applicant. Still, Mr. Brice is as certain he has achieved 
success as ever. Mr. Emmens has a considerable amount in- 
vested in a plant and is very sure of the correctness of his 
theory, which involves powerful compression of the material, 
thereby bringing the atoms closer together, until the substance 
arrives at the specific gravity of gold, when, presto! gold 
results. 



THE CALIFORNIA DRUGGIST. 



We can scarcely conceive of a greater revolution in the 
affairs of the world than would be brought about by the 
easy production of the precious metals used as the medium of 
exchange. One could in such case see, with Bellamy, a pos- 
sible abandonment of money in toto, and a providential oppor- 
tunity for a trial of his "Equality'' theories. On the whole, 
however, we are willing to assume that the world will plod 
along for another century or or two before gold and silver will 
become too cheap for us, and a considerable time before that 
we will get through caring. 



A NOTABLE change in the commercial value of a drug is 
**■ seen in the rapid and considerable increase in the price 
of lemon-grass oil, which has taken place recently. The arti- 
cle had for some years occupied a position somewhat similar to 
citronella, being one of the cheapest of perfumers' oils, but 
upon the discovery of the product iouone and the knowledge 
that lemon-grass oil furnished the greatest proportion of citral 
— the primary requisite in the manufacture of ionone — the de- 
mand speedily outran the supply, speculators buying the 
article largely for an advance. It is believed, however, that 
an unlimited quantity of the drug can be supplied, as soon as 
the attention of the distillers of the grass can be directed 
toward its production. There is no let up, however, in the 
marketing of new brands of "Violet " in various forms, the 
basis of which is ionone, so that much money will doubtless 
flow into the coffers of the ginger-grass distillers of India. 



'"THE widow of the late Dr. J. C. Ayer died in Paris early 
' in January, at the age of 71, her great wealth and strik- 
ing peculiarities giving rise to wide comment by the press. 
Commanding a fortune of $15,000,000 she was the richest and 
most extravagant woman in the city of her abode, spending 
her great income most royally, mainly in the gratification of 
her tastes and love of display. Although a Yankee of Yankees 
in her birth and ancestry, her own country could not satisfy 
her desire for magnificence, and she removed to Paris many 
years ago. When she married Dr. Ayer he was a drug clerk 
in Lowell. Mrs. Ayer was related to the Claflins of dry-goods 
fame. She leaves three children, who reside in New York 
city. 

PHIS is the way an English chemist puts it in his advertis- 

*■ ing circular (C. & D.): 

"Infants' preservative, 2d. per oz. 
" Commonly called 'Shut-up,' a grand remedy for your little 
darling screamers. This ' Shut-up ' has gained for me the grati- 
tude of thousands of mothers, numbers of them out of pure 
gratitude would willingly have thrown their arms around my 
neck and kissed me — of course I could not allow that, not that 
I dislike the mothers far from that, but, alas ! I am obliged to 
draw a line somewhere." 



THE Vichy-water Company (says C. & D.) has been mak- 
* ing a profit of 52,000 / yearly, on a capital of 88,000 /. 
The springs, which are located at Vichy, France, are owned 
by the State and leased to the Company. To persons drink- 
ing the waters at the wells no charge is made. The Sanato- 
rium at Vichy is to be greatly improved and put upon a simi- 
lar footing to the celebrated Carlsbad establishment in Ger- 
many. 

^HAMPAGNE-MILK is the name of a new beverage of 
^-^ French invention which has been put on the market in 
Europe. It is said to be prepared in the following manner : 
Cream is sweetened with syrup, placed in a closed vessel in 
which it is sterilized by passing a current of oxygen through 
it, and then charged with carbonic acid. 



" FERTILITY of imagination and abundance of guesses at 
*■ truth are among the first requisites in discovery." 
" As genius is essentially creative, and consists in divergence 
from the ordinary grooves of thought and action, it must neces- 
sarily be a phenomenon beyond the domain of the laws of 
nature. " — Jevon. 



A STYE is an exceedingly disagreeable attachment to one's 
**■ eyelid. You can abort it readily, however, in its early 
stage, by applying to it a drop of cider vinegar. Possibly the 
dilute acetic acid of commerce, will answer just as well, but the 
old fashioned article made from cider is what we have success- 
fully used. 

"P ASTER Sunday this year will come April 10. The drug- 
*— ' gist who makes attractive window displays for the amuse- 
ment of the little folks will secure the largest share of the 
Easter Egg Dye business. Order Fleck's or Paas Dyes of F. 
W. Braun & Co. 

I N England, the regulations regarding the sale of poisons re- 
* quire that in addition to the regular shop label, the name 
of the individual seller must appear also. This is to facilitate 
the tracing of evidence where necessary, and it strikes us as a 
wise provision. 

A PHARMACY law for Maryland is in consideration by the 
^*- legislators of that State, and is advocated by the Mary- 
land Pharmaceutical Association. At present the practice of 
pharmacy in Maryland is regulated only in the city of Balti- 
more. 

DEMEMBER the State Board of Pharmacy meeting in Los 
*^ Angeles, April 6, and in San Francisco, April 13, for ex- 
amination of candidates for registration. A week's notice of 
intention to take examination is required. 



A CHEMIST in the employ of Burroughs, Wellcome & Co. 
i* was fatally injured recently by the explosion of Erythrol 



'"THE Pharmaceutical Era has just published a series of inter- 

* esting and valuable papers entitled "First Aids to the 

Injured," which druggists would do well to read. The ability 

to take hold intelligently when accident has brought a patient 

under your care while waiting for a physician, is something A GEORGIA editor describes a defaulter as "six feet tall and 
worth a good deal more than it costs to acquire it. **■ $10,000 short." 



Nitrate, which he was triturating with sugar of milk. 



THE CALIFORNIA DRUGGIST. 



Trade Varieties of a Few Drugs and Mow to Distinguish 

Them. 

CARDAMONS. 

There is much confusion in the market relative to carda- 
mons. The common trade varieties are Mangalore, Malabar 
and Aleppy. These are distinctive enough in character, and 
when the supply came from natural sources there was no diffi- 
culty in obtaining them true to name ; but now they are 
largely cultivated in India, Ceylon and the East Indies, and 
more or less mixed before reaching us. The finest in appear- 
ance, and the most expensive is the Mangalore. They are of 
a light buff color, but slightly striated, large and plump, but 
are not well filled. The seeds proper are more or less shriv- 
eled, varying greatly in color, from light red to dark brown, 
and of inferior flavor. The light color of the capsules, and 
the inferior condition of the seeds is due to a process of bleach- 
ing. The present price is $1.50. They yield 68 per cent of 
seeds. The Malabar comes next in market value. They 
come from the same district as the Mangalore, and have the 
appearance of being the same cardamon, partly bleached. 
They are darker in color, more striated and not quite so plump. 
They yield 72 per cent of seeds and cost $1.25. The Aleppy 
is smaller, still darker in color, decidedly striated, and the cap- 
sules are well filled. They yield 78 per cent of a seed of a 
dark brown color and superior flavor. They cost $1. Although 
cheapest in price, and least attractive in appearance, I believe 
the Aleppy is the most desirable for manufacturing purposes, 
and for sale over the counter as well. 

ERYTHROXYLON. 

Coca is a native of South America. There are two distinct 
types, the Bolivian and the Peruvian. The former does 
not reach our. market. We have, however, two distinct varie- 
ties, both coming from Peru, known as Truxillo and Huan- 
uco. The Truxillo is grown in the northern portions of Peru, 
is a thin, fragile green leaf, one to two inches long, usually 
much broken. It yields a fine colored green powder. The 
The Huanuco is rather larger, thicker, somewhat coriaceous, 
and not much broken. It is brownish green, and yields a less 
handsome powder than the Truxillo. It is probable that the 
Huanuco comes from the same coca plant as the Bolivian, but 
grows in Peru. It yields a larger percentage of cocaine than 
the Truxillo, and is preferred for all purposes. 

BUCHTJ. 

The two official varieties are Barosma betulina and Barosma 
crenulata. The betulina is the short, broad leaf, notched at 
the apex, and the one in general use. Crenulata is practically 
out of the market. It is a short ovate leaf, tapering both 
ways. The long Buchu, Barosma serratifolia, is not official. 
It is lcng and very narrow, one inch long by 1-5 inch wide. 
It yields but one third of the active principles that is found in 
the betulina, and costs one-half more. 

SENNA. 

We have two official varieties of senna, Cassia acutifolia 
(Alexandria), and Cassia Angustifolia (India or Tinnevilly). 
The latter is usually found in the shops, being preferred for its 
fine appearance. It consists of long narrow unbroken leaves, 
y^ to \y 2 inches long, and is usually very clean. Alexandria 
Senna is much smaller, thinner, very much broken up and 



more or less dirty. It is, however, the more desirable, as it 
contains a larger percentage of active principle. It costs 
about 40 cents, the India 18 cents. 

IPECAC. 

The official Ipecac is from Cephaelis Ipecacuanha, Brazilian 
or Rio Ipecac. It is grayish brown or blackish, 1-12 to 1-6 
inch in diameter, with thick, strongly annulated bark, trans- 
versely fissued. The wood cord is small, white, tough and 
fibrous. There is in our market a closely allied species, Cep- 
haelis acuminata, Carthagena Ipecac. It is distinguished from 
the Rio by being thicker, of a light brown color, and less dis- 
tinctly annulate. The relative medicinal value has not been 
satisfactorily determined. It costs about 10 per cent less than 
the Rio. 

CINCHONA. 

There is no difficulty at this time in obtaining both red and 
yellow barks of proper alkaloidal strength, but there is diffi- 
culty in obtaining barks of distinctive botanical species. 
Twenty-five years ago our supply came wholly from natural 
forests in South America, while at this time very little comes 
from that source. Immense forests of Cinchonas have been 
planted in India, Ceylon, Java, and other Eastern countries, 
and most of our barks come from these countries. It was 
early found that by hybridizing various species, barks yielding 
much larger percentage of alkaloids were obtained, so that 
most of the cinchonas come from these hybrids. By this pro- 
cess much bark is produced, yielding as high as as 12 per cent 
of quinine, while the official requirement for calisaya is but 
2.5 per cent of quinine, or 5 per cent of total alkaloids. These 
high-percentage barks do not, however, come into the general 
market, all being taken by the large quinine manufacturers. 

The calisaya barks are cinnamon brown, merging into the 
red, and finely striated on the inner surface. The red barks 
are darker and more decidedly striated. 

CINNAMON. 

There are three official species of cinnamon, all quite dis- 
tinctive. Cinnamomum Zeylanicum, Ceylon cinnamon, is the 
very thin papery variety, rolled several layers in the quills It 
consists wholly of the inner bark, is of a light yellowish brown 
color, and good flavor. Cinnamomum cassia is the common 
Chinese cinnamon, is the very thin papery variety, rolled sev- 
eral thicknesses, about 1- 1 2 inch, of brown color, with the outer 
bark imperfectly removed, of inferior flavor. Cinnamomum 
Saigonicum is the new official Saigon cinnamon. It is very 
thick, about 1-6 inch, of dark brown color, consisting of the 
whole bark. It is of the purest cinnamon flavor. The rela- 
tive cost is: Cassia, 12 cents; Ceylon, 40 cents ; Saigon, 45 
cents. 

VANILLA. 

At the present price of vanilla bean it is worth while to know 
something of the market varieties. The official vanilla plani- 
folia is a native of Mexico, and is cultivated in several tropical 
countries. Other species are natives of South America. The 
Mexican bean hardly needs description except to compare the 
other varieties with it. The pods are 8 to 12 inches long, 1-3 
inch thick, tapering at both ends, the base being hooked, color 
blackish brown, wrinkled and slightly roughish to the feel, 
having the distinctive delicate vanilla odor. The present price 
is $16. The Bourbon vanilla most closely resembles the Mex- 



THE CALIFORNIA DRUGGIST. 



ican in odor, but differs in having a waxy feel, is a trifle 
shorter, has more crystals on the surface, contains more vanil- 
lin, makes a stronger extract, and costs $12. It is said to re- 
semble tonka in odor, but I cannot detect it. The bean known 
as South American resembles the 'Mexican in having a rough- 
ish feel, but is shorter — 4 to 8 inches — of lighter color and in- 
ferior odor. It costs $6. Tahiti vanilla is much like Bourbon, 
but is shorter and thicker, with inferior odor. Costs $5. The 
last two are used principally in cut vanillas, so that unless we 
have implicit confidence in our dealer, we should buy whole 
vanilla, or look out for the price. Brazilian vanilla is very 
different from the other varieties. It is 3 or 4 inches long, very 
plump, }4 inch or more thick. I have never seen it in the 
general market, but it may be used by essence manufacturers. 
It is of very inferior odor, and costs $5. 

ACACIA. 

There are too many varieties of Acacia to go over them 
here. I refer to them to emphasize the fact that the true Kar- 
dofan gum should be used in preparations. It costs more per 
pound, but is the cheapest to use, as mucilage or syrups made 
of it will keep much longer without souring. It is distin- 
guished by being whiter than other varieties, opaque rather 
than clear, due to many fissures. It is in smallish tears, or 
more commonly in fragments. 

ALOE. 

It is rather easy to get mixed up with the different kinds of 
aloe, specially in the powdered form. We have three princi- 
pal commercial varieties in the market, two of which, the 
Socotrine and Barbadoes, are official. Socotrine aloe is the 
best in all ways, and is the only one allowable in official pre- 
parations. It is commonly of an orange-brown color, with a 
resinous fracture, and a rather pleasant saffron-like odor. Bar- 
badoes aloe resembles Socotrine in color and appearance, but 
has a rank nauseous odor. It is used principally as a source 
for Aloin. Cape Aloe is not official. It is of a greenish-black 
color, very glossy, and has a bean-like odor. It is the least 
active of the aloes. Socotrine costs 40 cents ; Barbadoes, 20 
cents ; Cape, 16 cents. Of course the Socotrine is most likely 
to be adulterated, specially when powdered. Small percent- 
ages are difficult to find, but larger amounts may be distin- 
guished by the odor. 

GUAIAC. 

Guaiac occurs in the market in three forms. The most 
common is in irregular masses, of a blackish green color, con- 
taining fragments of bark and wood. Inferior lots sometimes 
contain as high as 30 per cent of such impurities. It is occa- 
sionally found in rounded tears of varying size, from % to 1 
inch in diameter. This is nearly pure resin, and is of superior 
quality. It is found also in large homogeneous, clear cakes or 
masses, prepared by melting and straining. If pure, this is of 
course of superior quality, but in this form is sometimes adul- 
terated with various pine resins. Such adulteration may be de- 
tected by treating with hot oil of turpentine, which dissolves 
pine resins, but does not affect guaiac resin. 

RHUBARB. 

The official rhubarb is the Chinese, from Rheum officinalis, 
and probably other species yielding roots practically identical. 
It comes in round or flattish sections, of a yellowish or reddish 



brown color, internally mottled with streaks of red and white, 
but without distinct rays. When chewed it is quite gritty. It 
is shipped direct from China, or by way of India, when it is 
known as India Rhubarb. The matter of selection depends 
upon the quality, rather than the exact geographical source. 
The European Rhubarb, raised largely in Austria, is of infe- 
rior quality. It is derived from Rheum Rhaponticum, the 
common garden rhubarb, and other species. It is distinguished 
from the Chinese by being lighter in color, not so decidedly 
mottled, is radiate, and but slightly gritty. It costs about a 
third less than the Chinese. — New England Druggist. 



The troublesome irritation of the throat and air-passages 
occurring just at this time of the year, call for the use of the 
California Mission Eucalyptus Lozenges, which speedily relieve 
the trouble. 

FOR MAKING BOGUS flEDICINE. 



Spurious "Castoria" Factory Found, and Work Stopped. 



The Centaur Company proposes to put a stop to the counter- 
feiting of its labels and the imitation of its "Castoria." On 
behalf of the company, Judge Van R. Patterson recently 
filed a bill in equity in the United States Circuit Court, and ob- 
tained a restraining order from Judge Morrow against George 
E. Brown of 407 Grove street, George Krog of 344 McAllister 
street, and McCabe & Sons of Merchant street, enjoining them 
from further printing, engraving or using counterfeits of the 
Centaur Company's labels. 

A similar suit was recently begun in the United States Court 
in Los Angeles against parties there, who had been engaged in 
the manufacture of bogus labels to be used in San Francisco. 
The Centaur Company is determined to protect its trade-marks 
and its goods at any cost. Charles H. Camp, who unearthed 
the fraud here, has found counterfeiters of the labels in a dozen 
different countries, and they have always been prosecuted. 



Dangers of Cocaine 

A member of the faculty of the Massachusetts College of 
Pharmacy is quoted in a Boston Post interview as having said 
in regard to the cocaine habit : 

"It is not a boy's habit, this taking of cocaine. There are 
plenty of bo3' opium smokers, and no end of fast women to 
keep them company. But the victims of cocaine are usually in 
the prime of life, from 30 to 40 years old. They may have 
been introduced to the drug by the family physician, who has 
advised its use for the relief of neuralgia, or who has used it in 
spray in throat and nose troubles ; or the dentist may have 
made operations upon the teeth painless by cocaine ; or, again, 
in the various preparations of coca and kola wines they may 
have had their first taste. After a while the exhilaration and 
good feeling due to the wine does not come. Something 
stronger is needed. Then comes the cocaine, pure and simple. 
Once in the clutch of the drug not one in a thousand breaks 
away." — Druggist's Circular. 



The sunny days at hand will call for the opening of the soda 
fountains very soon, and it will be well to note F. W. Braun 
& Co.'s new prices in fruit juices — $5.00 per dozen, and in 
quality without a peer upon the market. 



THE CALIFORNIA DRUGGIST. 



Sir John Lubbock at the Royal Institution. 

The first Friday evening lecture of the session took place at 
the Royal Institution on January 21 , when Sir John Lubbock 
gave an interesting hour's lecture on "Buds and Stipules." 

Sir F. Bramwell presided, and the audience included the 
President of the Pharmaceutical Society (Mr. Walter Hills). 
Over sixty diagrams were on the wall, illustrating the way buds 
were protected from cold. 

Sir John Lubbock said that although he would have rather 
delivered his lecture in the spring, the exceptional mildness of 
the winter had enabled him to have on the table specimens of 
buds which were usually not obtainable till later. He was led 
to investigate the subject by a remark that he had met with, 
that in rock roses some are found with stipule and some with- 
out, and his desire to find the reason. He went on to describe 
how the buds were protected, in some cases by means of the old 
leaves, and in others by the leaf-stalk. Hair and scales were 
also used for the purpose of protection, and in speaking of the 
ash-bud he explained Tennyson's simile of hair being as 
"black as the ash-bud in front of March," the ash-bud ap- 
pearing black because it is thickly covered by black downy 
hair ; but as the bud tissue grows the hairs become further 
apart, and so make the bud lighter in color as the spring ad- 
vances. The function of hairs in Alpine regions seemed to be 
to keep off excess of moisture, or in dry and desert countries 
to prevent too free transpiration of moisture, or again for 
warmth, "a great-coat, as it were." Stipules were mostly a 
protection for the bud, though sometimes fulfilling the function 
of leaves. The form varied considerably ; as a rule where the 
leaflets were large and broad, the stipules were broad, whilst 
in case of a narrow leaf only narrow stipules were found. The 
lecturer showed by folding papers why the seed-leaves of plants 
differed from the other leaves, because being folded in the seed 
they had to conform to its shape, the bud in like manner influenc- 
ing the form of the mature leaf. The unusual shape of the tulip- 
tree's leaf he believed was due to the shape of the bud, which 
contained the stipules, the stalk, and the leaf folded upon itself, 
the latter just filling the space left by the two former. Answer- 
ing the question with which the lecture began, he thought the 
evidence conclusive that where stipules were present the leaf- 
stalks were narrow, while stipules were absent when leaf-stalks 
were broad. In conclusion, the lecturer briefly referred to the 
processes attendant on the fall of the leaf in autumn, and 
trusted his audience would become unceasingly interested in 
the unfolding of nature in the coming spring — 
So careful of the type she seems, 
So careless of the single life. 

EXHIBITION OF NOVELTIES. 

After the lecture most of the audience stayed to examine the 
exhibits displayed in the library. Among them was the "Cox 
Generator" in several forms, for producing electricity direct 
from heat. These generators open up an interesting problem, 
and would seem to be efficient substitutes for primary batteries. 
The source of heat is a Bunsen or spirit flame radiating on to 
an alloy of metals protected by a covering of cement. The 
voltage of these generators is constant and there is no danger 
of short-circuiting them. They were shown in action driving 
a coil, plating bath, etc., and would be useful for charging ac- 
cumulators for ehemists who use them in x-ray work in those 



places where public-lighting stations are not within convenient 
distance. A new method of accurately centring opthalmic 
lenses was also shown in action. — Chemist and Druggist. 



What was the Biblical Myrrh ? 

From an interesting article in the Kew Bulletin on the myrrh 
of the Bible, so frequently mentioned in connection with frank- 
incense, we learn that this word is a mistranslation, and that 
the substance was not myrrh, as we know it, at all. The Afri- 
can traveler, Schweinfiirtb, has made an exhaustive study of 
the subject, and has demonstrated beyond possibility of a doubt, 
that the error arose from the similarity of the Hebrew word 
and the Arabian name for myrrh, morr. The biblical word 
should have been translated balsam, which is made plain by the 
fact that it was a highly odorous liquid, while myrrh, or the 
myrrhs (there are several of them) that we know anything 
about are solids, possessing an odor, it is true, but scarcely 
aromatic. Myrrh of today is derived from two regions, Africa 
and Arabia. The African myrrh is the gum of a palm, Bal- 
samodendron Schimperi. The Arabian, of which there are 
two or three kinds, comes from varieties of the same plant. 
The " balsam " of the Jews is the exudation of a palm known 
as Commiphora opobalsamwn. — National Druggist . 



The Hat =Th rower Fungus. 

Avery remarkable little fungus is the Hat-Thrower, Pilobolus 
crystallinus. Spores germinate in old manure, and seem to be 
especially favored by cow manure. When the spore germi- 
nates the case explodes, and the upper covering, just like a 
small black hat or cap, is thrown upward to a long distance. 
Some rose growers have entered their houses of a morning to find 
all the bloom completely covered with little black dots like pep- 
per, which are the hats that have been thrown up over night 
by this fungus. Of course the flowers are unsalable. It is 
only this way that this fungus is troublesome ; but that is bad 
enough. The cultivator in these days should not be without a 
small lens in his pocket, and he should be very alert to use it. 
With this habit, he would soon be able to detect the first ap- 
pearance of this fungus on the earth beneath the plants, and 
an application of the solution of copper would at once destroy 
the little pest and prevent all future trouble. Even without 
the lens, he may not suffer severely if he applies a solution 
when a few of the little dots are discovered. — Meehans' Monthly 
for January . 

Much has been said by the press about California perfumes, 
and manufacturers thereof who are claiming to be genuine 
producers ; but we fail to learn of any individual of them who 
does more than combine the essential oils of commerce (in the 
usual way) excepting Mr. C. Laux of this city, whose Triple 
Extract of Orange Blossoms is genuine, and is becoming 
widely known and admired on the Atlantic coast as well as at 
home. His Carnation Pink is a close second in favor, and 
with the rest of his line goes far to establish Mr. Laux in his 
position as the leading perfumer of the Pacific Coast. 



A political orator made the following statement : ' ' We con- 
gratulate ourselves most on having torn off Mr. Smith's mask 
and revealed his cloven foot. It was high time that the hydra- 
head of faction should be soundly rapped over the knuckles.'' 



THE CALIFORNIA DRUGGIST. 



- 



The Hidden Battle. 

Of the recent conclusions of medical science perhaps none 
are of greater interest than those pertaining to the work in the 
human system of the infinitesimal and all-pervading microbe. 
The following description of the antagonism between the 
microbe of disease and the conservative powers residing in the 
annual economy will be read with interest. It is from an 
article on " The Blood " in La Mojide Moderne, translated for 
the Literary Digest. The writer says : 

Besides the red globules, there are in the blood white 
globules or leucocytes. These are colorless cellules without 
membrane, mobile, and of changing form. They are much 
less numerous than the red globules, and there is only one of 
them to every 350 or 400 of the red globules ; but to make up 
for this they are found elsewhere than in the blood, notably in 
the conjunctival tissue, the glands, the lymph, etc. This 
ubiquity of the leucocytes is due to their mobility, to the plas- 
ticity of their protoplasm, which enables them to migrate from 






PHAGOCYTES AND BACTERIA. 

1.2. The phagocyte or leucocyte approaches a bacterium and extends its pseudo- 
pods toward it to envelop it. 3 The bacterium, surrounded by the pseudopods, pene- 
trates into the protolasm of the leucocyte, or is envacuolated. 4. The bacterium is di- 
gested by the phagocyte. 

tissue to tissue. This journeying is called " diapedesis." 

We may ask, "What is this diapedesis for?" Like all 
cellules the leucocytes are very sensitive to the action of cer- 
tain reagents. Among the substances that attract the leuco- 
cytes most energetically are the "toxins" or substance se- 
creted by pathogenic microbes. When such microbes exist in 
any part, and their presence is revealed by the presence of 
toxins carried by the blood, the leucocytes move toward the 
contaminated point and proceed to devour the bacteria that 
they meet (see figure). For this reason the leucocytes are 
called also "phagocytes " or devouring cells. A certain num- 
ber die, poisoned by the microbian toxins, and their accumu- 
lated bodies form pus. When the leucocytes finally succeed 
in destroying the pathogenic bacteria, the malady is stayed, 
the invalid is cured ; when, on the contrary, the leucocytes are 
vanquished the malady spreads aud the patient is in peril of 
death. This process of "phagocytosis" is one of the most 
curious processes of defense in our organism, and the vaccina- 
tions so widely employed in our day have for their object, by 
the previous attenuation of the inoculated virus, to habituate 
the phagocytes progressively to the poisons against which they 
would not be able to struggle were they introduced all at 
once. 



Nose=breathing a Protection Against flicrobes. 

The desirability of inspiring air through the nostrils only is 
further emphasized by the results obtained by Drs. St Clair 
Thompson and Hewlett. They had previously shown that 
the mucous membrane of the healthy nose only exceptionally 
shows any micro-organisms whatsoever, the interior of the 
great majority of normal nasal cavities being perfectly aseptic. 
They now find that nasal mucus is capable of exerting an in- 
hibitory action on the growth of micro-organisms, though they 
have not been able to obtain any proof that it possesses bac- 
tericidal properties. 

Aromatic Waters. 

The following is a rather clever way of making aromatic 
waters (<?. g., aq. menth. pip., aq. anethi, &c) extemporaneously. 
It is suggestsd and has been proved by Mr. J. K. Williams, 
Hartford, Conn.: Mix equal volumes of oil, S. V. R., and 
glycerine. Fold two filters together, open out, and with a 
glass rod (used in mixing the oil in the measure) spread the 
mixture over the surface of the inner filter. Place the filters 
in an earthenware funnel, and pour on the full quantuy of 
water at near the boiling-point. Catch the first filtrate in the 
measure in which is the glass rod, and return to the filter. Re 
peat this two or three times. In making camphor-water dis 
solve the camphor in its own weight of S. V. R. in a small 
mortar, then add glycerine, and proceed as with the oils. — 
Chemist and Druggist. 



' 



Practical Examination. 



. 



The Illinois pharmacy law (Phar. Era) has long bee 
known to possess many commendable features, and its practical 
workings have commanded quite generally the respect of the 
druggists of that State. To still further extend its scope of 
usefulness the Board of Pharmacy, upon which devolves the 
execution of the law, now announces that it will hereafter hold 
regular practical examinations, and that all applicants must 
possess the following general requirements : 

Applicants for examination will be expected to have a knowledge of 
the principles underlying the science of chemistry and the practice of 
pharmacy. 

A sufficient knowledge of mathematics to be able to calculate per- 
centage solutions, and convert one system of weights and measures 
into another. 

To be sufficiently conversant with Latin to correctly read and inter- 
pret prescriptions. 

To be thoroughly acquainted with manipulations or practical work, 
in so far as pertains to percolation, fusion, solution, trituration, cmulsi- 
ficatiou, evaporation, and other manipulations daily occurring at the 
prescription counter. 

To be familiar with organic Materia Medica. 

To be well informed on Posology and Toxicology. 

To read correctly fifty prescriptions, selected at random, from various 
stores in the State. 

Fifty or more oral questions will be asked relating to dispensing, 
manufacturing, posology, toxicology, materia medica, chemistry, and 
pharmacy. 

The applicant will be required to compound such prescriptions as the 
examiners may designate, in order to show proper qualifications for dis- 
pensing. 

Other special qualifications are noted as required by the 

Illinois law, but the requirements mentioned above are the 

meat of the whole subject of Board of Pharmacy examinations. 

They are intensely practical, and should be incorporated in the 

requirements exacted of applicants for registration by Boards 

of Pharmacy generally. 

E. M. Dial & Co. succeed Hinman & Dial, Redondo. 



THE CALIFORNIA DRUGGIST. 



Mothol. 

A pleasant Deodorizer and Moth-preventive. 

Oz. 

Rectified spirit 40 

Tincture of capsicum 5 

Naphthalene 1 

Absolute phenol 1 

Menthol %. 

Oil of lemongrass l / z 

Mix and filter. 

To be used in the form of spray by means of an atomizer 

where the moths frequent. C. & D. 



Furfuron, or " etherial extract of hayseed," is a liniment 
of dirty green color and strongly alkaline reaction, which is 
recommended for gout and rheumatism. According to "Ph. 
Ztg." it consists principally of a soap, mixed with camphor, 
salicylic acid, acetic ether, ammonia, and an alcoholic extract 
of peppermint. 

California Manna. —J. U. Lloyd (Am. Joun. Pharm. ) has 
investigated the subject of so-called California manna, and 
comes to the conclusion that it is produced by the phragmites 
communis, a reed-grass growing in the Rocky Mountain region. 
Another manna, possessed of cathartic properties, known in 
those quarters, is obtained from pinus lambertiana. 



A medical student has just graduated in Warsaw seventy- 
five years old. He commenced his course in 1843, but was 
forced to suspend it for lack of funds, and became a teacher 
for twenty years before he was able to return and resume it. 
He had partially completed his course when he became in- 
volved in the political uprising in Poland in 1863, and was 
sent to Siberia, where he worked in the mines for thirty-two 
years, when he was pardoned and returned to Warsaw to 
graduate at last. — Medical Times. 



A writer in one of the daily papers tells this little tale : ' 'A 
certain drug store on Massachusetts avenue, which I am in the 
habit of passing every day, had its prosperity endangered the 
other day by the establishment of another directly across the 
street. But the first drug store does not intend to go under if 
the proprietor can help it. A placard now stands in the win- 
dow with this brilliant legend staring at the passer-by : ' To 
avoid danger keep on this side of the street. ' ' ' — Era. 



Value of Compound Stillingia Liniment. 

Concerning this eclectic preparation the editor of the Eclec- 
tic Medical Journal says that it is one of the really valuable com- 
binations that have been transmitted to us by the earlier eclec- 
tics. This preparation has stood the test of time and is now 
in more general use than ever before. It is found in almost 
every eclectic practitioner's armamentarium, and in many fami- 
lies has become a household remedy. Compound stillingia lini- 
ment is an agent containing the combined virtues of stillingia, 
cajeput and lobelia, and is one of the best medicines we have in 
the treatment of either spasmodic or mucus croup. It should 
be applied externally to the throat and breast, rubbed on fre- 
quently, as long as there is cough and hoarseness. In cases 
where the cough is irritating, with a feeling of rawness and 
soreness in the throat and chest, the remedy may be given in- 



ternally in one-drop doses on sugar every hour or two. The 
compound stillingia liniment and the compound emetic powder, 
in conjunction with the' internal administration of aconite, will 
relieve croup in the majority of cases. Compound stillingia 
liniment has a wide range of usefulness. It is of value in the 
treatment of acute or chronic bronchitis, in minister's sore 
throat or quinsy, and is a good remedy in all forms of acute or 
chronic laryngitis. Recently, the writer says, he has used it 
with much benefit in acute and chronic catarrhal rhinitis by 
vaporization. In some cases of chronic pharyngitis the inhal- 
ation of this vapor for a half hour daily has given good results. 
The old formula for the compound stillingia liniment is oil of 
stillingia, 5ij ; oil of cajeput 5j ; oil of lobelia, 5 ss ; alcohol, 
oj. — Western Druggist. 



F. W. Braun & Co. 

This great wholesale drug firm is now housed in its magnifi- 
cent new home on North Main street, near the plaza. It is a 
great five-story building, all specially planned and fitted for 
the business. On the first floor, an immense space, are the 
sale-rooms, counting-room and offices of the firm. The base- 
ment and four floors are all filled with all sorts of drugs, med- 
icines, druggists' supplies, and drug specialties. 

The establishment is a credit to Los Angeles, and really in 
all respects would be an ornament to the business centers of 
San Francisco or Chicago. There is no drug house in San 
Francisco whose appointments will compare favorably with 
this Los Angeles establishment. 

The head of the firm, Mr. F. W. Braun, has been in business 
here about ten years. He began in a modest way, as became 
the Los Angeles of that day, on New High street. As the 
city and country grew his business kept even pace in its 
growth. The next move was on to Main street, where one 
floor was occupied, then two and then three. Then the busi- 
ness spread out latterly and occupied two stores. Now the firm 
own their own building, five stories and basement, reaching 
from Main to New High street. 

Mr. Braun is a rare combination of business traits of char- 
acter. He is conservative without a particle of timidity, en- 
terprising without any tendency to rashness, truthful in state- 
ment and upright in dealings ; always urbane in manner, and 
ever attentive to the desires of his customers. 

Hence his great success. — Commercial Bulletin. 

The Nebraska Board of Pharmacy met at Kearney, Febru- 
ary 9th. There appeared for examination 22 candidates, of 
whom seven were successful; viz , W. B. Hartigan, Hastings ; 
F. S. McKibbon, Lincoln; E. H. McMillan, McCook ; F. B. 
Packwood, Lincoln ; W. B. Storne, Kearney ; E. M. Schopp, 
Wood River; G. O. Taylor, Steele City. The next meeting 
of this board will be held at Hastings, May nth. 



The Florence Manufacturing Co. are making a great advance 
in their sales of Prophylactic Tooth-brushes. Doing an 
enormous business, in fact, notwithstanding the higher cost of 
their make over the ordinary goods in this line. The reason 
is, they are very different in their shape and action and are 
always satisfactory to the user. Note advertisement on an- 
other page. 



s 



THE CALIFORNIA DRUGGIST. 



Might Have Been Worse. 

"What an unfortunate thing that was about Henry Grim- 
shaw's death. The}' sa}' he did not leave his wife a thing ? " 

" That's a mistake." 

"Oh, I'm so glad. What did he leave her?" 

" He left her a young and mighty pretty widow. She's all 
right." — Cleveland Leader. 

Fogg (looking up from book ) : " The heroine appears to be 
as versatile as one of those bottles from which a magician 
pours all kinds of liquors. " 

Fenderson — ' ' How so ? " 

Fogg — " Why, in one place it says she wept bitterly, in 
another that the salt tears coursed down her cheeks, and in 
the very next paragraph we are told that her tears broke out 
afresh. A gifted woman that." 



Mr. Dooley — Gimme a bar of soap, please. 

Mr. Druggist — Yes, sir. Do you want it scented or un- 
scented ? 

Dooley — Aw, niver mind ; I'll just take it wid me. — Boston 
Budget. 

A Case in Point. 

Hargraves — After all, I believe there is something to the su- 
perstition about walking under a ladder being a hoodoo. I 
started out to borrow $5 this morning and met Ferry — 

Wallace — And he refused you, and then you found you had 
walked under a ladder without noticing it ? 

" No, but Ferry walked under the ladder and let me have 
the $5. — Cincinnati Enquirer. 



Rather Inconsistent. 

Brown — Deacon Jones is the most inconsistent man I ever 
saw. 

Green — Why, how is that? 

"You remember how loudly he sang that old hymn, 'I 
Would Not Live Alway,' in church last Sunday ? " 

' ' Yes, I remember it. ' ' 

" Well, I saw him in a drug store Monday morning buying 
a bottle of cough medicine." — Chicago News. 



Wanted a Round Trip Rate. 

It is related with excellent touches of realism by a local 
railroad man that some years ago in Omaha his road sold a 
round trip ticket for a corpse. 

He was sitting in the general office one day when in shambled 
a meek looking darky. 

" How do, Mistah D. ?" said he, with a bow and a scrape. 

"How are you, sir? What can I do for you?" 

" W'y, Mistah D., kain you tell me what am de rate to 
Lincoln?" 

" One dollar and sixty-five cents." 

"Well, what might be de round trip rate?" 

"Three dollars and thirty cents." That was easily an- 
swered. 

"Does you make a diffunce fo' 25 people?" 

" No. It's the same rate no matter how many go." 

" Well, Mistah D., look heah. What am de rate from Lin- 
coln up to Omaha ?" 



' ' One dollar and sixty-five cents. ' ' 

" What is the rate fo' a corpse ?" 

"One dollar and sixty-five cents." 

" Well, now, what's de round trip rate fo' a corpse?" 

" Why, I guess it would be $3.30. But what do you want 
to carry a corpse around the country in that way for ?" 

"Well, Mistah D., you see we's kin' of tied up. One of 
ouah membehs o' de Daughtahs of Ruth and Sons of Abra- 
ham died heah yistiddy. We want de membehs of de order in 
Lincoln to see deceased, but it costs too much money fo' 'em 
all to come to Omaha. So, if de round trip rate fo' a corpse is 
$3.30 we'll take de deceased down to Lincoln an' put him on 
exhibition an' bring him back to Omaha fo' de burial. Jus' 
make out a ticket fo' him, Mistah D , an' it'll he'p us out a 
lot. ' ' — Michigan Times. 

Horseflesh as Food. 

The prejudice against horseflesh as food is one that time and 
experience are fast dissipating. In France and other Conti- 
nental countries the use of this aliment is increasing so rapidly 
that great attention is given to the fattening of horses for the 
market. European societies for the prevention of cruelty to 
animals are interesting themselves in this subject, and are 
offering inducements to farmers to utilize their spare horses for 
food. It is conceded that the flesh of these animals is most 
excellent and nourishing. We all bear witness to this when 
we eat of the famous Saucisson de Lyons, which is now made 
almost exclusively of horseflesh. Liebig, Mohschott, and 
other chemists, have demonstrated that the muscles of horses 
contain a greater percentage of albumen than those of oxen 
and cows. Smoked horse tongues are more delicate than those 
of the now extinct buffalo. 

Europeans know their merit and accord them preference over 
all others. Horse tea is recommended to invalids as possessing 
greater tonic potency than beef tea. It is more savory and 
nourishing. The broth is of the color of chicken bouillon. As 
soup stock it has the taste of that made from game, and the 
same quantity of solid produces a larger quantity of liquid. 
Hippie meat requires a longer time to cook. When boiled it 
is apt to crumble ; when roasted it is said to suggest venison. 
There is no part of the horse that cannot be utilized. Inferior 
portions may be employed in ragouts, whose flavor is much 
more piquant than when made from corresponding cuts of beef 
or mutton. The color of the meat when roasted or boiled is 
darker than that of the ox. As the grain is shorter and more 
brittle, greater skill is required in the carving. The decreas- 
ing use of horses as beasts of burden, through the employment 
of mechanical modes of propulsion, suggests the value of con- 
sidering them seriously as an article of food. Every year there 
is more or less of a panic in regard to the short supply of beef. 
The horse, accorded the same care in selection and preparation 
for market, offers an entirely satisfactory substitute. Oleo- 
margarine has kept the price of butter within reasonable limits. 
A general use of hippie meat would be an equally effective 
check upon the cost of beef. In France, where the latter sells 
for from 25 to 40 cents a pound, horse meat may be had from 
5 to 8 cents. The pot-au-feu, which is no longer boiled in 
thousands of French homes on account of the cost of beef, 
through the cheapness of hippie tissue has assumed its former 
importance in the domestic economy of that people. — Public 
Health Journal. 






THE CALIFORNIA DRUGGIST. 



Business Personals. 



Mr. Jack Driver has accepted a position with G. C. Thaxter, 
Redlands. 



W. E. Neblett has accepted a position with C. E. Week, 
Riverside. Mr. Neblett is a graduate of the California College 
of Pharmacy. 

W. M. Higgins, Anaheim, has been making some desirable 
changes in his store, and painting the interior very tastefully 
in tints of green and white. 



B. F. Crews, Monrovia, has moved across the street into a 
new brick building, and has apparently fixed himself perma- 
nently this time. He has a fine store. 



Mr. R. S. Hawley, representing the New York Pharmacal 
Association, started for San Francisco on the 7th instant, hav- 
ing completed a thorough canvass of Southern California. 



Mr. George A. Kelly, of Pittsburg, Pa., one of the promi- 
nent and original members of the National Druggists' Asso- 
ciation, is spending a little time in Southern California for rest 
and recreation. 

Mr. Milroy Jones, representing Searle & Hereth, Chicago, 
has been in our city and vicinity for several weeks introducing 
"Violets" and other products of his house. He now goes to 
San Francisco. 



Wood & Royer, Orange, have made marked changes in the 
Gem Pharmacy, enlarging the salesroom and putting in new 
counter and show-cases. This greatly improves the appear- 
ance of their place of business. 



Mr. Odell, of Kamphefner & Co., Glendora, was in the city 
on the 5th, accompanied by Mrs. Odell. It is an incident to 
be noted to see Mr. Odell absent himself from his place of 
business. We would be glad to see him more frequently. 



F. L- Wingard, Long Beach, is devoting a portion of his 
surplus energy, and capital, to the establishment of a fine 
chicken ranch near his town. He has taken four acres of 
ground for his purposes and has stocked with high-class fowls. 



E. A. Cutter, San Jacinto, has sold his drug business to G. 
W. McKim and B. L. Chambers, who will continue the busi- 
ness under the firm name of McKim & Chambers. Mr. 
McKim has been connected with the store for a number of 
years and is thoroughly conversant with the business and the 
wants of the community. They have our best wishes for a 
successful business career. 



Heath & Morrison, Riverside, are making extensive changes 
in their place of business, taking in the next door north as an 
addition, and putting in one of the finest fronts in Southern 
California. An elegant waiting-room for ladies is one of the 
features comprised in their plan. When the improvements are 
completed H. & M. will be second to none in this part of the 
country, where beautiful stores are common. 



Phillips & Smith have purchased the interest of Dr. Mansur 
in the Sugar Loaf drug store, Los Alamitos, and placed Mr. 
G. H. Shaw in charge of the business. Mr. Shaw was for- 
merly with Bristol & Rowley, Santa Ana, and is a thoroughly 
competent druggist. 



Mr. Chas. D. Fairbanks, of H. Fairbanks & Son, Santa 
Ana, is now a happy benedict, and is taking a vacation from 
business cares in the form of a wedding trip. The lady in the 
case was Miss Bernice Hodges of Santa Ana. We extend our 
best wishes to the happy pair. 



Mr. Brent Good, of the Carter Medicine Company, is staying 
in Los Angeles for a few weeks before returning to his home 
in New York. Mr. Good has done prompt and effective work 
with the San Francisco counterfeiters of his goods and is 
entitled to the thanks of all honest druggists for his action in 
the matter. 



The J. T. Baker Drug Co. is the name by which the old 
pharmacy in Hanford will be called in future, Mr. H. E. 
Wright having transferred his interest to the present owners. 
Mr. Clarence S. Howland will have the management, as here- 
tofore. This is one of the best known stores in the big valley, 
and it is pleasant to see the old name again over the door. 



The Pasadena druggists have formed an association for 
mutual protection and the advancement of their interests. The 
disastrous cut-rate business heretofore in vogue in that city is 
to be abandoned, to a large extent, and nearly full prices for 
"patents" established. The officers of the association are: 
S. Rosenberger, president; L. J. Hough, secretary; M. P. 
Green, treasurer ; J. W. Wood, P. A. 



J. C. Hardman, Riverside, made a hit recently in his window 
display. In the midst of a group of pictures of the war vessels 
of the United States the Maine is shown, dressed in mourning, 
while " old glory " waves above. Portraits of the President 
and Consul-General Lee are also shown, the whole making an 
appropriate and timely appeal to patriotic sentiment. The dis- 
play has brought crowds of people to view it. 



Mr. Frank W. Mixter, with N. W. Kibler & Co., Visalia, is 
among the ten members of the Visalia company of the N. G. 
C. , who are qualified to compete for the State championship at 
next summer's target shoot. Mr. Kibler himself was one of 
the crack shots of the company, but his resignation puts him 
out of the competition. The Visalia boys have an excellent 
show for that gold medal. 



A. W. Ellington has removed his popular pharmacy to the 
northwest corner of Spring and Fourth streets, about a block 
south of his old location . The new place is one of the busiest 
corners in the city, and will doubtless be favorable for a large 
floral business as well as the drug and soda water trade. Mr. 
Ellington's reputation is well established for enterprise and 
ability, and we look to see him entirely successful in his nev? 
location. 



IO 



THE CALIFORNIA DRUGGIST. 



OUR ADVERTISERS. 



It will be of interest and value to the trade to consult our 
advertising columns, in which will be found represented the 
following firms and goods : 



A. Gettleman Brewing Co. 

Allcock's Plasters. 

Ammonol Chemical Co. 

Autikamnia Chemical Co. 

Apollinaris Co., Limited. 

Arlington Chemical Co. 

Armstrong Manufacturing Co. 

Batchelor Hair Dye Co. 

Beeman Chemical Co. 

Blake, C. E. & Co. 

Braun, F. W. & Co.'s Laboratory 

Products. 
California Fig Syrup Co. 
Centaur Company. 
Cal. Mission Eucalyptus Lozenges. 
Davol Rubber Co. 
Dement, W. E. 
Empire Mfg. Co. 
Etna Chemical Co. 
Fox, Fultz & Co. 
Gedney, L. H. 
Goodrich, B. F. & Co. 
Coronado Corks. 
Hayden Manufacturing Co. 
Hildreth, H. L. 
Hunyadi Salts Co. 
Jayne, Dr. D. & Son. 
Johnson, I. S. & Co. 
Kennedy, S. H. 



Kline, R. H., M. D. 

Kondon Manufacturing Co. 

Kuhns, Arthur Company. 

Leiner, M. 

Levy, B. & Co. 

Ludwick, G. M. 

Major Cement Co. 

Mariani & Co. 

Moore, H. H. & Sons. 

Munn & Co. 

Norman Lichty Manufacturing Co. 

N. Y. Pharmacal Association. 

Omega Chemical Co. 

Planten.H. & Son. 

Pond's Extract Co. 

Portuondo Vicente. 

Principe de Gales Cigars. 

Richmond, Dr. S. A. 

Sharp & Dohme. 

Sterling Remedy Co. 

Taite, Jos. G. & Sons. 

T. B. Insect Powder. 

Tetlow, Henry. 

Thum, O. W. Co. 

Wells, A.J. Manufacturing Co. 

Whittemore Bros. & Co. 

Wilbur Safety Packet Co. 

Wright, Chas. & Co. 

Wyeth, John & Bro. 



Mr. Will A. Peairs, who seems to be surrounding the globe 
with the Chamberlain medicines, has an interesting account of 
his African travels in the Pharmaceutical Era of February ioth. 
His statements regarding the considerable importations of goods 
from America are highly gratifying to our national pride. Mr. 
Peairs is making his second trip through South Africa. 



The Early Doctor Gets the Worm. 

There is usually little humor in that frequent incident in 
which customers leave town and forget to pay their bills, but 
when there is, the fact is deserving of wide publication for the 
benefit of the forlorn and shipwrecked brother, who, reading, 
shall take heart again. 

Dr. F. Gundrum, of Sacramento, Cal., betrays a leaning to- 
ward that joyous spirit which puts a gloss upon adversity in a 
letter to Dundas Dick & Co. He says : ' ' Your tablets acted 
successfully — but the patient did not. Two days after reliev- 
ing him of a forty-foot worm he took the 1 1 p.m. train and left 
the State, forgetting to pay me for the medicine or my trouble. 
The only thing he left was the worm — and I got left too. — 
Era. 



The proprietors of 

Cushman /Menthol Inhaler 

Offer to supply the trade with calendar's for distribution on 

the following basis : 

With one dozen Inhalers 250 calendars 

With two dozen Inhalers 500 calendars 

Orders sent to F. W. Braun & Co. will receive immediate 
attention, and the calendars supplied promptly from the manu- 
facturers. 



Pacific Coast Drug Agency 



OFFERS FOR SALE 



First-Class Drug Stores 
and Medical Practices 

in all the Pacific States and Territories 

Clerks Registered, Prooided and Employed. Partnerships 
Negotiated. Lists Sent Free. Correspondence Solicited 



G. M. LUDWICK, 

S. E. Corner Second St. and Broadway, Room 202, Los Angeles, Cal. 






WANTS, Etc., Etc. 





[Under this heading we will be pleased to publish FREE OF 
CHARGE, notices of clerks wanted, positions desired, stores for 
sale or exchange, propositions for purchasing, etc.~\ 



FOR SALE — Owing to press of other business, I would sell my Sixth 
and Olive street store at an extremely low figure, $600. $500 cash ; 
balance on time. G. A. CUTLER, M. D. 



FOR SALE — In Los Angeles, a centrally located drug store, doing a 
paying business. About $6500 will buy. Reason for selling — 
owner has two stores. Address F. C. W., care F. W. Braun & Co. 



FOR SALE — Set of shop bottles for small store, at a bargain. Ad- 
dress Pierce & Robbins, Pomona, Cal. 

FOR SALE — In coast city of Southern California, a drug business 
established over eight years. Stock about $2500; location first-clas9. 
Address M. H., care CALIFORNIA DRUGGIST. 

FOR SALE — Drug store in the most prosperous mining town in Cali- 
fornia; doing a good business ; price $2000. Good reasons for sell- 
ing. A full investigation desired. This is a splendid opportunity for a 
competent man. Population 6000 and only three drug stores. Address 
" GUARANA" care CALIFORNIA DRUGGIST, Los Angeles. 



FOR SALE — Drug store in suburbs of Los Angeles, worth $2000, stock 
clean and in good condition. Store has been established 18 months;' 
will sell at invoice price. Inquire of F. W. BRAUN & CO. 

FOR SALE — Drug business in Los Angeles. Established eight years. 
Valuation about $1000. Good location for a single man. 

Address J. O. WHITE, 337 Aliso Street. 



FOR SALE — A city drug store. Fine location. Good business. Low 
rent. Good reasons for selling. Address L, care F. W. BRAUN & 
CO. 

FOR SALE — City drug business at a bargain. Stock about $1200, all 
clean and no dead stuff. Good location for a doctor. Inquire of F. 
W. BRAUN & CO., Los Angeles. 



FOR SALE — A well stocked drug store in busy interior city of South- 
ern California. No cutting in any line. Average daily sales $30. 
Expenses light. Inventory $6000. Will sell for cash or part cash and 
good security. Good reason for selling. Address "Senna," care of 
F. W. BRAUN & CO. 



FOR SALE— Elegant clean stock 
T,ns AnuMps. Onlv rims* store 



in the most progressive suburb of 
Los Angeles. Only drug store within twenty blocks. Best reasons 
for selling. Value about $2000. Inquire of F. W. BRAUN & CO., 
Los Angeles. 



FOR SALE— A good, long 
Price, $2500. Address ' 
DRUGGIST. 



established drug business in this city. 
ADVANTAGEOUS," care CALIFORNIA 



FOR SALE CHEAP— Six-syrup Green's Soda Fountain, Tenn. marble, 
with steel tank, gauge, and six tumbler holders; all in good order. 
Address H. FAIRBANKS & SON., Santa Ana, Cal. 



THE CALIFORNIA DRUGGIST. 



ii 



PRICE LIST OF DRUGS, CHEMICALS, ETC. 

These prices are for quantities as ordinarily bought by average buyers, and include containers, unless 
otherwise indicated. Subject to market changes. 

For special quantities we will make special figures. 

F. W. BRA UN & CO., Los Angeles, Cal. 



ACETANILID ft 42® 45 

ACID, Acetic No. 8 ft 10® 25 

Acetic U. S. P ft 30 

Benzoic, Eng oz 16 

Benzoic, German oz 10 

Boracic ft 14® 20 

Boracic powd ft 14® 20 

Carbolic, crude '. gal 40® 50 

Carbolic, cryst, blk label, 1-ft tin ft 30® 32 

Carbolic, cryst, blk label, 5-ft tins ft 28® 30 

Carbolic, cryst, gold label, 1-ft bots ft 36® 38 

Carbolic, cryst, gold label, 5-ft tin ft 33® 36 

Citric ft 37® 42 

Gallic oz 11® 12 

Hydrocyanic, dil oz 11® 12 

Hydrocyanic, cone, Scheele's oz 40® 45 

Hydrofluoric, 1-oz bots ea 45® 50 

Hydrofluoric, 4-oz bots ea 75 

Muriatic, coml., 6-ft bots ea 65® 75 

Muriatic, coml , carboy, $2 ft 3%@ 4 

Muriatic. C. P., 1-ft bots ft -35® 40 

Muriatic, C P., 6-ft bots ft "25® 30 

Nitric, coml., 7-ft bots ea 1 00 

Nitric, coml., carboy, $2 ft 8@ 9 

Nitric, C. P., 1-ft bots ft 35® 40 

Nitric, C. P., 7-ft bots ft 25® 30 

•Oxalic ft 12® 15 

Pyrogallic, Merck's ft 3 25 

Pyrogallic, Merck's oz 26 

Salicylic ft 60® 70 

Salicylic oz 8® 10 

Salicylic, from oil wintergreen oz 54 

Sulphuric, coml., 9-ft bots ea 65® 75 

Sulphuric, coml., carboy, $2 ft 2^@ 2% 

Sulphuric, C. P., 1-ft bots ft 35® 40 

Sulphuric, C. P., 9-ft bots ft 25® 30 

Tannic ft 1 25@. 1 50 

Tartaric. ft 38® 42 

ALCOHOL, absolute, 1-qt bots ea 1 60 

Grain market 

Wood, 5 gal. lot to bbl. lot gal 90® 1 00 

Wood, less quantity, can extra gal 1 10 

ALUM, chrome ft 13® 15 

Dried (burnt alum) ft 12@ 15 

Lump ft 3%@ 4 

Ground ft 5® 6 

Powdered ft 6® 8 

AMMONIA, cone, 26°, 5-pt bots ea 85 

Cone, bulk, can extra gal 75 

Bromide , ft 75 

Carbonate ft 12® 25 

Muriate, lump ft 13@ 15 

Muriate, gran, coml ft 11® 15 

Muriate, gran, pure ft 16® 20 

Muriate, powd ft 20® 25 

Valerianate oz 27 

ANT1KAMNIA (10 oz, .90) oz 100 

ANTIPYRIN (25 oz, $1.30) oz 1 40 

AKISTOL (25 oz, $1.65) oz 180 

ARROWROOT, Bermuda ft 35 

ARSENIC, powd, white ft 10® 12 

BALSAM Copaiba ft 60® 75 

Fir, Canada ft 45® 50 

Peru ft 2 50® 2 75 

Tolu ft, 75® 80 

BAKE, Cinchona, red, true ' ft 50® 55 

Cinchona, red, powd ft 35® 60 

Cinchona, yellow, Calisaya ft 50® 55 

Cinchona, yellow, powd ft, 35® 60 

Elm, slab ft 12® 15 

Elm, ground ft, 14® 18 

Elm, powd ft, 15® 20 

Sassafras ft 12® 15 

Soap, slab ft, 7® 10 

-Soap, ground ft 10® 13 

Soap pwd ft, 18® 20 

Soap, cut, 5c boxes doz 35 

Soap, cut, 10c bozes doz 60 

Wild Cherry ft, 12® 15 

BAT BUM gal 2 50® 3 00 

F. W. B. & Co., % pts doz 1 75 

F. W. B. & Co., pts doz 3 50 

BEANS, Tonka, Angostura ft 2 25® 2 50 

Vanilla, Mexican .ft 13 50@14 50 

Vanilla, Tahiti ft, 3 25® 3 50 

BERRIES, Cubeb ft, 25® 30 

Cubeb, powd ft, 30® 35 

Juniper ft, 9® 10 

BISMUTH, sub-carbonate ft 1 60® 1 70 

Sub-gallate oz 19 

Sub-nitrate ft 1 25® 1 35 

BLUE MASS ft, 70® 75 

BLUE VITRIOL ft, 4^@ 7 

BORAX, refined ft, 8^@ 12 

^Powd ft, 8%@ 12 

BUDS, Cassia ft 35® 38 

CALOMEL, American ft, 80® 85 

English ft, l 10® 1 15 

Stock ft, 55® 65 

CAMPHOR ft, 45® 50 

CANTHARIDES, Chinese, powd ft 60® 65 

Russian, powd ft 1 00® 1 10 



CAPSICUM, African, pods ft 

African, powd ft, 

CARAMEL (gal$l 50,can extra) ft 

CARBON, bisulphide, 1-ffi bots doz 

Bisulphide, 2-ft bots doz 

Bisulphide, 1-gal cans ea 

Bisulphide, 5-gal cans ea 

CARMINE, No 40 oz 

CHALK, French, powd ft, 

White, precip ft, 

White, prepared, drops ft 

CHARCOAL, animal, gran ft 

Animal, powd ft 

Willow, powd , bulk ft 

Willow, powd., 1-ft cartons ft 

Willow, powd., J^-ft cartons ft 

Willow, powd., Y -ft cartons ft 

CHLORAL HYDRATE, 1 fts ft 

^fts ft 

Y. fts ft 

CHLOKOEORM, 1-ft tins ft 

7-ft tins ft, 

Squibbs', 500-gm ea 

Squibbs', 250-gm ea 

Squibbs', 100-gm ea 

CLOVES ft, 

Powd ft, 

COBALT, powd ft 

COCAINE, hydrochlorate oz 

Hydrochlorate, Yz oz oz 

Hydrochlorate, y$ oz ea 

COCOA BUTTER ft, 

CODEINE, alk., Ys oz oz 

"Sulphate, % oz oz 

COLOCYNTH APPLE ft 

Powd ft 

COMPOSITION POWDER, i/ 3 -ftpkgsft> 

COPPERAS, bbls, 1% ft 

CORROSIVE SUBLIMATE ft 

Powd ft 

CREAM TARTAR, pure ft 

CREOLIN, 1-ft and 5-ft bots ft 

CREOSOTE, beech-wood ft 

Coml 

CURCUMA, powd ft 

CUTTLE BONE ft 

DEXTRINE ft 

DOVER'S POWDER ft 

EIKONOGEN oz 

EMERY, flour ft 

ERGOT, powd ft 

ESSENCE PEPPERMINT, 2-oz bot..doz 

ETHER, Nitrous, cone, 1-ft bots ft 

Nitrous, cone, %-ft bots ft 

Nitrous, cone, %>ft bots ft 

Sulphuric, U. S. P.. 1880 ft 

Sulphuric, cone, 1890 ft 

Sulphuric, Squibbs', 500-gm ....ea 

Sulphuric, Squibbs', 250-gm ea 

Sulphuric, Squibbs', 100-gm ea 

EUCALYPTOL, Merck's oz 

EXTRACT. Cascara, fluid, F. W.B. &Co..ft 
Cascara, fluid, F. W. B. & Co.. 5-ft bots. ..ft 
Cascara, fl.,arom., F.W.B. & Co., 1-ft bot.ft 
Cascara, fl., arom., F.W.B. & Co , 5-ft bot..ft 

Logwood, 15 and 25-ft boxes ft 

Logwood, 1-ft, I /i-9> and i^-ft boxes ft 

Witch Hazel, distilled gal 

Less than 5 gals, container extra. 
EXTRACTS, FLAVORING, 

Lemon, F.W.B. &Co., 2-oz doz 

Vanilla, F. W. B. & Co ,2-oz doz 

FLOWERS, Arnica ft 

Chamomile, Eng ft 

Chamomile, Ger ft 

Lavender ft 

Rosemary ft 

FOIL, Tin, Heavy ft 

Tin, Medium ft 

Tin, Light ft 

FORMALDEHYD ft 

FRUIT JUICES, F. W. B. & Co., qts., doz 
FRUITS, Crushed, F.W.B.& Co., ^gals ,doz 

FULLERS EARTH ft 

GELATINE,, Cox's, sml doz 

French, gold label ft 

French, silver label ft 

French, bronze label ft 

GLUE, Carpenter's ft 

White ft 

GLYCERINE, 50-ft cans ft 

10-ft cans ft 

2-oz bots doz 

Schering's 1-ft bots ft 

Schering's 10-ft bots ft 

GLYCOLINE (gal., $1.50, can extra) ft 

GUM, Aloes, Barb ft 

Aloes, Barb., powd ft 

Aloes, Cape ft 

Aloes, Cape, powd ft 

Aloes, Socotrine, true ft 

Aloes Socotrine, powd ft 



22® 25 

20® 25 

25 

2 00 

4 00 

1 15® 1 25 

4 00 

35 



10® 



12 
10 
12 
10 
15 
18 
20 
25 

1 25 
1 35® 1 40 

1 60 



1 55® 
60® 
57® 



60® 65 



1 25 
68 
31 
20 
25 
30 

3 50 

3 60 
60 
55 

5 20 

4 75 
90 
85 
35 

3 

85 

95 

32 

55 

1 10 

ft 45® 50 

12® 15 

30® 35 

8® 12 

1 25 

37 

8® 10 

50® 55 

1 50 

1 20® 1 25 

1 35® 1 40 

1 55® 1 60 

75® 80 

80® 85 

1 25 

66 

30 

24 

70 

50 



12® 



1 50 

1 75 

20 

30 

SO 

15 

40 

25 

30 

35 

60 

5 50 

10 80 

£ 10 

1 50 

$ 65 

45 

40 

12 

15® 18 

14® U>4 

18 

1 25® 1 50 

45 

40 

35 

25® 30 

30® 35 

20® 25 

20® 25 

45® 50 

50® 55 



12® 

20® 

25® 
30® 
55® 



35® 



Ammoniac ft 

Arabic, No. 1 ...."jfb 

Arabic, No. 2 ].ft 

Arabic, powd., No. 1 .........ft 

Arabic, powd., French ft 

Arabic, sorts ft 

Asafetida ft 

Asafetida, powd ft 

Benzoin ft 

Benzoin, powd ft 

Catechu ft 

Catechu, powd ft 

Guaiac ft 

Guaiac, powd ft 

Myrrh ft 

Myrrh, powd ft 

Olibanum ft 

Opium ft 

Opium, powd ft 

Shellac, orange ft 

Shellac, orange, ground ft 

Shellac, white ft 

Shellac, white, powd ft 

Spruce, tears ft 

Tragacanth, flake ft 

Tragacanth, sorts ft 

Tragacanth, powd ft 

HOFFMAN'S ANODYNE ft 

HOPS, pressed, y 2 and J^-lbs... ft 

Pressed, oz ft 

HYDROGEN PEROXIDE. Mar- 

chand's, lbs doz 

Marchand's, %-lbs doz 

Marchand's, J^-lbs doz 

Marchand's. J^-lbs doz 

M. C. W., or P. & W., 1 lbs doz 

M. C. W., or P. & W., %-lbs doz 

M. C. W., or P. & W., %-lbs doz 

Oakland, 1 lb doz 

Oakland, %-lbs doz 

Oakland, %-lbs doz 

U. S. P., 1 lb ft 

U. S. P. , 1 lb full doz 

HYDROZONE, 1-lb bots doz 

%-lb bots doz 

i^-lb bots doz 

J^-lb bots doz 

ICHTHYOL oz 

Ichthyol ft 

INDIGO ft 

INSECT POWDER, Buhach, 6-lb cans.ft 

Dalmatian, bulk ft 

Hill's California, bulk ft 

"T. B." 6-lb cans ft 

"T. B " lib cans doz 

"T. B," ^fj-lb cans doz 

' T. B." small doz 

IODINE, re-subl oz 

Re-subl ft 

IODOFORM oz 

Iodoform ft 

IRON, carbonate precip ft 

Chloride, solution ft 

Iodide oz 

Sub-sulphate (Monsel) oz 

Sub-sulphate (Monsel) ft 

Sub-sulphate solution.... ft 

Sulphate, dried ft 

Sulphate, pure cryst., bulk ft 

Sulphate, pure cryst., 1-lb bots ft 

JUICE, Grape, Los Gatos, pts doz 

Grape, Welch's, J^ pts doz 

Grape, Welch's, pints doz 

Grape, Welch's, quarts doz 

LANOLIN, Leibreich's ft 

LEAD, acetate, coml ft 

Acetate, powd ft 

Acetate, C. P ft 

Sub-acet. solu., Goulard's ft 

LEAVES, Bay ft 

Buchu, long ft 

Buchu, short ft 

Rosemary, bulk ft 

Sage, %s and Y s 9> 

Sage, ozs ft 

Senna, Alex ft 

Senna, Alex., powd , ft 

Senna, Tinnevelli ft 

Senna, Tinnevelli, powd ft 

Uva Ursi ft 

LEECHES, (25 or more, 8c.) ea 

LIME. Chloride, 35-ft cans ft 

Chloride, Acme, 1-lb cans doz 

Chloride, Acme, J^-lb cans .' doz 

Chloride, Acme, 1^ -lb cans doz 

Chloride, Electron, 1-lb cans doz 

Chloride, Phoenix, 1-lb cartons doz 

LITHARGE ft 

LONDON PURPLE ft 



70® 



45 
75 
55 

70® 75 
90® 1 00 
40® 45 



50® 



45® 
35® 



32® 
35® 
35® 
40® 

25® 



35 

50 
55 
70 
12 
35 
40 
50 
38 
40 
30 

3 15® 3 25 
" 4 20 
35 
38 
40 
45 

1 35 
95 
50 

£ 1 10 
65 

x> 20 
25 

7 50 

5 50 

3 75 

2 25 

4 80 

3 00 

1 SO 

6 00 
3 75 

2 50 
35 

3 25 
10 50 

7 25 

4 75 

2 25 
50 

6 50 

i> 75 

£ 60 

40 

45 

40 

5 50 

3 25 
1 25 

36 

3 60® 3 80 

40 

4 15® 4 40 
16® 18 
25® 35 

35 



35® 



34® 



20® 
27® 



40 
30 
20 
10 
18 

4 00 
1 75 
3 10 

5 50 
1 00 

20 



IS® 2' 



12® 



iy 2 © 



30 
35 
15 
33 

25 
>U 
20 
25 
35 
35 
20 
25 
15 
10 

1 25 
80 
45 
1 20 
1 10 
10 
20 



12 



THE CALIFORNIA DRUGGIST, 



LOZENGES, Licorice, 5-lb boxes ft 24 

Licorice, "Acme," 5-lb boxes ft 35 

Peppermint, 5-lb boxes ft 14 

IYCOPODIUM ft 50® 55 

LIE, concentrated (case, $3.50) _ doz 90 

I/TSOt, 1-lbbots ft 65 

MAGNESIA, Calcined, 1-lb tin ft 65 

Carbonate, Jenning's, 2 and 4-oz ft 35 

Carbonate, K. & M., 4-oz., 2 oz. and l-oz..ft 18® 25 

Carbonate, K. & M., powdered ft 35 

Carbonate, K. & M., S. S ft 60 

Eff. citrate, Herring's doz 2 00 

MANGANESE, black oxide ft 6@ 8 

MANNA, large flake ft 90@ 1 00 

Small flake ft 60® 65 

MENTHOL, (oz. 30c.) ft 2 85® 3 10 

MERCURY ft 68® 75 

Bi-sulphate ft 65® 70 

Iodide, green — oz 25 

Iodide, red oz 26 

MORPHINE, sulph., % oz oz 2 30@ 2 50 

Sulph., >/s oz., 2^4 oz. bxs oz 2 25® 2 45 

Sulph., 1-oz tins oz 2 05® 2 25 

Sulph., 5-oz tins oz 2 00® 2 20 

MOSS, Iceland ft 15 

Irish .-...ft 20 

MUSK, Canton, 1-oz bxs oz 35 

Tonquin, '/a oz bots ea 4 50 

MUSTARD. Colburn's, 6 lb cans ft 28 

Ground California ft 14® 15 

NAPHTHALINE, balls, cakes or flakes..tb 4® 8 

NUTMEGS ft 60® 65 

Ground ft 65® 70 

NUTS, Areca ft 30® 35 

Areca.powd ft 35® 40 

Kola ft 25® 35 

NUX VOMICA ft 15® 20 

Powdered ft 20® 25 

OIL, Almond, bitter oz 65 

Almond, sweet ft 25® 45 

Amber, rect ft 50® 55 

Anise ft 2 40® 2 60 

Bay oz 45® 50 

Benne (can extra) gal 1 15® 1 25 

Bergamot, Sanderson ft 3 40® 3 60 

Bergamot, Sicilian lb 3 00® 3 20 

Cassia ft 2 25® 2 50 

Castor "A A" gal 1 25® 1 35 

Castor, machine gal 45® 50 

Castor, special com'l gal 75® 80 

Less than 5 gals., can extra. 

Cedar, coml ft 40® 50 

Cedar, pure ft 75® 80 

China nut (can extra) gal 65® 75 

Cloves ft 80® 1 00 

Cocoanut ft 20® 30 

Cod liver, Norwegian (can extra) gal 1 10® 1 25 

Cottonseed gal 55® 70 

Less than 5 gal., can extra. 

Croton ft 1 35® 1 50 

Cubebs ft 1 50® 1 75 

Eucalyptus ft 65® 75 

Geranium Rose oz 65® 75 

Hemlock, pure ft 75® 80 

Lard gal 75® 85 

Less than 5 gal can extra. 

Lavender flowers ft 2 25® 2 40 

Lavender, garden ft 75® 80 

Lemon, Sanderson It) 2 00® 2 20 

Lemon, Sicilian lb 1 2o@ 1 50 

Mustard, Essential oz 65 

Neatsfoot (less than 5-gal. can extra) ...gal 75g> mi 

Olive, California, qts doz 12 00 

Olive, Italia, 1 gal cans gal 1 85 

Olive, Malaga, can exti a gal 1 00<§ 125 

Orange, bitter lb I 50® I 7"> 

Orange, sweet lb 2 25(5 '_' 50 

Origanum ft 50® 60 

Pennyroyal It. 1 50@ 1 75 

Peppermint Hotchkiss ft 2 L0<§ 2 25 

Peppermint, Western Mi I 40(« 1 lid 

I'inus Sylvestris ft 1 20® 1 40 

Rhodium oz 10(W 75 

Rose oz 7 60@10 00 

KosemRry flowers It) 1 50@ 1 65 

Sandalwood, Eng oz 5d 

Sandalwood, Ger ft 3 00<§ 8 25 

Snssalras ft 75® 85 

Sewing Machine, Nye's, small doz - 45 

Sewing Machine. Nye's, large doz 76 

Sperm, Nye's crystal gal 75 

Sperm, pure, w. b gal 1 25 

Less than 5 gal can extra. 

Spike It. 25(§ 35 

Turpentine, rect., Merck tt> 45 

Union salad gal 75® 80 

Less than 5 gal can extra. 

Wintergreen tt. l 70@ I 90 

Wormwood ft I 00® 5 00 

OH, CAKE, ground Hi 02#<§ 08 

OINTMENT, Citrine ft 65 

Mercurial Km tt ■ 50@ 

Mercurial '.. m ft 60® 65 

Zinc, lien/, oxide tti 75 

ORANGE I'KKI Hi 15® 18 

PAI'OII), ■;. or 1-oz bots oz 8 00 

PARAFFIN tti ldi.i I . 

PARIS GREEN ft 20(g 

It. 

I'KTKOI.ATIIM, ex. amber ft 

Snow while Hi " 

PHEN \< I I IN(25ozs. .95) oz 1 00 

PHOSPHORUS, 11-ft cans II. 

l-lli cans It. 

% and ;i-cans ft 106 

PLASTER PAKIS It. 026 

Dentist's It. dl„, us 

POISON, purple Ih 08(5 10 



31® 



09® 



POTASH, Babbitt's, (case $3.50) doz 90 

Caustic, crude ft 7J4® 13 

Caustic, white, stick ft 45® 70 

Bichromate „ ft 15® 20 

Carbonate ft 15® 25 

Chlorate ft 14® 17 

Cyanide, mining ft 30® 35 

Cyanide, pure granular ft 65 

Iodide ft 2 55® 2 65 

Nitrate ft 08® 12 

Permanganate ft 40® 60 

Prussiate, red ft 60® 65 

Prussiate, yellow ft 32® 35 

PUMICE STONE, lump ft 09® 10 

Powd ft 06® 

QUASSIA, Chips ft 

QUININE, 1-oz bottle oz 

1-oz tin oz 

5-oz tin oz 

25-oz tin oz 

50-oz tin oz 

100-oz tin oz 

RED PRECIPITATE ft 

RESIN, ft 

ROOT, Aconite ft 

Althea, cut ft 

Blood ft 

Blood, powd ft 

Calamus, peeled ft 

Gentian ft 

Gentian, powd ft 

Ginger, African _ ft 

Ginger, Jamaica ft 

Goldenseal ft 

Goldenseal, powd •. ft 

Ipecac, powd ft 

Licorice, select ft 

Licorice, cut ft 

Licorice, powd ft 

Orris, powd ft 

Rhubarb ft 

Rhubarb cubes ft 

Rhubarb fingers ft 

Rhubarb, powd ft 

Rhubarb, powd., Allen's, Eng ft 

Sarsaparilla, Hond ft 

Sarsaparilla, Hond, gro ft 

Sarsaparilla, Mex ft 

Sarsaparilla, Mex., gro ft 

Valerian ft 

Valerian, powd ft 

ROTTEN STONE, powd ft 

SACCHARIN, 25gm. cartons ea 

SAFFRON, American... ft 

Spanish oz 

SAL EPSOM ft 

Epsom 4-oz cartons doz 

Glauber ft 

Nitre, cryst ft 

Nitre, powd ft 

Rochelle , ft 

Soda ft 

SALOL, (oz30) ft 

SEED, Anise, Ital ft 

Anise, powd ft 

Bird, mixed, 1-lbs., 60-lb case case 

Bird, mixed, 1 ft doz 

Canary ft 

Caraway ft 

Cardamom ft 

Celery ft 

Coriander ft 

Flax, cleaned lb 

Flax, ground ft 

Hemp ft 

Millet ft 

Mustard ft 

Poppy, blue ft 

Rape ft 

Sabadilla, powd ft 

Worm, American ft 

Worm, Levant ft 

SEIDLITZ MIXTURE ft 

Powders, single, 100s box 

Powders, 3's doz 

Powders, 0's doz 

Powders, 10s doz 

SHEEP DIP, Carbolic gal 

Little's 1 gal cans gal 

Little's 5 gal cans gal 

SNUFF, Garrett's Scotch, blads ft 

Garrett's Scotch, 1-oz tins doz 

Garrett's Scotch, 2-oz tins doz 

Garrett's scotch, loz tins doz 

Garrett's Scotch, 6 oz bots doz 

Lorillard's Maccaboy. 4-oz bots doz 

Lorillard's Rappee, loz bots doz 

SOAP, Castile, Conti white tt. 

Marseilles, white ft 

Mottled, coml It. 

Mottled, pure ft 

Turkish, green or white ft 

Powdered lb 

German green, Stiefel's lb 

Whale Oil ft 

SODA ASH ft, 

Caustic, 98 per cent ft 

Caustic, 70 per cent (Drums) lb 

Caustic, white, sticks Ih 42® 

Bicarbonate ft 02y 2 @ 

Bromide ft. 

Hyposulphite ft 03tf@ 05 

Hyposulphite, new process ft 04® 06 

SOLUTION, Donavan's ft. 10 

Fowler's ft. 25® 35 

Goulard's ft 

SPERMACETI ft 50® 55 

si- 1 KITS, Brooklyn and Columbian gal. 1 50<§ 

Cess than 5 gals, can extra. 

Nitre, U.S. P lb 55® 60 

Nitre, 2-oz bots doz 1 50 



10 

33 

30 

26® 27 
24® 25 

23}4@ 24& 

23® 24 

1 10 

01% to 03 
30® 35 
35® 40 
25® 30 
30® 35 
60 
13® 16 
14® 18 
20® 25 
25® 29 
65® 70 
70® 75 

2 50® 2 75 
13® 15 

30 

14® 18 

35® 40 

75 

1 25® 1 50 

1 50® 1 75 

75 

1 75 
40® 45 
40® 45 
25® 30 
25® 30 
30® 35 
35® 40 
07® 10 

100 

40® 45 

90 

02' ;@ 04 
35 

01',® 03 
12 
12 
30 

01",® 03 

3 .50® 3 65 
16® 18 
20® 25 

3 50 

75 

03 K® 05 

10® 12 

1 35® 1 40 

18® 25 

10® 12 

03%® 05 

03M® 05 

03H® 06 

04® 06 

06® 08 

10® 12 

04® 06 

40® 50 

20 

25 

28® 30 

2 50 
60 

1 45® 1 50 

1 @ 2 00 

1 10 

1 35 

] 20 

50 

i iu 

1 00 

1 75 

2 75 
2 50 
2 75 

Id 
18 
10 
12 
11 
:;:, 
iu 
06 
08 

IIS 

n:„r ii:;., 
15 

1 



13® 

tow 

(17' ...-■ 

08® 

10® 



ill,,, 
06® 



STRONTIUM, nitrate ft 14® 17 

STRYCHINE., cryst., y s -oz bots oz 1 25 

Cryst., 1-oz bots oz 1 00 

Powd., '/i-oz bots oz 1 20 

Powd., 1-oz bots oz 95 

SUGAR MILK, powd ft 20® 25 

SULFONAL oz 1 35 

SULPHUR, crude, ground, Cal ft 02® 08 

Flour ft 02'^® 0334 

Flowers ft 02%® 04 

Roll ft 0234® 04 

SIRUP, Iodide Iron, F. W. B. & Co ft 57® 60 

Rock Candy, bbls and % bbls gal 70® 75 

TAR, Pine, y 2 pints doz 75 

Pine, pints doz 90 

Pine, quarts doz 1 50 

WATER, distilled, containers extra gal 10 

Orange Flower, containers extra gal 2 00® 2 25 

Rose, containers extra gal 2 00® 2 50 

WAX, Floor, powd ft 40 

Yellow, pure ft 27® 30 

White, pure ft 50® 55 

White, No. 1 ft 35® 40 

WHITE PRECIPITATE ft 1 20 

ZINC, metallic, shavings ft 20® 35 

Oxide, com'l ft 14® 15 

Oxide, Hubbuck's ft 45® 5C 

Sulphate, com'l ft 06® 08 

Sulphate, chem. pure ft 17® 20 

PROPRIETARY ARTICLES 

Controlled by F. W. Braun & Co. 

Braun's Carbolic Salve doz $1 25 

" Carbolic Soap doz 75 

" Condition Powder doz 1 00 

" Essence Jamaica Ginger doz 150 

Florida Water, lge doz 3 50 

" Klorida Warer, small doz 150 

" Sarsaparilla doz 4 00 

" Syrup Tar and Wild Cherry doz 150 

Cal. Mission Eucalyptus Lozenges doz 150 

Cal. Mission Eucalyptus Plasters doz 1 50 

Cal. Mission Poison Oak Remedy doz 1 50 

Cal. Root Beer doz 80 

Cal. Mocking Bird Food doz 3 00 

Corouado Sea Salt doz 80 

Hayden's Sachet Powder, # ft bots ft 3 00 

Hunter's Witch Hazel doz 1 75 

Matchless Sarsaparilla doz 5 00 

Matchless Wild Cherry Phosphates doz 1 75 

Swain's Carbolic Powder doz 1 50 

Tarine doz 1 75 

"T. B." Insect Fowder, 6-ftcan ft 40 

'• " 1-ft " doz 5 50 

" " '• %-ft" doz" 3 25 

" " " sml " doz 1 25 



BRAUN'S... 

California 
Condition Powder 



IS A 



Well Established Remedy 






Having a good sale throughout Southern 
California and the Territories 



It is used for 

Horses, Cattle, Sheep and Poultry 

IT IS GOOD 

It. Retails for 25 cents 
It Costs $ 1 .OO Per Dozen 

You need it in your business ! 



MANUFACTURED 
AND SOLD BY 



F. W. BRAUN & CO. 



LOS ANGELES, CAL. 



VOLUME 7.] 



LOS ANGELES, APRIL, 1898, 



[NUMBER 4. 




DROP US A LINE 







When in want of ANYTHING pertaining to the DRUG TRADE. We have the STOCK and make the PRICES. 



F. W. BRAUN & 6©. 



WHOLESALE DRUGGISTS AND 

JOBBERS OF DRUGGISTS' SUNDRIES 



501-505 N. Main Street, Los Angeles, Cat 

SEND us VOIR ORDERS, we guarantee to please you in SERVICE, QUALITY OF GOODS and PRICES. 



COLUMBIAN SPIRITS 



TRADE MARK 



THE EQUAL of ALCOHOL for all 
PURPOSES EXCEPT INTERNAL use. 

MANHATTAN SPIRIT CO. 

Sole Manufacturers, BUFFALO, N. Y. 



The Prices to RETAILERS 

are as follows: 
$8 -Case of 50 glass bottles 
$7.— Case of 100 glass % bottles 




See that the 

Labels bear the well known 

RED DIAMOND MARK of the 

APOLXINARIS COMPANY, LIMITED. 

SOLE EXPORTERS: 
THe flPOLLINflRIS 60MPANy, Ld., London 

JOHN CAFFREY, 21 Sutter St., San Francisco 
Representing United Agency Co., 503 Fifth Ave., New York 



I 



LACTOPEPTINE Powder, in ounces, per dozen $8 00 

LACTOPEPTINE Powder, in half-pound bottles, per pound 9 60 

Lbs. per doz. 5-R> Bot. Ea. 

LACTOPEPTINE Elixir $12 00 $4 50 

LACTOPEPTINE Elixir with Bismuth 12 00 4 50 

LACTOPEPTINE Elixir with Strychnia and Bismuth 12 00 4 50 

LACTOPEPTINE Elixir with Calisaya 12 00 4 50 

LACTOPEPTINE Elixir with Calisaya, Iron and Bismuth 12 00 4 50 

LACTOPEPTINE Elixir with Gentian and Chloride of Iron 12 00 4 50 

LACTOPEPTINE Elixir with Phosphate of Iron, Ouinia and Strychnia 12 00 4 50 

LACTOPEPTINE Liquid 12 00 4 50 

LACTOPEPTINE with Beef, Iron and Wine 9 00 3 25 

Per Doz. 6-lb Bot. 

LACTOPEPTINE Syrup with Phosphates $12 00 $5 50 



NEW YORK PHARMACAL ASSOCIATION, Yonkers, N. Y. 






CAP. 



CORRUGATED END 




THIS CUT ILLUSTRATES THE THREE PARTS OF 



Blanchard's Hard Rubber Pocket 

I r* li ~» l/> r This is positively the Finest Menthol Inhaler 
IllllalCI* — on the Market 



WHY NOT SELL THE BEST? 



Retails for 50 Cents. 
Price, $4.00 per dozen. 



BLANCIIARD'S INHALER is put up in handsome easel cartons, an 
attractive advertisement and an ornament to any drug store. 



BLANCHARD MANUFACTURING CO., Cincinnati, O. 

The Trade Supplied by P. W. BRAUN & CO., Los Angeles and San Diego. 



50 YEARS* 
EXPERIENCE 




Trade Marks 
Designs 
Copyrights &c 
Anyone sending a slcetch and description may 
quickly ascertain our opinion free whether an 
Invention is probably patentable. Communica- 
tions strictly confidential. Handbook on Patents 
sent free. Oldest agency for BccurniK patents. 

Patents taken through Muim <lt Co. receive 
tpeetanotice, without c harg e, in the 

Scientific American* 

A handsomely illustrated weekly. Largest clr. 
dilation of aiiv scientific Journal. Terms, #1 a 
Tear ; four months, f L Sold by all newsdealers. 

MUNN & Co. 361Broad ^ New York 

Branch Office, 625 V St., Washington. D. C 



Jtye ^aliforr?ia Dnj^ist 

A MONTHLY JOURNAL 

DEVOTED TO THE INTERESTS OF THE RETAIL DRUGGIST. 



Volume VII.] 



LOS ANGELES, CAL., APRIL, 1898. 



[Number 4. 



51?e ^aliforpia Dru^ist 



PUBLISHED MONTHLY BY 



THE CALIFORNIA DRUGGIST PUB. CO. 

P. O. Drawer 406, Station C. - - LOS ANGELES, CAL. 
(To whom all Communications should be addressed.) 



F. S. LANGDON, ........ President 

J. Q. BRAUN, ... .... Treasurer 

R. A. ALLEN, ......... Editor 

TERMS OF SUBSCRIPTION. 

Per Year $1 00 

Single Copies 10 

ADVERTISING RATES. 

One Page $100 00 

Half Page 60 00 

Fourth Page 35 00 

Eighth Page 20 00 

Cards (per month) 1 50 

B^° Advertisements for positions or assistants, or to buy or sell Drug 
Stores, are inserted free of charge. 

Items of interest to Pharmacists are solicited. 
The official organ of the San Diego Retail Druggists' Association. 
The official organ of the Los Angeles County Pharmaceutical Associa- 
tion. 



pn 



HE Pure Food and Drug Congress, which met in Wash- 
ington, D. C, early in March, had for its object the secur- 
ing of national legislation for the prevention of adulteration 
and fraud in food products and drugs. A bill has been formu- 
lated, as a result, and is to be presented to the United States 
Congress for consideration. As only the District of Columbia 
and the Territories come under the direct supervision of Con- 
gress in legislation of this character, the several States having 
the sole right to regulate these matters within their own borders, 
it is proposed to control shipments between the States, under the 
Interstate Commerce Act, and thus prohibit the transportation 
from one State to another of such products as may be adjudged 
to belong to the category of impure or adulterated articles. 

We are not among those who have confidence in good re- 
results from such national legislation. It would open the way 
for a horde of agents, inspectors and detectives to harass and 
brow-beat the dealer and make life a burden to the innocent 
while searching for possible frauds. The result, thus far, of 
pure food and drug legislation in the State of Ohio has been 
far from encouraging, for it has been the occasion of more 
hard feeling, and has furnished the opportunity for more spite 
work, than has ever before been shown in drug circles in that 
State. We do not want to see a similar condition throughout 
the country, and while we are second to none in our desire to 



squelch the operations of adulterators and frauds, we prefer to 
wait for the development of a better method to reach them 
than the Ohio or the proposed national law. We are prepared 
to believe that the higher education of pharmacists, including 
the influence of pharmaceutical associations, has a strong tend- 
ency to diminish the practice of adulteration of drugs. We 
know, positively, that the drugs of the present day are vastly 
superior in purity to those common to the trade a generation 
back, and we ascribe the change largely to the better educa- 
tion of the retail druggist of today. To that education we 
look for the public's best defense against worthless or adulter- 
ated drugs. 

r\RUGGISTS who make a practice of gathering formulas 
*-^ for perfumes from the various periodicals, which make so 
liberal a use of them in their columns, are quite likely to meet 
with disappointment in their attempts at compounding the 
same. It is one of the earliest fads of the drug clerk to secure 
a large supply of "receipts" for colognes, toilet waters and 
extracts, and he awaits the time with impatience when he can 
manufacture these things under his own name and thereby 
reap an unlimited harvest of shekels, as well as a brilliant 
reputation ' ' on the side ' ' 

What 'the boys do not understand, nor all the elders, either, 
is that there is not one chance in a hundred that this amateur 
work can possibly meet with success. The making of per- 
fumes is like writing poetry, in more senses than one. The 
perfumer, like the poet, is " born, not made ". No printed form- 
ulas or rules can take the place of the refined sensibility of 
genius, as shown in the selection of material and its harmo- 
nious adjustment — in the poem or the perfume. 

It will suffice for our purpose in making these comments to 
indicate some reasons for the failure to obtain satisfactory re- 
sults in the compounding of perfume formulas. Perhaps the 
most serious difficulty arises from the lack of an expert knowl- 
edge of the materials required in formulas. The articles 
named are perhaps, in name at least, old friends and habitues 
of our shelves, but as perfumers we are required to enter 
a new field, and to become familiar with the special brand 
and source of supply of each particular oil or essence, and to 
recognize the peculiar feature that makes that special variety 
valuable. We must know what constitutes the true blend in 
odors, and how to adjust the "balance of power " between the 
delicate odor and the strong ; and no less to calculate with 
judgment upon the ripening effect of time upon the various 
combinations. This latter is only learned by long experience, 
and is one of the strong points of advantage held by the ex- 
pert perfumer. 

We are led to make these few remarks by noting the in- 
quiries for formulas in the various journals of the trade, and 



THE CALIFORNIA DRUGGIST. 



with the object of advising the pharmacist to leave the higher 
work of the perfumer to the experts, devoting his attention in 
this line to the minor, but no less profitable, toilet preparations, 
which come strictly within his province. 



MISS ABIGAIL M. LITTLEFIELD captured two prizes, 
each $20 in gold, at the recent commencement of the 
Albany (X. Y.) College of Pharmacy. One was for the best 
final examination — senior class — and the other for best set of 
pharmaceutical preparations made in the laboratory. We 
learn from the Era that Miss Littlefield was awarded the prize 
for the best final examination in the junior course also. At 
the State Board examination she stood the highest among 40 
successful applicants for certificates. Miss Littlefield is likely 
to be heard from again in pharmaceutical circles, judging from 
her record as a student. 



THE D. H. McEwen Olive Oil Mill, Pomona, formerly J. L. 
Howland's, has just finished the season's run, the output 
being 8500 gallons. These works have the reputation of be- 
ing the finest in the country, and the product, which is care- 
fully filtered by the most approved method, is as pure and fine 
as can be made. Mr. McEwen is an experienced business 
man as well as manufacturer, and his brand will not fail to be- 
come standard in the near future. 



IT is known that a considerable prize has been offered for a 
model of a bottle that caunot be refilled. Many complicated 
and unsatisfactory devices have been shown for that purpose, 
but it remained for a true genius to solve the problem. This 
he has done by introducing into the glass a coin, the value of 
which is sufficient to insure the breaking of the bottle to ob- 
tain the money. A Yankee trick, but we think the prize 
should be awarded. 

IMITATIONS of proprietary medicines continue to crop out. 
*■ The latest we hear of is a base imitation of the well known 
McGill's Orange Blossom. We repeat what we have before 
said, that druggists should beware of strangers offering staple 
goods below market rates. Buy only from reputable jobbers, 
and you need not fear getting caught with fraudulent goods 
on your shelves. 

"THE State Board of Pharmacy held a meeting for examina- 
*■ tion of candidates for registration on the 6th inst., at the 
Medical College in this city, and continued its sessions until the 
8th. Twenty-three candidates appeared for examination, the 
result of which has not been made public at this writing. 



A RETAIL druggist of Bellows Falls, Vt., is serving out a 
** thirty days' sentence at the workhouse for liquor selling. 
As he is now able to keep regular hours and does not have to 
wait on postage stamp customers, his lot is not so hard after 
all. 

Little drops of bourbon, 

Captured by a wink, 
M:ike the soda water 

Easier to drink. — Meyer Bros.' Druggist. 

Detectives in the background, 

Sniffing at the fizz, 
Throw their nets around you, 

Confiscate your biz. 



A Hygienic Floor. 

"It is well known", says Revue Scientifique (Lit. Digest), 
"that floors have been accused of grave sins. Recently at 
the Academy of Medicine, Messrs. Vallin and Laveran have 
been conducting the prosecution. It is a fact that the ordinary 
floor retains in its cracks the most injurious dust and the most 
dangerous germs. These penetrate thence between floor and 
ceiling, where they can preserve their virulence for along time. 
For this reason the cracks of old floors are often stopped up 
with paraffin or some similar substance. Sometimes for greater 
economy they are calked. In new buildings they are often re- 
placed with cement. But then people complain, for cement is 
very disagreeable to the feet. M. Capitan, in La Medecine 
Moderne, tells us of a new kind of floor that is really in the 
line of progress, if it proves to possess durability. We speak 
of wood pulp floors, which have no cracks ; they are also bad 
conductors of heat and sound, and in spite of their durability 
are soft to the feet like, for instance, linoleum. The wood 
pulp is mixed with a small amount of cement to increase the 
resistance of the floor, the price of which is much lower than 
that of the ordinary flooring. The dried pulp is reduced to 
powder to facilitate transportation, and this, after being made 
into a gelatinous mass, is pressed between rollers. When the 
pulp is dry it is painted to imitate oak or other wood, accord- 
ing to taste." 

Illinois Board. 

Illinois State Board of Pharmacy examined 138 applicants 
for registration Feb. 15, 16, 17, 18, at Chicago. Out of 91 
who took the examination for registered pharmacist eight 
passed for registered pharmacist (five of these were already 
registered as assistants). 

Ensign A. Hemming, Peter J. Koerper, Bertram Maier, 
Frank H. Martin, Cornelius Osseward, Charles J. Renshaw, 
Samuel H. Sheppard, and T. Milton Weirich, all of Chicago. 

The next meeting of the board for examination will be held 
in room 173, Thirty-ninth street, Chicago, April 19th, 1898. 
There will be a meeting for examination in room 3, State 
House, Springfield, June 2d, 1898. New applications must 
be on file at the office in Springfield at least ten days before the 
day set for examination. Those who have applications on file 
must also give ten days' notice before taking examination. 
This requirement is necessary in order to make suitable prep- 
arations for the class, and will be strictly enforced. Affidavits 
from R. P.'s of time service must be filed at least three days 
before the examination. No applicant will be admitted to 
these examinations except those who comply with the above 
requirements. Address all communications to Frank Fleury, 
secretary, Springfield, 111. 






Construction of Welsbach Light. 

The chemicals constituting the incandescent mantel of the 
Welsbach gas burner are principally the oxides of zirconium, 
lanthanum, thorium, and yttrium. The mantel is made by 
first impregnating a woven fabric with a chemical compound 
containing salts of the above metals. On lighting the first 
time the fibrous substance it consumed, leaving behind the 
fragile cone of the above oxides, which, when heated to in- 
tense whiteness by the gas flame underneath, shines with great 
brilliancy. — Era. 



THE CALIFORNIA DRUGGIST. 



'"FHE American Druggist for February 25th, prints a letter 
* from Acting Hospital Steward Ernest C. Mertou, relative 
to Prof. Remington's position on the proposed legislation to 
advance the status of pharmacists in the army and navy of the 
United States. Mr. Merton's letter is accompanied by ex- 
tracts from the Army Regulations and the Manual for the 
Medical Department, together with a set of questions actually 
used in an examination of aspirants for detail as Acting Hos- 
pital Stewards. 

In view of the many new ships being added to our navy, 
aud the possible large increase of the army, in case the present 
indications of war are not dispelled, these memoranda are of 
especial value to our young pharmacists who are ambitious to 
enter government service, and will be read with interest : 

The following extracts are from the Army Regulations and 
Manual for the Medical Department. 

A. R. Par. 1397. No person will be appointed a hospital steward until 
he has served a year as acting hospital steward ; nor will a steward be 
appointed nor an acting hospital steward be detailed until he has passed 
a satisfactory examination, under the direction of the Surgeon General. 
Privates who have served one year in the hospital corps, and graduates 
in pharmacy who have served six months and have shown particular fit- 
ness, may be recommended to the Surgeon General for promotion by the 
senior medical official of the command. From those thus recommended 
acting stewards will be detailed after passing the required examination. 
* * * * 

" Manual of the Medical Department." Par. 18. The examination 
for the position of acting hospital stewards and hospital stewards will 
embrace the following subjects : (1 ) arithmetic, (2) materia medica, (3) 
pharmacy, (4) care of sick and ward management, (5) minor surgery and 
first aid, (6) elementary hygiene. Proficiency in penmanship and 
orthography will be estimated from the papers submitted. 

Par. 19. The replies, certified to by the Board as having been made 
without recourse to books, memoranda, or other sources of assistance, 
-together with the report of the Board, will be forwarded directly to the 
Surgeon General, in whose office they will be examined and marked. 
The examination for acting hospital stewards and hospital stewards will 
embrace the same subjects, but the questions for candidates for the lower 
grade will be less difficult and comprehensive. 

Par. 20. The local board will investigate aud report upon the follow- 
ing : (1) physical condition, (2) character and habits, especially as to 
the use of stimulants and narcotics, (3) discipline and control of men, 
(4) knowledge of regulations, (5) nursing, (6) dispensary work, (7) 
clerical work, (8) principles of cooking and mess management, (9) hos- 
pital corps drill, minor surgery and first aid, including the extraction of 
teeth. 

Par. 22. The duties of hospital stewards and acting hospital stewards 
are, under the direction of the surgeon, to look after and distribute hos- 
pital stores and supplies ; to care for hospital property ; to compound 
and dispense medicines ; to supervise the preparation and serving of 
food ; to maintain discipline in hospitals and watch over their general 
police ; to prepare the required reports and returns ; to supervise the 
duties of the members of the hospital corps in hospital and in the field, 
and to perform such other duties connected with their position as may, 
by proper authority, be required of them. 

Par. 23. A re-examination before first re-enlistment as hospital 
steward may not be required if the surgeon. at the post and the chief 
surgeon state that the steward has periormed his duties efficiently, but 
will be held before second re-enlistment. No subsequent re-examina- 
tion will ordinarily be required. 

A. R. 1042. Hospital stewards, though liable to discharge, will not be 
reduced. The detail of an acting steward may be revoked by the post 
commander upon the recommendation of the surgeon or by sentence of 
a court martial. 

Reference to the above will, I think, show that tHe method 
followed by the military authorities is practically identical 
with that followed by the majority of States in granting cer- 
tificates of registration. 



Examination Questions for Acting Hospital Stewards. 

ARITHMETIC 

1 — Divide 1 by 1-15. Multiply the quotient by 1-45 and subtract 5-42 
from the product. 

2 — Multiply .009 by 90. Divide .009 by 900 

3— Give the metric equivalents of 3 drs., 3 fi. drs., 3 lbs., 3 quarts, 3 
yards, 3 inches. 

4 — If 126 men are taken sick one month in a garrison of 678, what 
annual sick rate does this represent per 1000 ? 

5 — How many rations in 939 lbs. of flour ; 75 lbs. of beans ; 42 lbs. of 
coffee ? 

6 — With beef at 7y z c. per lb. and bacon at 10c. per lb., what will be 
the difference in money value of 80 rations, if saving is made in beef 
instead of bacon ? 

7. How many square yards of floor space in a hospital ward 20 feet 
wide, 50 feet long and 12 feet high ? 

8 — How many feet, board measure, in a board 18 feet long, 9 inches 
wide and y$ inch thick ? 

MATERIA MEDICA. 

1 — What is the name of the principal alkaloid in cinchona ? In how 
many ways may this alkaloid be administered and what would be the 
adult dose by each method ? 

2 — What is an emetic? Give examples from the mineral and vege- 
table kingdoms with dose of each. Mention one that may be given hy- 
podermically and its dose. 

3 — Write the official names and doses of the following : Dover 
powder, Huxham's tincture, Hoffman's anodyne, Mustard, Calomel, 
Tartar emetic. 

4. What is an astringent ? Give examples of mineral and vegetable 
astringents. With dose of each. 

5 — Give the official names of four cathartic medicines, stating the 
adult dose of each. 

6 — What is the principal local anaesthetic now in use? How is it or- 
dinarily used and in what strength ? Is there any danger of the use of 
too excessive a quantity, if so, what is the danger? 

7— What is the composition of C. C. Pills ? Of the C. & O. Pills ? 

8 — From what sources are antipyrine and phenacetine derived? What 
are they chiefly used for? What is the danger to apprehend from an 
overdose ? Give does of each. 

PHARMACY. 

1 — Write the following in full and explain the meaning of each : 
Chart., Coch., Sig , c. c, Mgs.? 

2 — What excipient is ordinarily used in making suppositories and how 
are suppositories made? 

3 — What is an emulsion ? Describe exactly how you would make an 
emulsion of cod liver oil. 

4 — How is a seidlitz powder made? Give its official name. Give the 
official and common names of its ingredients. What chemical changes 
occur at the time of administration ? 

5 — Define evaporation, desiccation, distillation, and sublimation. 

6 — What precaution should be taken in making and preserving a solu- 
tion of Argenti Nitras, and why? 

7 — In what class of substances would you use the following solvents : 
Water, alcohol, glycerin, ether? 

8 — What medicines are incompatible with tr. of chloride of iron ? 
With chloride of potash ? Carbonate of ammonia ? Corrosive sublimate ? 
And why ? 

MINOR SURGERY AND FIRST AID. 

1 — What is a roller bandage ? Describe its application to a lower ex- 
tremity. What will indicate that it has been badly applied ? 

2 — What is a torniquet ? Mention the different varieties. How may 
one be improvised ? Describe its application when a hand has been cut 
off in a saw mill. 

3 — Describe an antiseptic dressing. 

4 — What signs indicate the presence of a fracture ? With the field 
hospital three miles in rear, what should be done for a man with a 
fracture of the femur ? 

5 — What application would you make to a severe scald by boiling 
water ? 



THE CALIFORNIA DRUGGIST. 



6 — Where would you apply pressure to arrest hemorrhage for a an in- 
cised wound of the forehead, and why ? 

7 — Give method for resuscitation of the apparently drowned. 
8 — Give the appliances necessary for a capital operation. 

CARE OF SICK AND WARD MANAGEMENT. 

1 — When a patient enters hospital what is done with his clothing and 
effects ? What when he leaves the hospital, being returned to duty ? 

2 — How would you change the sheets under a very sick patient ? 

3 — -How should a clinical thermometer for ward use be cared for ? How 
used ? 

4 — What are the indications for raising a patient's head ? For removing 
his pillow ? When the removal of the pillow is not enough, what else 
can be done? 

5 — Describe fully how you would give a hypodermic injection of mor- 
phine? 

6 — Whal is meant by sterilization ? How would you sterilize instru- 
ments, and how dressings ? 

7 — Name such articles of food as you would regard as constituting 
light diet for a patient in hospital. Special diet. 

8 — Describe as fully as you can the duties of a nurse to a patient for a 
period of twenty-four hoursafter a major operation ; for instance, ampu- 
tation of the forearm, under ether. 

ELEMENTARY HYGIENE. 

1 — What is meant by disinfectant ? Antiseptic? Deodorant? 

2 — What is the difference between soft water and hard water ? Explain 
physically and chemically what happens when soap is dissolved in hard 
water. 

3 — What do you understand by ventilation, and how is it secured in a 
hospital ward ? 

4 — How does the expired air from the lungs differ from the air that is 
taken into the lungs ? 

5 — What should be done with the excreta from case of typhoid fever ? 

6 — What end is accomplished by throwing chloride of lime into a privy 
vault ? 

7 — What benefits result from the cooking of food? 

8 — What precaution should be taken before drinking water of doubtful 
quality. 

Crushing a Drummer. 

BY M. QUAD. 

If he had been a veteran drummer for a dry goods or a gro- 
cery house — if he had been on the road a year with sample 
shoes, cigars or crockery — it would have been all right, but to 
wade into a young man on his first trip with druggists' sun- 
dries, as they did at Alton, was taking an unfair advantage. 

The embryo drummer was only twenty years old, and one j 
had only to glance at him to realize that he had no cheek. In 
riding up to the hotel in the 'bus he was very quiet, and when 
the clerk assigned him a back room on the fourth floor, not a 
word of protest fell from his lips. It was almost by accident 
that anybody got onto the fact that he was a drummer. When 
the discovery was made that such was his profession, the land- 
lord beckoned him into the private office and began : 

" Young man, what sort of a little game are you trying to 
play in this town ? ' ' 

" I — I'm not playing any game," was the confused reply. 

" I hope not for your own sake, but things look very queer. 
People who came up in the 'bus with you tell me that you 
hadn't a word to say against the town." 

"No, sir." 

"And when you entered this hotel you didn't throw your grip 
at a bell-boy and bang up to the office and demand a second- 
floor parlor at $2 per day. What was the matter with you?" 

" That — that isn't my way, sir." 

"Oh ! it isn't ? Playing the humility dodge, eh ? I under- 



stand from the clerk that you didn't ask for violet-scented soap 
for your bath. You didn't find fault with the hours for meals ; 
you didn't cuss around about damp sheets. What do you 
mean by this humility business ? " 

" This is my first trip, sir," replied the drummer in abject 
tones. 

" I hope you are speaking the truth, young man," said the 
landlord, as he glared at him. " The man who lies to me finds 
me a hard man to deal with. The head-waiter says you ordered 
from the bill of fare and made no kick. Was that part of your 
little game?" 

"I don't understand you." 

" But you will before we get through ! You were in the 
smoking-room last evening. There was a score of others there, 
but you worked the humility dodge to perfection. You did not 
put your feet on the back of a chair ; you did not announce in 
a loud voice that you were from New York ; you did not boast 
that your firm was the biggest in the world ; you did not say 
that every one-horse town in the country had a better hotel 
than mine. Perhaps you can explain yourseif in a police court, 
but I am far from being satisfied. There is something behind all 
this, and I have telegraphed your house to know whether you 
are all right or not." 

"Why, of course, I am all right," said the young man, as 
his face grew troubled. "I told you this was my first trip, and if 

I have done anything out of the way 

"That excuse don't go down, young man! Have you 
found any fault with the railroads entering Alton since you 
came here?" 
"No, sir." 

' ' Have you had one single word to say against our river — 
the weather — street-car service, or the police department ? " 
"I don't think so." 

" And look here, young man ! " continued the landlord, as 
he touched the other on the shoulder, " there were three 
drummers in the smoking-room all the time you sat there. 
You must have known they were drummers. You heard each 
one of them get off a whopping big lie, but you never opened 
your mouth." 

"But what was I to do ? " 

"You, a drummer, and ask such a question ! Great heavens, 
but what is the profession coming to ! You should have gone 
in and told a lie big enough to drop all three of them, of 
course. Do you mean to tell me you can't lie ? " 
" N — no, sir ! " was the trembling answer. 
"Jehosephat to Jerusalem ! but how did you get this far 
from New York without losing your clothes ! You intend to 
sit still and let three old liars show off and get all the credit ! 
Well, well, but I took you for a suspicious character as you 
got out of the 'bus ! Perhaps you will next tell me you can't 
tell a funny story." 

" No, sir, I can't ! was the contrite admission. 
" Humph ! Well, your guilt grows blacker and blacker. 
When you left New York didn't you have a lot of old jokes 
and gags and guys stored up in your head to get off in country 
towns like this ? ' ' 
" No, sir." 

" No lies — no jokes — no guys! And you — you call your- 
self a drummer ! I can't find words to express my astonish- 
ment. When you leave here are you going at 2 o'clock in the 









THE CALIFORNIA DRUGGIST. 



morning, and wake everybody in the house banging your 
trunk along the halls ? " 

" No, sir; I am going away at noon to day." 

"Going to tell every drummer you meet for the next month 
that this is the cussedest town you ever struck for business ? " 

" No, sir. Business has been first-rate with me." 

" And you do not intend to ask me take a draft on New 
York in payment of your bill ? ' ' 

"No, sir." 

" Nor kick at paying $2.50 per day, and say you can live 
cheaper at the Waldorf? " 

"No, sir." 

" Young man, see here," said the landlord, as he bent for- 
ward and dropped his voice a peg or two, "there is no doubt in 
my mind that you are a shover of the queer, a dealer in green 
goods or a spotter for bank burglars. As an honest man it is 
my duty to turn you over to the law, but I will give you a 
chance to reform. Pay your bill, get out of the ladies' door 
with your grip, and make a sneak for the depot. If you can 
get clear away, I won't say anything, but don't you ever show 
up in Alton again ! " 

The young man went. He made a straight line for New 
York; handed in his samples and resignation, and is now con- 
nected with a religious publication house. — Amer. Druggist. 



Effects of Liquid Air. 

During the recent dedication of the new physical-chemical 
institute of Leipzig University, Prof. Ostwald conducted a 
number of highly interesting experiments to show the action 
of liquid air, through the intense cold caused by its evapora- 
tion, upon the physical and chemical properties of various sub- 
stances. It has been found possible to construct glass contain- 
ers in which large quantities of liquid air can be stored. This 
fluid has a gray-blue color, and is turbid from the presence of 
solid carbonic acid suspended in it, which can be readily re- 
moved by filtration. A rubber tube introduced into liquid air 
becomes as hard and brittle as glass. Cinnabar loses its char- 
teristic red color and changes to a reddish-yellow. Liquids 
become viscous, crystallize or solidify. Hydrochloric acid forms 
a thick sirup ; ether becomes as hard as stearin. Chlorine 
gas changes to a yellow fluid ; ammonia gas, the same. Illu- 
minating gas loses its lighting power, and hydrocarbons, as 
benzol and ethylene, separate out. Oxygen gas, introduced 
into liquid air under ordinary atmospheric pressure, becomes 
liquid ; hydrochloric acid freezes, accompanied by such violent 
contraction that the receptacle threatens to break. — Ph. Ztg. 



A New Bitter Water. 

Among the numerous therapeutic candidates for professional recog- 
nition, none comes with a greater array of sponsors of recognized ability 
in the profession than does Apenta Water. 

When such men as Liebreich, Gerhardt, Iviebermann, Pouchet, Bo- 
goslowsky, Tichborne and Althaus, as well as many men of standing in 
our own country, bear testimony to its constant value in diseases asso- 
ciated with portal congestion there must be something in this water 
which makes it worthy of our careful consideration. 

These Apenta Springs, which are situated near Buda-Pest, on the left 
bank of the Danube, have a constant composition, an advantage for 
administration not possessed by all other natural waters. 

Their therapeutic value depends upon the presence of sulphate of 
magnesium, sulphate of sodium, of which the former is greatly in excess, 
and a small amount of lithia. — From the Milwaukee Medical Journal, 
Dec, 1897. 



What are Adulteration and Deception? 

The reversal of the lower court's decision in the Marvin- 
Winslow Soothing Sirup case in Ohio (Era) is most important to 
wholesalers and patent medicine manufacturers. It is likewise 
a hard set-back for the Dairy and Food Commission, which in- 
stituted the prosecution. If the construction which the judge 
places upon the Ohio law is to hold good and is warranted, it 
will be difficult to prosecute any cases of this nature to con- 
viction. The judge held as follows on the question of adulter- 
ation, and the construction of the statute : 

" The word adulteration is most explicitly defined by statute 
in the chapter regulating that subject. The word deception is 
nowhere defined by the statute. We approach this question 
then with obscurity. The word deception has no statutory de- 
finition. Adulteration is a crime defined by law." 

Judge Barber held that ' ' deception ' ' as used in the section 
means deception because of or the result of adulteration, caused 
by the imitation and counterfeiting of the natural products of 
food, such as cheese, butter, and all artificial and counterfeit 
foods and drinks. He continued: "The last reason that I 
care to give supporting the adopted construction is that the 
legislature itself has classified offenses of the kind charged 
against Marvin as different from offenses against adulteration 
and deception in the sale of foods and drugs. In the act creat- 
ing the Dairy and Food Department we find this explicit lan- 
guage : ' The commissioner is charged with the enforcement 
of all law against fraud and adulteration or impurities in foods 
or drugs, and unlawful labeling in Ohio '. Could there be a 
more satisfactory and distinct recognition of two classes of 
offenses ? If this is not a deliberate legislative recognition of 
a distinction between unlawful labeling and adulteration and 
deception in the sale of foods and drugs I am wholly incapa- 
ble of understanding the English language. ' ' 

" Whenever a statute admits of two constructions we are 
bound to presume that the legislature intended to do that 
which is clearly manifest and just. The presumption against 
absurdity in the provisions of a legislative enactment is prob- 
ably a more powerful guide in construction than the presump- 
tion against inconvenience and injustice. The legislature can- 
not be supposed to contend its own stultification. When, 
therefore, to follow the words of an act leads to an absurdity 
in its consequences that constitutes sufficient authority to de- 
part from them." 

Examination of Drugs. 

In reply to a question submitted to the Treasury Depart- 
ment, whether there is any regulation of the United States cus- 
toms which requires that drugs entering an American port from 
a foreign country in original packages shall be held at such port 
of entry pending examination by a special agent as to their 
purity, the Assistant Secretary quotes Section 2933, Revised 
Statutes as follows : All drugs, medicines, medicinal prepara- 
tions, including medicinal essential oils and chemical prepara- 
tions used wholly or in part as medicine, imported from abroad, 
shall, before passing the custom-house, be examined and ap- 
praised as well in reference to their quality and fitness for med- 
ical purposes as to their value and identity specified in the in- 
voice. The examination is conducted by the examiner of 
drugs at the port of original entry and not by special agents. 
— Era. 



THE CALIFORNIA DRUGGIST. 



BOARD OF PHARMACY OF THE CITY OF NEW YORK. 



9. 
10 



12. 
13. 



14 
15. 



12. 



13. 



Questions Asked at the February 21 fleeting. 



MATERIA MEDICA. 

Give the official names of 2 Chlorides, 2 Iodides, and 2 Oxides of 

Mercury, 
Give the botanical name of Buckthorn Bark: 

(b) Name the official preparations. 
Is Oleum Copabia a volatile or a fixed oil ? 

From what is Oleum Copabia obtained? 
What is Cetaceum ? 

(b) From what is Cetaceum obtained? 
Give the definition of gum-resin. 

(b) What is an Oleoresin? 
Give the botanical name of Hemlock. 

(b) Name the official preparations and their doses. 
Name five Antipyretics. 
What is Asafetida ? 

(b) Give the source from which Asafetida is obtained. 

(c) Name the official preparations and their doses. 
Name two official drugs Natural Order Urticaceae. 

Give the botanical name and habitat with official title of each of 
the following drugs : 
(b) Bitter Orange Peel, (c) Chestnut Leaves, 

(d) Boneset, (e) Calabar Bean. 
What is the source from which Salicin is obtained? 

Give the composition of Compound Jalap Powder. 
What is Arsenic ? 

(b) Give its source and some tests for it. 

(c) Name the official preparations and their doses. 
What is Phytolacca Radix? 

(b) Give the official preparations and their doses. 
Give the common names of the following : 

(a) Eupatorium, (b) Convallaria, (c) Calendula, 

(d) Apocynum, (ej Geranium. 



14. 



15. 



Toxicology and Posology. 

Define— (a) a Narcotic Poison, (b) a Corrosive Poison. 

Define an Antidote (b) State two different ways in which antidotes 

may act. 
What is the largest dose of Carbolic Acid that may ordinarily be 

safely taken ? 

(b) What is the best antidote for Carbolic Acid? 

(c) Why is it an antidote for Carbolic Acid ? 

By what symptoms are the effects of an overdose of Belladonna or 
its alkaloids recognized? (b) What is the proper emergency 
treatment for Belladonna poisoning? 

What emergency treatment should be employed for poisoning by 
arsenical preparations ? 

What is the dose of Tully's Powder ? (b) What is the chief poison- 
ous ingredient of Tully's Powder ? (c) What is the largest dose 
that may ordinarily be given with safety ? 

What is the poisonous constituent of — (a^ Cherry Laurel Water? 

(b) Tartar Emetic ? 

What proportion of the adult dose of medicine should ordinarily be 
given for the following ages — (a) 1 yr.? (b) 2 yrs.? (c) 4 yrs.? 

(d) 6 yrs? (e) 12 yrs.? 

What does the law require of a pharmacist when selling a poison 
enumerated in— (a) "Schedule A" ? (b) "Schedule B " ? 

What is the dose of — (a) Camphor? (b) Sulfonal ? (c) Creosote ? 
(d) Guaiacol Carbonate? (e) Apomorphine Muriat ? 

What is the dose of — (a) Caffeine Citrate? (b) Tr. Belladonnna? 

(c) Atropine Sulphate ? (d) Mercuric Chloride ? (e) Chloral 
Hydrate ? 

What is a dose of — (a) Santonin? (b) Salicin? (c) Pancreatin? 

(d) Agaricin ? (e) Resorcin? 

Should the following prescription be dispensed ? 



9. 



10. 



R Strych. Sulph. 
Potass. Brom. 
Syrupi 
Aquae, q. s. ad 



gr- 



ss 

5v. 

5i 

oiv 



M. Sig. A teaspoonful three times a day. 

(b) Upon what ground does the pharmacist base his action? 
Should the following prescription be dispensed? 

R Liq. Morph. Sulph. .")i 

(Magendie.) 

Elix. Smp. 5xi 

M. Sig. A teaspoonful every hour until pain is relieved. 

fb) How much Sulphate of Morphine would be taken in four 

hours ? 

What is a dose of — (a) Podophyllin ? (b) Oleoresin of Aspidium ? 

(c) Potassium and Sodium Tartrate ? (d) Infusion of Digitalis ? 
(e) Wine of Antimony ? 



Pharmacy. 

How does "Colation" differ from " Filtration" ? 

What class of official preparations represent the active principle of 
a drug "volume for weight" ? 

Name three official preparations containing Ammonia Gas, and giv 
the % present in each case. 

Give official title for "Carron Oil" and how it is prepared. 

What would you dispense if " Liquor Ferri Persulphatis" \ 
called for? 

What is the object of adding Hydrochloric Acid in making Luna 
Caustic? 

Name the active constituents of "Acidum Carbolicum Crudum." 

What poisonous compound is present in true Oil of Bitter Almonds? 

Name three tests which serve to distinguish Phenol from Creosote. 

Give a brief outline for preparing official Syrup of Ferrous Iodide. 

You have a call for an Arsenic antidote. What official preparation 
would you dispense? 

Chloroform. Official title. From what source obtained. Decom- 
position products when exposed to sunlight, and its prepara- 
tions ? 

Give the % strength of the following, viz. : 

(a) Alcohol, (b) Chlorine water, (c) Dilute Acetic Acid, 

(d) Dilute Hydrocyanic Acid, (e) Tincture of Opium. 

Name at least three incompatibles of "Antipyrinum." 

Criticise the following prescription : 

R Calomelanos Gr. II 

Sacch. Lact. Gr. V 

Antipyrin Gr. HI 

Misce. Fiant Pulv. Dent. Tal. Dos. No. XII. 
S. One at night. 



e 




Chemistry. 

Show by an equation what reaction occurs in making "Lime Water" 

U.S. P. 
Give the name of the following : 

(a) H2O2 (b) HN0 2 (c) KNAOH4O0 (d) H>P0 4 (e) ( 
When carbonate of magnesia is calcined, what gas is given off and 

what compound is left ? 
Complete the following reactions : 

(a) HGO + 2HNO1 (b) K + H,o (c) AGNO3 + NACL 

(d) BACLi+HiSOi (e) PB(N0 3 )2 + 2KI 

Carbon. Give symbol. Atomic weight. Valence. Occurrence 

and properties. 
Write the chemical formula of the 2 oxides of carbon. 
Show by equation what occurs when an acid is added to KHCO'. 
Give two tests of identity for — (a) Ferrous salts. (b) Ferric salts. 
What happens in a mixture containing Iodide of Potassium and a 

decomposed sample of Spirits of Nitrous Ether ? 
Write the chemical formula for : 

(a) SODA, (b) BORAX, (c) GLAUBER SALTS, (d) BLUE 

VITRIOL, (e) WOOD ALCOHOL. 
Show by an equation how Hydriodic Acid can be prepared, and in 

what official preparation it is found. 
Give a test of identity for iodine. 

State what happens when Alum is added to impure drinking water. 
What acid of Phosphorus is formed when 3H2O are added to P2O5? 
Lead : Give symbol. Valence. Occurrence and formula of the 

official oxide. 



THE CALIFORNIA DRUGGIST. 



Jamaica Ginger. 

One of the most remarkable papers which, we have seen for 
a long time (C. & D.) is printed in the current issue of the 
American Journal of Pharmacy. It is entitled " In the Land 
of Ginger," and is written by Mr. F. B. Kilmer, who has re- 
sided in Jamaica for several years. It contains the most 
graphic account of ginger planting and harvesting which has 
been printed for many years, and from it we draw the follow- 
ing particulars : Between 25,000 and 50,000 of the Jamaica 
population depend for their living upon the ginger crop. The 
ginger is of two kinds — ' ' blue ' ' and ' ' yellow ' ' — but the plants 
are botanically indistinguishable; the " yellow " is the better 
root, being brittle, and more pungent than the "blue," which 
is tough and fibrous. These, again, are subdivided into 
"plant" and "ratoon" ginger — the former is ginger planted 
each season, and the latter is a return crop, secured by leaving 
a part of the rhizome in the ground at the harvest time. 
Ginger is planted in March and April. Pieces of the rhizome, 
each with an "eye," are planted. Few planters have settled 
farms ; they clear a piece of the forest, burn the weeds, and 
plow the soil a little, then do the planting. When once in the 
ground the plant appears to require little attention, except that 
it must be well watered, and as there is an abundant rainfall in 
Jamaica no labor in this direction is required. Attempts are 
rarely made to fertilize the plant, manure being scarce in 
Jamaica, as there are no stables. The most that is done is to 
plow in the weeds and cover the ground with banana waste. 
As an experiment, watering the beds with sea-water and sea. 
weeds has yielded good results ; but the average planter is 
quite indifferent to scientific cultivation, and this is bad for 
him, because the soil is impoverished by a few ginger crops, 
and " dried-up streams, general barrenness — in fact, a wilder- 
ness — marks the progress of ginger-culture." 

After washing, the rhizomes are dried in the sun, and from 
six to eight days they become thoroughly dry. At sunrise 
the ginger is put out upon a barbecue (platform of stone or 
concrete), turned over at mid-day, and taken in at sunset. The 
average loss of weight by drying is nearly 70 per cent. Ex- 
periments have been made with calcium chloride as a drying- 
agent, but the result was not equal to the native method, and 
the same may also be said of American fruit-evaporators, in 
which wood is used as the source of heat. It has been asserted 
that it is a common practice to bleach ginger with the fumes 
of chlorine or sulphurous acid, but Mr. Kilmer states that no 
instance of it is known in Jamaica, as the planters are unintelli- 
gent, and are opposed through prejudice to innovations. Mr. 
Kilmer tried chlorine gas as a bleaching-agent, but the product 
was of a dirty yellow color. When the crop is fully dried it is 
carried, mostly by women, to the place of sale, which may be 
from five to forty miles distant. Here it is sold by the "heap," 
not by measure or weight. A "heap" of ginger varies con- 
siderably, according to the law of supply and demand. If the 
"hands" are finely shaped and large, there are fewer 
in the heap ; if small, dark, and snarly, the pile is made 
larger. Should the price of ginger in London or New York 
advance, it is because the heaps in Jamaica have been dimin- 
ished, and should the price go down the heaps have become 
larger. The exporters of ginger assort the produce into four 
or five grades, the highest being the large-sized hands of light 
and uniform color, the lowest being the ratoon finger sorts, 



which are small, soft, and lacking flavor. Some of the hands 
weigh as much as 8 oz. 

The deep-black soil of the virgin forest is where the best 
quality is produced, and to grow ginger under this condition 
involves the destruction of large areas of woodlands by fire. 
This burning is considered of great importance, as potash and 
other minerals contained in the ashes are deposited to sweeten 
the ground, while the fire also destroys insect pests. In con- 
sequence of the many thousands of acres of land destroyed and 
abandoned in this manner in Jamaica, the local Agricultural So- 
ciety has been at work since 1895 on worn-out land, and with 
the aid of suitable artificial manures have had very encouraging 
results in reclaiming the land. The society is extending their op- 
erations by securing larger plots and giving aid to planters by 
furnishing manures, etc. The "ginger season," or harvest is 
from March to January. When the stalk withers and the 
bloom has departed, the rhizomes are twisted out of the ground 
with a fork, an operation which takes long practice to become 
expert in. After the soil and fibrous roots have been removed, 
the root-stalk is thrown into water, when it is ready for the 
peeling operation. "Peeling-matches," in which the planter 
gets all his friends to join, are a time of much merry-making in 
the sable community. The peeling is mostly done by experts 
with the aid of a simple knife. So far peeling-machinery has 
been a complete failure. The operation is an all-important 
one, as may be seen from examination of a transverse section 
of ginger. First there is an outer striated skin, under 
which are numerous layers of thin-walled cork cells. The oil 
Contained in these cells in fresh specimens is very pungent, ex- 
ceedingly aromatic, and almost colorless. As this corky layer 
c ontains the greatest amount of oil and resin cells, the deeper 
the peeling is made so much more of these substances are carried 
away with the epidermis. When peeled, the roots are thrown 
into water and washed ; the purer the water the whiter is the 
product. Sometimes lime-juice is used in the wash-water, 
which gives a whiter root, but as the lime-juice contains sacchar- 
ine matter and pectose, it prevents drying, and mildew follows. 

The amount of ginger exported from the island during the 
last ten years was as follows : 



lbs. 

887 1,121,827 

888 1,141,877 

889 1,002,653 

890 [yi year) 554,193 

891 1,219,197 



lbs. 

1892 1,822,531 

1893 1,526,884 

1894 1,672,384 

1895 1,736,460 

1896 1,960,609 



Half of this goes to the United States. An average crop 
may be estimated at from 1000 to 1500 pounds dried ginger 
per acre, and in some cases 2000 pounds. As already men- 
tioned, the Jamaica Agricultural Society is improving the 
methods of cultivation by fertilization, and from information 
recently to hand it is predicted that the crop now about to be 
gathered will probably be a record one, partly due to an 
abundant rainfall. This will mean lower prices for the ginger- 
planter. 

The ancient firm of Herrings & Co., manufacturing chemists, 
etc., of London, England, which was established in the eight- 
eenth century, has passed out of existence. Their successors 
are Messrs. Willows, Francis, Butler & Ayscough Thompson. 
— a firm name quite in contrast with the severe simplicity of 
the old title. 



THE CALIFORNIA DRUGGIST. 




GET YOUR 



Acid Phosphates 

Citric Acid 



pring and 
ummer 



SODA WATER 

SUPPLIES 



Both Together 




Fruit Juices 

Fountain Chocolates 

Flavorings, Wild Cherry Phosphate 
Mineral Waters and Salts 



FLY TIME AT HAND 



Julep Straws, etc., etc. 



■ MM 



I 



qpm 



Look out for Insect Powder, Moth Balls 

Poison Fly Paper, Camphor, Tanglefoot, Tarine 



Disinfectants for Hot Weather 



Carbolic Acid 



Chloride Lime 



Carbolic Powder 



Copperas 



HEADQUARTERS AT 




F. W. BRAUN & COS 



LOS ANGELES AND SAN DIEGO, CAL. 



THE CALIFORNIA DRUGGIST. 



Business Personals 



John Devine, of Santa Monica, made a business trip to our 
city last week. 

Mr. Clarence Condon, late with J. V. Akey, has accepted 
a position with Sale & Son Drug Company. 



F. N. Van Horn, the East Fiist-street druggist, is complet- 
ing a fine residence, which will very soon be ready for his oc- 
cupancy. 

Mr. Gale, of the well known firm of Gale & Blocki, Chicago, 
accompanied by Mrs. Gale, is spending some time in Los 
Angeles this season. 

Chenoweth & Mix, Nogales, Arizona, have dissolved part- 
nership, Dr. Chenoweth's interest having been purchased by 
Mr. Mix. The new firm is Jas. B. Mix & Co. 



E. C. Thomas, manager for R. W. Bostwick, Sixteenth and 
Grand, has been spending a week at Catalina, Walter Sanborn 
taking his place in the store in the meantime. 



Edwin Virden, of Santa Paula, spent two or three days in 
Los Angeles the last week in March, and gave our new quar- 
ters a looking oyer. Mr. Virden reports business fair, con- 
sidering the dry season. 



S. F. De Voin, Azusa, was in the city on the nth inst. 
making selections of goods. Mr. De Voin served his country 
during the War of the Rebellion, and is prepared to offer his 
services again if war is declared with Spain. 



Dr. Langdon, head of F. W. Braun & Co.'s sales depart- 
ment, took a week's outing early this month. The string of 
trout shown on our cover, this issue, is the kind the doctor 
takes in on such occasions. 



Feather dusters are in good demand. It is cheaper to pro- 
vide dusters than to sprinkle the road this year. Although 
feathers have advanced, and dusters higher, yet prices are still 
lower than they were a few seasons ago. F. W. Braun & Co. 
nave a full line and at fair prices. 



J. C. Hardman, of Riverside, favored us with a call on the 
14th inst. Mr. Hardman makes his visits too infrequent, 
being -a good deal of a home body. He reports business good, 
though the prices received by the orange growers this season 
are quite unsatisfactory. 



Wm. F. Lutz has purchased the business of J. A. Lyon, 
Bakersfield. Mr. Lutz, who for the past year has assisted the 
former proprietor, is a competent and reliable pharmacist and a 
man of excellent business qualities. We therefore look for a 
successful future for him, which we cordially wish. Mr. Lyon 
expects to return to his Chicago home. 



Dried Milk 

Is one of the most recent results of food industry. It is a 
yellowish powder, presenting the appearance of coarse 
rye flour. According to the manufacturers, it gives a product 
resembling fresh milk when mixed with water in proper pro- 
portions. Chemical analysis shows that the water is reduced 
from about 88 to about 3 per cent in this powder. Its compo- 
sition is as follows : 

Total solid matter 95 per cent 

Albumin 25 " 

Fat 24 to 25 " 

Ash 5.7 " 

Milk sugar 40 " 

It represents 10 times its weight of fresh milk, and may be 
used advantageously in coffee, cocoa, etc. — Stidd. Ap. Ztg. 



Mr. H. Wickizer, our associate, and the head of city sales 
department in the office of F. W. Braun & Co., retires this 
month from his late position to take the presidency and man- 
agement of the Los Angeles Reduction Company. In his re- 
tirement the house loses one of its oldest and most valued 
workers, a gentlemanly and popular salesman, as well as a 
thoroughly informed druggist and chemist. On the day of 
Mr. Wickizer's retirement, his fellow employes, as an expres- 
sion of their esteem and a memento of the pleasant relations so 
long existing between them, presented him with a fine set of 
Shakespeare's comedies, illustrated by Abbey, uniting also in 
wishing him all success in his future business operations. Mr. 
Wickizer was touched in a tender spot by these evidences of 
good will, and made an appreciative response as he bade the 
" boys " good-by. 



The following is G. R. Sims', the English playwright and 
writer, comment on the so-called "discovery" of Dr. 
Schenck on the determination of sex : " What has become of 
the Evolution of Sex boom which a week or two back was the 
glory of the morning and evening press? Has it died the 
death, or will it be resurrected again in the silly season ? If 
any have given it serious consideration, they may be interested 
to know that this ' wonderful discovery ' has been discussed for 
some years past in the doggy papers, and that the late Sir 
Everett Millais wrote many articles on the question in connec- 
tion with dog breeding, and the original experiments were not, 
as the newspapers led us to believe, tried on duchesses and 
countesses, but on lady mastiffs, boarhounds and bulldogs. I 
have a very strong idea that some wag who read the accounts 
of the experiments long ago in the Stock-keeper and Our 
Dogs, and other canine periodicals, treasured up the idea, and 
palmed it off upon the press as the latest great scientific discov- 
ery from abroad." 

Fly-time is delayed this spring by uncommonly cool 
weather, but the insects will soon be lively. Put in your 
supplies of "Tanglefoot" and "Shoo- Fly" paper, and "T. B." 
Insect Powder. F. W. Braun & Co. sell them. 



A recently discovered copper and cobalt mine in Wy- 
oming is said to contain 4 per cent of the latter mineral, 
worth $128 to the ton, while the copper assays 70 per cent. 
A valuable find. 

The vitality of the bacillus of tuberculosis is remarkable, 
boiling a handkerchief in water for three hours not being suf- 
ficient to destroy the life. — From. C. and D. 



IO 



THE CALIFORNIA DRUGGIST. 



OUR ADVERTISERS. 



It will be of interest and value to the trade to consult our 
advertising columns, in which will be found represented the 
following firms and goods : 



A.. Gettleman Brewing Co. 

Allcock's Plasters. 

Ammonol Chemical Co. 

Antikamnia Chemical Co. 

Apollinaris Co., Limited. 

Arlington Chemical Co. 

Armstrong ManufacturingCo. 

Batchelor Hair Dye Co. 

Beeman Chemical Co. 

Blake, C. E. & Co. 

Bravin, F. W. & Co.'s Laboratory 

Products. 
California Fig Syrup Co. 
Centaur Company. 
Cal. Mission Eucalyptus Lozenges. 
Davol Rubber Co. 
Demeut, W. E. 
Empire Mfg. Co. 
Etna Chemical Co. 
Fox, Fultz & Co. 
Gedney, L. H. 
Goodrich, B. F. & Co. 
Coronado Corks. 
Hayden Manufacturing Co. 
Hunyadi Salts Co. 
Jayne, Dr. D. & Son. 
Johnson, I. S. & Co. 
Kennedy, S. H. 



Kline, R. H., M. D. 

Kondon Manufacturing Co. 

Kuhns, Arthur Company. 

Leiner, M. 

Levy, B. & Co. 

Ludwick, G. M. 

Major Cement Co. 

Mariani & Co. 

Moore, H. H. & Sons. 

Muun & Co. 

Norman Lichty Manufacturing Co. 

N. Y. Pharmacal Association. 

Omega Chemical Co. 

Planten, H. & Son. 

Pond's Extract Co. 

Portuondo Vicente. 

Principe de Gales Cigars. 

Sharp & Dohme. 

Sterling Remedy Co. 

Taite, Jos. G. & Sons. 

T. B. Insect Powder. 

Tetlow, Henry. 

Thum, O. W. Co. 

Wells, A.J. Manufacturing Co. 

Whittemore Bros. & Co. 

Wilbur Safety Packet Co. 

Wright, Chas. & Co. 

Wyeth, John & Bro. 



New Goods Received by F. W. Braun & Co. 

Quinimel ( 5 Pt. Ea, $2.45) doz $ 6.75 

Elix. Strontium Bromide Co., S. & H., doz 10.13 

Syrup Codeine Comp., S. & H., doz 6.75 

Calactose, 34:1b, S. & H., doz 3.00 

Mohr's Cocoa Butter, pound 45 

Iodothyrine, ozs., J^oz., X oz -» ounce $3.40 to 3.90 

Kohlers's Antidote, 25c size, doz 1.75 

Trib., doz $2.00, $4.00, 8.00 

Ozojell, Slocum's, doz ".... 4.00 

Tritipalm (5 Pt. Ea. $6.00), doz 8.00 

Upjohn's 2-gr. Quinine Pills, 5-oz. Cans, each 2.00 

Buchard's French Capsules, doz 4.00 

Electrozone, doz 4.50 

E. I. Tea, doz 3.50 

Wampole's Soda Mint Granules, doz 75 

Resinol, $1.00 size, doz 8.00 

Carofen, Powder or Tablets, doz 1.00 

Calcium Carbide, doz 



Nebraska State Board of Pharmacy. 

The next meeting of this Board for examination of appli- 
cants for registration as Pharmacists in the State of Nebraska 
will occur as follows: Wednesday, May n, 1898, Bostwick 
Hotel, Hastings, Nebraska. 

All examinations begins promptly at 8 o'clock, a.m. A 
marking of not less than 45 required upon each paper, and 
a general average of 70 in order to pass. 

Application for examination should be filed prior to above 
date with the secretary. Apply for blank application to 

A, W. Buchheit, Secretary. 



A Missouri editor says he stepped into the store of a business 
man who did not advertise, and was surprised to find him 
busy. The storekeeper had the itch and a Waterbury watch, 
and when he was not scratching himself he was winding his 
watch . — National Printer -Journalist. 



P acific Coast Drug Agen cij 

OFFERS FOR SALE 

First-Class Drug Stores 
and Medical Practices 

in all the Pacific States and Territories 

Clerks Registered, Prooided and Employed. Partnerships 
Negotiated. Lists Sent Free. Correspondence Solicited. 

G. M. LUDWICK, 

S. E. Corner Second St. and Broadway, Room 201, Los Angeles, Cal. 

WANTS, Etc., Etc. 

[Under this headifig we ivill be pleased to publish FREE C 
CHARGE, notices of clerks wanted, positions desired, stores ft 
sale or exchange, propositions for purchasing, etc.~] 






FOR SALE — In Los Angeles, a centrally located drug store, doing 
paying business. About $6500 will buy. Reason for selling- 
owner has two stores. Address F. C. W., care F. W. Braun & Co. 



FOR SALE — In coast city of Southern California, a drug business 
established over eight years. Stock about $ 2500 ; location first-class. 
Address M. H., care CALIFORNIA DRUGGIST. 



FOR SALE — Drug store in the most prosperous mining town in Cali- 
fornia; doing a good business ; price $2000. Good reasons for sell- 
ing. A full investigation desired. This is a splendid opportunity for a 
competent man. Population 6000 and only three drug stores. Address 
" GUARANA" care CALIFORNIA DRUGGIST, Los Angeles. 

FOR SALE — Drug store in suburbs of Los Angeles, worth $2000, stock 
clean and in good condition. Store has been established 18 months; 
will sell at invoice price. Inquire of F. W. BRAUN & CO. 

FOR SALE — Drug business in Los Angeles. Established eight years. 
Valuation about $1000. Good location for a single man. 

Address J. O. WHITE, 337 Aliso Street. 



FOR SALE — A city drug store. Fine location. Good business. Low 
rent. Good reasons for selling. Address L, care F. W. BRAUN & 
CO. 



FOR SALE — City drug business at a bargain. Stock about $1200, all 
clean and no dead stuff. Good location for a doctor. Inquire of F. 
W. BRAUN & CO., Los Angeles. 



FOR SALE— Elegant clean stock in the most progressive suburb of 
Los Angeles. Only drug store within twenty blocks. Best reasons 
for selling. Value about $2000. Inquire of F. W. BRAUN & CO., 
Los Angeles. 

FOR SALE — A good, long established drug business in this city. 
Price, $2500. Address " ADVANTAGEOUS," care CALIFORNIA 
DRUGGIST. 

FOR SALE CHEAP— Six-syrup Green's Soda Fountain, Tenn. marble, 
with steel tank, gauge, and six tumbler holders; all in good order. 
Address H. FAIRBANKS & SON., Santa Ana, Cal. 



"What's veal, Benny? " "Oh, its the part of the cow we 
eat before she grows up. ' ' — Excha?ige. 



Talker : "I was but a little lad when I started in business." 
Walker : " That's been the foundation of many a business 
man's success." 
Talker: "What has?" 
Walker : "A little ad."— Exchange. 



THE CALIFORNIA DRUGGIST. 



1 1 



PRICE LIST OF DRUGS, CHEMICALS, ETC, 

These prices are for quantities as ordinarily bought by average buyers, and include containers, unless 
otherwise indicated. Subject to market changes. 

For special quantities we will make special figures. 

F. W. BRA UN & CO., Los Angeles, Cal. 



42® 
10® 



14® 
40® 
30® 
28® 
36® 
33® 
37® 
11® 
11® 
40® 



65® 7: 



35® 



8® 



45 

25 
30 
16 

10 
20 
20 
50 
32 
30 
38 
36 
42 
12 
12 
45 
50 
75 
75 
4 
40 
30 
1 00 



12® 



40 

30 

15 

3 25 

26 

60® 70 

8® 10 

54 

65® 75 

2\i® 1M 

35© 40 

25® 30 

1 25® 1 50 

38® 42- 

1 60 

market 

90® 1 00 

1 10 

13® 15 

12® 15 



ACETANIUD ft 

ACID. Acetic No. 8 ft 

Acetic U. S. P ft 

Benzoic, Eng oz 

Benzoic, German oz 

Boracic lb 

Boracic powd ft 

Carbolic, crude » gal 

Carbolic, cryst, blk label, 1-ft tin ft 

Carbolic, cryst, blk label, 5-ft tins ft 

Carbolic, cryst, gold label, 1-ft bots ft 

Carbolic, cryst, gold label, 5-ft tin ft 

Citric ft 

Gallic oz 

Hydrocyanic, dil oz 

Hydrocyanic, cone, Scheele's oz 

Hydrofluoric, 1-oz bots ea 

Hydrofluoric, 4-oz bots ea 

Muriatic, coml., 6-ftbots ea 

Muriatic, coml , carboy, $2 ft 

Muriatic, C. P., 1-ft bots ft 

Muriatic, C P., 6-lb bots ft 

Nitric, coml., 7-ib bots ea 

Nitric, coml.. carboy, $2 ft 

Nitric, C P., 1-ftbots ft 

Nitric, C P., 7-ftbots ft 

Oxalic ft 

Pyrogallic, Merck's ft 

Pyrogallic, Merck's oz 

Salicylic ft 

Salicylic oz 

Salicylic, from oil wintergreen oz 

Sulphuric, coml., 9-ft bots .. ea 

Sulphuric, coml., carboy, $2 .ft 

Sulphuric, C. P., 1-ft bots ft 

Sulphuric, C. P., 9-ft bots ft 

Tannic ft 

Tartaric ft 

ALCOHOL, absolute, 1-qt bots ea 

Grain ; 

Wood, 5 gal. lot to bbl.lot gal 

Wood, less quantity, can extra gal 

ALUM, chrome ft 

Dried (burnt alum) ft 

Lump ft 

Ground lb 

Powdered ft 

AMMONIA, cone, 26°, 5-pt bots ea 

Cone, bulk, can extra gal 

Bromide ft 

Carbonate ft 

Muriate, lump ft 

Muriate, gran, coml lb 

Muriate, gran, pure ft 

Muriate, powd ft 

Valerianate oz 

ANT1KAMNIA (10 oz, .90) oz 

ANTIPYRIN (25 oz, $1.30) oz 

ARISTOL (25 oz, $1.65) oz 

ARROWROOT, Bermuda ft 

AR8ENIO, powd, white ft 

BALSAM Copaiba ft 

Fir, Canada ft 

Peru ft 

Tolu ft 

BARK, Cinchona, red, true ft 

Cinchona, red, powd ft 

Cinchona, yellow, Calisaya ft 

Cinchona, yellow, powd ft 

Elm, slab ft 

Elm, ground ft 

Elm, powd ft 

Sassafras ft 

Soap, slab ft 

Soap, ground lb 

Soap pwd ft 

Soap, cut, 5c boxes doz 

Soap, cut, 10c bozes doz 

Wild Cherry ft, 

BAT RUM gal 

F. W. B. & Co., % pts doz 

F. W. B. & Co., pts doz 

BEANS, Tonka, Angostura ft 2 25® 2 50 

Vanilla, Mexican „ ft 13 50@14 50 

Vanilla, Tahiti ft 3 25® 3 50 

BERRIES, Cubeb ft 25® 30 

Cubeb, powd fti 30® 35 

Juniper ft, 9® 10 

BISMUTH, sub-carbonate ft 1 60® 1 70 

Sub-gallate oz 19 

Sub-nitrate ft 1 25® 1 35 



5® 6 
6® 8 

85 

75 

75 

12® 25 

15 

15 

20 

25 

27 

1 00 

1 40 

1 80 

35 

12 

75 

50 

2 50® 2 75 

75® 80 

50® 



11® 
16® 



10® 
60® 



55 
60 
55 

oo 

15 

18 

20 

15 

10 

13 

20 

35 

60 

12® 15 

2 50® 3 00 

1 75 

3 50 



35® 
12® 
14® 
15® 
12® 
7@ 
10® 
18® 



BLUE MASS. 
BLUE VITRIOL 
BORAX, refined.. 

«Powd 

BUDS, Cassia 

CALOMEL, American 



English ft 

Stock ft 

CAMPHOR ft 

CANTHARIDES, Chinese, powd "..ft 



Russian, powd ; ft 1 



75 
7 
12 
12 
38 
85 

1 10® 1 15 
55® 65 
37® 42 
65 



70® 
4%@ 
8^® 
8H® 

35® 



1 10 



CAPSICUM, African, pods ft 

African, powd ft 

CARAMEL lgal$150,can extra) ft 

CARBON, bisulphide, 1-ft bots doz 

Bisulphide, 2-ft bots doz 

Bisulphide, 1-gal cans ea 

Bisulphide, 5-gal cans ea 

CARMINE, No. 40 oz 

CHALK, French, powd ft 

White, precip ft 

White, prepared, drops ft 

CHARCOAL, animal, gran ft 

Animal, powd ft 

Willow, powd , bulk 

Willow, powd., 1-ft cartons 

Willow, powd., !^-ft cartons ft 

Willow, powd., Yi -ft cartons ft 

CHLORAL HYDRATE, 1 fts ft 

y 2 fts » 

Vi fts ....ft 

CHLOKOFORM, 1-ft tins ft 

7-fttins ft 

Squibbs', 500-gm ea 

Squibbs', 250-gm ea 

Squibbs', 100-gin ea 

CLOVES ft 

Powd ft 

COBALT, powd ft 

COCAINE, hydrochlorate oz 

Hydrochlorate, J4 oz oz 

Hydrochlorate, ]/s oz ea 

COCOA BUTTER ft 

CODEINE, alk., y a oz oz 

Sulphate, % oz oz 

COLOCYNTH APPLE ft 

Powd ft 

COMPOSITION POWDER, %-ftpkgsft 

COPPERAS, bbls, V/g, ft 

CORROSIVE SUBLIMATE ft 

Powd ft 

CREAM TARTAR, pure ft 

CREOLIN, 1-ft and 5-ft bots ft 

CREOSOTE, beech-wood ft 

Coml ft 

CURCUMA, powd ft 

CUTTLE BONE ft 

DEXTRINK ft 

DOVER'S POWDER ft 

EIKONOGEN oz 

EMERY, flour ft 

ERGOT, powd ft 

ESSENCE PEPPERMINT, 2-oz bot.doz 

ETHER, Nitrous, cone, 1-ftbots ft 

Nitrous, cone, H-ft bots ft 

Nitrous, cone, %>ft bots ft 

SulphuTic, U. S.p.. 1880 ft 

Sulphuric, cone, 1890 ft 

Sulphuric, Squibbs', 500-gm ea 

Sulphuric, Squibbs', 250-gm ea 

Sulphuric, Squibbs', 100-gm ea 

ElICALYPTOL, Merck's oz 

EXTRACT. Cascara, fluid, F. W. B. &Co..ft 
Cascara, fluid, F. W. B. & Co., 5-ft bots...ft 
Cascara, fl.,arom., F.W.B.&Co., l-ftbot..ft 
Cascara, fl., arom., F.W.B. & Co , 5-ft bot..ft 

Logwood, 15 and 25-ft boxes ft 

Logwood, 1-ft, H-ft and %-ft boxes ft 

Witch Hazel, distilled gal 

Less than 5 gals, container extra. 
EXTRACTS, FLAVORING, 

Lemon, F.W.B. & Co., 2-oz doz 

Vanilla. F. W. B. & Co , 2-oz doz 

FLOWERS. Arnica ft 

Chamomile, Eng ft 

Chamomile, Ger ft 

Lavender ft 

Rosemary ft 

FOIL. Tin, Heavy ft 

Tin, Medium ; ..ft 

Tin, Light ft 

FORWALDEHYD ft 

FRUIT JUICES, F. W. B. & Co., qts., doz 
FRUITS, Crushed, F.W.B.&Co., ^gals ,doz 

FULLERS EARTH ft 

GELATINE,, Cox's, sml doz 

French, gold label ft 

French, silver label : ft 

French, bronze label ft 

GLUE, Carpenter's ft 

White ft 

GLYCERINE, 50-ft cans ft 

10-ftcans ft 

2-oz bots doz 

Schering's 1-ft bots ft 

Schering's 10-ft bots ft 

GLYCOLINE (gal., $1.50, can extra) ft 

GUM, Aloes, Barb ft 

Aloes, Barb., powd ft 

Aloes, Cape ft 

Aloes, Cape, powd ft 

Aloes, Socotrine, true ft 

Aloes Socotrine, powd ft 



22® 



ft 12® 



25 

25 

25 

2 00 

4 00 

1 25 

4 00 

35 

8 

12 

10 

12 

10 

15 

18 

20 

25 

1 20® 1 25 

1 35® 1 40 

1 55® 1 60 

60® 65 

57® 60 

1 25 



31 
20 
25 
30 
3 50 

3 60 
60 
55 

5 20 

4 75 
90 



55® 



2® 
80® 



45® 
12® 



8® 
50® 



35 

3 

85 

95 

32 

55 

1 10 

50 

15 

35 

12 

1 25 

37 

10 

55 

1 50 

1 20® 1 25 

1 35® 1 40 

1 55® 1 60 

75® 80 

80® 85 

1 25 

66 

30 

24 

70 

50 

80 

75 

12® 13 

15® 20 

65® 90 



1 50 

1 75 

20 

30 

30 

15 

10 

25 

30 

35 

60 

5 00 

10 80 

6® 10 

1 50 

60® 65 

40® 45 

35® 40 

9® 12 

15® 18 

14® 1.4)4 

18 

1 25® 1 50 

45 

40 

35 

25® 30 

35 

25 

25 

50 

55 



28® 
28® 
12® 

20® 



55® 



20® 



Ammoniac ft 

Arabic, No. 1 ".'ft 

Arabic, No. 2 ft 

Arabic, powd., No. 1 ft 

Arabic, powd., French ft 

Arabic, sorts ft 

Asafetida ft 

Asafetida, powd ft 

Benzoin ft 

Benzoin, powd ft 

Catechu ft 

Catechu, powd ft 

Guaiac , ft 

Guaiac, powd ft 

Myrrh ft 

Myrrh, powd ft 

Olibanum ft 

Opium ft 

Opium, powd ft 

Shellac, orange ft 

Shellac, orange, ground ft 

Shellac, white ft 

Shellac, white, powd ft 

Spruce, tears ft 

Tragacanth, flake ft 

Tragacanth, sorts ft 

Tragacanth, powd ft 

HOFFMAN'S ANODYNE ......ft 

HOPS, pressed, y 2 and J^-lbs ft 

Pressed, oz ft 

HYDROGEN PEROXIDE, Mar- 

chand's, lbs doz 

Marchand's, H-lbs doz 

Marchand's, 5^-lbs doz 

Marchand's. y^-Vos doz 

M. C. W., or P. & W., 1 lbs doz 

M. C. W., or P. & W., %-lbs ..doz 

M. C. W., or P. & W., %-lbs doz 

Oakland, 1 lb doz 

Oakland, J^-lbs doz 

Oakland, 5^-lbs doz 

U. S. P., 1 lb ft 

U. S. P. , 1 lb full doz 

HYDROZONE, 1-lb bots dcz 

J4-lb bots doz 

J£-lb bots doz 

54-lb bots doz 

IliHTHYOL oz 

Ichthyol ft 

INDIGO ft 

INSECT POWDER, Buhach, 6-lb cans.ft 

Dalmatian, bulk ft 

Hill's California, bulk ft 

"T. B." 6-lb cans ft 

"T. B." 1-lb cans doz 

"T. B," %-1b cans doz 

1 T. B." small doz 

IODINE, re-subl oz 

Re-subl ft 

IODOFORM oz 

Iodoform ft 

IRON, carbonate precip ft 

Chloride, solution ft 

Icdide oz 

Sub-sulphate (Monseli oz 

Sub-sulphate (Monsel) ft 

Sub-sulphate solution ft 

Sulphate, dried ft 

Sulphate, pure cryst., bulk ft 

Sulphate, pure cryst., 1-lb bots ft 

JUICE, Grape, Los Gatos, pts doz 

Grape, Welch's, )4 pts doz 

Grape, Welch's, pints doz 

Grape, Welch's, quarts doz 

LANOLIN, Leibreich's ft 

LEAD, acetate, coml ft 

Acetate, powd ft 

Acetate, C. P ft 

Sub-acet. solu., Goulard's ft 

LEAVES, Bay ft 

Buchu, long ft 

Buchu, short ft 

Rosemary, bulk ft 

Sag e > K s and Jj(s ft 

Sage, ozs ft 

Senna, Alex ft 

Senna, Alex., powd ft 

Senna, Tinnevelli ft 

Senna, Tinnevelli, powd ft 

Uva Ursi ft 

LEECHES, (25 or more, 8c.) ea 

LIME. Chloride, 35-ft cans _ ft 

Chloride, Acme, 1-lb cans doz 

Chloride, Acme, J^-lb cans doz 

Chloride, Acme, %-lb cans doz 

Chloride, Electron, 1-lb cans doz 

Chloride, Phoenix, 1-lb cartons doz 

LITHARGE ft 

LONDON PURPLE ft 



40® 45 
70® 75 
50® 55 
70® 75 
90® 1 00 
40® 45 
32® 35 
45® 50 
50® 55 
60® 70 
9@ 12 
32® 35 
38® 40 
45® 50 
35® 38 
38® 40 
25® 30 

3 15® 3 25 

4 00® 4 20 
32® 35 
35® 38 
35® 40 
40® 45 

1 25® 1 35 

90® 95 

45® 50 

1 00® 1 10 

65 

16® 20 

25 

7 50 

5 50 

3 75 

2 25 

4 80 

3 00 

1 80 

6 00 
3 75 

2 50 
35 

3 25 
10 50 

7 25 

4 75 
2 25 

50 
6 50 
70® 75 



50® 


60 


28® 


40 


35® 


45 




40 




5 50 




8 25 




1 25 




36 


3 60® 


3 80 




40 


4 15® 4 40 


16® 


18 


25® 


35 




35 




8 


34® 


40 


25® 


80 


15® 


20 


8® 


10 


14® 


18 




4 00 




1 75 




3 00 




5 50 




1 00 


16® 


20 


20® 


25 


27® 


30 


30® 


35 


14® 


lb , 


30® 


# 


22® 


2 n 


18® 


2 n 


18® 


2" 

?5 


30® 


30 




3^ 


18® 


20 


20® 


25 


12® 


15 




10 




1 25 




80 




45 




1 20 




1 10 


7^@ 


10 


15® 


20 



12 



THE CALIFORNIA DRUGGIST. 



LOZENGES, Licorice, 5-lb boxes ft 24 

Licorice, "Acme," 5-lb boxes ft 35 

Peppermint, 5-lb boxes ft 14 

LTtOPODIUM ft 50@ 55 

IiTE. concentrated tease, $3 50) doz 90 

LYSOL, 1-lb bots ft 65 

MAGNESIA, Calcined, 1-lb tin ft 65 

Carbonate, Jenning's, 2 and 4-oz ft 35 

Carbonate, K. & M., 4-oz., 2 oz. and loz.. ft IS® 25 

Carbonate, K. & M., powdered ft 35 

Carbonate, K. & M., S. S ft 60 

Eff. citrate, Herring's doz 2 00 

MANGANESE, black oxide ft 6@ 8 

MANNA, large flake ft 90® 1 00 

Small flake ft 60® 65 

MENTHOL, (oz. 30c.) ft 2 85® 3 10 

MERCURY ft 68® 75 

Bi-sulphate ft 65® 70 

Iodide, green , oz 25 

Iodide, red oz 26 

MORPHINE, sulph., y t oz oz 2 30® 2 60 

Sulph., '/s oz., 2 l /i oz. bxs oz 2 25® 2 55 

Sulph., loz tins oz 2 05® 2 35 

Sulph., 5-oz tins oz 2 00@ 2 30 

MOSS, Iceland ft 15 

Irish ft 20 

MU8K, Canton, 1-oz bxs oz 35 

Tonquin, % oz bots ea 4 50 

MUSXARO Colburn's,6 lb cans ft 28 

Ground California ft 14® 15 

NAPHTHALINE, balls, cakes or flakes..ft 4® 8 

NUTMEGS ft 60® 65 

Ground ft 65® 70 

NUTS, Areca ft 30® 35 

Areca.powd ft 35® 40 

Kola ft 25® 35 

NUX VOMICA ft 15® 20 

Powdered ft 20® 25 

OIL, Almond, bitter oz 65 

Almond, sweet ft 25® 45 

Amber, rect ft 50® 55 

Anise ft 2 40® 2 60 

Bay .oz 45® 50 

Benne (can extra) gal 1 15® 1 25 

Bergamot, Sanderson ft 3 40® 3 60 

Bergamot, Sicilian ft 3 00® 3 20 

Cassia : ft 2 25® 2 50 

Castor "A A" gal 1 25® 1 35 

Castor, machine gal 45® 50 

Castor, special com'l .gal 75® 80 

Less than 5 gals., can extra. 

Cedar, cotnl ft 40® 50 

Cedar, pure ft 75® 80 

China nut (can extra) gal 65® 75 

Cloves ft 80® 1 00 

Cocoanut ft 20® 30 

Cod liver, Norwegian (can extra) gal 1 10® 1 25 

Cottonseed gal 55® 70 

Less than 5 gal., can extra. 

Crotou ft 1 35® 1 50 

Cubebs ft 1 50® 1 75 

Eucalyptus ft 65® 75 

Geranium Rose oz 65® 75 

Hemlock, pure ft 75® 80 

Lard gal 75® 85 

Less than 5 gal can extra. 

Lavender flowers ft 2 25® 2 40 

Lavender, garden ft 75@ 80 

Lemon, Sanderson ft 2 00® 2 20 

Lemon, Sicilian ft 1 25® 1 50 

Mustard, Essential oz 65 

Neatsfoot (less than 5-gal. can extra) ...gal 75® 80 

Olive, California, qts doz 12 00 

Olive, Italia, 1 gal cans gal 1 85 

Olive, Malaga, can extra gal 1 00® 1 25 

Orange, bitter ft 4 50® 4 75 

Orange, sweet ft 2 25® 2 50 

Origanum ft 50® 60 

Pennyroyal ft 1 50® 1 75 

Peppermint Hotchkiss , ft 2 10® 2 25 

Peppermint, Western ft 1 40® 1 60 

Pinus Sylvestris ft 1 20® 1 40 

Rhodium oz 40® 75 

Rose oz 7 50®10 00 

Rosemary flowers ft 1 50® 1 65 

Sandalwood, Eng oz 50 

Sandalwood, Ger ft 3 00® 3 25 

Sassafras ft 75® 85 

Sewing Machine, Nye's, small doz 45 

Sewing Machine, Nye's, large doz 75 

Sperm, Nye's crystal gal 75 

Sperm, pure, w. b gal 1 25 

Less than 5 gal can extra. 

Spike ft 25® 35 

Turpentine, rect., Merck ft> 45 

Union salad gal 75® 80 

Less than 5 gal can extra. 

Wintergreen ft 1 70® 1 90 

Wormwood ft 4 00® 5 00 

OIL CAKE, ground ft 02'/® 03 

OINTMENT, Citrine It. 65 

Mercurial, \\ m ft 50® 55 

Mercurial !4 m ft 60® 65 

Zinc, benz. oxide Iti 75 

ORANGE PEEL ft 15® 18 

PAPOID, ^orl-ozbots oz 3 00 

PARAFFIN ft 10® 15 

PARIS GREEN ft 20® 25 

l's, 'A's, Vt'a ft 25® 30 

PKTROLATUM, ex. amber ft 6&@ 9 

Snow while ft 80® 35 

PHENACETIN (25 ozs. .95) oz 1 00 

PHOSPHORUS, 11-ft cans ft 75 

1-ft cans It. 86 

% and /-cans ft 95(9 1 OS 

PLASTER PARIS ft 02® 05 

Dentist's ft 04® 08 

POISON, purple ft 08® 10 



POTASH, Babbift's, (case $3.50) doz 

Caustic, crude ft 

Caustic, white, stick ft 

Bichromate ft 

Carbonate ft 

Chlorate ft 

Cyanide, mining ft 

Cyanide, pure granular ft 

Iodide ft 

Nitrate ft 

Permanganate ft 

Prussiate, red ft 

Prussiate, yellow ft 

PUMICE STONE, lump ft 

Powd ft 

QUASSIA, Chips ft 

QUININE, 1-oz bottle oz 

loz tin oz 

5-oz tin oz 

25-oz tin oz 

50-oz tin oz 

100-oz tin oz 

RED PRECIPITATE ft 

RESIN,... ft 

ROOT, Aconite ft 

Althea, cut ft 

Blood ft 

Blood, powd ft 

Calamus, peeled ft 

Gentian ft 

Gentian, powd ft 

Ginger, African _ ft 

Ginger, Jamaica ft 

Goldenseal ft 

Goldenseal, powd ft 

Ipecac, powd ft 

Licorice, select ft 

Licorice, cut ft 

Licorice, powd ft 

Orris, powd ft 

Rhubarb ft 

Rhubarb cubes 

Rhubarb fingers ft 

Rhubarb, powd ft 

Rhubarb, powd,, Allen's, Eng ft 

Sarsaparilla, Hond ft 

Sarsaparilla, Hond, gro ft 

Sarsaparilla, Mex .ft 

Sarsaparilla, Mex., gro ft 

Valerian ft 

Valerian, powd ft 

ROTTEN STONE, powd ft 

SACCHARIN, 25 gm. cartons ea 

SAFFRON, American ft 

Spanish oz 

SAL EPSOM 

Epsom 4-oz cartons doz 

Glauber ft 

Nitre, cryst ft 

Nitre, powd ft 

Rochelle ft 

Soda ft 

SALOL, (oz30) ft 

SEED, Anise, Ital ft 

Anise, powd ft 

Bird, mixed, 1-lbs., 60-lb case case 

Bird, mixed, 1 ft doz 

Canary ft 

Caraway ft 

Cardamom „ ft 

Celery ft 

Coriander ft 

Flax, cleaned ft 

Flax, ground ....ft 

Hemp ft 

Millet .'. ft 

Mustard ft 

Poppy, blue ft 

Rape ft 

Sabadilla, powd ft 

Worm, American ft 

Worm, Levant ft 

SEIDLITZ MIXTURE ft 

Powders, single, 100s box 

Powders, 3's doz 

Powders, 6's doz 

Powders, 10s doz 

SHEEP DIP, Carbolic gal 

Little's 1 gal cans gal 

Little's 5 gal cans gal 

SNUFF, Garrett's Scotch, blads ft 

Garrett's Scotch, loz tins doz 

Garrett's Scotch, 2-oz tins doz 

Garrett's Scotch, 4-oz tins doz 

Garrett's Scotch, 6 oz bots doz 

Lorillard's Maccaboy, 4-oz bots doz 

Lorillard's Rappee. 4-oz bots doz 

SOAP, Castile, Conti white ft 

Marseilles, white ft 

Mottled coml |t> 

Mottled, pure ft 

Turkish, green or white ft 

Powdered ft 

German green, Stiefel's ft 

Whale Oil .ft 

SODA ASH ft 

Caustic, 98 per cent ft 

Caustic, 70 per cent (Drums) ft 

Caustic, white, sticks ft 

Bicarbonate ft 

Bromide ft 

Hyposulphite th 

Hyposulphite, new process ft 

SOLUTION, Donavan's ft 

Fowler's ft 

Goulard's ft 

SPERMACETI ft 

SPIRITS, Brooklyn and Columbian gal. 

Less than 5 gals, can extra. 

Nitre, U. S. P ft 

Nitre, 2-oz bots doz 



l l A@ 
45® 
15® 
15® 
14® 
30® 



90 
13 

70 
20 
25 
17 
35 
65 

2 55® 2 65 
08® 12 
40® 60 
60® 65 
32® 35 
09® 10 
06® 08 
10 
29® 30 
27® 28 
24® 25 
23® 23 
21® 22)4 
20® 22 
1 
01% to 



35® 
25® 
30® 

13® 
14® 
20® 
25® 
65® 
70® 
50® 



14® 
35® 



ft 1 25® 1 50 



40® 
25® 
25® 
30® 
35® 
07® 



ft 02^® 



01 ',@ 
08® 



1 75 
45 
45 
30 
30 
85 
40 
10 

1 00 
45 
90 
04 
35 
03 
12 
12 
30 
03 



26® 

01 y 2 @ 

3 50® 3 65 

16® 18 

20® 25 

3 50 



03^® 05 

10® 12 

1 35® 1 40 

18® 25 

10® 12 

03%® 05 

03K® 05 

03^® 06 

04® 06 



10® 
04® 
40® 



12 
06 
50 
20 
25 

28® 30 

2 50 

60 

1 45® 1 50 

1 @ 2 00 

1 10 

1 35 

1 20 

50 

60 

1 00 

1 75 

2 75 
2 50 
2 75 

16 



13® 
10® 

(I7\. W > 



13 
10 

12 
11 
::;. 
40 
06 
08 

04^@ 08 
03® 03/ 
42® 45 

02^@ 



10® 



04® 



04® 

25® 
30® 
50® 
1 50® 1 75 



55® 



60 
1 50^ 



STRONTIUM, nitrate ft 14® 17 

STRYCHINE., cryst., "/soz bots oz 1 25 

Cryst., 1-oz bots oz 1 00 

Powd., Ya-oz bots .....oz 1 20 

Powd., 1-oz bots oz 95 

SUGAR MILK, powd ft 20® 25 

SULFONAL oz 1 35 

SULPHUR, crude, ground, Cal ft 02® 03 

Flour ft 02H® 03% 

Flowers ft 02%® 04 

Roll ft 02%® 04 

SYRUP. Iodide Iron, F. W. B. & Co ft 57® 60 

Rock Candy, bbls and y 2 bbls gal 70® 75 

TAR, Pine, y 2 pints doz 75 

Pine, pints doz 90 

Pine, quarts doz 1 50 

WATER, distilled, containers extra gal 10 

Orange Flower, containers extra gal 2 00® 2 25 

Rose, containers extra gal 2 00® 2 50 

WAX, Floor, powd ft 40 

Yellow, pure ft 27® 30 

White, pure ft 50® 55 

White, No. 1 ft 35® 40 

WHITE PRECIPITATE ft 1 20 

ZINC, metallic, shavings ft 20® 35 

Oxide, com'l ft 14® 15 

Oxide, Hubbuck's ft 45® 50 

Sulphate, com'l ft 06® 08 

Sulphate, chem. pure ft 17® 20 

PROPRIETARY ARTICLES 

Controlled by F. W. Braun & Co. 

Braun's Carbolic Salve doz $1 25 

" Carbolic Soap doz 75 

" Condition Powder doz 1 00 

" Essence Jamaica Ginger doz 150 

•' Florida Water, lge doz 3 50 

" Florida Warer, small doz 150 

" Sarsaparilla doz 4 00 

" Syrup Tar and Wild Cherry doz 150 

Cal. Mission Eucalyptus Lozenges doz 1 50 

Cal. Mission Eucalyptus Plasters doz 1 50 

Cal. Mission Poison Oak Remedy doz 1 50 

Cal. Root Beer doz 80 

Cal. Mocking Bird Food doz 3 00 

Coronado Sea Salt doz 80 

Hayden's Sachet Powder, '/ ft bots ft 3 00 

Hunter's Witch Hazel doz 1 75 

Matchless Sarsaparilla doz 5 00 

Matchless Wild Cherry Phosphates doz 1 75 

Swain's Carbolic Powder doz 1 50 

Tarine doz 1 75 

" T. B." Insect Towder, 6-ft can ft 40 

1-ft " doz 5 50 

_ " " " %-ft " doz 3 25 

" " " sml " doz 1 25 



BRAUN'S... 



Condition Powder 



IS A 



Well Established Remedy 



Having a good sale throughout Southern 
California and the Territories 



It is used for 

Horses, Cattle, Sheep and Poultry 

IT IS GOOD 

It Retails for 25 cents 
It Costs*$1.00 Per Dozen 

Yon need it in your business ! 



MANUFACTURED 
AND SOLD BY 



F. W. BRAUN & CO. 



LOS ANGELES, CAL. 






i* 
'-&>> 



mm 



m 



mk 



S6 ' Oni 



V 



row au 



F. W. BRAUN & CO.'S 

ANNIVERSARY NUMBER 




it the * California * Druggist # # 

A MONTHLY JOURNAL DEVOTED TO THE INTERESTS OF THE RETAIL DRUGGIST 



L. 



\y 



LOS ANGELES, MAY, 1898. 



No. 5. 




r. W. Braun & Co.'s Building, 501-505 N. Main Street, Los Angeles, Cal. 



The Prices to RETAILERS 

are as follows : 
$8— Case of 50 glass bottles 
$7.-Case of 100 glass % bottles 




See that the 
latels tear the wellknown 
RED DIAMOND MARK of the 
APOLXINARIS COMPANY, LIMITED. 



SOLE EXPORTERS: 
The flPOL>L>INf\RIS 60MPf\NY, Ld., London 

JOHN CAFFREY, 21 Sutter St., San Francisco 
Representing United Agency Co., 503 Fifth Ave., New York 






PRICE LIST ■*— * 

FEB. i, 1890, AND FEB. 1, 1891. 

Beef Peptonoids 6 ozs., per dozen $ 8 OO 

Beef Peptonoids 16 " " 18 00 

Liquid Peptonoids 16 " " 9 00 

Liquid Peptonoids with Coca 16 " " 9 00 

Peptonoids, Iron and Wine 16 " " 9 00 

Phospho-Caffein Compound J " " 2 OO 

Phosplio-Caffein Compound 4 " " 4 00 

Phospho-Caffein Compound 8 " " 8 OO 

Phospho-Caffein Compound 32 " " 24 00 

WE GUARANTEE THE SALE OF ALL OUR GOODS. 



THE AHMNGTON CHEMICAL GO. 

YONKERS, N. Y. 












CAP. 



CORRUGATED END. 



TUBE CONTAINING MENTHOL. 




THIS CUT ILLUSTRATES THE THREE PARTS OF 



Blanchard's Hard Rubber Pocket 

I n li -i I /> i" This is positively the Finest Menthol Inhaler 

IllllalC/l • ■ nn thP. MatU, 



on the Market 



WHY NOT SELL THE BEST? 



Retails for 50 Cents. 
Price, $4.00 per dozen. 



BLANCHARD'S INHALER is put up in handsome easel cartons, an 
attractive advertisement and an ornament to any drug store. 



BLANCHARD MANUFACTURING CO., Cincinnati, O. 

The Trade Supplied by F. W. BRAUN & CO., Los Angeles and San Diego. 



50 YEARS* 
EXPERIENCE 




Trade Marks 
Designs 
Copyrights &c. 

Anyone sending a sketch and description may 
quickly ascertain our opinion free whether an 
invention Is prohnMv patentable. Communion- 
t ions si rid 1 v confident lal. Handbook on Patents 
sent free. Oldest agency for securing patents. 

Patents taken through Munn & CO. receive 
special notice, without c harg e, in the 

Scientific American, 

A handsomely Illustrated weekly. Lnrgest cir- 
culation of ativ scientific journal. Terms, $3 a 
year: four months, $1. Sold by all newsdealers. 

MUNN &Co. 361Broad ^ New York 

Branch Office, G25 F St., Washington, D. C. 



Jr/e California Dru§§ist 

A MONTHLY JOURNAL 

DEVOTED TO THE INTERESTS OF THE RETAIL DRUGGIST. 



Volume VII.] 



LOS ANGELES, CAL., MAY, 1898. 



[Number 5. 



Sl?e California Druggist 



PUBLISHED MONTHLY BY 



THE CALIFORNIA DRUGGIST PUB. CO. 

P. O. Drawer 406, Station C. - - LOS ANGELES, CAL. 

(To whom all Communications should be addressed.) 



F. S. I.ANGDON, ........ President 

J. Q. BRAUN, ... .... Treasurer 

R. A. ALLEN, ......... Editor 

TERMS OF SUBSCRIPTION. 

Per Year $1 00 

Single Copies 10 

ADVERTISING RATES. 

One Page $100 00 

Half Page 60 00 

Fourth Page 35 00 

Eighth Page 20 00 

Cards (per month) 1 50 

J8@F" Advertisements for positions or assistants, or to buy or sell Drug 
Stores, are inserted free of charge. 

Items of interest to Pharmacists are solicited. 
The official organ of the San Diego Retail Druggists' Association. 
The official organ of the Los Angeles County Pharmaceutical Associa- 
tion. 



T. W. BRAIN & CO.'S 10th ANNIVERSARY. 

'"THE completion of F. W. Braun & Co.'s new building 
* this spring, and its occupancy by the firm, marks a 
distinct period in the history of the house, and leads us to 
briefly review some of 
the steps in its growth. 

Of the early business 
life of the head of the 
firm it may be sufficient 
to note that after a 
thorough training in re- 
tail and prescription 
work in Chicago, Mr. 
Braun upon attaining his 
majority — we believe a 
little before — engaged in 
business for himself at 
Roanoke, Texas, remov- 
ing from thence in 1883, 
to Colorado City, in the 
same State, where he re- 
mained until 1888, build- 
ing up meanwhile a large and profitable business, it being 
the "boom" period of that prairie town. 




F. W. BRAUN 




L. N. BRUNSWIG 



During these years Mr. Braun was a valued customer and 
friend of Messrs. Finlay & Brunswig, of New Orleans, 
who had a thorough knowledge of his business capacity and 
of his personal character, and this prompted them to make a 

1 proposition to join him 
in a business enterprise 
in case he desired to en- 
large his field of activity, 
leaving to him the choice 
of location and the 
management of the busi- 
ness. In 1887 Mr. 
Braun's attention was 
called to the rapid growth 
of Southern California, 
and to the possible busi- 
ness chances in that lo- 
cality. With this in mind 
he visited Los Angeles, 
and spent time enough 
here to convince him of 
the importance of its position as a distributing center, and 
of the certainty of its continued growth. He found also 
the opening for a wholesale drug business, and lost no time 
in making preliminary arrangements to enter the field. 

Making a favorable sale of his Colorado City business 
and completing his partnership arrangements, Mr. Braun 
secured the most available quarters offered in which to open 
the new house. They were found in the double store and 
basement Nos. 325-329 New High street, and the lease be- 
ing obtained, Mr. Braun immediately left for the East to 
purchase his stock. 

May 1, 1888, found Mr. Free Smith installed as office 
man with a cheap deal table and nail keg as office fur- 
niture, receiving and caring for the stock as it arrived, with 
the assistance of Mr. J. Q. Braun and Mr. Wm. Kennedy. 
As soon as possible thereafter orders were solicited from the 
trade, the druggists of Southern California being prompt to 
appreciate the advantages of a nearby wholesale stock to 
draw from, and giving ready support and encouragement 
to the new firm, so that within a year from the opening 
of its business it became necessary to obtain more room in 
which to conduct its growing operations. Early in '89 a 
lease of the old Postoffice building, 401 to 407 North Main 
street was secured, and after remodeling was occupied by 
the firm, giving them about three times their former space. 
In the fall of 1890 a branch house was established in San 
Diego, to better accommodate the trade in that city and 
vicinity, forming an important auxiliary to the main house, 



THE CALIFORNIA DRUGGIST. 




OFFICES AND DRUGGISTS' SUNDRIES DEPARTMENT 

and growing with its growth. Mr. Will M. Gray is its 
present manager. 

The business of the house rapidly extending, soon reach- 
ing out through Arizona and New Mexico on the east and 
far into the San Joaquin Valley on the north, more storage 
room was needed, and was supplied by double-decking each 
story, and by utilizing near-by basements and store-rooms. 
After some years in this location it became increasingly 
evident that larger, and if possible, permanent quarters 
should be secured, the growth of the business amply justify- 
ing the necessary outlay to attain so desirable an end. 

At about this time the personnel of the firm underwent a 
change through the purchase of Mr. Fin- 
lay's interest by Messrs. Braun and Bruns- 
wig, an event which placed the business 
entirely in the hands of the younger and 
more aggressive members of the firm, and 
opened the way for the next forward move- 
ment. In the summer of 1897 Mr. Brunswig 
visited L,os Angeles, and during that visit 
spent some time with Mr. Braun in the con- 
sideration of various business properties 
offered, the result being the purchase of the 
five story brick block known as the Vickery 
Building, 501 to 505 North Main street, 
corner Republic street, together with the 
adjoining property on Republic and New 
High streets, formerly occupied by the City 
Gas Works, the whole comprising 60 feet 
front on North Main, 180 feet on Republic 
and 180 feet on New High streets, a ground 
area of 18,800 square feet. To prepare the 
property for the uses of the firm involved 
the complete reconstruction of the interior 
of the five-story building, and the addition 
of a two-story annex 50 x 80 feet, with basement, as well as 
the cementing of the open yard and the construction of 
storage sheds on two sides of same. 



Some unlooked for delays occurred in the 
building operations, so that the firm's head- 
quarters remained in the old store until 
February 7th of this year, when the transfer 
of their office was made and all hands gladly 
settled down to work in their new, con- 
venient and commodious quarters, of which 
it is proper at this point to make more men- 
tion. The views herewith shown of various 
departments of the store will give some idea 
of the orderly arrangements therein, and in- 
dicate in some degree the system through 
which the house has attained its reputation 
for prompt and accurate attention to the 
wants of its patrons. The various floors of 
the buildings are put to the following uses : 
First in order is the front basement, mainly 
devoted to the storage of Alcohol, Wines, 
Whiskies and Mineral Waters ; the hand- 
some Spongeroom, 15x60 feet, shown in 
the illustration, occupying much of one side 
and opening in to a Rubber Goods room 15 x 
15 feet, in which all soft rubber goods, so liable to injury 
from a dry atmosphere, are kept in perfect condition. In 
this basement are the necessary heating arrangements for 
the office and salesroom, and a vault for valuable drugs, the 
latter being the lower one of a series of four, the second and 
third above it being in the book-keeping department, and 
the fourth being used for costly chemicals. The rear base- 
ment is separated from the front by double iron doors and is 
used for heavy chemicals, dyestuffs and oils. On the 
ground floor we find the office and salesroom, occupying 
the entire front to the depth of 36 feet. Mr. Braun's private 
office being on one side of the entrance and the book-keep- 







OFFICES AND DRUGGISTS' SUNDRIES DEPARTMENT. 

ing department on the other, with a dozen desks devoted 
to the sales, mailing and buying departments, and with 
three stenographers' and typewriters' tables next the wall. 



THE CALIFORNIA DRUGGIST. 



Immediately back of the rows of desks are the 
counters and showcases of druggists' sundries 
department, occupying the entire width of the 
building and 65 feet in depth, wide galleries 
considerably increasing its dimensions, the 
shelving reaching the entire height of the 
room. Abundant light is supplied through 
the fine plate-glass front and from a side win- 
dow by day, and three arc lights and a large 
number of incandescent bulbs furnish illumin- 
ation by night. Connected with the sundries 
department is a rear room, 35 x 80 feet, devoted 
to assayers' and chemists' goods, a branch of 
the business to which the firm has given much 
attention, issuing for the same a special cata- 
logue. Adjoining the latter room is the office 
of the shipping and receiving clerk, 18x22 
feet, opening into the sheds and yard, where 
all freight is loaded or unloaded on the firm's 
own premises. The capacious sheds 14 and 
16 feet in width and extending 225 feet in 
length, protect the outgoing and incoming 
goods in wet weather, and furnish storage for 
large stocks of Sulphur, Copperas, Acids, Resin, Caustic, 
and other heavy and low priced merchandise. A fine 
Fairbanks platform scale of 2400 lbs. capacity, is one of the 
conveniences in that department. On the second floor the 
entire front building is occupied by the order-filling or drug- 
room, which is well shown in the illustration, and which 
is a model of order and convenience. The laboratory is 
directly back of this room, occupying a large part of the 
corresponding floor of the rear building. The third floor 
is devoted to patent medicines, of which the stock is always 
very large. On the fourth floor is kept the wrapping and 
toilet paper stock, with various drugs in quantity, among 





sponge and chamois department. 



which may be seen carload lots of Bicarbonate Soda, Bird 
Seed, Cyanide Potash, Flax Seed, Flax Seed Meal, etc. 
The fifth story is entirely given up to glassware, the 



ASSAYERS' AND CHEMISTS' SUPPLIES DEPARTMENT. 

spacious room being piled high with prescription vials and 

bottles of all kinds. 

From the windows of this floor a fine view of the city is 

obtained, looking to the east and south. 

Directly below, within a stone's throw, lies the old Plaza 

with its flowers, palms and green turf, while nearer still the 

yet older adobe mission church, dedicated to the Queen of 

the Angels, remains to connect and contrast the first Dos 

Angeles with the city of today. 

Upon the top of the main building is placed a 9000 gallon 

water tank, which supplies the means for fire extinguishing 

through the Grinnell Automatic system, with which every 
floor is provided. It would be impossible 
for a fire to get headway at any point in 
the building, as a temperature of 155 Fahr. 
melts the caps from the water jets immedi- 
ately over the fire, quickly flooding it, and 
giving an alarm simultaneously upon two 
large fire-gongs on the outside of the build- 
ings. This system, costing $2500 to put 
in, will pay for itself in reduced cost of 
insurance within a few years. Further safe- 
guards are provided by double floors 
throughout of two-inch plank, between 
which sheet-iron is placed, and by double 
doors at all openings between the build- 
ings, doors also closing the stairways from 
floor to floor, and all openings in the ele- 
vators. 

The buildings are provided with a com- 
plete system of electrical conveniences, in- 
cluding elevators, lighting arrangements and 
telephones. Of the latter, besides the usual 
outside and long distance instruments there 
are fourteen house telephones, connecting 

every floor and all departments of the business with the office. 
The pay-roll shows fifty -two employes in the Dos Angeles 

house, six of whom date from the opening year, 1888. The 



THE CALIFORNIA DRUGGIST. 




ORDER AND PACKING DEPARTMENT. 

city business alone of the house requires the constant use of 
three wagons, and the services of two solicitors, while four 
travelers are employed outside. "^$ j i I 

The combined requirements of the New Orleans, Los 
Angeles and San Diego houses permit of the purchase of 
goods in large quantities, which is a distinct advantage, en- 
abling them to handle many import lots. Foreign consign- 
ments to the Los Angeles house are not infrequently seen 
upon our near-by wharves, a feature which will be likely to 
become more noticeable in the future than in the past, owing 
to the firm's improved storage facilities, and the purpose of 
the firm to keep fully abreast of the growth and require- 
ments of this section of the country will 
be steadily maintained. 



in this direction, the firm can point with 
some degree of gratification to the evi- 
dences at hand. The material part of these 
evidences is seen in the large increase of 
stock required to supply their orders, and 
in the enlarged pay-roll of the department 
from time to time, but not less gratifying 
have been the complimentary expressions of 
the trade to their traveling representa- 
tives, upon the quality and completeness 
of their lines. 

In 1896 an illustrated catalogue of over 
500 pages was issued by the house, a large 
part of which was devoted to druggists' 
sundries, and all of the work on which was 
done in Los Angeles, and which, up to that 
time at least, was the most artistic publica- 
tion of the kind this city had produced. 
The distribution of this volume among the 
trade was followed by excellent results, for 
by enabling purchasers to order from pic- 
tured samples they readily availed them- 
selves of its assistance. 
Two years ago the firm was led to perceive the need of a 
complete stock of assayers' and chemists' supplies in this 
locality, for, owing to the rapid development of mining 
operations in Southern California and Arizona, the demand 
for supplies in those lines had become much greater than 
ever before, and it was only by sending away to distant 
markets that such wants could be filled. The chemicals 
and chemists' glassware which are always included 
in the wholesale druggists' stock, formed a proper 
nucleus and basis upon which to build, and the idea soon 
took form in the gathering together of material necessary to 
form an adequate assortment in this line. A special cata- 



Druggists' Sundries Department. 

""THE importance of this department of 
F. W. Braun & Co.'s business and the 
attention that the house has given it, jus- 
tifies us in commenting upon it in some 
additional paragraphs. It may be truly 
stated that until this house put its ener- 
gies to the work of maintaining an ade- 
quate stock of Sundries, it was not possi- 
ble to obtain any kind of a line of these 
goods in Southern California. 

The trade was forced to depend upon 
traveling salesmen for all they required, and 
orders went through them to be filled in 
San Francisco or the far East, entailing 
much loss of time, and necessitating the 
purchase of much larger invoices. To 
learn the particular needs of the drug trade 
in this part of the country in these goods 
became an object of close study by the 
house, and upon their removal in 1898 preparations were 
made to make this branch one of the leading features of 
the business. Of the success that has attended their efforts 




I.AHOKATORY AND MANUFACTURING DEPARTMENT. 



logue of Assayers', Chemists' and Miners' supplies was is- 
sued in 1897, aQ d the business put upon a fairly good foot- 
ing, the lack of sufficient room however, qualifying to some 



THE CALIFORNIA DRUGGIST. 



extent the operations in this line. With 
the larger space now available the storage 
and display of these lines are in greatly 
improved condition, and intending pur- 
chasers may view to their satisfaction the 
show of fine balances, the various furnaces, 
gasoline tanks, retorts, crucibles, muffles, 
mortars, and the almost endless variety of 
apparatus and appliances in glass, porce- 
lain, agate, copper, iron, steel, platinum, 
aluminum, lead, zinc and clay, that are em- 
braced in the category of a chemist's or 
assayer's outfit. 

Mr. R. H. Brown, the manager of the 
druggists' sundries and assayers' depart- 
ments is well fitted by long experience, 
as well as by natural qualifications, to 
oversee these important lines. As mana- 
ger of the sundries department of Brown 
& Bro., Baltimore, and subsequently occu- 
pying for six years a similar position in the 
house of Strong, Cobb & Co., Cleveland, 
his opportunities for gaining an intimate 
acquaintance with the leading markets and manufacturers 
of his lines of goods have been unsurpassed, and his judg- 
ment of values is seldom at fault. Ably assisted by Mr. J. 
E. Sullivan (who is now, temporarily we trust, engaged in 
fighting his country's battles, with his regiment), Mr. J. R. 
Smith, formerly with Borgfeldt & Co. in their Toronto 
house ; Mr. John Taylor, lately from the house of Humis- 
ton, Kealing & Co., Chicago; and by Messrs. Talbot, Con- 
dit, Stone, Erwin and Burnett at the counters, the work of 
his department is performed with orderly despatch. 

Messrs. J. O. Braun, credit man, and Wm. Kennedy, 





CELLAR No. 2. 



cashier, are the original members of the office force, begin- 
ning their work at the earliest inception of the house. Mr. 
Phil. S. Thompson is manager of the books. Dr. F. S. 



Langdon presides over the city and country sales desks, 
assisted by Messrs. Percy Stone and M. E. Conboy. The 
working and order-filling force in the drug department is 
under the management of Mr. C. D. Swain. 

Mr. Gus. Knecht is stock-keeper in the buying depart- 
ment, and Mr. J. L. Wallace has charge of all shipping and 
receiving of goods. 

The work of the laboratory has been for some time in 
charge of Mr. Fred. L. Schueddig, who has now gone to the 
war with the 7th Regiment. The products of this depart- 
ment include all the regular pharmaceutical preparations 
common to the wholesale drug laboratory, 
and in addition cover the following special- 
ties of the house, viz : 

Braun 's Carbolic Salve. 

Braun's Carbolic Soap. 

Braun's^California Condition Powder. 

Braun's Ess. Jamaica Ginger. 

Braun's Florida Water. 

Braun's Sarsaparilla. 

Braun's Syr. Tar and Wild Cherry. 

California Mission Eucalyptus L,ozenges. 

California Mission Plasters. 

California Mission Poison Oak Remedy. 

California Root Beer. 

California Mocking Bird Food. 

Coronado Sea Salt. 

Hayden's Sachet Powder. 

Hayden's Antiseptic Sanitary Towels. 

Hunter's Witch Hazel. 

Matchless Sarsaparilla. 

Matchless Wild Cherry Phosphates. 

Swain's Carbolic Powder. 

Tarine. 

"T. B." Insect Powder. 
The liquor department covers a selection of first quality 
whiskies purchased direct from distillers and stored in bond; 
also California wines and brandies from the'best manufac- 



"THE CALIFORNIA DRUGGIST. 




PATENT MEDICINE DEPARTMENT, THIRD FLOOR. 



turers. The firm have the agency for the celebrated Cana- 
dian Club Whisky of Hiram Walker & Sons. They are 
also sole distributers of the well known and favorite 
Crescent Malt and Seal of Maryland brands of bottled 
whiskies. 

The salesmen of the house bring up the rear of the 
procession, and with the innate bashfulness of their class 
are content "to be seen and not heard." They feel, how- 
ever, that many friendly eyes will look upon their " speak- 
ing likenesses" and that they will add such pronounced 
attractiveness to this issue that it will be long preserved 
from that bourne of old journals, the waste basket. 

Cuts of the buildings occupied by the San Diego branch, 
and the New Orleans house of L. N. Brunswig & Co., are 
shown also, and are of interest in this connection. 



T N consequence of the impending stamp tax upon proprietary 
*■ medicines that Congress is about to impose, the manufac- 
turers have practically united upon an agreement to increase 
their wholesale prices sufficiently to cover the cost of the 
stamps. The schedule we understand to be similar to that 
which was adopted during the last war, viz., one cent for each 
bottle or package retailing for 25 cents or under; twocents for 
articles above 25 cents and not exceeding 50 cents ; and an 
additional cent for each 25 cents or fraction of 25 cents. The 
regular printed prices for the articles will of course be the 
basis for stamping. Besides medical articles the tax 
will apply equally to perfumes and toilet preparations, 
and the drug trade will have to go through the same 
process of education as did the older druggists, a few of whom 
remain, who saw the beginning and the end of the former tax. 




CRUDE DRUG DEPARTMENT, FOURTH FLOOR. 



THE CALIFORNIA DRUGGIST. 



%"* 




WM. KENNEDY, Cashier. 




BOTTLES AND DRUGGISTS' GLASSWARE DEPARTMENT, FIFTH FLOOR. 



If the imposition of this tax could awaken the druggists every 
where to the folly of continuing the cut-rate practice it would 
be the greatest boon we could ask for. Why not unite in 
making it the turning point, and the beginning of a new era 
of prosperity ? 

T^HE war has had the effect thus far of advancing prices on 
*■ but a small number of drugs, of which the explosives, or 
rather materials from which explosives are made, glycerine, sul- 
phur, saltpeter and chlorate potash are examples. Opium has 
gone up, and so has quinine, the latter drug being invariably 
in great demand for armies in active service. Upon the great 
bulk of medicinal substances, however, the effect of war is not 
yet manifest. The result of heavy war expenses we have no 
doubt will be to create a higher tariff on imports, and this, with 



a heavier internal tax, will in due time increase prices. At 
present, with a few exceptions, drugs are quoted at almost un- 
exampled low figures. 

'"FHE " Shorter Hours" bill, which has been before the L,eg- 
1 islature of New York the present session, has been shelved. 
The Mayor of Greater New York gave it his strong disap- 
proval, as did a large number of drug clerks who were the 
(supposed) interested parties. The whole scheme was an at- 
tempt to interfere by law with the present relations of drug- 
gists and their employers, and was, we think, very properly 
overthrown. . 

The Antikamnia Chemical Company, in view of the war tax, 
which will require the stamping of their product, have an- 
nounced the withdrawal of the discount on io-ounce lots, leav- 
ing the price uniformly $1.00 per ounce to the trade. 




SHIPPING DEPARTMENT. 



THE CALIFORNIA DRUGGIST. 






R. H. BROWN. 
Manager Sundries Department. 



F. S. LANGDON, 
Head Salesman. 



C. D. SWAIN, 
Manager Order Department. 






R. A. ALI.EN. 



W. W. LEITHEAD. 



N. E. FERGUSON. 






J. K. SMITH. 



M. R M CAS. 



JOHN TAYLOR. 



THE CALIFORNIA DRUGGIST. 




WILL M. GRAY, 
Manager San Diego Branch. 







'C'HJOti'i^'C 




SAN DIEGO BRANCH. 



I TNCLE SAM'S Universal Dispensary is now in successful 
^ operation. Doctor Dewey, of the Pacific Surgical branch, 
has just performed a successful operation for enlarged spleen, 
the patient's abdominal Cavite having first been opened and 
fumigated with the Doctor's celebrated preparation of American 
tar. A subsequent slight fever was promptly reduced by a 
dose of Dover (or was it Concord ?) powder. 

The patient, however, spoiled his chances for recovery by 



surreptitiously taking a salt-water bath. 

The Atlantic branch, under Medical Director McKinley, as- 
sisted by the able Surgeons Sampson and Schley, has been 
vigorously publishing its prospectuses until more orders have 
been received than could be filled. Advertising, therefore, has 
been suspended until they can "catch up." 

We shall be pleased to report a series of capital operations 
in our next issue. 




L. N. BRUNSWIG & CO.'S BUILDING, NEW ORLEANS. 



IO 



THE CALIFORNIA DRUGGIST. 



Business Personals. 



J. O. White has discontinued his business on Aliso street. 



Theo. Wrede has removed from his East First street location 
to corner Pico and San Pedro streets. 



R. J. Knox has bought from Dr. G. A. Cutler the Silver 
Pharmacy, corner Sixth and Olive streets. 



W. B. Thompson, formerly at Twenty-second street and 
Grand ave., has removed to 800 East First street. 



We are glad to see Mr. J. W. Montague about again, after 
the severe attack of iritis which laid him up for three months. 



W. B. Condit, of F. W. Braun & Co.'s druggist sundries 
department, left on the 10th inst. for a visit to his old home in 
Illinois. 

R. W. Dewar, lately with Sale & Son, has accepted a posi- 
tion as traveling salesman for the W. S. Merrill Chemical 
Company, and will represent them on this Coast. 



The soda water business of L. J. Huff's fine establishment, 
Pasadena, has increased so much that he has found it neces- 
sary to enlarge his conveniences so that he can better accom- 
modate the patrons of his fountain. 



T. W. Brown, Twenty-fourth and Hoover, streets, has been 
making some very handsome improvements on his store, beau- 
tifully decorating the same in white and gold. He now has an 
exceptionally fine place of business. 



Mr. Wm. Kennedy, cashier of F. W. Braun & Co., took a 
week's vacation in April, his first outing for recreation in ten 
years. However, the fishing stories he brought home indicate 
enjoyment enough for several outings in one. 



Mr. J. E. Sullivan, who left F. W. Braun & Co. to help 
whip the Spaniards, has been made quartermaster sergeant of 
the 7th Regiment; a position for which his business experience 
gives him peculiar fitness. We congratulate him. 



The following young druggists of our city are among the 
number who have patriotically joined Uncle Sam's army for 
the present war: R. J. Newman, M.J. Hill, Louis Druell, 
Stewart Allen, Fred J. Kupfer, and F. W. Allen. C. Laux's 
son Herbert G. may properly be added also. 



Viole & Lopizich have been making interesting displays of 
crude drugs in their windows of late. During the days of 
Pharmacy Board examination early last month we noticed a 
number of candidates paying much attention to the exhibition, 
as they well might do. It was as good as a "pony." 



Ed T. Off, secretary Sale & Son Drug Co., gained the Bul- 
letin of Pharmacy prize of $25 for the best article on preven- 
tion of errors in prescription compounding. There were a 
large number of competitors, and it is a compliment to Los 
Angeles, as well as to Mr. Off, that the prize came to our city. 



Kamphefher & Co., Glendora, have sold out to F. E. 
Odell & Co. 

S. D. Ludlum has bought the business of E. J. Roberts, 
Phoenix, Arizona. 

J. C. Thomas, Deming, N. M., is about to remove his drug 
business to Cerillo, N. M. 



Walter Sanborn, recently with J. H. Trout, this city, has ac- 
cepted a position with Gillis & Spoor, Redlands. 



H. L. Clark, lately with Pierce & Robbins, Porterville, has 
accepted a position with J. D. Se Brell, Riverside. 



Mr. W. H. Baldridge, Escondido, is making a visit to Kan- 
sas City to look after some business interests in that locality. 



Dr. C. C. Bailey of White & Bailey, San Bernardino, has 
recently made the purchase of a nice residence on North E 
street. 

C. C. Abbey, Redlands, has gone to the Virginia Dale 
mining camp for some weeks recuperation. He expects to re- 
turn July 1 st. 

G. C. Thaxter, Redlands, has been authorized to raise a 
new company of the N. G. C. to take the place of Company G 
which has gone to the war. 



Mr. J. C. Hardman, Riverside, has just completed a very 
fine residence for his own occupancy. It is on the City Park, 
an elegant site and quite convenient to business. 






Mr. Carl F. Clapp of Covina and Miss Alice Scott Cook of 
the same place were married Wednesday, May 18th, at the 
Church of the Holy Trinity, Covina. We extend congratula- 
tions. 

F. L. Wingard, Long Beach, has just had a cellar built 
under his place of business. The rumor that a war ship, pos- 
sibly Spanish, was hovering about the coast may not have sug- 
gested this bomb-proof retreat — but then again it might. 



The recent disastrous fire at Randsburg caught our friend 
N. N. Miller, who was fortunate enough to escape the fire of 
a few weeks earlier. However, on the ashes of the " Rands- 
burg Drug Store" rises the house of N. N. Miller, and long 
may it be before he again has to fight fire. 



The military spirit runs high in the drug circles of "Old 
Berdoo." Company K of that city, just gone into service 
with the Seventh Regiment, has for its 1st Lieutenant Will 
Seccombe, who was head clerk for Towne & Lamb, and for its 
2d Lieutenant D. W. Schlotte, who occupied a similar 
position with White & Bailey. 



May 6th was a notable occasion for Los Angeles, when the 
crowds assembled to see the 7th Regiment start for the front. 
It seemed as if all Southern California was on our streets. Two 
of F. W. Braun & Co.'s men were among the "boys in blue." 
J. E. Sullivan of the sundries department and F. L- Schued- 
dig of the laboratory. The firm holds their positions open for 
them, awaiting their return. 



THE CALIFORNIA DRUGGIST. 



1 1 



Mr. Will M. Gray, manager of F. W. Braun & Co.'s San 
Diego house, paid Los Angeles a visit of a few days, this 
month. 

E. A. Cutter is about to open a fine drugstore in Fresno. 
He has secured one of the most prominent locations in the 
city, and will doubtless do his share of the trade of that city. 



W. D. Rosenberger has purchased the business of H. J. 
Rose, Ontario. Mr. Rosenberger has recently come from Phil- 
adelphia, and is a thoroughly up-to-date druggist. We wish 
him complete success in his new field. 



Ben L. Bear has purchased the drug business of Mont P. 
Chubb, Phoenix, Arizona. Mr. Bear has recently been repre- 
senting Parke Davis & Co. in the South, but has now re- 
turned to the old business, for which he is well adapted. Suc- 
cess to him. 

For the first time in ten years Colton has got down to two 
drug stores. The Pacific Drug Store has been sold to G. A. 
Sprecher, whose stock has been transferred to the " Pacific." 
Mr. Walter M. Gibson is in charge, as Dr. Sprecher is unable 
from ill health to attend to business. 



We are pleased to note the name of Miss Florence E. Myers 
among the successful candidates for licentiate of pharmacy, at 
the Los Angeles meeting. Miss Myers has been for some 
years with the Bedford Pharmacy, San Bernardino, and has 
worked faithfully to attain the object she has gained. 



We regret to note the death, in New Orleans, April 22, of 
Mr. W. F. Peterson, long in the employ of F. W. Braun & 
Co., as foreman of their order department. For two years back 
he has been with the New Orleans house of L. N. Brunswig. 
Mr. Peterson was a man of wide experience in the drug busi- 
iness, and of much energy. His former associates here deeply 
sympathize with his family in their loss. 



The Trans-Mississippi issue of the Omaha Druggist, which 
is just at hand, is beautifully illustrated with half-tones of the 
exposition buildings and grounds, now of special interest, for 
the opening of the exposition occurs in June. The Richard- 
son Drug Company is also handsomely written up, with views 
of its place of business and portraits of its officers and travel- 
ing salesmen. The Druggist is to be congratulated on this 
elegant and artistic number. 



Mr. Henry J. Rose, Ontario, who has recently disposed of 
his business to Mr. W. D. Rosenberger, will, we understand, 
now retire from active business life. Mr. Rose has had a long 
and honorable career as a pharmacist, starting in business in 
Toronto some forty years ago, and becoming prominent in his 
profession. He was for a long time Secretary of the Ontario 
Pharmaceutical Association and lecturer in the Ontario College 
of Pharmacy. He came to California about ten years ago and 
cast in his fortunes with the Ontario Colony, starting there 
its first drug business, and materially assisting in building up 
the town. In his retirement he carries with him the best 
wishes of his many friends for a long continuance of his life 
and health. 



SAN DIEGO ITEriS. 

Mr. P. C. Caraway is now in charge of the Hotel del Coro- 
nado Pharmacy. 

Mr. E. Strahlman returned home on the 17th inst. from a 
pleasant trip to San Francisco. 

Mr. T. J. Fisher, proprietor of the Coronado Pharmacy, is 
now Captain Fisher of the Home Guards of Coronado. 

Mr. D. S. Lacey and family have returned from the East 
where Mr. Lacey has been settling up his father's estate. 

Lynn Boyd of National City left on the 18th for a two 
weeks' visit to San Francisco, where he will represent the K. 
of P. lodge of his city. 

Mr. A. L. Marsh received the appointment as Hospital 
Steward for the Seventh Regiment N. G. C, and is now on 
duty with the regiment. 

Wedding Bells. 

Married at Escondido, Tuesday, May 3, at the residence of 
the bride's parents: Miss Olive Jenkins and Mr. Charles W. 
Baldridge. The happy couple have our congratulations and 
best wishes. They will reside in Fallbrook, where Mr. Bal- 
dridge is engaged in the drug business. 



Insurance From a Business Man's Standpoint. 

At the recent convention of the Northwestern Fire Under- 
writer's Association Harlow N. Higginbotham, credit manager 
of Marshall Field & Co., Chicago, presented an essay bearing 
the above title. In the course of the esssay there appeared 
the following : 

It would be impossible to carry on business without insur- 
ance against loss by fire. A man's statement of assets would 
be incomplete if it did not include the amount of insurance 
carried, the character of the companies and the kind of a 
building occupied and its environment. It is to be a note of 
warning if I find a customer over or under insured. I always 
take the liberty of cautioning customers who even temporarily 
carry over-insurance. Some business men, in good faith, carry 
a certain amount of insurance throughout the year. The only 
safe way is to insure in a good company, and a business which 
will not enable a man to insure is not worth having, and 
should be discontinued. 

Insurance has been considered by many a speculation based 
upon certain calculations of chance on the moral and physical 
hazard. This is plainly incorrect. It is a mutual protective 
association. I decry the spirit of the sharp practices so often 
exhibited between the parties to an insurance contract or their 
representatives. I regret there seems to be a moral antago- 
nism and a suspicion of integrity on either side. It should be 
understood that we are insuring one another out of premiums 
paid by each, and the company is simply our agent. The 
capital of a company is necessary for temporary deficiencies. 

Over-valuation usually indicates fraud aimed against the in- 
surance or the credit man. If I were an agent I would take 
note of the applicant's character and reputation as well as his 
financial standing. A man who tempts another to crime is 
himself a criminal, and an agent who permits an applicant to 
insure for enough to tempt a fire to break out is himself an ac- 
cessory. There is a fair degree of harmony between buildings 
and the character of their occupants. The best class of mer- 
chants is seldom found in the worst class of buildings. 



12 



THE CALIFORNIA DRUGGIST. 



Examination Questions — Nebraska State Board of 
Pharmacy. 

CHEMISTRY — NIELS P. HANSEN. 

No. i. (a) What branch of physical science is chemistry? 

(b) What is density? 

(c) How would you obtain the molecular weight of a 

molecule by knowing its density ? 

No. 2. Define analysis, synthesis, chemism. 

No. 3. (a) How many atoms may a compound molecule con- 
tain? 

(b) How is the molecular weight obtained? 
No. 4. (a) What are formulas ? 

(£) State rule for writing formulas ? 

(c) Give formulas of potassium iodide, lead acetate, 

zinc sulphate and potassium chlorate. 
No. 5. (a) Define normal acid and basic salts. 
(b) Complete the following reaction : 

AG N0 3 I -Na Cl= 

Ca Cl 2 - Na C0 3 = 
No. 6. How much potassium and iodine is required to make 

3C0 grams of potassium iodide ? 
No. 7. Chemically what are alkaloids and how do they differ? 
No. 8. (a) How is sulphuric acid manufactured { 

(b) Give lead chamber reaction. 
No. 9. Give test for sodium, potassium, arsenic, mercury, 

morphine, quinia. 
No. 10. Discuss fully sulphur, iron, hydrogen oxide, mercury 

and its compounds. 

THEORETICAL PHARMACY — HENRY H. BARTH. 

1 (a) What is a Thermometer ? 

(b) Give freezing and boiling points on Fahrenheit scale. 
(e) Centigrade scale. 

(d) Convert— 50 C. into F. 

(c) Convert 62 F. into C. 

2 (a) Give table of weights Troy, (b) Avoirdupois. 

(c) What is the difference in grains between one ounce 
Troy and one ounce Avoirdupois. 

3 (a) Define the term "solution." 

(b) What is a saturated solution. 

(c) In how many parts of water at 15 C is one part of 

each of the following chemicals soluble : Boracic 
Acid, Epsom Salt, Iodide of Potassium, Sulphate 
Quinine, Salicylate Sodium? 

4 Give process of coating pills with (a) sugar (b) Gelatine 

(c) Silver. 

5 By what three ways may heat be transferred ? Give an ex- 

ample of each? 

6 (a) What is specific gravity ? 

(b) How would you find the specific gravity of a solid 

heavier than water ? 

(c) Lighter than water ? 

7 (a) About how many drops are there in a fiuidrachm of 

water ? 

(b) In a fiuidrachm of syrup acacia ? 

(c) In a fiuidrachm of chloroform ? 

(d) In a fiuidrachm of tincture opium ? 

(e) In a fiuidrachm of carbolic acid ? 

8 Describe the process of granulation. Exsiccation. 
Name two salts prepared by each . 

9 How many liniments are official ? 
Name them. 



10 How many cerates are official? 

Name them and give formula and official process for three. 

MATERIA MEDICA. — HENRY R. GERING. 

i (a) Define that branch of Pharmacology known as Ma- 
teria Medica. 
(b) What are drugs ? (c) What are Alkaloids ? 

2 (a) Give the correct U. S. P. title of five waters, 
(b) Give the correct U. S. P. title to five fluid extracts. 

3 (a) Give the official description of Opium. 

(b) Pancreatinum. (c) Phosphorus. 

4 Give the common name of the drug, and the part used, 

from which the following oils are obtained : 
(a") Oleum Thymi (b) Oleum Menthse Viridis. 

(c) Oleum Ricini. (d) Oleum Santali. 
(e) Oleum Sesami. 

5 Give the habitat, part used and natural order of each of 

the following : 
(a) Senna. (b) Squill. (c) Pepo. 

(d) Cinnamomum Cassia. 

6 Give the source and active principle of : 

(a) Coca. (b) Belladonnse Folia. (c) Opium. 

(d) Cinchona. 

7 (a) What is a narcotic, and give an example ? 

(b) Stimulant? (c) Analgesic? (d) Mydriatic? 

8 (a) Describe the physical appearance of Galla. 
(b) Gelsemium. (c) Ficus. (d) Aqua. 

(e) Hydragyrum. 

9 (a) Describe Carbolic Acid, and give the official forms, 

characteristics and preparations, 
(b) What are Glucosides and give an example ? 
10 Identify drugs marked one to ten. 

TOXICOLOGY — G. J. EVANS. 

1. Name two mineral acids, give their toxic effects, antidote 

and treatment. 

2. Name four vegetable drugs, their toxic principles, dose of 

each and antidote. 

3. Define Minimum, Maximum and Toxic. What do you 

understand by an over-dose ? 

4. Give examples of chemical and mechanical antidotes. 

5. How are maximum and toxic doses of an unknown drug 

determined ? 

6. State what organs are affected by toxic doses of Cantha- 

rides, Croton Oil, Strychnine, Opium. 

7. What treatment and antidotes for question six? 

8. Define Antidote, Emollient, Demulcent, Emetic. 

9. Why are fixed used in preference to essential oils in cases 

of poisoning ? 
10. Do you keep a poison register ? State fully your reasons 
why ? 

PRACTICAL PHARMACY — A. W. BUCHHEIT. 

1 . Define Practical Pharmacy ? 

2. Give definition of the word Prescription ? From what 

Latin word is it derived ? In writing prescriptions 
what are the advantages of using Latin ? 

3. What would be understood by the following abbreviations 

occurring in Prescriptions? — aa — ad. lib. — Coch. 
mag. — d. t. d. no. 10 — Q. S. — t. i. d. 

4. How would you make 2fl-oz. of three per cent solution 

of cocain ? Show figures. 



THE CALIFORNIA DRUGGIST. 



13 



5. Give the formula and mode of making Collodion. How 

many are official ? Name them ? 

6. State number of grains in one fi. oz. of water. In one 

gram. In one Litre 

7. Mention the official Oleates ? What advantages do they 

possess over Ointments ? 

8. Write a Prescription for an Alterative, Astringent, Tonic, 

Carminative, and Laxative. 

9. Give the ingredients in Dovers Powder, Hiera picra, 

Hot drop, Fowler's solution, and Elixir Vitriol. 
10. Criticise and re- write the following Prescription in the 
Metric System : 

Tr. Cinchon. Co. oz. 11 
Tr. Gentian. Co. dr. vi 
Tr. Ferri. Chlor. dr. 11 
M. et sig. A teaspoonful 3 times daily. 
Criticise the following Prescription : 

3 

Hydr. Chlor. grs. 11 
Kali Iod. grs. xi. 
Aqua q. s. oz. 1 
M. et sig. A teaspoonful 3 times daily. 



the processes introduced by MM. Cros and Ducos du Hauron, 
in preference to the more direct process which Professor Lipp- 
mann favors. — Chemist and Druggist. 



The State Board of Pharmacy. 

San Francisco, April 17, 1898. 

California State Board of Pharmacy has held two meetings 
this month. At Los Angeles April 6th to 9th ;• at San Fran- 
cisco April 13th to 19th. 

The following were registered as graduates : C. L. Esch- 
mann, Peter Rock, A. G. Robenau, C. E. Henley, C. F. Tom- 
kins, Felix Paquin, J. G. Dougherty, G. M. Forester, R. T. 
Kyle, E. W. Hanson. 

Licentiates. — The following having passed a satisfactory 
examination, were registered as licentiates : E. A. Agnew, 
W. Garner, E. G. Wolf, O. S. Mish, R. J. Newman, L. 
Macken, Jr., Florence E. Myers, A. F. Hyer, C. H. Wolfe, 
E. T. Yarnell. F. E. Twining, F. G. Culver, E. C. Wilson, 
and T. J. Day were registered as licentiates on their certificates 
from Ontario College of Pharmacy. 

Assistants. — Edward Henderson, H. C. Lassen and J. F. 
Gibson were granted Assistants' Certificates on their Licentiate 
examination. 

The following having passed a satisfactory examination, 
were granted the Assistant Certificate : W. D. Briggs, E. J. 
Lawless, J. M. Waste, J. W. Calder, A. T. Nadeau, J. H. 
Huntoon, G. H. Phillips, C. E. Condon, F. C. Rulison, J. L. 
Whitlock. 

J. Calvert, 

Sec'y Board Pharmacy. 

The next meeting will be held in San Francisco. July 13, 
1898. 

The Photography of Colors 

Was the item of greatest interest at the usual Monday meeting 
at the Paris Academy of Sciences recently, M. Mascat ex- 
hibited a collection of new proofs produced by MM. Auguste 
and Louis Lumiere, of Lyons. They are beautiful photo- 
graphs, and seem to mark a new step in the progress 
of the photography of colors. The pictures represent a 
basket, a lady wearing a silk dress, a group of officers in 
uniform, etc., and in all the tones and colors are excellently 
reproduced. MM. Lumiere have followed in their experiments 



Money in Your Pocket. 

For a limited time only we will give a gratuity of one-fourth 
dozen ot Smith's Dandruff Pomade free with every purchase of 
one dozen purchased through a wholesale dealer, provided the 
blanks furnished by the jobbers are properly signed and re- 
turned to the manufacturers. Smith's Dandruff Pomade is now 
more extensively advertised, and free samples "are sent to all 
those troubled with dandruff, itching scalp, and falling hair. 
This preparation is daily becoming more popular, and with the 
extended advertising, your sales are bound to increase. Lay 
in a supply before the offer closes. We will be pleased to fur- 
nish a neat and attractive counter wrapper with dealer's name 
printed on same to all who can use them. State jobber to 
whom advertising matter is to be sent. 

Smith Bros., Manufacturers, 

Fresno, California. 

A Valuable Addition to the Materia Medica. 

Dr. W. W. Winthrop, of Fort Worth, in Florida, gives his 
experience in the Texas Record, with a plant found in the 
Everglades of Florida, called by the Indians Husa. The 
plant, as yet unclassified, is of a dirty whitish green color, 
with a ball-like white formation at its summit, where the 
flower should be, and slightly lobulated, and to all appear- 
ances like a small cauliflower. It grows in clumps in moist, 
shady places, particularly on the hummocks at the root of the 
cabbage palm. It is of a low order of plants, above the 
mosses, probably a cryptogam and indigenous to the Ever- 
glades. It is claimed by the natives that the plant is a per- 
fect antidote for all snake bites and stings of insects. A negro 
in the presence of Dr. Winthrop allowed himself to be bitten 
several times by mocassins freshly caught, whose poison is 
ranked among the most virulent of snake-poison. After each 
bite the negro chewed a little of the herb which he said coun- 
teracted the venom. This was probably true, as no bad effect 
followed the bite. Dr. Winthrop, in subjecting the plant to 
the strongest tests, finds it one of the most diffusable stimu- 
lants known, acting immediately. 

Dr. Winthrop and other physicians who have joined in the 
tests find the plant not only a perfect antidote for narcotic 
poisons, but an infallible cure for the opium habit. He says 
it takes the place of opium, sedative but not narcotic, support- 
ing the patient fully. It produces slight elation, but no som- 
nolent effect. A physician cured himself of the opium habit 
with it, of twenty-three years' standing, having used as high 
as forty grains of morphine a day. The effect upon him he 
said was delightful, making him feel as comfortable as one 
would feel after a satisfying meal. The testimony of several 
physicians whom Dr. Winthrop invited to test the drug in the 
opium habit was that it was a perfect success, never having 
failed where the patient wanted to be cured. Dr. Winthrop is 
a man; of high standing in his profession and his testimony 
seems to be so positive as to exclude doubt as it regards his 
statements. The field of action as a diffusable stimulant is so 
vast that when thoroughly tested it may prove one of the 
most valuable remedial agents in the materia medica. — Medi- 
cal Times. 



H 



THE CALIFOENIA DRUGGIST. 



OUR ADVERTISERS. 



It will be of interest and value to the trade to consult our 
advertising columns, in which will be found represented the 
following firms and goods : 



A. Gettleman Brewing Co. 
Allcock's Plasters. 
Ammonol Chemical Co. 
Antikamnia Chemical Co. 
Apollinaris Co., Limited. 
Arlington Chemical Co. 
Armstrong Manufacturing Co. 
Beeman Chemical Co. 
Blake, C. E. & Co. 
Braun, F. W. & Co.'s Laboratory 

Products. 
California Fig Syrup Co. 
Centaur Company. 
Cal. Mission Eucalyptus Lozenges. 
Davol Rubber Co. 
Etna Chemical Co. 
Goodrich, B. F. & Co. 
Coronado Corks. 
Hayden Manufacturing Co. 
Jayne, Dr. D. & Son. 



Kondon Manufacturing Co. 
Kuhns, Arthur Company. 
Leiner, M. 
Levy, B. & Co. 
Ludwick, G. M. 
Marian i & Co. 
Moore, H. H. & Sons. 
Munn & Co. 

Norman Lichty Manufacturing Co. 
N. Y. Pharmacal Association. 
Planten.H. & Son. 
Pond's Extract Co. 
Portuondo Vicente. 
Taite, Jos. G. & Sons. 
T. B. Insect Powder. 
Thum, O. W. Co. 
Wells, A.J. Manufacturing Co. 
Whittemore Bros. & Co. 
Wyeth, John & Bro. 



National Wholesale Druggists Association. 

Committees representing the National Wholesale Druggists' 
Association and the Proprietary Medicine Manufacturers' As- 
sociation held a meeting yesterday afternoon at the Southern 
Hotel, to arrange for the joint convention to be held on October 
17 next. Those present were Theo. F. Meyer, Clarence H, 
Stone, ex-Mayor C. P. Walbridge, H. H. Green, Thos. H. 
Earkin, James Richardson, George K. Hopkins, Courtney H. 
West, Frank A. Ruf, Henry R. Strong, Edward Mallinckrodt, 
Thos. P. Haley, Jr., Chas. W. Staudinger, Duncan Mellier and 
A. R. Deacon. It was decided to hold the convention at the 
Southern Hotel during the week beginning October 17. 

H. R. Strong, 
St. Louis, March 16, 1898. Secretary. 



Kurtz' Freckle Salve 

(ORIGINAL) 

Manufactured only by C. F. HEINZEMAN & CO. 
*\ Los Angeles, Cal. J^ 

7y Trade Mark Registered. K 






New Goods Received by F. W. Braun & Co. 

Gray's Glycerine Tonic, doz $ 8.50 

Kinney's Rheumatism and Kidney Remedy, doz 9.00 

Dean's French Female Pills, double strength, doz 14.00 

Mather's Senna "M", 10c, doz 75 

" 25c, doz 1.75 

Pinole, doz 1.20 

Stearns' Haemoferrum, liquid, doz 8.00 

Colorado Catarrh Root, doz 4.00 

Snuff, doz 4.00 

Ripans Tabules, 5c, doz 42 

Kuttnow's Eff. Powder, doz 8.50 

Blennostasin, oz 1.25 

Guaiaquiu, oz 2.00 

Anticroyza Tablets, oz 1.50 

Four pounds of saccharine is equal in sweetening power to 
a ton of sugar. 



Pacific Coast Drug Agencij 



OFFERS FOR SALE 

First-Class Drug Stores 
and Medical Practices 

in all the Pacific States and Territories 

Clerks Registered, Prooided and Employed. Partnerships 
Negotiated. Lists Sent Free. Correspondence Solicited. 

G. M. LUDWICK, 

S. E, Corner Second St. and Broadway, Room 201, Los Angeles, Cal. 

Three money-makers are offered to the trade this month by 
F. W. Braun & Co. in the Hayden Mfg. Co.'s Arnica Salve, 
Carbolic Salve and Witch Hazel Salve. They are very neatly 
put up in large-sized boxes, and retail at 25 cents. The un- 
iform price is $1 per dozen Add some to your next order. 

WANTS, Etc., Etc. 

[Under this heading we will be pleased to publish FREE OF 
CHARGE, notices of clerks wanted, positions desired, stores for 
sale or exchange, propositions for purchasing, et.c^\ 

FOR SALE — Wall Soda Fountain, 8 syrups; new patent draught 
tube ; marble slab, glasses, spoons, etc.; all complete, but without 
tanks. Used only one season. Will sell verv cheap for cash. Inquire 
of F. W. BRAUN & CO., Los Angeles. 

FOR SALE — A drug store in good country town. No opposition ; 
nearest store seven miles. Stock clean ; fixtures good. Fine op- 
portunity for physician. Good reason for selling. Adress Quinine, 
care California Druggist, Los Angeles. 

FOR SALE — A full set of shelf bottles with glass labels, including set 
of Fluid Extract bottles in blue glass. Will sell cheap. Inquire 
of White & Bailey, San Bernardino, Cal. 

FOR SALE — A well located drug store in Los Angeles, with an in- 
creasing trade, value $1200. Expenses small. Owner not pharma- 
cist is reason for selling. Inquire of F. W. Braun & Co., Los Angeles. 

FOR SALE — In Los Angeles, a centrally located drug store, doing a 
paying business. About $6500 will buy. Reason for selling — 
owner has two stores. Address F. C. W., care F. W. Braun & Co. 

FOR SALE — In coast city of Southern California, a drug business 
established over eight years. Stock about $2500 ; location first-class. 
Address M. H., care CALIFORNIA DRUGGIST. 



FOR SALE — Drug store in the most prosperous mining town in Cali- 
fornia; doing a good business ; price $2000. Good reasons for sell- 
ing. A full investigation desired. This is a splendid opportunity for a 
competent man. Population 6000 and only three drug stores. Address 
" GUARANA" care CALIFORNIA DRUGGIST, Los Angeles. 

FOR SALE — Drug store in suburbs of Los Angeles, worth $2000, stock 
clean and in good condition. Store has been established 18 months; 
will sell at invoice price. Inquire of F. W. BRAUN & CO. 

FOR SALE — A city drug store. Fine location. Good business. Low 
rent. Good reasons for selling. Address L, care F. W. BRAUN & 
CO. 

FOR SALE — City drug business at a bargain. Stock about $1200, all 
clean and no dead stuff. Good location for a doctor. Inquire of F. 
W. BRAUN & CO., Los Angeles. 



FOR SALE— Elegant clean stock in the most progressive suburb of 
Los Angeles. Only drug store within twenty blocks. Best reasons 
for selling. Value about $2000. Inquire of F. W. BRAUN & CO., 
Los Angeles. 

FOR SALE — A good, long established drug business in this city. 
Price, $2500. Address "ADVANTAGEOUS," care CALIFORNIA 
DRUGGIST. 



THE CALIFORNIA DRUGGIST. 



15 



PRICE LIST OF DRUGS, CHEMICALS, ETC. 



These prices are for quantities as ordinarily bought by average buyers, and include containers, unless 
otherwise indicated. Subject to market changes. 

For special quantities we will make special figures. 

F. W. BRA UN & CO., Los Angeles, Cal. 



5 

ACETANILID ft 42® 45 

ACID, Acetic No. 8 ft 10® 20 

Acetic U. S. P ft) 36 

Benzoic, Eng oz 10 

Benzoic, German oz 10 

Boracic ft 14® 20 

Carbolic, crude •. gal 40® 52 

Carbolic, cryst, blk label, 1-ft) tin ft) 30® 30 

Carbolic, cryst, blk label, 5-ft> tins ib 28® 38 

Carbolic, cryst, gold label, 1-ft bots ft 36® 36 

Carbolic, cryst.^gold label, 5-ft tin ft 33® 32 

Citric ft 37® 42 

Gallic oz 11® 12 

Hydrocyanic, dil oz 11® 15 

Hydrocyanic, cone, Scheele's oz 40® 40 

Hydrofluoric, 1-oz bots ea 45® 55 

Hydrofluoric, 4-oz bots. ea 7g 

Muriatic, cotnl., 6-ft bots ea 65® 7^ 

Muriatic, coml., carboy, $2 ft 3J^@ n 

Muriatic, C. P., 1-ft bots ft 35® 4" 

Muriatic, C. P., 6-ft bots ft 25® 30 

Nitric, coml., 7-ft bots ea 1 00 

Nitric, coml., carboy, $2 ft 8® 9 

Nitric, C. P., 1-ftbots ft 35® 40 

Nitric, C. P., 7-ft bots ft 25® 30 

Oxalic ft 12® 15 

Pyrogallic, Merck's ft 3 25 

Pyrogallic, Merck's oz 2fi 

Salicylic ft 60® 70 

Salicylic oz 8@ in 

Salicylic, from oil wintergreen oz 54 

Sulphuric, coml., 9-ft bots ea 65® 75 

Sulphuric, coml., carboy, $2 ft 2^@ ly A 

Sulphuric, C. P., 1-ft bots ft 35® 40 

Sulphuric, C. P., 9-ft bots ft 25® 30 

Tannic ft 1 25® 1 50 

Tartaric ft 38® 42 

ALCOHOL, absolute, 1-qt bots ea 1 60 

Grain market 

Wood, 5 gal. lot to bbl. lot gal 90® 1 05 

"Wood, less quantity, can extra gal 1 10 

ALUM, chrome ft 13® 15 

Dried (burnt alum) ft 12® 15 

Lump , ft 3y 2 @ 4 

Ground ft 5® 6 

Powdered ft 6® 8 

AMMONIA, cone, 26°, 5-pt bots ea 85 

Cone, bulk, can extra gal 75 

Bromide ft 75 

Carbonate ft 12® 25 

Muriate, lump ft 13® 15 

Muriate, gran, coml ft 11® 15 

Muriate, gran, pure ft 16@ 20 

Muriate, powd ft 20® 25 

Valerianate oz 27 

AMMONAL (Po. or Tablets) oz 1 00 

ANT1KAMNIA oz 1 00 

ASTIPTRIN (25 oz, $1.30) oz 1 40 

AKISTOL (25 oz, $1.65) oz 180 

ABKOWKOOT, Bermuda ft 35 

ARSENIC, powd, white ft 10® 12 

BALSAM Copaiba ft 60® 75 

Fir, Canada ft 45® 50 

Peru ft 2 75® 3 00 

Tolu ft 75® 80 

BAKK, Cinchona, red, true ft 50® 55 

Cinchona, red, powd ft 35® 60 

Cinchona, yellow, Calisaya ft 50® 55 

Cinchona, yellow, powd ft 35® 60 

Elm, slab ft 12® 15 

Elm, ground ft 14® 18 

Elm, powd ft 15® 20 

Sassafras ft 12® 15 

Soap, slab ft 7® 10 

Soap, ground ft 10@ 13 

Soap pwd ft 18® 20 

Soap, cut, 5c boxes doz 35 

Soap, cut, 10c bozes doz 60 

Wild Cherry ft 12® 15 

BAT BUM gal 2 50® 3 00 

F. W. B. & Co., y 2 pts doz 1 75 

F.W. B. &Co., pts doz 3 50 

BEANS, Tonka, Angostura ft 2 25® 2 50 

Vanilla, Mexican ft 14 50@15 50 

Vanilla, Tahiti ft 3 25® 3 50 

BERRIES, Cubeb ft 25® 30 

Cubeb, powd ft 30@ 35 

Juniper ft 9® 10 

BISMUTH, sub-carbonate ft 1 60® 1 70 

Sub-gallate oz 19 

Sub-nitrate ft 1 25® 1 35 

BLUE MASS ft 70® 75 

BLUE VITRIOL ft i%© 7 

BORAX, refined ft 8^® 12 

Powd ft 8J4® 12 

BUDS, Cassia ft 35® 38 

CALOMEL, American ft 80® 85 

English ft 1 10® 1 15 

Stock ft 55® 65 

CAMPHOR ft 37® 42 

CANTHARIDES, Chinese, powd ft 60® 65 

Russian, powd ft 1 00® 1 10 



CAPSICUM, African, pods ft 22® 25 

African, powd ft 20® 25 

CARAMEL (gal $1 50, can extra) ft 25 

CARBON, bisulphide, 1-ftbots doz 2 00 

Bisulphide, 2-ft bots doz 4 00 

Bisulphide, 1-gal cans ea 1 15® 1 25 

Bisulphide, 5-gal cans ea 4 00 

CARMINE, No. 40 oz 35 

CHALK, French, powd ft 6%@ 8 

White, precip lb 10® 12 

White, prepared, drops ft 8® 10 

CHARCOAL, animal, gran ft 8® 12 

Animal, powd ft 8® 10 

Willow, powd , bulk ft 12® 15 

Willow, powd., 1-ft cartons ft 18 

Willow, powd., ^-ft cartons ft 20 

Willow, powd., 14 -ft cartons ft 25 

CHLORAL HYDRATE, 1 fts ft 1 20® 1 25 

V 2 fts ft 1 35® 1 40 

% fts lb 1 55® 1 60 

CHLOKOFOEM, 1-ft tins ft 55® 57 

•7-ft tins ft 52® 54 

Squibbs', 500-gm ea 1 15 

Squibbs', 250-gm ea 66 

Squibbs', 100-gm ea 26 

CLOVES ft) 20 

Powd ft) 25 

COBALT, powd ft, 30 

COCAINE, hydrochlorate oz 3 25 

Hydrochlorate, y 2 oz oz 3 §5 

Hydrochlorate, y% oz ea 50® 55 

COCOA BUTTER ft. 50® 55 

CODEINE, alk.,/ 8 oz oz 5 10 

Sulphate, % oz oz 4 75 

COLOCYNTH APPLE ft 90 

Powd ft 85 

COMPOSITION POWDER, / 8 -ftpkgs ft 35 

COPPERAS, bbls, iy a ft 2® 3 

CORROSIVE SUBLIMATE ft 80® 85 

Powd ft 90® 95 

CREAM TARTAR, pure ft 27® 32 

CREOLIN, 1-ft and 5-ft bots ft 50® 55 

CREOSOTE, beech-wood ft 99® 1 10 

Coml ft 45® 50 

CURCUMA, powd ft 12® 15 

CUTTLE BONE ft 30® 35 

DEXTRINE ft 8® 12 

DOVER'S POWDER ft 125 

EIKONOGEN oz 37 

EMERY, flour ft 8® 10 

ERGOT, powd ft 50® 55 

ESSENCE PEPPERMINT, 2-oz bot..doz 1 50 

ETHER, Nitrous, cone, 1-ftbots ft 1 20® 1 25 

Nitrous, cone, %-ft bots ft 1 35® 1 40 

Nitrous, cone, %-ft bots ft 1 55® 1 60 

Sulphuric, U. S. P.. 1880 ft 75® 80 

Sulphuric, cone, 1890 ft 80® 85 

Sulphuric, Squibbs', 500-gm ea 1 25 

Sulphuric, Squibbs', 250-gm ea 66 

Sulphuric, Squibbs', 100-gm ea 30 

EUCALYPTOL, Merck's oz 24 

EXTRACT, Cascara, fluid, F.W. B. &Co..ft 70 

Cascara, fluid, F. W. B. & Co., 5-ft bots...ft 50 

Cascara, fl., arom., F.W.B. & Co., 1-ft bot.ft 80 

Cascara, fl.. arom., F.W.B. & Co., 5-ft bot.ft 75 

Logwood, 15 and 25-ft boxes ft 12® 13 

Logwood, 1-ft, %-ft and y± -ft boxes ft 15® 20 

Witch Hazel, distilled gal 65® 90 

Less than 5 gals, container extra. 
EXTRACTS, FLAVORING, 

Lemon, F. W. B. & Co., 2-oz doz 1 50 

Vanilla, F. W. B. &Co.,2-oz doz 1 75 

FLOWERS, Arnica ft 18® 20 

Chamomile, Eng ft 28® 30 

Chamomile, Ger ft 28® 30 

Lavender ft 12® 15 

Rosemary ft 40 

FOIL. Tin, Heavy ft 20® 25 

Tin, Medium ft 25® 30 

Tin, Light , ft 30® 35 

FORVIALDEHYD ft 55® 60 

FRUIT JUICES, F. W. B. & Co., qts., doz 5 00 

FRUITS, Crushed, F.W.B.&Co.,Kgals ,doz 10 80 

FULLERS EARTH ft 6® 10 

GELATINE,, Cox's, sml doz 1 50 

French, gold label ft 60® 65 

French, silver label ft 40@ 45 

French, bronze label ft 35® 40 

GLUE, Carpenter's ft 9® 12 

White ft 15® 18 

GLYCERINE, 50-ft cans ft 14® 14% 

10-ftcans ft 18 

2-oz bots doz 1 25® 1 50 

Schering's 1-ft bots ft 45 

Schering's 10-ft bots ft 40 

GLYCOLINE (gal., $1.50, can extra) ft 35 

GUM, Aloes, Barb .ft 25® 30 

Aloes, Barb., powd ft 30® 35 

Aloes, Cape ft 20® 25 

Aloes, Cape, powd ft 20® 25 

Aloes, Socotrine, true ft 45® 50 

Aloes Socotrine, powd ft 50® 55 



Ammoniac ft 40® 45 

Arabic, No. 1 ft 70® 75 

Arabic, No. 2 ft 50® 55 

Arabic, powd., No. 1 ft 70® 75 

Arabic, powd., French ft 90® 1 00 

Arabic, sorts ft 40® 45 

Asafetida ft 32® 35 

Asafetida, powd ft 45® 50 

Benzoin ft 50® 55 

Benzoin, powd ft 60® 70 

Catechu ft 9® 12 

Catechu, powd ft 32® 35 

Guaiac ft 38® 40 

Guaiac, powd ft 45® 50 

Myrrh ....ft 35® 38 

Myrrh, powd ft 38® 40 

Olibanum ft 2o@ 30 

Opium ft 3 15® 3 25 

Opium, powd ft 4 00® 4 20 

Shellac, orange ft 32® 35 

Shellac, orange, ground ft So® 38 

Shellac, white ft 35® 40 

Shellac, white, powd ft 40® 45 

Spruce, tears ft 1 -°@ 1 g 

Tragacanth, flake ft 90® 95 

Tragacanth, sorts ft 45® 50 

Tragacanth, powd ft 1 00® 1 10 

HOFFMAN'S ANODYNE ft 65 

HOPS, pressed, % and K-lbs ft 16 @ 20 

Pressed, oz ft 2o 

HYDROGEN PEROXIDE. Mar- 

chand's, lbs doz 7 50 

Marchand's, J4-lbs doz 50 

Marchand's, X"l bs do2, o l- 

Marchand's, Mi-lbs . doz j 2o 

M. C. W., or P. & W., 1 lbs doz 4 80 

M. C. W., or P. & W., %-lbs doz 3 00 

M. C. W., or P. & W., 14-lbs doz 1 80 

Oakland, 1 lb doz b 00 

Oakland, ^-lbs doz 3 7o 

Oakland, %-lbs doz 2 DU 

U. S. P. lib ft " 

tj' s! , ~P ' 1 lb full doz 3 25 

HYDROZONE, 1-ibbots dcz 10 50 

%-lb bots doz 7 20 

jl-lb bots doz 4 75 

Ks-lb bots doz 2 25 

ICHTHYOL oz . ™ 

Ichthyol £ „^ 6 2° 

INDIGO * (0® /5 

INSECT POWDER, Buhach, 6-lb cans.ft 50® 60 

Dalmatian, bulk ft 28® 40 

Hill's California, bulk ft 35® 45 

"T. B." 6-lb cans •••B> . *" 

"T. B." 1-lb cans doz 011 

"T. B,"%-lbcans doz A 20 

"T. B." small doz 1 25 

IODINE, re-subl oz ao 

Re-subl & 3 60® 3 80 

IODOFORM oz 4U 

Iodoform.. »> 3 81 ® 4 00 

IRON, carbonate precip ft J- 6 ® 18 

Chloride, solution B> 2& ® *? 

Iodide oz % 

Sub-sulphate (Monsell oz 

Sub-sulphate (Monsel) ft §4® 40 

Sub-sulphate solution » f® f 

Sulphate, dried » ^f f 

Sulphate, pure cryst., bulk ft |@ ™ 

Sulphate, pure cryst., 1-lb bots ft 14® 18 

JUICE, Grape, Los Gatos, pts doz 4 00 

Grape, Welch's, Y 2 pts doz 1 9U 

Grape, Welch's, pints : doz i 10 

Grape, Welch's, quarts doz a 

LANOLIN, Leibreich's ft X 00 

LEAD, acetate, coml » f® f. 

Acetate, powd » 20® 25 

Acetate C. P » ^7® 30 

Subacet. solu., Goulard's ft 30® 30 

LEAVES, Bay » «® $ 

Buchu.long » f® £5 

Buchu, short » z ~® %a 

Rosemary, bulk » f® 50 

Sage, Ks and *s » 18 @ | 5 

Sage, ozs £ ,, n „ ,5 

Senna, Alex » *°@ % 

Senna, Alex., powd JP 2 

Senna, Tinnevelli a f°@ 55 

Senna, Tinnevelli, powd ft 20® 1 

Uva Ursi ;- ro L ~ w 

LEECHES, (25 or more, 8c.) ea 

LIME. Chloride, 35-ft cans .--ft 4 % 

Chloride, Acme, 1-lb cans doz J. .0 

Chloride, Acme, %-lb cans -doz »U 

Chloride, Acme, 5^-lb cans doz 40 

Chloride, Electron, 1-lb cans doz J. -u 

Chloride, Phoenix, 1-lb cartons doz 1 iu 

LITHARGE »> 7 ^@ 10 

LONDON PURPLE ft 15® 20 



16 



THE CALIFORNIA DRUGGIST 



LOZENGES, Licorice, 5-lb boxes ft 

Licorice, "Acme," 5-lb boxes ft 

Peppermint, 5-lb boxes ft 

LYUOPODIUM ft 

I.YE. concentrated (case, $3.50) doz 

LTSOL, 1-lb bots ft 

MAGNESIA, Calcined, 1-lb tin ft 

Carbonate, Jenning's, 2 and 4-oz ft 

Carbonate, K. & M., 4-oz., 2 oz. and l-oz..ft 

Carbonate, K. & M., powdered ft 

Carbonate, K. & M., S. S ft 

Eff. citrate, Herring's doz 

MANGANESE, black oxide ft 

MANNA, large flake ft 

Small flake ft 

MENTHOL, (oz. 30c.) ft 

MERCURY ft 

Bi-sulphate ft 

Iodide, green oz 

Iodide, red oz 

MORPHINE, sulph., % oz oz 

Sulph., '/s oz., 2}4oz. bxs oz 

Sulph., 1-oz tins oz 

Sulph., 5-oz tins oz 

MOSS, Iceland ft 

Irish ft 

MUSK. Canton, 1-oz bxs oz 

Tonquin, Yt oz bots ea 

MUSTARD Colburn's,6 lb cans ft 

Ground California ft 

NAP HTH ALINE, balls, cakes or flakes..ft 

NUTMEGS ft 

Ground ft 

NUTS, Areca ft 

Areca.powd ft 

Kola ft 

NUX VOMICA ft 

Powdered ft 

OIL, Almond, bitter oz 

Almond, sweet ft 

Amber, rect ft 

Anise ft 

Bay oz 

Benne (can extra) gal 

Bergamot, Sanderson ft 

Bergamot, Sicilian ft 

Cassia ft 

Castor "A A" gal 

Castor, machine gal 

Castor, special com'l gal 

Less than 5 gals., can extra. 

Cedar, coml ft 

Cedar, pure ft 

China nut (can extra) gal 

Cloves ft 

Cocoanut ft 

Cod liver, Norwegian (can extra) gal 

Cottonseed gal 

Less than 5 gal., can extra. 

Croton ft 

Cubebs ft 

Eucalyptus ft 

Geranium Rose oz 

Hemlock, pure ft 

Lard gal 

Less than 5 gal can extra. 

Lavender flowers ft 

Lavender, garden ft 

Lemon, Sanderson ft 

Lemon, Sicilian ft 

Mustard, Essential oz 

Neatsfoot (less than 5-gal. can extra) ...gal 

Olive, California, qts doz 

Olive, Italia, 1 gal cans gal 

Olive, Malaga, can extra gal 

Orange, bitter ft 

Orange, sweet ft 

Origanum ft 

Pennyroyal ft 

Peppermint Hotchkiss ft 

Peppermint, Western ft 

Pinus Sylvestris ft 

Rhodium oz 

Rose oz 

Rosemary flowers ft 

■Sandalwood, Eng oz 

Sandalwood, Ger ft 

Sassafras ft 

Sewing Machine, Nye's, small doz 

Sewing Machine. Nye's, large doz 

Sperm. Nye's crystal gal 

Sperm, pure, w. b gal 

Less than 5 gal can extra. 

Spike ft 

Turpentine, rect., Merck ft 

I'nion salad gal 

Less than S gal can extra. 

Winterpreen ft 

Wormwood ft 

OIL CAKE, ground ft 

OINTMENT, Citrine ft 

Mercurial, ' ', m ft 

Mercurial % m ft 

Zinc, beuz. oxide tb 

ORANGE PEEL Hi 

PAPOID, J4 or 1-oz bots oz 

PARAFFIN It' 

PARIS GREEN B> 

l's, !S's, l/i'S ft 

PBTROLATUM, ex. amber B> 

Snow while ft 

PHENACETIN (25 ozs. .95) oz 

PHOSPHORUS, 11-ft cans ft 

1-lb cans ft 

J^ and '^ -cans ft 

PLASTER PARIS ft 

Dentist's If' 

POISON, purple ft 



18® 



85 

14 

50@ 55 

90 

65 

65 

35 

25 

35 

60 

2 00 

6@ 8 

90® 1 00 

60® 65 

2 S5® 3 10 

68® 75 

65® 70 

25 

26 

2 50® 2 80 

2 45® 2 75 

2 25® 2 55 

2 20fe 2 50 

15 

20 

35 

4 50 

28 

15 



14® 
4® 

l',ll<„ 

65® 
30® 
35® 
25® 
15® 
20® 

25® 



65 
70 
35 

Id 
35 
20 
25 
65 
45 
55 

2 40® 2 60 
45® 50 

1 15® 1 25 

3 40® 3 60 
3 00® 3 20 

2 25@ 2 50 
1 25® 1 35 

45® 50 
75® 80 

40® 50 

75® 80 



80® 


1 00 


20® 


30 


1 10® 


1 2o 


55® 


70 


1 35® 1 50 


1 50® 


1 io 


65® 


75 


65® 


75 


75® 


80 


7o@ 


80 


2 25® 


2 40 


75i.. 


80 


2 uiif,. 


?i 


1 25® 




(io 


'o/Fr 


80 


] 


2 00 




1 85 


1 00(3 1 25 


4 50(5 1 75 


2 25® 2 50 


;,n„, 


60 


] frtlfri 


1 75 


2 10® 


2 25 


1 40® 


1 60 


1 2NM 


1 40 


III,,, 


75 


7 50(§ 10 00 


1 50® 


1 6b 




50 


:; inn.. 


3 25 


75® 


8o 




40 




75 




75 




1 25 


_•:„„ 


35 




4o 


75® 


80 


1 70® 1 90 


I ii.i„, 


") 00 


02'X@ 


1)3 




Kb 


50® 


55 





66 




T.i 


15® 


18 




; 00 


10® 


15 




26 




B0 


hi ,„, 
30® 


9 
35 




1 00 




75 






95® 1 05 


02® 


05 


nl„, 


08 


08® 


10 



POTASH, Babbift's, (case $3.50) doz 

Caustic, crude ft 

Caustic, white, stick ft 

Bichromate ft 

Carbonate ft 

Chlorate ft 

Cyanide, mining ft 

Cyanide, pure granular ft 

Iodide ft 

Nitrate ft 

Permanganate ft 

Prussiate, red ft 

Prussiate, yellow ft 

PUMICE STONE, lump ft 

Powd ft 

QUASSIA, Chips ft 

QUININE, 1-oz bottle oz 

1-oz tin oz 

5-oz tin oz 

25-oz tin oz 

50-oz tin oz 

100-oz tin oz 

RED PRECIPITATE ft 

RESIN , ft 

ROOT, Aconite ft 

Althea, cut ft 

Blood ft 

Blood, powd ft 

Calamus, peeled , lb 

Gentian ft 

Gentian, powd ft 

Ginger, African _ lb 

Ginger, Jamaica ft 

Goldenseal fl> 

Goldenseal, powd ft 

Ipecac, powd ft 

Licorice, select ft 

Licorice, cut ft 

Licorice, powd ft 

Orris, powd ft 

Rhubarb ft 

Rhubarb cubes ft 

Rhubarb fingers ft 

Rhubarb, powd ft 

Rhubarb, powd., Allen's, Eng ft 

Sarsaparilla, Hond ft 

Sarsaparilla, Hond, gro ft 

Sarsaparilla, Mex ft 

Sarsaparilla, Mex., gro ft 

Valerian ft 

Valerian, powd ft 

ROTTEN STONE, powd ft 

SACCHARIN, 25 gm. cartons ea 

SAFFRON, American ft 

Spanish oz 

SAL EPSOM ft 

Epsom 4-oz cartons doz 

Glauber ft 

Nitre, cryst ft 

Nitre, powd... ft 

Rochelle ft 

Soda ft 

SALOL, (oz30) ft 

SEED, Auise, Ital ft 

Anise, powd ft 

Bird, mixed, 1-lbs., 60-lb case case 

Bird, mixed, 1 ft doz 

Canary ft 

Caraway ft 

Cardamom ft 

Celery ft 

Coriander tb 

Flax, cleaned ft 

Flax, ground ft 

Hemp ft 

Millet ft 

Mustard ft 

Poppy, blue ft 

Rape ft 

Sabadilla, powd ft 

Worm, American ft 

Worm, Levant ft 

SEIDLITZ MIXTURE ft 

Powders, single, 100s box 

Powders, 3's doz 

Powders, fi's doz 

Powders. 10s doz 

SHEEP DIP, Carbolic gal 

Little's 1 gal cans gal 

Little's 5 gal cans gal 

SNUFF, Garrett's Scotch, blads ft 

Garrett's Scotch, 1-oz tins doz 

Garrett's Scotch, 2-oz tins doz 

Garrett's Scotch, 4-oz tins doz 

Garrett's Scotch, 6 oz bots doz 

Lorillard's Maccaboy, 4-oz bots doz 

Lorillard's Rappee. 4-oz bots doz 

SOAP, Castile, Conti white ft 

Marseilles, white ft 

Mottled, coml Ih 

Mottled, pure Ih 

Turkish, green or white Ih 

Powdered th 

German green, Stiefel's ft 

Whale Oil ft 

SODA ASH lb 

Caustic, 98 per cent ft 

Caustic, 70 per cent (Drums) ft 

Caustic, white, sticks ft 

Bicarbonate th 

Bromide ft 

Hyposulphite Ih 

Hyposulphite, new process ft 

SOLUTION, Donavan's ft 

Fo%vler's ft 

Goulard's lb 

SPERMACETI ft 

SPIRITS, Brooklyn and Columbian gal. 

Less than 5 gals, can extra. 

Nitre, V. S. P ft 

Nitre, 2-oz bots doz 



90 
13 

70 
211 
25 
17 
35 
65 

2 55® 2 65 
08® 12 
40® 60 



1%® 

45® 
15® 
15® 
14® 



32m 
09® 
06® 



37® 41 
35® 39 
:;2(g 30 
27® 34 
26® 33^ 
26® 33 
1 10 
01% to 03 
35 
40 
30 
35 
60 
16 
18 
25 
29 
7ii 
7,3 
75 
15 
30 
18 
40 



35® 
25® 
30® 

13® 
14® 
20® 
25® 
65® 
70® 
2 50® 2 



14® 
35® 



1 25® 1 50 
1 50® 1 75 



40® 
40® 
25® 
25® 
30® 
35@ 
07C 



02&® 
01%® 



1 75 
45 
45 
30 
30 
35 
40 
10 

1 00 
45 
90 
04 
35 
03 
12 
12 
30 
03 



26® 
01<^@ 
3 50® 3 65 

16® 18 

20® 25 

3 50 

75 

03%® 05 

10® 12 
1 35® 1 40 

18® 25 

10® 

HP,,,, 

1 1: :<,.,-, 

04® 

ur„„, 

HIM 

04® 
40® 



28® 30 

2 50 

00 

1 45® 1 50 

1 @ 2 00 

1 10 

1 35 

1 20 

50 

60 

1 00 

1 75 



2 50 
2 75 
16 
13 
10 
12 
11 
35 
40 
06 

(IS 

lis 
n:;.,i li:'.', 
42® 45 



18® 
10® 

07! <" 
08® 
10® 



04® 

06@ 

04 Si® 



02%@ 

03K® 
04® 

25® 

50® 

1 .•.(!.,. 1 



55® 60 
1 50 



STRONTIUM, nitrate ft 

STRY CHINE,, cryst., J-s oz bots oz 

Cryst., 1-oz bots oz 

Powd., ;/ 8 -oz bots oz 

Powd., 1-oz bots oz 

SUGAR MILK, powd ft 

SULFONAL oz 

SULPHUR, crude, ground, Cal ft 

Flour ft 

Flowers ft 

Roll ft 

SYRUP. Iodide Iron, F. W. B. & Co ft 

Rock Candy, bbls and % bbls gal 

TAR, Pine, % pints doz 

Pine, pints doz 

Pine, quarts doz 

TVATER, distilled, containers extra gal 

Orange Flower, containers extra gal 

Rose, containers extra gal 

WAX, Floor, powd ft 

Yellow, pure, ft 

White, pure ft 

White, No. 1 ft 

"WHITE PRECIPITATE ft 

ZINC, metallic, shavings ft 

Oxide, com'l ft 

Oxide, Hubbuck's ft 

Sulphate, com'l ft 

Sulphate, chem. pure ft 



14® 17 

1 25 

1 00 

1 20 

95 

25 

1 35 

03 

04% 

05 

05 

60 

75 

75 

90 

1 50 

10 

2 00® 2 25 

2 00® 2 50 

40 

30 

55 



20® 

02%® 
03%<§ 

(14 id 

0.JV5 

:.7m 



27® 
50<§ 
35® 

20® 
14® 
15<| 

Or,,,. 
17® 



40 
1 20 
&5 
15 
5C 
08 
20 



PROPRIETARY ARTICLES 

Controlled by F. W. Braun & Co. 

Braun's Carbolic Salve doz $1 25 

" Carbolic Soap doz 75 

" Coudition Powder doz 1 00 

" Essence Jamaica Ginger doz 150 

Florida Water, lge doz 3 50 

" Florida Warer, small... doz 150 

" Sarsaparilla doz 4 00 

" i Syrup Tar and Wild Cherry doz 150 

Cal. Mission Eucalyptus Lozenges doz 150 

Cal. Mission Eucalyptus Plasters ...doz 1 50 

Cal. Mission Poison Oak Remedy doz 1 50 

Cal. Root Beer doz 80 

Cal. Mocking Bird Food doz 3 00 

Coronado Sea Salt doz 80 

Hayden's Arnica Salve doz 1 00 

" Carbolic Salve doz 100 

Witch Hazel doz 1 00 

" Sanitary Towels, small gro 3 50 

" " " medium gro 3 75 

" " large gro 4 00 

Hayden's Sachet Powder, % ft bots ft 3 00 

Hunter's Witch Hazel doz 1 75 

Matchless Sarsaparilla doz 5 00 

Matchless Wild Cherry Phosphates doz 1 75 

Swain's Carbolic Powder doz 1 50 

Tarine doz 1 7.3 

" T. B." Insect Powder, 6-ft can ft 40 

" " " 1-ft " doz 5 50 

" " " %-ft " doz 3 23 

" " " siul " doz 1 25 



BRAUN'S... 

California 
Condition Powder 






IS A 



Well Established Remedy 



Having a good sale throughout Southern 
California and the Territories 



It is used for 



Horses, Cattle, Sheep and Poultry 

IT IS GOOD 

It Retails for 25 cents 
It Costs $1.00 Per Dozen 

You need it in your business ! 



MANUFACTURED 
AND SOLD BY 



F. W. BRAUN & CO. 



LOS ANGELES, CAL. 



to 



OLUME 7.] 



LOS ANGELES, JUNE, 1898. 

THE* 



[NUMBER 6. 




wM¥Kiiyj®y^lAL keVotefs to 



E^ESTSOFITHIS ^ETTABL D^JIIJeeilS'f 



> 




59/.33S- 



F. W. BRAUN & CO., WHOLESALE DRUGGISTS 



COLUflBIAN SPIRITS 



TRADE MARK 



THE EQUAL of ALCOHOL for all 
PURPOSES EXCEPT INTERNAL use. 

MANHATTAN SPIRIT CO. 

Sole Manufacturers, BUFFALO, N. Y. 



The Price to RETAILERS is 
$8 -Case of 50 glass bottles 




See that the 
Labels bear the well known 
RED DIAMOND MARK of the 
APOLLINARIS COMPANY, LIMITED. 



SOLE EXPORTERS: 
The APOLLINflRlS 60MPflNY, Ld., 



London 



JOHN CAFFREY, 21 Sutter St., San Francisco 
Representing United Agency Co., 503 Fifth Ave., New York 



LHCTOPGPTI N0 



LACTOPEPTINE Powder, in ounces, per dozen $8 00 

LACTOPEPTINE Powder, in half-pound bottles, per pound 9 60 

Lbs. per doz. 5-tb Bot. Ea 

LACTOPEPTINE Elixir $12 00 $4 50 

LACTOPEPTINE Elixir with Bismuth 12 00 4 50 

LACTOPEPTINE Elixir with Strychnia and Bismuth 12 00 4 50 

LACTOPEPTINE Elixir with Calisaya 12 00 4 50 

LACTOPEPTINE Elixir with Calisaya, Iron and Bismuth 12 00 4 50 

LACTOPEPTINE Elixir with Gentian and Chloride of Iron 12 00 4 50 

LACTOPEPTINE Elixir with Phosphate of Iron, Quinia and Strychnia 12 00 4 50 

LACTOPEPTINE Liquid 12 00 4 50 

LACTOPEPTINE with Beef, Iron and Wine 9 00 3 25 

Per Doz. 6-tb Bot. 

LACTOPEPTINE Syrup with Phosphates $12 00 $5 50 



NEW YORK PHARMACAL ASSOCIATION, Yonkers, N. Y. 



^^^s^^^^s^** t ^s^Si^!Si*r^^^^^^^^S^^^ 




CAP. 



CORRUGATED END. 



TUBE CONTAINING MENTHOL. 







THIS CUT ILLUSTRATES THE THREE PARTS OF 



Blanchard's Hard Rubber Pocket 

I r\ Y\ -* 1 r> f This is positively the Finest Menthol Inhaler 
IlllldlCI. — on the Market 



WHY NOT SELL THE BEST? 



Retails for 50 Cents. 
Price, $4.00 per dozen. 



BLANCHARD'S INHALER is put up in handsome easel cartons, an 
attractive advertisement and an ornament to any drug store. 



BLANCHARD MANUFACTURING CO., Cincinnati, O. 

The Trade Supplied by F. W. BRAUN & CO., Los Angeles and San Diego. 



50 YEARS' 
EXPERIENCE 




Trade Marks 
Designs 
Copyrights &c 

Anyone sending it sketch and dcsertntlon may 
qulcklv ascertain our opinion free whether an 
invention is probably patentable, Communiea- 
ttons strictly confidential. Handbook on Patents 
sent free. Oldest agency for securing patents. 

Patents taken t linmuli Munn & Co. receive 
special ifit ice, without c harg e, in the 

Scientific American. 

A handsomely illustrated weekly. Largest cir- 
culation of anysolentlflc Imirmil. Terms, $3 a 
year ; four months, $L Sold by all newsdealers. 

MUNN &Co. 361Bfoad ^ New York 

Branch Office, 025 V St., Washington, D. C 






Jtye (alifortyia Dru<§<§ist. 

A MONTHLY JOURNAL 

DEVOTED TO THE INTERESTS OF THE RETAIL DRUGGIST. 



Volume VII.] 



LOS ANGELES, CAL., JUNE, 1898. 



[Number 7. 



5l?e ^aliforpia Dru^ist 



PUBLISHED MONTHLY BY 



THE CALIFORNIA DRUGGIST PUB. CO. 

P. O. Drawer 406, Station C. - - LOS ANGELES, CAL. 

(To whom all Communications should be addressed.) 



F. S. LANGDON, ... .... PRESIDENT 

J. Q. BRAUN, ... .... Treasurer 

R. A. ALLEN, . Editor 

TERMS OF SUBSCRIPTION. 

Per Year $1 00 

Single Copies 10 

ADVERTISING RATES. 

One Page ■ $100 00 

Half Page 60 00 

Fourth Page 35 00 

Eighth Page 20 00 

Cards (per month) 1 50 

g^° Advertisements for positions or assistants, or to buy or sell Drug 
Stores, are inserted free of charge. 

Items of interest to Pharmacists are solicited. 

The official organ of the San Diego Retail Druggists' Association. 

The official organ of the Los Angeles County Pharmaceutical Associa- 
tion. 



TRADE follows the flag. That is why the commercial inter- 
ests of the United States demand the retention of the 
Philippines, which have dropped into our hands so oppor- 
tunely, and will likewise demand the permanent possession of 
Porto Rico. We can use them in our business. 



"THE American Pharmaceutical Association meeting in Balti- 
' more, during the week beginning August 29, will be an 
occasion of great interest, and should be attended by all who 
can possibly make it convenient to go. The entertainments 
provided include a visit to Annapolis Naval Academy, and ex- 
cursions to Gettysburg and Washington. 



YOU must procure your Special Tax Stamps by the first day 
of July, or be liable under the law. The new War Rev- 
enue Bill requires a tobacco as well as a liquor stamp if cigars 
or tobacco are sold. $25 for retail liquor dealers, and $6 for 
retail dealers in tobacco, where sales of same do not reach 
$10,000 per annum. Make application and procure your 
stamps of W. H. Harrison, Deputy Collector Internal Reve- 
nue, Los Angeles. 

(Later — From a copy of the bill just received we find 
that dealers in tobacco have no special tax to pay unless their 
sales reach 50,000 lbs. in a year. — Ed.) 



TJENRY TETLOW, Jr., has established through the Courts 
*■ *■ his absolute and exclusive right to the use of the name 
Swan Down as a designation foi a face or complexion powder. 
It is evident that parties having in stock any " Swan Down " 
powder of other make than Tetlow's will be wise to destroy or 
re-label it, and thus avoid trouble. 



r "FHE use of acetylene gas in stores as an illuminant is at- 
* tended with objectionable features, so that it is being 
thrown out by parties who have experimented with it. The 
feature especially unpleasant is the blackening of the ceiling 
by the smoke. We doubt, too, that there is any great economy 
in its use, at the present cost of carbide. 



HTHE aphorism "there's always room up higher" means, if 
*■ it means anything, that the thoroughly trained and ac- 
complished man has always a position waiting for him. Think 
it over, boys, and see if it is "luck " that gives the hundred 
dollar position to another than yourself while you are hustling 
to get a fifty dollar job, and can't keep even that. 



A SERIES of tests made by Dr. E. Q. Thornton and Dr. 
**• Chas. A. Holder, in the laboratory of experimental thera- 
peutics of Jefferson Medical College, Philadelphia, seem to 
demonstrate beyond question that Moor's antidote for morphine 
poison (permanganate of potash) is of no value whatever given 
hypodermically. On the other hand, it is undoubtedly a 
chemical antidote when both the morphine and permanganate 
are together in the stomach. 



T^HE liquefaction of hydrogen, which Prof. Dewar of London 
has accomplished in a practical way, and in considerable 
quantities, brings to a finish the problem of many years as to 
its possibility. All the gases have now been brought to the 
liquid state, and results in chemical science hitherto not 
dreamed of are sure to follow promptly upon this latest dem- 
onstration. 

It is but a few years since air was first liquefied in the labor- 
atory. It is now prepared in quantities large enough to 
handle in bucketfuls, enabling extremely interesting experi- 
ments to be made with it. In liquefying hydrogen, the lowest 
temperature ever produced by man — 205 centigrade — was 
reached. The next thing for Prof. Dewar to accomplish in 
this line is to freeze his liquid hydrogen, which may perhaps 
be done if he can produce a lower temperature by a hundred 
or two degrees than that already produced. Then we appre- 
hend he will have gone to, the extreme limit of human possi- 
bilities in this direction, the production of metallic hydrogen, 



THE CALIFORNIA DRUGGIST. 






THE Antikamnia Company, through its secretary, Mr. J. 
* W. Cox, has just run down another set of counterfeiters, 
this time in Atlanta, Ga. The history of Mr. Cox's dealings 
with Los Angeles counterfeiters was repeated, the machinery 
and supplies being promptly located and seized, and the parties 
arraigned before the court. With such object lessons before 
them it is surprising that druggists will continue to be led into 
complicitity with fraudulent operations of this kind. They 
are certain to be found out, sooner or later, and to suffer the 
mortification of exposure as well as pecuniary loss, and the 
liability of imprisonment. 
It doesn't pay. 

TTHE Annual Commencement exercises of the Philadelphia 
*■ College of Pharmacy took place April 14th, on which oc- 
casion the degrees of the graduating class were distributed as 
follows : Doctors in Pharmacy, 87 ; Pharmaceutical Chemists, 
10 ; graduates in Pharmacy, 10. We note among the Phar- 
maceutical Chemists one Californian, Wm. R. Monroe. 

The John M. Maisch Memorial Prize of a Zentmayer micro- 
scope offered for original histological work on American plants, 
was awarded to Gilbert Kent, Preston. 

Further prizes were also awarded, as follows : James David 
King, gold medal and certificate. 

Jacob Franklin Strawinski, gold medal and a second prize of 
$20. 

Joseph Huntington, two prizes of $25 each, and another of a 
fine Troemner Agate Prescription Balance. 

Theodore S. Schlauch, $20. 

Audrew C. Parse, $25. 

Chas. W. Dirmitt, $25. 

Joseph Huntington and George Augustus Schwab were 
awarded the grade of distinguished. 

The new three-years course of the P. C. P. is considered to 
be an eminent success. It is easier upon the student, and yet 
the student does more and better work. We are indebted to 
the Alumni Report for May for the foregoing facts. 



"THE adoption of the metric system by the British Pharma- 
* copeia in its recent revision, goes a long way toward 
breaking down the old conservatism that still holds back the 
English-speaking nations from enjoying the advantages of the 
change. With the lesson of our currency before us, the 
American people should easily perceive the benefit to be de- 
rived from the extension of the decimal computation to all 
measurements. We would shrink from a proposition to ex- 
change our dollars and cents for the pounds, shillings and 
pence of our English friends, with the additional brainwork 
required for the facile elucidation of their mathematical com- 
plications. The Englishman, by his habit of mind does his 
financial thinking in his own currency system, and probably 
manages to figure seven per cent interest on an odd number of 
pounds and shillings with accuracy, and a reasonable prompt- 
ness. It would seem from our point of view, however, that 
his labor would be vastly reduced were he to adopt our form 
of currency. 

Applying this object lesson (of our currency) which is al- 
ways before us, to the reasonableness of making all weights 
and measures equally simple in computation, with the added 
advantage of harmony between all .parts of the great system, 
we may readily believe that our absolute adoption of the metric 



system will remove from our shoulders a burden like unto the 
"old man of the mountain" of the Arabian Nights. 



A CIRCULAR letter has recently been sent out to the 
retail drug trade by Mr. C. F G. Meyer, president of 
Meyer Bros.' Drug Co., relative to the cut-rate problem, so long 
a menace to the prosperity (and almost to the existence") of the 
business in portions of our country, calling attention to the 
probable advance in prices of proprietary goods due to war 
taxes, and pointing out the excellent opportunity afforded by 
the new conditions for returning to regular prices Druggists 
are urged to bury the hatchet and to mutually agree upon 
legitimate rates once more. 

We need hardly say that our sentiments are heartily in ac- 
cord with the spirit of this circular ; and we hope that the 
words of advice given therein will be heeded in every com- 
munity to which they are applicable. Mr. Meyer is well 
known as one of the soundest business men of our country, 
whose long experience and broadly extended business relations 
give his word much weight, although the conditions outlined 
by him are not such as prevail within the circle of our ob- 
servation, i. e., west of the Rocky Mountains. We are glad 
to believe that, with the exceptions noted below, the cut-rate 
problem is non-existent on this coast. The exceptions, how- 
ever, are important, covering our largest cities, San Fran- 
cisco, Los Angeles and Oakland, in California ; also, Portland 
and Seattle. 

The point of special difference to be noted between the pre- 
vailing Eastern conditions and those upon this coast, is that 
in the California cities above named the cut-rate plan was in- 
augurated, and is continued, by an incorporated drug company, 
apparently foimed for the purpose of doing the business of 
their several houses upon this plan, enjoying all the rights and 
privileges of other retail druggists, and holding the unusual 
advantages of large capital and wholesale connections. Depart- 
ment stores are not the trouble, there is no antagonism, at least 
not in San Francisco, Oakland or Los Angeles, between the 
druggists, and we believe all would gladly return to the old 
schedule were not the way effectually barred by the position 
of the strong corporation referred to. We have little hope, 
albeit a strong desire, that a change for the better will come in 
the California communities referred to, although the adoption of 
a harmonious policy and a return to schedule prices throughout 
the country would certainly gladden the hearts and relieve the 
anxieties of thousands of suffering druggists. 



r ~PHE Annual Meeting of the Arkansas Pharmaceutical Asso- 
* ciation was held at Little Rock, May nth and 12th ult. 
At the election of officers the following were re-elected : J. F. 
Dowdy, President ; J. B. Bond, Jr., Secretary ; J. A. Juugkind, 
Treasurer. For First Vice-President, R. B. King, succeeding 
H. C. Johnson, and for Second Vice-President, E. W. Thomas, 
succeeding J. W. Morton. 

The next meeting of the association will take place on the 
second Tuesday in May, 1899, at Hot Springs, lasting three 
days. 

Look sharp for War Revenue Stamps. F. W. Braun & Co. 
have made a requisition for a quantity, and will supply your 
first wants as far as able, upon early request. First come first 
served. 



THE CALIFORNIA DRUGGIST. 



FOLLOWING is a copy of a postal card circular mailed to 
the trade by F. W. Braun & Co. immediately upon receipt 
of information that the War Revenue Bill had become a law. 
No official copy of the bill as actually passed was accessible, 
therefore recourse was neccessarily had to unofficial sources. 
It gives briefly the main points of interest to the retail trade 
regarding the provisions of the law, but we observe that the 
item Chewing Gum requires explanation. • The retail package 
is not required to be stamped ; but the box containing twenty 
5-cent packages requires 4-cent stamp, and if containing 
more than one dollar's worth at retail, a further 4 cents for 
every dollar, or fraction of a dollar, in value. Manufac- 
turers will doubtless hereafter pack this article in even dollars' 
worth for the sake of economy : 

WAR TAX. 

Extracts from New Revenue Law showing special features affecting 
Drug Trade Items, becomes operative July 1st, 1898: 

Proprietary Medicinal Preparations and Articles. — Manufac- 
turers of medicinal proprietary articles and preparations shall pay a 
stamp tax at the rate of one eighth of 1 cent on packets, boxes, etc., of a 
value not exceeding 5 cents; one-quarter of 1 cent on 10 cents, three- 
eighths of 1 cent on 15 cents, five-eighths of 1 cent on 25 cents, and 
five-eighths of 1 cent for each additional 25 cents retail value. 

Perfumery and Cosmetics, and Similar Articles. — On every 
packet, box, bottle, etc., or other enclosure containing any essence, ex- 
tract, toilet water, cosmetic, vaseline, petroleum, hair oil, pomade, hair 
dressing, hair restorative, hair dye, tooth wash, dentifrice, tooth paste, 
aromatic cachous or similar substances of articles, not exceeding in 
value 5 cents for each package, box, etc., at retail, one-eighth of 1 
cent ; higher rates are paid upon retail values, as in the case of 
proprietary medicinal preparations previously described. 

Note : Dealers in the above enumerated articles must stamp goods in 
stock at the rates named when sold at retail. All allowance or 
drawback in Schedule B on which tax has been paid, shall be paid 
when such goods are exported. 

Chewing Gum. — Each package of a retail value of $1 or fraction 
thereof shall pay a stamp tax of 4 cents. 

Wines. — Wines, sparkling or other, bottled, 1 cent for each pint or 
less ; bottles containing more than one pint, 2 cents. 

PENALTIES. 
Violation of the act £y evasion of the stamp taxes on proprietary and 
patented articles is punishable by a fine of $500 or six months' im- 
prisonment. Evasion of the stamp tax on documents, papers, etc., is 
punishable by a fine of $100. Forging or counterfeiting stamps is 
punishable by a fine of $1,000, or confinement at hard labor for five 
years. 

Cigar and cigarette stock in excess of 20,000 in hands of dealers are 
subject to additional tax. Dealers in cigars and tobaccos must pay a 
yearly Revenue License of not less than $6. [Thrown out. — Ed.] 

Further information will be sent to you as soon as the Commissioner 
of Internal Revenue promulgates instructions for enforcing the 
measure now daily expected. 

Yours truly, 

F. W. BRAUN & CO., 

Wholesale Druggists, 

Los Angeles. 

It will pay you to bear in mind that F. W. Braun & Co.'s 
Fruit Juices and Crushed Fruits are more economical to use 
than any other upon the market. • They have no superior in 
quality, being made fiom selected thoroughly ripe fruit. 



IT will be a most remarkable feat for the Internal Revenue 
Department to accomplish should the new proprietary stamps 
be issued within the very short time before the war taxes go 
into effect. It seems to us impossible to manufacture and dis- 
tribute them for some weeks to come. Our country is too big 
to permit its being done. Meantime we are expecting some 
modification of the requirements of the law in order that busi- 
ness may not be suspended or hampered. We think that a 
record of sales of goods requiring stamps might be kept, the 
account sworn to and the tax paid up to the time stamps are 
forthcoming. This would work all right on proprietary goods, 
and they are all we are at present considering. 



Coca Cola may now be obtained of F. W. Braun & Co. Or- 
iginal packages are 5, 10, 35 and 50-gallon kegs and barrels. 
Your list of soda water drinks is incomplete if you omit Coca 
Cola. 



A NILIN was first discovered (Nat' I Drug. )in. 1826, through 
**- the destructive distillation of indigo, and was called 
crystalline by the discoverer. The same oily substance was 
found ten years later in coal-tar by another chemist, who, not 
knowing of its previous discovery, gave it the name of Kyanol, 
from the fact of its yielding, on treatment with chloride of lime, 
a beautiful blue color. A third investigator a few years later 
rediscovered the substance in indigo, and gave it the name 
anilin, by which it is now known. An interesting fact in con- 
nection with this useful product, now so extensively utilized all 
over the civilized world, is found in the recent synthetic pro- 
duction of indigo itself from anilin, by a German chemist, 
which is one of the strangest of the many strange features in 
the history of synthesis. 

[Another remarkable thing is that while anilin as first made 
was a very costly product from the cheap indigo, now indigo 
is produced from anilin so cheaply as to be likely to destroy 
the (agricultural) indigo industry entirely, if reports that 
reach us are true. — Ed. Cal. Drug.] 



Past Due Accounts. 

In a very able address delivered by W. H. Preston, ex-Presi- 
dent of the National Association of Credit Men, at the conven- 
tion of the Iowa and Nebraska Retail Implement Dealers' As- 
sociation, at Council Bluffs, Iowa, the speaker referred to past 
due accounts as follows : 

When a statement of past due account is received, the 
amount should be promptly remitted or an acknowledgment of 
statement sent and reasons for non-payment given and the 
prospects for payment in the future. There is nothing that 
will influence a Credit Man more than the treatment of 
statement of past due account, for in this is shown one of the 
important characteristics of the conduct of business. A state- 
ment of past due account is always a request for immediate at- 
tention and should be granted this courtesy without delay, and 
if remittance is not made, reasons should be given. It is cus- 
tomary with many houses to give a ten days' notice of inten- 
tion to make draft. When such notice is given preparation 
should be immediately made to meet the draft, but if you pre- 
fer not to have the draft made it is your duty to either promptly 
remit the amount or request the draft to be withheld, giving 
reasons for such request and prospect of payment. 



Remember the meeting of the State Board of Pharmacy, at 
San Francisco, July 13. 

The price of antipyrin has been reduced to 90 cents per 
ounce, the patent on the article having expired. 



THE CALIFORNIA DRUGGIST. 



Injunction — The Fig Syrup Co. 

JUDGE MORROW, of the United States Circuit Court, 
Northern District of California, has granted the Fig Syrup 
Company an injunction against Clinton E. Worden & Co. and 
others, as appears below. The company expects now to bring 
suit against several other manufacturers of imitation Fig 
Syrup. 

The text of the injunction is as follows : 

In the Circuit Court of the United States, in and for the 
Ninth Circuit, Northern District of California. 

California Fig Syrup Company, 

Complainant, 

vs. 

Clinton E. Worden & Company, a Cor- 
poration, J. A. Bright, T. F. Bacon, 
E. Little, C. J. Schmelz and Lucius 
Little. 

ORDER FOR INJUNCTION, PENDENTE LITE- 

It is thereupon Ordered, Adjudged and Decreed that the in- 
junction and restraining order heretofore made herein be continued 
until final decree herein, and to that end that an injunction be issued as 
prayed for in the bill of complaint herein, strictly commanding and 
enjoining the defendants, Clinton E. Worden & Company, a corpora- 
tion ; J. A. Bright, T. F. Bacon, E. Little, C. J. Schmelz and Lucius 
Little, and each and all of them, their and each and all of their agents, 
employees, workmen, servants, attorneys and counselors, from making, 
using or selling any liquid laxative medicine, marked with the name 
" Syrup of Figs," or "Fig Syrup," or any colorable imitation of the 
same ; from making, using or selling any laxative medicine put in 
boxes, wrappers or cartons, having on the same the name " Syrup of 
Figs," or "Fig Syrup," or any colorable imitation of same; from 
making, using or selling any liquid laxative medicine put up in boxes, 
wrappers or cartons, so as to be like the cartons, wrappers or boxes used 
by complainant in connection with the liquid laxative medicine made 
by it, or so as to be a colorable imitation of the cartons marked Exhibit 
A, and filed in this case, being a carton, box or wrapper used by com- 
plainant for its liquid laxative medicine, marked and named " Syrup of 
Figs," or "Fig Syrup," from making, using or selling any box, wrapper 
or carton as a wrapper or case for a liquid laxative medicine bearing 
upon it the figure of a branch of a fig tree with leaves and fruit, and 
surrounded by the words in a circle, "San Francisco Syrup of Figs 
Company, San Francisco, Cal. ," or any similar words or figures, or any 
colorable imitation of such a symbol or mark, or from making use of, 
in any way, in connection with the liquid laxative medicine, the name 
"Syrup of Figs Co.," or from using any name whereof the words "Fig 
Syrup Co." or "Syrup of Figs Co." form a part as a business name of a 
company, or concern, or corporation engaged in the business of making 
and selling a laxative medicine. 

(Signed) WM. W. MORROW, Judge. 

March 14, 1898. 



Hugh K. Moore, a student at the Massachusetts Institute of 
Technology, has made a discovery of a valuable process for 
manufacturing chloride of lime, or bleaching powder, by 
which he claims to be able to produce this article of 99 per 
cent purity. More than $3,000,000 worth of an inferior prod- 
uct of chloride of lime is imported every year in the face of 
a heavy tariff. The discoverer of this process is twenty-six 
years of age, son of a clergyman. He has been deeply inter- 
ested in chemistry all his life, and he is in receipt of letters of 
congratulations from scientific men in all parts of the world 
who have become much interested in his discovery. A factory 
is being built in Rumford Falls, Me., where it will soon be in 
operation. Some prominent capitalists are interested in the 
scheme to make commercial use of the discover}'. — Era. 



When a Feller is out of a Job. 

All nature is sick from her heels to her hair 

W'en a feller is out of a job ; 
She is all out of kilter an' out of repair 

W'en a feller is out of a job. 
Ain't no juice in the earth or salt in the sea, 
Ain't no ginger in life in this land of the free, 
An' the universe ain't what it's cracked up to be 

W'en a feller is out of a job. 

Wat's the use of blue skies an' of blossomin' trees, 

W'en a feller is out of a job, 
W'en your boy has large patches on both of his knees, 

An' a feller is out of a job ? 
Them patches, I say, look so big to your eye 
That they shut out the lan'scape an' cover the sky, 
An' the sun can't shine. through 'em the best it can try 

W'en a feller is out of a job. 

W'en a man has no part in the work of the earth, 

W'en a feller is out of a job, 
He feels the whole blunderin' mistake of his birth 

W'en a feller is out of a job ; 
He feels he's no share in the whole of the plan, 
That he's got the mitten from natures own han', 
That he's a rejected and left-over man, 

W'en a feller is out of a job. 

For you've jest lost your holt with the rest of the crowd 

When a feller is out of a job ; 
An' you feel like a dead man with nary a shroud, 

W'en a feller is out of a job. 
You are crawlin' aroun', but yer out of the game : 
You may bustle about, but yer dead just the same — 
Yer dead with no tombstone to puff up your name, 

W'en a feller is out of a job. 

— Sam Walter Foss, in Omaha Druggist. 



First Tramp : "I hear dere's a new drug what kin be put 
in a cup of coffee an' it'll take away yer desire fer liquor widout 
yer knowin' it." Second tramp : " Great hevings ! Some of 
dem wimen temperance cranks'!! be tryin' dat game on us ! " 



Tooth Soap. 

(Laviendes.) 

(1) Castile soap 1 pound 

Prepared chalk 1 ounce 

Carbolic acid 20 grains 

Oil wintergreen 30 minims 

Shave the soap into ribbons, beat into a paste with a little 
water and add first prepared chalk, and lastly the carbolic acid 
and wintergreen oil dissolved in a little alcohol. 

(2) Dentist Frohmann, of Berlin, offers the following : 
Thymol 0.25 gm., extract of krameria 1 gm. ; these are to be 
dissolved in 6 gm. of hot glycerin, then calcined magnesia 0.5 
gm., powdered borax 4 gm., and powdered soap in sufficient 
quantity are added to make 30 gm. of product to which 1 gm. 
of oil of wintergreen is added. 

(3) White castile soap, powdered 10 av. ounces 

Tincture of rhatany 3% fl. ounces 

Precipitated chalk 3)( av. ounces 

Benzoic acid ]/z av. ounces 

Potassium chlorate, powder % av. ounces 

Borax, powder }i av. ounces 

Saccharin 40 grains 

Oil cinnamon, sufficient to flavor. 

Make into a hard mass by the addition of glycerin and 
water, press into tin boxes and dry. — Era. 



" 'Tis passing sweet," sighed the young assistant to his lay 
friend. "What?" said the victim. Diabetes, yelled the 
youth, dodging the directory. 



THE CALIFORNIA DRUGGIST. 



Ambulance Ship. 

The construction of our modern battleships is such as to 
render an ambulance ship to accompany each squadron, to re- 
ceive the wounded after an engagement, an absolute necessity. 
An abulance car is already in use on one or two railroads. 
The idea of an ambulance ship was first suggested by Dr. 
Rufus I. Tyson, when Surgeon-General of the Navy. The idea 
was taken up by Dr. Van Riper, the present Surgeon-General 
and fully elaborated in a paper read before the. International 
Medical Congress. In outlining his plan Dr. Van Riper said : 
" The vessel as designed will be 3,550 tons displacement ; 275 
feet on the load line, and 300 feet over all ; 50 feet beam and 
drawing 18 feet ; a coal capacity of 450 tons, giving 18 days' 
steaming at 10 knots. The water tanks will hold 9000 gallons. 
The ship will carry 4 steam launches and 4 barges, each barge 
arranged with a flying floor between the thwarts so as to con- 
veniently carry tackle coils on the floor. There will be beds 
for 274 and hammock space for 86. State rooms for 8 disabled 
officers, and cOt space for 12. The forward wards on the upper 
deck have one tier of baths for a ward of isolation, or to ac- 
commodate more serious cases. The vessel can accommodate 
336 wounded men. There are quarters for four medical offi- 
cers, 2 apothecaries and 12 nurses. Near the center of the 
ship, on the bath deck, is a well ventilated and well lighted 
operating-room, 18x21 feet. As soon as the action is over a 
launch will tow its barge alongside, receive the wounded and 
take them to the ambulance ship." 

The naval authorities in their naval preparations for a war 
in which the principal fighting must be on the ocean are carry- 
ing the suggestion of the Surgeon-General into effect by pur- 
chasing the Cromwell liner Creole, which they have converted 
into a floating hospital to accompany the North Atlantic 
Squadron. Two hundred trained nurses have volunteered 
their services under the leadership of Clara Barton, of the Red 
Cross Society, and a large number of them have already been 
assigned to positions ; some on the ambulance steamer, and 
others will accompany the army to Cuba. — Medical Times. 



Next Time He Will Read the Sign Before He Speaks. 

Just inside of one of the leading drug stores of our city 
there is a blackboard, which is used very effectively for adver- 
tising purposes, the " ads. " thereon being got up in a very 
catchy manner. For instance, the other day the following was 
written upon it to catch the eye of young lady customers. 
' ' Have you a sweetheart ? If so, buy him a bottle of our pure 
Florida water." A young man who dropped in to get a glass 
of soda water saw it. Next day he was passing by with his 
girl and as they were going in to get some soda water he told 
her to read the sign. He spoke before he looked, for to his 
dismay the inscription on the blackboard was : ' ' Have you a 
baby? If so use sterilized milk." — Meyer Bros. Druggist. 



Dental Hemorrhage. 

This is quickly stopped by carbolized resin. It is a mixture 
of powdered resin four parts, carbolic acid three parts, and 
chloroform two parts. Make a short, thick cotton rope, larger 
than the wound to be treated, moisten the end well with the 
compound and plug the cavity tightly. The bleeding will 
cease almost as if by magic. — Dental Times. 



Confessions of an Errand Boy. 

When my father brought me to Mr. Reubarb's shop, to 
take the job of errand lad, he says to me, "Billy, my boy, 
lam all yer can, and spcriment, and some day thou'l turn out 
a great chi-mist." One of the first jobs master set me to do 
was to catch them narsty worms called leeches — in the Latin 
tunge called Hi-rude-o, and a good name, too. On my first 
go hoff, while I was scraping one of these beasties hoff the 
side of the hay-quarium, another divil gets onto my bare harm 
and he draws blood, he does. Says I to myself, " Billy, these 
hi-rude-o must be copped in a si-hen-tific manner in future." 
So I rigs up han hap-a-rat-us which costs no think, and it han- 
sard admirably. One of Mr. Reubarb's long boots hand a 
corkscrew. 

Somethink had to be sack-ri-ficed. So I says to the great old 
cat in the cellar, "Hi-o-doe-form' ' (because he always announces 
hisself), "I must make use of thee." So I dropped a handful 
of cotton wool into the bottom of master's boot and poured 
some chlor-hi-form on. Hi jams the boot over pussi, leaving 
his tail hout ; passed the corkscrew threw the top of the boot 
to keep him from getting out. My hobject in doing this was 
to use that there cat's tail for bait for them narsty savages, the 
hi-rude-o. Directly the cat's tail went into the water undreds 
of hi-rude-o came swimin' round and snuffin' hawful, but did 
not stick — the air of that cat's tail tickel their noses that 
much that they coffed hoff. Han hidea now struck me, I 
must burn hoff the air, and use bare meat ; so I dips puseye's 
tail in the methi-lated spirite and haplies a light. This time 
the hi-rude-o bit like deviles, and I have never had no bother 
since with them. I ope to see this method in the new B. P. 

X-PER-I-MKNT NO. 2. 

Strike-nine is a drug much like hox-halic-hasid, in fact you 
cannot tell the difference till you take it. The strike-nine 
makes cats bend their backs till their eads strike their tails 
with a crack, and hox-halic-hasid don't. There is much more 
fun to be got hout hof strike-nine. 

I noticed Hi-o-doe-form struck nine times with his back legs 
before he dyed, provin' that the drug was pure. This is the 
reason the drug got his name. — Fred Reynolds in Chemist and 
Druggist. 

Gratitude in the Transvaal. — The following singular 
death announcement appeared lately in the Krugersdorp 
Sentinel : 

SmiT. — On the 28th inst., Amy Jane Mary Smit, eldest 
daughter of John and William Smit, aged 1 day 2^ hours. 

The bereaved and heartbroken parents beg to tender their 
hearty thanks to Dr. Featon for his unremitting attention 
during the illness of deceased, and for the moderate brevity of 
his bill. Also to Mrs. Williams for the loan of clean sheets, to 
Mrs. Jurgens for running to the doctor, and to Mr. Le Roux 
for recommending mustard plasters. — C. & D. 



"The Spanish language," said the Fifth avenue bookseller, 
" is rather verbose. I mean by that you can say the same 
thing more succinctly in English. Take, for instance, the 
name of the Spanish king, ' Alphonso Leon Ferdinand Marie 
Jacques Isadore Paschal Antoine.' Translated into American, 
that's 'mud.' " — American Stationer. 



THE CALIFORNIA DRUGGIST. 



Patents of April and May, Relating to Pharmacy, etc. 

James H. Chandler, Boston, Mass., Invalid-table, 601945. 

Alexander Hoenig, Berlin, Germany, Insufflator, 602010. 

Austin V. M. Sprague, Brooklyn, N. Y., Therapeutical apparatus, 
601684. 

Seriah Stevens, Boston, Mass., Surgical lounge, 601 7 62. 

Walter S. Frost, London, England, Atomizer, 602070. 

John F. Haines, Freeport, Pa., Soda water apparatus, 602257. 

Thomas H. Hutchinson, Brooklyn, N. Y., Urinal pan, 602080. 

Richard A. Lucchesi, San Francisco, Cal., Dilator for fingers of the 
hand, 602191. 

John E. Peterson, Washington, D. C, Remedial appliance, 602228. 

Ham* V. R. Read, London, England, Stopper for discharge of aerat- 
ing capsules, 602269. 

Israel Roos, Frankfort-ou-the-Main, Germany, Making salts of para- 
midophenol, 602109. 

Wm. H. & G. E. Russell, Hasbrouck Heights, N. J., Apparatus for 
manufacturing carbureted hydrogen, 602408. 

Hiram C. Bowers, Canton, Ohio, Surgical table, 602571. 

Wilhelm Dieterle, assignor to firm of J. Hauff, Feurbach, Germany, 
Producing orthotoluene sulfonic acid, 602682. 

Daniel Hall and J. H. Kay, Ashton-under-Lyne, England, Humidify- 
ing air, 602745. 

Abijah F. Henry, Alomo, Ind., Vaginal syringe, 602751. 

Eugen Sandow, London, England, Electric muscular exerciser, 602- 
774. 

Joseph W. Scroggs, Rogers, Ark., Pessary, 602777. 

Charlie E. Swink, Chicago, 111., Medicine carton, 602668. 

Charles F. Dight, Washington, D. C, Thermal inspirator, 603021. 

Oscar Doebner, Halle-on-the-Saale, Germany, assignor to Farben- 
fabriken of Elberfeld Co., New York, N. Y. , Condensation product 
from salicylic and gallic acids, 602834. 

Ludwig O. HaJmers, assignor to Ichthyol Cesellschaft, Cordes, Her- 
manni & Co., Hamburg, Germany, Iodin derivative of ichthyol and 
thiol, 602942. 

Carl K. Judd, Bushong, Kan., Forceps, 602946. 

Fred J. S. Lau, Kansas City, Mo., Electric massage appliance, 602950. 

Wilhelm Majert, Grunau-Berlin, Germany, Purifying orthotoluene- 
sulfo-chlorid, 603195. 

Peter E. Malmstrom, New York, N. Y., Apparatus for making and 
dispensing mineral waters, 602909. 

Frederick J. Mitchell, New York, N. Y., Disinfecting apparatus, 603- 
012. 

Bernard Scheinkman, New York, N. Y., Self-retaining splint, 602917. 

Herman E. Sturcke, assignor to ^Etna Chemical Co., New York, N. 
Y., Preparing amorphous carbonate of lime from residues, 603225. 

Herman E. Sturcke, Jamaica, assignor to -Etna Chemical Co., New 
York, N. Y., Prepairing amorphous carbonate of lime from residues, 
603226. 

Margaret Hoff, Brooklyn, N. Y., Medicine case for physicians, 603467. 

Joseph H. Hoover, Waterloo, Iowa, Breast pump, 603564. 

Jennie Drawe, Marine City, Mich., Invalid rest, 603756. 

Gervaise G. Duke, Chicago, 111., Electrotherapeutic apparatus, 603815. 

Asahel J. Goodwin, Brookline, Mass., Invalid bedstead, 603632. 

Kugene B. Mower, Minneapolis, Minn., Soda water fountain, 603856. 

Douitry A. Peniakoff Solzaete, Belgium, Making alkaline alumi- 
nates, 603657. 

James B. Schermerhorn, Maiden, N. Y., Medicine dropper, 603073. 

Smith Tucker, Medina, X. Y., Truss pad, 603932. 

Alfred H Cook, Jr., Joliet, 111., File for prescriptions, 604108. 

Louisa Edwards, Florence, Colorado, Hair-tonic, 604111. 

John Gray, Pittsburg, Pa., Syringe, 604147. 

Albert H. Hamel and A. N. Hibbert, De Soto, Mo., Orthopedic ap- 
pliance, 604044. 

Paul Jacobson and H. Tigges, Berlin, Germany, Oxydiatnidodiphenyl 
anil making same, 604049. 

Milton H. Lowe, Jefferson ville, Ind., Surgical needle, 604119. 

Isaac N. Miller and J. B. Moss, St. Joseph, Mo , Suppository, 604063. 

Pierre P. Monnct, Lyons, France, Making pyrocatechin-sulfonic acid 
6040' 

Wm. P. Xicbling, Cincinnati, Ohio, Apparatus for treating milk 

hygienically, 604177. 



James A. Everitt, Indianapolis, Ind., Design, Atomizer body, 28643. 

James Evetts, Chicago, 111., Disinfecting apparatus, 604562. 

Charles C. Hooker, Richmond, Ky., Device for administering medi- 
cines, 604393. 

Jakob Schmid, Basle, Switzerland, Bismuth-oxyiodin tannate, 604571. 

Wm. L. Whittington, St. Joseph, Mo., Syringe, 604645. 

Wm. S. Cooper, Birmingham, Ala., Design, Medicine case a-ad desk, 
28710.. 

Scientific Progress in the Last Decade. 

A contributor to La Nature (Literary Digest) remarks that 
the best reply to the attitude toward modern science of certain 
critics who profess to make light of what they call its preten- 
tions, and who magnify its failures, is to enumerate some of 
the wonderful discoveries and inventions of the last few years. 
This he does in the following brief though striking fashion : 

"Suppose that a man had fallen into a trance just after 
the closing of the Exposition of 1889, that is, less than nine 
years ago, and consequently knew nothing of the progress that 
has been made since that time, up to the period of our next 
great international manifestation. His admiration and his 
study would be devoted to the following objects : 

"1. The bicycle, which is revolutionizing our habits, and 
which existed in his time only in rare specimens, bulky, in- 
deed, compared with the little queen of our day 2. The 
horseless carriage, moved by petroleum or electricity, whose 
future is, perhaps, even more promising than that of the bicycle. 
3. The electric railways, which scarcely existed in 1889 and 
which will modify in the next century the conditions of work- 
ing of the great trunk lines. 4. Polyphase currents, which en- 
able us to transmit and distribute natural motor forces at great 
distances. 5. The Laval turbine, a new process — from the in- 
dustrial standpoint — for utilizing steam at high pressure. 6. 
The interior combustion motor of M. Diesel, which is the most 
economical means now known for transforming heat into work. 
7. Calcium Carbid, which gives rise to acetylene, one of the 
illuminants of the next century. 8. The cinematograph, with 
which we have been recently filled with wonders to the point 
of saturation. 9. The Roentgen rays, which are revolution- 
izing the healing art. To these nine discoveries or great in- 
ventions, whose results are already ours and whose benefits we 
enjoy daily, we may add : 10. Liquid air for industrial pur- 
poses. 1 1 . Color photography, in which the latest results of 
the Messrs. Lumiere have just been presented to the Academy 
of Sciences by M. Mascart. 12. Wireless telegraphy, a pro- 
cess full of promise. 13. Cold light, obtained by luminescence 
of rarefied gases traversed by the electric current. 14. High 
frequency currents, with which Tesla and D'Arsonval have 
conducted such marvelous experiments. 

"In less than ten years, solely in the domain of mechanics 
and physics, we have fourteen new sensational discoveries 
which are to be added to the already long list of the scientific 
conquests of the nineteenth century, and which we should 
have to explain to our sleeper on his awakening." 



Navajos and Gum. 

The shipment recently of a large lot of chewing gum to a 
trader in the Navajo reservation coming to our notice, suggests 
the reflection that the " higher civilization " is making rapid 
strides in the most unexpected quarters. Does chicle supply 
" the touch of nature" that "makes the whole world kin? " 



THE CALIFORNIA DRUGGIST. 



Artificial Fruit Sugar. 

An invention which has been patented- by O. Follenius of 
Frankfort, Germany, consists apparently in the inversion of 
beet-sugar at a certain stage of its manufacture, by chemical 
treatment, in what is technically called " levulose (C 6 H,20 6 ), 
which is chemically identified with the natural fruit sugar de- 
veloped in a greater or less degree in most kind of fruit — 1.57 
per cent in peaches, 6.26 per cent in plums, 10.79 per cent in 
sweet cherries, and as high as 15 per cent in some varieties of 
grapes. Fruit sugar differs, both in taste and chemical com- 
position, from cane-sugar, which latter belongs to the second 
group of saccharine substances, having the formula C27H2 2 O n . 

The artificial fruit-sugar manufactured by the Follenius 
process is a limpid white syrup of great density, containing 
from 75 to 76 per cent of sugar, and possessing among other 
valuable qualities a rich, fruity flavor, as of natural fruit 
sugar, and the capacity to remain fluid and free from granula- 
tion for an indefinite period, notwithstanding its high degree 
of density. It is well known that ordinary white syrup con- 
taining 65 per cent or more of sugar crystallizes and forms 
granular deposits, and when used for preserving fruit often 
" candies " to such a degree that the preserves have to be re- 
cooked to restore the desired smoothness and fluidity. The 
new artificial fruit sugar, on the contrary, remains smooth and 
fluid under all conditions. 

But the quantity which chiefly determines its commercial 
value is its power to assimilate, develop and preserve the 
natural aromatic flavor of the fruit to which it is applied as a 
preserving material. Confectioners, fruit packers and skilled 
housekeepers who have tested it quite extensively during the 
past year, in the preservation of cherries, strawberries, peaches 
and various other fruits, pronounce it far superior for such 
purposes to any other known form of sugar, and cite among 
its other advantages the fact that it is always ready for use and 
eliminates wholly from the factory all incidental processes of 
dissolving and refining the syrup. Finally, it corrects the ten- 
dency, so common in fruits preserved in ordinary sugar, to 
soften and assume a crude, sugary flavor, which not only 
injures the color and appearance of the preserves, but renders 
them cloying and disagreeable to the taste. 

Although of recent innovation, it is largely used in this 
country for perfecting wines, as well as in the manufacture of 
fine liqueurs, and is far superior to ordinary sugar for making 
lemonade or any preparations in which the saccharine principle 
is brought into contact with the acid juices of fruits. So far 
as is known, its use has not been extended, even experiment- 
ally, to the United States. It is made only at the sugar factory 
in Hamburg, where it is sold to the trade for $7.14 per 100 
kilograms, which would be equal to 3^ cents per American 
pound. — Texas Druggist. 



Waterproof Cement for Glass. 

Gelatin (opt.) 1 dr. 

Water 2 ozs. 

Potassium bichromate 10 grs. 

Dissolve the bichromate in 2 drachms of water ; dissolve the 
gelatin in the remainder of water and mix just before apply- 
ing. When applied expose to sunlight for several hours, when 
the cement will become impervious even to water. — Ther. Gaz. 



Valuation of Insect Powder. 

The value of insect powder is in direct proportion to the 
combined amount of essential oil and soft acid resin present, 
and in inverse proportion to the amount of chlorophyl, says 
the Pharmical Journal. The powder should yield 5.25 per 
cent of combined essential oil and soft resin ; chlorophyl 
should be absent or present in the merest trace. Place 100 
grains of the powder to be tested in the cylinder of a glass 
syringe (1 ounce). The powder should be pressed down com- 
pactly on to a piece of absorbent cotton, to act as a filter. 
Moisten with ether 0.3735. Close the top of the syringe, and 
macerate for thirty minutes ; percolation may then proceed ; 
the powder being re-percolated with the same fluid four 
times, and finally washed through with sufficient ether to 
make up one fluid ounce. The resulting percolate should be of 
a rich, yellow color ; if a pronounced green color be the result, 
the sample may be discarded at once. In the absence of much 
green coloring matter, the fluid may be carefully evaporated 
(temperature not exceeding 200 F.), and the residue weighed 
in a tared watch glass. The resulting soft mass should not 
weigh less than 3.75 grains, and in the finest samples reaches 
5.5 grains, and should have the flower's odor. 



(From Schimmel & Co.'s Semi-Annual Report, April, 1898.) 

Ionone. — Good violet extracts continue to maintain prefer- 
ence among the fashionable perfumes. To attain to the most 
natural violet fragrance in their extracts is today the ambition 
of every perfumer ; a choice of such preparations are now in the 
market of an excellence as was not considered to be possible a 
few years ago. This wonderful achievement we owe to the 
discovery of ionone, which, in a certain sense, has revolution- 
ized the art of perfumery. 

Ionone is also much used as a flavor for fine confections, 
but its proper application requires discretion. In the perfec- 
tion of such goods the United States thus far excel. 

Terpineol. — This product has attained to considerable im- 
portance in perfumery, being used as a constituent of many 
floral odors and as the principal basis of the lilac "extracts" 
proper. Although it has not yet been demonstrated, terpineol, 
in all probability, seems to be a natural constituent of various 
flowers. It remains for further studies to establish this as a 
fact. 

Cumarin. — The constant low price has brought about a 
considerably increase in the use of this product, but has made 
it an unprofitable one to the manufacturer. 

The leaves of the so-called vanilla plant, Trilisa odoratissima 
Cass. (Liatris odoratissima Willd) for some time have been 
used with advantage for the manufacture of Cumarin, specially 
on account of an accumulation of large stocks of these fra- 
grant leaves in New York and Hamburg. Since the consump- 
tion of this material and the consequent rise of its price, the 
manufacturers have had to resort again to the synthetic method 
of preparation. 

Hubert's Malvina Cream is one of the popular toilet prepa- 
rations of this generation, and is well supplemented by Mal- 
vina I,otion and Ichthyol soap. They are carried always in 
stock by F. W. Braun & Co. 



THE CALIFORNIA DRUGGIST. 



Prices for Distributing. 

In answer to many inquiries asking the correct prices to 
charge for distributing, we would state that that is a hard mat- 
ter to decide, as no two sections are alike, and therefore it 
takes much longer to distribute iooo pieces in one section than 
it does in another. Thus we have always held that distribu- 
tors should charge what it is really worth. But many adver- 
tisers have adopted a scale of prices which they seem to think 
is about right, and should apply to all sections alike ; thus it 
seems necessary to adopt this scale in order to get their work, 
at least for their first order. Prices now paid by general ad- 
vertisers are : For distributing circulars, pamphlets, dodgers 
or booklets, single thousand, $2.50; less than 3000, $2 per 
thousand ; in lots of 3000 or over, $1.50 per thousand if dis- 
tributed in your own town or city. For distributing in country 
and adjoining towns and villages, $2 per thousand. Samples, 
$2 per thousand in your own city ; in country and adjoining 
towns and cities, $2.50 per thousand. Sign tacking, small tin 
or cardboard signs, $1 per hundred ; large sizes, requiring six 
or more tacks, $1.50 per hundred. You furnish tacks. Terms 
on all work cash when work is completed and bill mailed. In 
determining how many it will take for your town, first get the 
correct population. The average is 1000 circulars for 5000 
population ; but this varies in the smaller towns, and can be 
estimated at 1000 circulars for every 4000 population. — Up-to- 
date Distributor. 

Colored Fluids for Show Bottles. 

E. C. M. asks how to make colored 'Solutions for show 
globes ; and how to prevent them from freezing in cold 
weather. We answer him by giving the following selected 
formulas for standard show-globe colors : 

ATVfBER. 

Potasium bichromate 10 ozs. 

Nitric acid 2 fl ozs. 

Distilled water 2 gals. 

Dissolve the potassium bicromate in the water, add the ni- 
tric acid, and filter. 

violet. 

Cobalt, nitrate 4 ozs. 

Ammonium carbonate 2 ozs. 

Copper ammonio-sulphate 2 ozs. 

Water 2 gals. 

Dissolve the cobalt nitrate in water saturated with ammo- 
nium carbonate, and add to the copper ammonio-sulphate suffi- 
cient to produce the desired tint. 

PURPI.K. 

Copper sulphate 120 grs. 

French gelatin 60 grs. 

Liquor potassa 32 fl. ozs. 

Water, sufficient. 

Dissolve the copper salt in 2 fluid ounces of water, add the 
gelatin in the same amount of boiling water ; mix the two so- 
lutions, add the liquor potassa, shake the mixture, let stand 
10 hours, decant the clear liquid and dilute as desired with 
water. 

RED. 

Cobalt carbonate 60 grs. 

Hydrochloric acid sufficient. 

Ammonium carbonate sufficient. 

Distilled water, enough to make 2 gals. 



Dissolve the cobalt salt in the acid and some water, add 
enough ammonium carbonate so that the precipitate first 
formed is re-dissolved ; filter and dilute as desired. 

GREEN. 

Nickel 5 ozs. 

Hydrochloric acid 10 fl. ozs. 

Nitrous acid 3 fl. ozs. 

Distilled water enough to make 2 gals. 

Dissolve the nickel in the hydrochloric acid, add the water, 
then the nitrous acid. 

GOLDEN YELLOW. 

Dragon's blocd 45 grs. 

Sulphuric acid 3 fl. drs. 

Distilled water 2 gals. 

Powder the dragon's blood and macerate in the acid for 20 
or 30 minutes, then add the distilled water and filter. 

BLUE. 

Dissolve indigo sulphate in water sufficient to produce the 
desired tint. 

Any of the aniline colors may be used for show-globe colors 
but a solution of chemicals is more lasting. The aniline colors 
are affected by light and fade quickly. 

The fluids may be prevented from freezing during cold 
weather by the addition of a little glycerin, say 3 per cent. 

Wood alcohol is also used for preventing freezing, but glyc- 
erin is preferred since less is required to effect the purpose. — 
Amer. Druggist. 

A Parcel-Post Movement. 

The attention of the people of the United States has recently 
been directed to the subject of the transmission of articles of 
merchandise through the mails, by the discussion of the draft 
of a parcel-post treaty between the United States and Venezu- 
ela. The Pan-American conference gave urgent recommenda- 
tion of the establishment of such treaties between the United 
States and the countries of South America, but nothing has 
been accomplished. Public sentiment strongly approves 
favorable action now, and it is expected the treaty with Vene- 
zuela will be consummated with comparatively little delay. 

The interest awakened in the subject by the proposed inter- 
national treaty has begun to arouse business men generally to 
an appreciation of the fact that the parcel-post system of this 
country, in the measure of its advantages, is far behind the 
systems in use in other progressive countries. With a limit of 
four pounds as the heaviest package transmitted, and a rate of 
sixteen cents a pound, the parcel-post service of the United 
States affords but slight service compared to what it should 
provide, and to what it could furnish to the great advantage of 
the people and the profit of the government. 

To place the facts before the public and unite sentiment 
favorable to the extension of the system and the establishment 
of reasonable and equitable rates, the National Parcel-Post 
League was recently organized in Chicago by a number of 
leading mercantile and manufacturing houses representing 
various lines of trade and industry. It is the purpose of the 
league to carry the work of organization into every State, and 
to present the result of its efforts to the next session of Con- 
gress. 

The movement is highly commendable and undoubtedly will 
receive the universal and active effort of all classes of busi- 
ness men, as also of the general public. — Western Druggist. 



THE CALIFORNIA DRUGGIST. 



The Quinine Question. 

Two years ago a German professor estimated the world's 
annual consumption of quinine salts to be 7,000,000 oz., and 
those who were able to cheek him did not think the professor 
wide of the mark. This must now be taken as an underesti" 
mate, for in the year ending December 31, 1897, the United 
States alone imported 4,364,823 oz. of quinine sulphate, and 
as a third as much is made in U. S. A. as is imported, it fol- 
lows that the consumption there is well over 5,000,000 oz. a 
year. The rest of the world consumes somewhat more, as 
Java alone supplies 10,000,000 oz. of quinine sulphate in the 
bark yearly, and the supplies from other sources bring the 
total up to over 12,000,000 oz. These remarks are suggested 
by a paper written by Mr. Joseph W. England, of Philadel- 
phia, for the Alumni Report, which he edits. Mr. England 
has been inspired by the history of Messrs. Howards & Sons, 
which was inserted in our winter number. He relates the 
history of American quinine-manufacture, which goes back a 
year or two before the Howard record ; for it was in 1823 that 
Messrs. Farr & Kunzi, Philadelphia (predecessors of Powers 
& Weightman), had fairly established the manufacture of qui- 
nine sulphate, and were selling it at $16 per oz. Mr. George 
D. Rosengarten, of the same city, also manufactured the alka- 
loid in 1824. Mr. England traces the progress of the industry, 
showing how the bark-supply has varied, and how quinine 
prices have fluctuated since 1823. Until 1879 quinine salts, 
on entering the United States, were subject to duties of 15 to 
30 per cent ad vaL, and bark also was liable to occasional 
duties, the last, one of 10 per cent on bark bought in Amster- 
dam and London or imported direct from the East Indies, 
being repealed three years after quinine was made free — a de- 
reliction of duty on the part of the protectionists which is un- 
pardonable. 

Mr. England tells us that " since 1879 the United States has 
been the dumping ground of Europe's excess of quinine." 
How long that will obtain is a problem ; not that American 
manufacturers will increase their production, but because 
Java, as a quinine-producer, has to be reckoned with. Nearly 
three years have elapsed since the foundation of the factory at 
Bandoeng, or, rather, Samarang, was laid, and the first con- 
signments of quinine sulphate manufactured there are to be 
put forward to auction, one in London this week, another in 
Amsterdam next week. The Java people seem sanguine of 
success, as may be judged by the following glowing epistle 
which we have received from Amsterdam : 

On April 6, twenty-one cases, each containing 12-kilo. tins of Java 
quinine, will be offered in public auction. This is the first import of the 
quinine manufactured in Java. According to the chemical analysis of 
Dr. W. F. Koppeschaar, the quinine is of excellent quality, and can 
compete with the first qualities of the European market. There is 
every probability that the Java factories will in the future continue to 
send considerable quantities of their make to our market, and they will 
be able to sell at a lower rate than their European competitors, because 
they avoid the great expenses of freight, commissions, &c, on the 
bark, and have their plantations at their door. Should the English 
market show sufficient interest in this quinine, we feel sure that we 
shall be able to get the manufacturers to put it up in a style suitable 
for that market. — Chemist and Druggist. 



" Perkins has gone to California for his health." "How 
did he lose his health ? " " Earning the money to go to Cali- 
fornia . ' ' — Chicago Record. 



BUSINESS PERSONALS. 



Minier, Kennedy & Co. succeed the Arcadian Pharmacy, 
Tucson, Ariz. 

Dr. C. F. Roberts, Williams, Ariz., is putting up a building 
in which he will open a bank, when completed. 



Mr. J. J. Brown is with the C. Laux Co., doing substitute 
work during the summer vacations of the house. 



J. B. Mix & Co., Nogals, Ariz., have considerably enlarged 
their store, adding a second story and building on at the rear. 



B. Sale, of Sale & Son Drug Co., has returned from a few 
days' trip to San Francisco. He was accompanied by Mrs. 
Sale. 

S. A. Harper, Vermont avenue and Jefferson street, has sold 
to C. E. Bean. We welcome Mr. Bean back again into the 
drug circles of the city. 



Warren Quinn, recently with the Thomas Drug Co., has 
gone to San Antonio, Texas, his home, to enlist with the San 
Antonio company for the war. 



T. W. Brown, of Twenty-fourth and Hoover streets, has 
gone with his family to the seashore, where they will spend a 
fortnight enjoying surf bathing and fishing. 



Mr. Joe S. Anderson, representing the United Agency Com- 
pany, was in the city the first part of the month. The firm is 
withdrawing the small size Apenta Water from sale. 



A fire at Off & Vaughn's, June 8, might easily have been a 
serious matter for them, but it was, fortunately, extinguished 
by a chemical engine, with but little loss. It occurred in the 
cellar. 

Mr. J. M. Anderson ot the Reid Drug Co., Tulare, Cal., 
spent a few pleasant days in Los Angeles this month, and fa- 
vored us with an agreeable call. We are always glad to wel- 
come our friends from the big valley. 



Eloquent Testimonials. 

Here are a few testimonials that patent medicine men might 
use : "I have been unable to walk without crutches for many 
years, but after using your liniment I ran for office." " I lost 
my eyesight four years ago. I used a bottle' of your eyewash 
and I saw wood." " I have been dumb ever since I was mar- 
ried, but the day after using your remedy I had a speaking 
likeness taken at the photographer's." "Some time ago I lost 
the use of both arms. Shortly after buying a box of your pills 
I struck a man for $10." " I have been deaf for many years, 
but after using your ointment I heard that my aunt had died 
and left me $10,000." 

•Had Him. — "Well, Dick, the drug business seems to agree 
with you ; you are getting as fat as a porpoise. By the way, 
what did you weigh last ? " "I can't quite remember, but I 
think it was a couple of ounces of Epsom salts." 



IO 



THE CALIFORNIA DRUGGIST. 



OUR ADVERTISERS. 



It will be of interest and value to the trade to consult our 
advertising columns, in which will be found represented the 
following firms and goods : 



Pacific Coast Drug Ac;en ey 



OFFERS FOR SALE 



A. Gettleman Brewing Co. 

Allcock's Plasters. 

Ammouol Chemical Co. 

Antikarnnia Chemical Co. 

Apollinaris Co., Limited. 

Arlington Chemical Co. 

Beeman Chemical Co. 

Blake, C. E. & Co. 

Braun, F. W. & Co.'s Laboratory 

Products. 
California Fig Syrup Co. 
Cal. Mission Eucalyptus Lozenges. 
Centaur Company. 
Crown Perfumery Co. 
Davol Rubber Co. 
Etna Chemical Co. 
Goodrich, B. F. & Co. 
Coronado Corks. 
Hayden Manufacturing Co. 
Hubert, Prof. I. 



Jayne, Dr. D. & Son. 

Kondon Manufacturing Co. 

Kuhns, Arthur Company. 

Leiner, M. 

Levy, B. & Co. 

Ludwick, G. M. 

Mariani & Co. 

Mead, J. L., Cycle Co. 

Moore, H. H. & Sons. 

Muuu & Co. 

N. Y. Pharmacal Association. 

Planten, H. & Son. 

Pond's Extract Co. 

Portuondo, Vicente. 

Taite, Jos. G. & Sous. 

T. B. Insect Powder. 

Thum, O. W. Co. 

Wells, A.J. Manufacturing Co. 

Whittemore Bros. & Co. 

Wyeth, John & Bro. 



First-Class Drug Stores 
and Medical Practices 

in all the Pacific States and Territories 

Clerks Registered, Prodded and Employed. Partnerships 
Negotiated. Lists Sent Free. Correspondence Solicited. 

G. M. LUDWICK, 

S. E. Corner Second St. and Broadway, Room 201, Los Angeles, Cal. 



We are in receipt of a copy of the announcement of the new 
government loan, from the Secretary of the Treasury, which 
we regret our inability to print in this issue, as it came too late. 
It is with much pleasure, however, that we urge it upon our 
friends to show their patriotism and good business sense by 
subscribing for such amounts of this loan as their surplus funds 
will allow. Subscriptions by the general public, the "popular" 
feature of the loan, will close July 15, when capitalists will be 
permitted to take the unsubscribed balance of the $200,000,000 
to be issued. Full particulars regarding this loan will be 
found in most of the newspapers as well as posted in the various 
postomces throughout the country. 



v 



Kurtz' Freckle Salve \ 

A 

A 
A 
A 



(ORIGINAL) 

Manufactured only by C. F. HEINZEMAN 
Los Angeles, Cal. 

Trade Mark Registered. 



*^^*^i^^>^^ir'*r>^>^^^^^^^^^?^'w^K 



Calcium Sulfid as a Depilatory. — Dr. A. W. Brayton 
of Indianapolis (Journ. Am. Med. Asso.) again calls attention 
to calcium sulfid as a depilatory, a treatment which, he says, 
is perfectly harmless to the skin and may be left on any length 
of time, not irritating abraded surfaces even. The powder is 
made into a paste with water. He calls this powder calcium 
" sulfhydrate," and says it can be made by heating together 
in a closed crucible calcium sulfate and charcoal. But this 
process yields the official calx sulfurata (sulfurated lime), a 
mixture of calcium sulfid and sulfate. The " sulfhydrate " is 
obtained by supersaturating milk of lime with hydrogen 
sulfid. The author recommended the latter highly not very 
long ago as a superior depilatory, and this paper was repro- 
duced in the Western Druggist in 1896, page 500. — W, Dr. 



In a St. Louis drug store a broken electric wire and a bar- 
rel of alcohol formed the combination that caused, by explo- 
sion, about $200 damage. 

Carbon may be converted into plumbago by the electric 
uruace. About 85 per cent is thus transformed. 



Three money-makers are offered to the trade this month by 
F. W. Braun & Co. in the Hayden Mfg. Co.'s Arnica Salve, 
Carbolic Salve and Witch Hazel Salve. They are very neatly 
put up in large-sized boxes, and retail at 25 cents. The un- 
iform price is $1 per dozen Add some to your next order. 

WANTS, Etc., Etc. 

[ Uncle}' this heading we will be pleased to publish FREE OF 
CHARGE, notices of clerks wanted, positions desired, stores for 
\ sale or exchange, propositions for purchasing, etc^\ 

FOR SALE — Neat little drug store iu suburb of Los Angeles. All new 
goods. No dead stock. Established over three years. Nice 
J neighborhood trade. Very little credit. Average daily cash sales 
$12. Rent $15. No clerk needed. Trade growing. Increase of sales 
for last 12 months over sales of preceding 12 months $600. Will invoice 
from $1300 to $1500. Satisfactory reasons forselling. Address "PHAR- 
MACIST," care California Druggist 

.COR SALE — Small drug store, near the peat lands, Orange county. 

* Drugs will invoice about $600 Lot and house $350. Good open- 
ing for doctor. Address F. W BRAUN & CO., Los Angeles. 

COR EXCHANGE— House and lot in Los Angeles, Cal., worth $1500 

* for stock of drugs of like amount, in country town where cutting 
of prices is unknown. Address GEO. E. BLUE, 3129 S. MAIN, Los 
Angeles, Cal. 

COR SALE — Wall Soda Fountain, 8 syrups; new patent draught 

* tube ; marble slab, glasses, spoons, etc.; all complete, but without 
tanks. Used only one season. Will sell very cheap for cash. Inquire 
of F. W. BRAUN & CO., Los Angele s. 

COR SALE — A drug store in good country town. No opposition ; 
A nearest store seven miles. Stock clean ; fixtures good. Fine op- 
portunity for physician. Good reason for selling. Adress Quinine, 
care California Druggist, Los Angeles. 

COR SALE — A full set of shelf bottles with glass labels, including set 
*• of Fluid Extract bottles in blue glass. Will sell cheap. Inquire 
of White & Bailey, San Bernardino, Cal. 

COR SALE — A well located drug store in Los Angeles, with an in- 
1 creasing trade, value $1200. Expenses small. Owner not pharma- 
cist is reason for selling. Inquire of F. W. Braun & Co , Los Angeles. 

FOR SALE — In coast city of Southern California, a drug business 
established over eight years. Stock about $2500; location first-class. 
Address M. H., car e CALIFORNIA DRUGGIST. 

FOR SALE — Drug store in the most prosperous mining town in Cali- 
fornia; doing a good business ; price $2000. Good reasons for sell- 
ing. A full investigation desired. This is a splendid opportunity for a 
competent man. Population 6000 and only three drug stores. Address 
" GUARA NA" c ar e CALIFORNIA DRUGGIST, Los Angeles. 

FOR SALE — A city drug store. Fine location. Good business. Low 
rent. Good reasons for selling. Address L, care F. W. BRAUN & 
CO. , 

FOR SALE — City drug business at a bargain. Stock about $1200, all 
clean and no dead stuff. Good location for a doctor. Inquire of F. 
W. BRAU N & CO., Los Angeles. 

FOR SALE — Elegant clean stock in the most progressive suburb of 
Los Angeles. Only drug store within twenty blocks. Best reasons 
for selling. Value about $2000. Inquire of F. W. BRAUN & CO. 
Los ViiKcles. 

FOR SALE — A good, long established drug business in this city. 
Price, $2500. Address " ADVANTAGEOUS," care CALIFORNIA 
DRUGGIST. 



THE CALIFORNIA DRUGGIST. 



1 1 



PRICE LIST OF DRUGS, CHEMICALS, ETC. 



These prices are for quantities as ordinarily bought by average buyers, and include containers, unless 
otherwise indicated. Subject to market changes. 

For special quantities we will make special figures. 

F. W. BRA UN & CO., Los Angeles, Cal. 



ACETANILID ft 42® 45 

ACID, Acetic No. 8 ft 10® 25 

Acetic U. S. P ft 30 

Benzoic, Eng oz 16 

Benzoic, German oz 10 

Boracic ft 14® 20 

Carbolic, crude gal 40® 50 

Caroolic, cryst, blk label, 1-ft tin ft 30® 32 

Carbolic, cryst, blk label, 5-ft tins ft 28® 30 

Carbolic, cryst, gold label, 1-ft bots ft 36® 38 

Carbolic, cryst, gold label, 5-ft tin ft 33® 36 

Citric ft 37® 42 

Gallic oz 11® 12 

Hydrocyanic, dil .'. oz 11® 12 

Hydrocyanic, cone, Scheele's oz 40® 45 

Hydrofluoric, 1-oz bots ea 45® 50 

Hydrofluoric, 4-oz bots ea 75 

Muriatic, coml., 6-ft bots ea 65® 75 

Muriatic, coml , carboy, $2 lb 3J^@ 4 

Muriatic, C P., 1-ft bots ft 35® 40 

Muriatic, C P., 6-ft bots ft 25® 30 

Nitric, coml., 7-ft bots ea 1 00 

Nitric, coml., carboy, $2 ft 8® 9 

Nitric, C. P., 1-ft bots ft 35® 40 

Nitric, C P., 7-ft bots ft 25® 30 

Oxalic ft 12® 15 

Pyrogallic, Merck's ft 3 00 

Pyrogallic, Merck's oz 26 

Salicylic ft 60® 70 

Salicylic oz 8® 10 

Salicylic, from oil wintergreen oz 54 

Sulphuric, coml., 9-ft bots .. .. ea 65® 75 

Sulphuric, coml., carboy, $2 ft 2*/® 2^ 

Sulphuric, C. P., 1-ft bots ft 35® 40 

Sulphuric, C. P., 9-ft bots ft 25® 30 

Tannic ft 1 15® 1 50 

Tartaric - .ft 38® 42 

ALCOUOL, absolute, 1-qt bots ea 1 60 

Grain market 

Wood, 5 gal. lot to bbl. lot gal 90® 1 05 

Wood, less quantity, can extra gal 1 10 

ALUM, chrome ft 13® 15 

Dried (burnt alum) ft 12® 15 

Lump ft 3^@ 4 

Ground ft 5® 6 

Powdered ft 6® 8 

AMVIOVIA, cone, 26°, 5-pt bots ea 85 

Cone, bulk, can extra gal 75 

Bromide , ....ft 75 

Carbcmate : ft 12® 25 

Muriate, lump ft 13® 15 

Muriate, gran, coml ft 11® 15 

Muriate, gran, pure ft 16® 20 

Muriate, powd ft 20® 25 

Valerianate... oz 27 

AMMONAL (Po. or Tablets) oz 1 00 

ANT1KAMNIA oz 100 

ANT IFYKIN (10 oz., 85c; 25 oz, 80c) oz 90 

AKISTOL (25 oz, $1.65) oz 180 

ARROWROOT, Bermuda ft 35 

ARSENIC, powd, white ft 10® 12 

BALSAM Copaiba ft 70® 85 

Fir, Canada ft 45® 50 

Peru ft 2 75® 3 00 

Tolu ft 75© SO 

BARK, Cinchona, red, true .... ft 50® 55 

Cinchona, red> powd ...ft 35® (?<_> 

Cinchona, yellow, Calisaya tb 50® 55 

vMnchona, yellow, powd ft 35(® 60 

Sim, slab -. ft 12® 15 

Sim, ground ft 14® 18 

Elm, powd ft lo@ 20 

Sassafras ft 12® 15 

Soap, slab ft 7@ 10 

Soap, ground ft 10® 13 

Soap pwd ft 18® 20 

Soap, cut, 5c boxes doz 35 

Soap, cut, 10c bozes doz 60 

Wild Cherry ft 12® 15 

BAY RUM gal 2 50® 3 00 

F. W. B. & Co., y 2 pts doz 1 75 

F.W. B. &Co., pts doz 3 50 

BEANS, Tonka, Angostura ft 2 25® 2 50 

Vanilla, Mexican ft 14 50@15 50 

■ Vanilla, Tahiti ft 3 25® 3 50 

BERRIES, Cubeb ft 25® 30 

Cubeb, powd ft 30® 35 

Juniper ft 9® 10 

BISMUTH, sub-carbonate ft 1 60® 1 70 

Sub-gallate oz 19 

Sub-nitrate ft 1 25® 1 35 

BLUE MASS ft 70® 75 

BLUE VITRIOL ft iy 2 @ 7 

BORAX, refined ft 8^® 12 

Powd ft 8^@ 12 

BUDS, Cassia ; ft 35® 38 

CALOMEL, American ft 80® 85 

English ft 1 10® 1 15 

Stock ft 55® 65 

CAMPHOR ft 37® 42 

CANTHARIDES, Chinese, powd ft 60® 65 

Russian, powd ft 1 00® 1 10 



CAPSICUM, African, pods ft 22® 25 

African, powd ft 20® 25 

CARAMEL (gal $1 50, can extra) ft 25 

CARBON, bisulphide, 1-ft bots doz 2 00 

Bisulphide, 2-ft bots doz 4 00 

Bisulphide, 1-gal cans ea 1 05® 1 15 

Bisulphide, 5-gal cans ea 3 75 

CARMINE, No 40 oz 35 

CHALK, French, powd : ft 614® 8 

White, precip ft 10® 12 

White, prepared, drops ft 8® 10 

CHARCOAL, animal, gran ft 8® 12 

Animal, powd , ft 8® 10 

Willow, powd , bulk ft 12® 15 

Willow, powd., 1-ft cartons ft 18 

Willow, powd., y 2 -9> cartons ft 20 

Willow, powd., %-ft cartons ft 25 

CHLORAL HYDRATE, 1 fts ft 1 20® 1 30 

% fes ft 1 35® 1 40 

Vi fts ft 1 55® 1 60 

CHLOKOFORM, 1-ft tins ft 55® 57 

7-ft tins ft 52® 54 

Squibbs', 500-gm ea 1 15 

Squibbs', 250-gm ea 66 

Squibbs', 100-gm ea 26 

CLOVES ft 20 

Powd ft 25 

COBALT, powd...: ft 30 

COCAINE, hydrochlorate oz 3 25 

Hydrochlorate, y 2 oz oz 3 35 

Hydrochlorate, y$ oz ea 50® 55 

COCOA BUTTER ft 45® 55 

CODEINE, alk.,i/ 3 oz oz 5 10 

Sulphate, % oz oz 4 75 

COLOCYNXH APPLE ft 90 

Powd ft 85 

COMPOSITION POWDER, / 8 -ftpkgsft 35 

COPPERAS, bbls, 1% ft 2® 3 

CORROSIVE SUBLIMATE ft 80® 85 

Powd ft 90® 95 

CREAM TARTAR, pure ft 27® 32 

CREOLIN, 1-ft and 5-ft bots ft 50® 55 

CREOSOTE, beech-wood ft 99® 1 10 

Coml ft 45® 50 

CURCUMA, powd ft 12® 15 

CUTTLE BONE ft 30® 35 

DEXTRINE ft 8® 12 

DOVER'S POWDER ft 1 25 

EIKONOGEN oz 37 

EMERY, flour ft 8® 10 

ERGOT, powd ft 50® 55 

ESSENCE PEPPERMINT,2-ozbot..doz 1 50 

ETHER, Nitrous, cone, 1-ft bots ft 1 20® 1 25 

Nitrous, cone , %-ft bots ft 1 35® 1 40 

Nitrous, cone, J^-ft bots ft 1 55® 1 60 

Sulphuric, U. S. P.. 1880 ft 75® 80 

Sulphuric, cone, 1890 ft 80® 85 

Sulphuric, Squibbs', 500-gm ea 125 

Sulphuric, Squibbs', 250-gm ea 66 

Sulphuric, Squibbs', 100-gm ea 30 

EUCALYPTOL, Merck's oz 24 

EXTRACT, Cascara, fluid, F.W. B. &Co..ft 70 

Cascara, fluid, F. W. B. & Co., 5-ft bots... ft 50 

Cascara, fl., arom-, F.W.B. & Co., 1-ft bot.ft 80 

Cascara, fl.. arom., F.W.B. & Co , 5-ft bot..ft 75 

Logwood, 15 and 25-ft boxes ft 12® 13 

Logwood, 1-ft, %-ft and %-ft boxes ft 15® 20 

Witch Hazel, distilled gal 65® 90 

Less than 5 gals, container extra. 
EXTRACTS, FLAVORING, 

•Lemon, F. W. B. &Co., 2-oz doz 1 50 

Vanilla, F. W. B. & Co., 2-oz doz 1 75 

FLOWERS, Arnica ft 18® 20 

Chamomile, Eng ft 28® 30 

Chamomile, Ger ft 30® 35 

Lavender ft 12® 15 

Rosemary ft 40 

FOIL. Tin, Heavy ft 20® 25 

Tin, Medium... ft 25® 30 

Tin, Light ft 30® 35 

FORVIALDEHYD ft 55® 60 

FRUIT JUICES, F.W.B. & Co., qts., doz 5 00 

FRUITS, Crushed, F.W. B.& Co., ^gals ,doz 10 80 

FULLERS EARTH ft 6® 10 

GELATINE,, Cox's, sml doz 1 50 

French, gold label ft 60® 65 

French, silver label ft 40® 45 

French, bronze label ft 35® 40 

GLUE, Carpenter's ft 9® 12 

White ft 15® 18 

GLYCERINE, 50-ft cans ft 14® 14J4 

10-ftcans , ft 18 

2-oz bots doz 1 25® 1 50 

Schering's 1-ft bots ft 45 

Schering's 10-ft bots ft 40 

GLYCOLINE (gal., $1.50, can extra) ft 35 

GUM, Aloes, Barb ft 25® 30 

Aloes, Barb., powd ft 30® 35 

Aloes, Cape .. ft 20® 25 

Aloes, Cape, powd ft 20® 25 

Aloes, Socotrine, true ft 45® 50 

Aloes Socotrine, powd ft 50® 55 



Ammoniac ft 40® 45 

Arabic, No. 1 ft 70® 75 

Arabic, No. 2 ft 50® 55 

Arabic, powd., No. 1 ft 70® 75 

Arabic, powd., French ft 90® 1 00 

Arabic, sorts -r. ft 40® 45 

Asafetida ft 32® 35 

Asafetida, powd ft 45® 50 

Benzoin ft 50® 55 

Benzoin, powd ft 60® 70 

Catechu ft 9® 12 

Catechu, powd ft 32® 35 

Guaiac ft 38® 40 

Guaiac, powd ft 45@ 50 

Myrrh ft 35® 38 

Myrrh, powd ft 38® 40 

Olibanum ft 25® 30 

Opium ft 4 00®. 3 25 

Opium, powd ft 5 20® 4 20 

Shellac, orange ft 32® 35 

Shellac, orange, ground ft 35® 38 

Shellac, white ft 35@ 40 

Shellac, white, powd ft 40® 45 

Spruce, tears ft 1 25® 1 35 

Tragacanth, flake ft 90® 95 

Tragacanth, sorts ft 45® 50 

Tragacanth, powd ft 1 00® 1 10 

HOFFMAN'S ANODYNE ft 65 

HOPS, pressed, y 2 and %-lbs... ft 16® 20 

Pressed, oz ft 25 

HYDROGEN PEROXIDE, Mar- 

chand's, lbs doz 7 50 

Marchand's, }4-lbs doz 5 50 

Marchand's, %-lbs doz 3 75 

Marchand's. %-lbs doz 2 25 

M. C. W., or P. & W., 1 lbs doz 4 80 

M. C. W., or P. & W., %-lbs doz 3 00 

M. C. W., or P. & W., %-lbs doz 1 80 

Oakland, 1 lb doz 6 00 

Oakland, J4-lbs doz 3 75 

Oakland, %-\hs doz 2 50 

U.S. P., lib ft 35 

U.S. P., lib .• full doz 3 25 

HYDROZONE, 1 -lb bots : doz 10 50 

J^-lb bots doz 7 25 

%>lb bots doz 4 75 

ji-lb bots doz 2 25 

ICHTHYOL oz 50 

Ichthyol ft 6 50 

INDIGO ft 70® 75 

INSECT POWDER, Buhach, 6-lb cans. ft 50® 60 

Dalmatian, bulk ft 28® 40 

Hill's California, bulk ft 35® 45 

"T. B." 6-lb cans ft 40 

"T. B " 1-lb cans doz 5 50 

" T. B," J^-lb cans doz 3 25 

' T. B." small doz 1 25 

IODINE, re-subl oz 36 

Re-subl ft 3 60® 3 80 

IODOFORM oz 40 

Iodoform ft 3 81® 4 00 

IRON, carbonate precip ft 16® 18 

Chloride, solution ft 25® 35 

Iodide oz 35 

Sub-sulphate (Monsel) oz 8 

Sub-sulphate (Monsel) ft 31® 40 

Sub-sulphate solution ft 25® 30 

Sulphate, dried ft 15® 20 

Sulphate, pure cryst., bulk ft 8® 10 

Sulphate, pure cryst., 1-lb bots ft 14® 18 

JUICE, Grape, Los Gatos, pts doz 4 00 

Grape, Welch's, y 2 pts doz 1 90 

Grape. Welch's, pints doz 2 75 

Grape, Welch's, quarts doz 5 25 

LANOLIN, Leibreich's ft 1 00 

LEAD, acetate, coml ft 16@ 20 

Acetate, powd ft 20® 25 

Acetate, C. P ft 27® 30 

Subacet. solu., Goulard's ft 30® 35 

LEAVES, Bay ft 14® 15 

Buchu, long ft 30® 33 

Buchu, short ft 22® 25 

Rosemary, bulk ft IS® 20 

Sage, %s and Ks * 18® 2 9 

Sage, ozs ft 25 

Senna, Alex ft 30® 35 

Senna, Alex., powd , ft 35 

Senna, Tinnevelli ft 18® 20 

Senna, Tinnevelli, powd ft 20® 25 

Uva Ursi ft 12® 15 

LEECHES, (25 or more, 8c.) ea 10 

LTME. Chloride, 35-ft cans ft i l A 

Chloride, Acme, 1-lb cans doz 1 25 

Chloride, Acme, y,-\b cans doz 80 

Chloride, Acme, 5^-lb cans doz 45 

Chloride, Electron, 1-lb cans doz 1 20 

Chloride, Phoenix, 1-lb cartons doz 1 10 

LITHARGE ft 7^@ 10 

LONDON PURPLE ft 15® 20 



12 



THE CALIFORNIA DRUGGIST 



LOZENGES, Licorice, 5-lb boxes ft 24 

Licorice, "Acme," 5-lb boxes lb 35 

Peppermint, 5-lb boxes ft) 14 

LYCOPODIUM ft) 50@ 55 

LYE, concentrated (case, $3.50) doz 90 

LYSOL, 1-lbbots lb 65 

MAGNESIA, Calcined, 1-lb tin ft) 65 

Carbonate, Jenning's, 2 and 4-oz lb 35 

Carbonate, K. & M., 4-oz., 2oz. and loz..ft IS® 25 

Carbonate, K. & M., powdered ft) 35 

Carbonate, K. & M., S. S ft 60 

Eff. citrate, Herring's doz 2 00 

MANGANESE, black oxide ft) 6@ 8 

MANNA, large flake ft) 90® 1 00 

Small flake lb 60® 

MENTHOL, (oz. 30c.) ft) 2 sa@ 3 10 

MERCURY .' ft 78® 85 

Bi-sulphate ft) 65® 70 

Iodide, green , oz 25 

Iodide, red oz 26 

MORPHINE, sulph., / s oz oz 2 50@ 2 80 

Sulph., !4oz.,2J^oz. bxs oz 2 45® 2 75 

Sulph., 1-oz tins oz 2 -■••■< _ ■>■' 

Sulph., 5-oz tins oz 2 20® 2 50 

MOSS, Iceland ft 15 

Irish ft 20 

MUSK, Canton, 1-oz bxs oz 35 

Tonquin, l /% oz bots ea 4 50 

MUSTARD Colburn's,6 lb cans ft 28 

Ground California ft 14® 15 

NAPHTHALINE, balls, cakes or flakes..ft 4® 8 

NUTMEGS ft 60® 65 

Ground ft) 65® 70 

NUTS, Areca ft 30® 35 

Areca.powd ft 35® 40 

Kola ft 25® 35 

NUX VOMICA ft) 15® 20 

Powdered ft 20® 25 

OIL, Almond, bitter oz 65 

Almond, sweet ft 25@ 45 

Amber, rect ft 50® 55 

Anise ft) 2 40(3 2 60 

Bay oz 45® 50 

Benne (can extra) gai 1 15® 1 25 

Bergamot, Sanderson ft 3 40® 3 00 

Bergamot, Sicilian ft 3 00® 3 20 

Cassia ft 2 25® 2 50 

Castor "A A" gal 1 25® 1 35 

Castor, machine gal 4o® 50 

Castor, special com'l gal 75® 80 

Less than 5 gals., can extra. 

Cedar, coral ft 40® 50 

Cedar, pure ft) 75® 80 

China nut (can extra) gal 65® 75 

Cloves ft 90® 1 10 

Cocoanut ft 20® 30 

Cod liver, Norwegian (can extra) gal 1 10® 1 25 

Cottonseed gal 55® 70 

Less than 5 gal., can extra. 

Croton ft 1 35® 1 50 

Cubebs ft) 1 50® 1 75 

Eucalyptus ft 65® 75 

Geranium Rose oz 65® 75 

Hemlock, pure ft) 75® 80 

Lard gal 75® 85 

Less than 5 gal can extra. 

Lavender flowers ft 2 25®, 2 40 

Lavender, garden ft) 75® 80 

Lemon, Sanderson ft 2 00® 2 20 

Lemon. Sicilian ft 1 25® 1 50 

Mustard, Essential oz 65 

Neatsfoot (less than 5-gal. can extra) ...gal 75® 80 

Olive, California, qts doz 12 00 

Olive, Italia, 1 gal cans gal 2 10 

Olive, Malaga, can extra gal 1 00® 1 25 

Orange, bitter ft t 50(3 175 

Orange, sweet ft 2 25® 2 50 

Origanum ft 50® 00 

Pennyroyal ft) 1 50(« 1 75 

Peppermint Hotchkiss ft 2 10® 2 25 

Peppermint, Western ft 1 1"<" I 60 

Pinus Svlvestris ft 1 20® 1 40 

Rhodium oz 40® 75 

Rose oz 7 50@10 00 

Rosemary flowers lb 1 50® 1 65 

Sandalwood, Eng oz 50 

Sandalwood, Ger ft 3 urn,, .", •_>:> 

Sassalras ft' 75® 85 

Sewing Machine, Nye's, small doz 15 

Sewing Machine. Nye's, large doz 75 

Sperm, Nye's crystal gal 75 

Sperm, pure, w. b '. gal 1 25 

Less than 5 gal can extra. 

Spike 10 85 

Turpentine, rcct., Merck 10 45 

I'nion salad gal 75® 80 

Less than 6 gal can extra. 

Wintergreen Hi l 70@ i 90 

Wormwood 10 1 00<§ 

OIL CAKK. ground tb 02}i<a 03 

OINTMENT, Citiine ft) 65 

Mercurial ' i m ft) 50 

Mercurial % m ft) 60(§ 65 

Zinc ide ft) 75 

ORANGE PEEL ft) 15® 18 

PAPOID, '..r 1-oz bots.. oz 2 00 

r \ RA ki'in ft) 10<S 

PARIS GREEN ft) 20<§ 26 

10 25@ 80 

PETROLATUM, ex. amber lb !.',.< 9 

Snow while 10 

I'MKN ACKTIN (26 OZS. .95) oz I 00 

PHOSPHORUS, 11-fticaus ft) 75 

Mb cans 10 86 

cans 10 

PLASTER PARIS lb 02(3 06 

Dentist's 10 04(3 IIS 

POISON, purple lb ov 



POTASH, Babbift's, (case $3.50) doz 

Caustic, crude ft 

Caustic, white, stick ft 

Bichromate ft 

Carbonate ft 

Chlorate ft 

Cyanide, mining ft 

Cyanide, pure granular ft 

Iodide ft 

Nitrate ft 

• Permanganate ft 

Prussiate, red ft 

Prussiate, yellow ft 

PUBIICE STONE, lump ft 

Powd ft 

QUASSIA, Chips ft 

QUININE, 1-oz bottle oz 

1-oz tin oz 

5-oz tin oz 

25-oz tin oz 

50-oz tin oz 

100-oz tin oz 

RED PRECIPITATE ft 

RESIN , ft 

ROOT, Aconite ft 

Althea, cut ft 

Blood ft 

Blood, powd ft) 

Calamus, peeled ft 

Gentian ft 

Gentian, powd ft 

Ginger, Alrican ft 

Ginger, Jamaica ft 

Goldenseal ft 

Goldenseal, powd ft 

Ipecac, powd ft) 

Licorice, select ft 

Licorice, cut ft 

Licorice, powd ft 

Orris, powd ft) 

Rhubarb , ft 

Rhubarb cubes ft) 

Rhubarb fingers ft 

Rhubarb, powd ft) 

Rhubarb, powd., Allen's, Eng., ft 

Sarsaparilla, Hond ft 

Sarsaparilla, Hond, gro ft 

Sarsaparilla, Mex ft 

Sarsaparilla, Mex., gro ft) 

Valerian ft 

Valerian, powd ft 

ROTTEN STONE, powd ft 

SACCHARIN, 25 gm. cartons ea 

SAFFRON, American ft 

Spanish oz 

SAL EPSOM ft 

Epsom 4-oz cartons doz 

Glauber ft 

Nitre, cryst ft) 

Nitre, powd ft 

Rochelle ft 

Soda ft) 

SALOL, (oz30) ft 

SEED, Anise, Ital lb 

Anise, powd ft 

Bird, mixed, 1-lbs., 60-lb case case 

Bird, mixed, 1 ft doz 

Canary ft) 

Caraway ft 

Cardamom ft 

Celery ft 

Coriander ft 

Flax, cleaned ft 

Flax, ground ft 

Hemp ft 

Millet ft 

Mustard ft) 

Poppy, blue ft 

Rape ft 

Sabadilla, powd ft 

Worm, American ft 

Worm, Levant ft 

SEIDLITZ MIXTURE ft 

Powders, single, 100s box 

Powders, 3's doz 

Powders, 6's doz 

Powders. 10s doz 

SHEEP DIP, Carbolic gal 

Little's 1 gal cans gal 

Little's 5 gal cans gal 

SNUFF, Garrett's Scotch, blads ft 

Garrett's Scolch, 1-oz tins doz 

Garrett's Scotch, 2-oz tins doz 

Garrett's Scotch, 4-oz tins doz 

Garrett's Scotch, 6 oz bots doz 

Lorillard's Maccaboy, 4-oz bots doz 

Lorillard's Rappee. 4-oz bots doz 

SOAP, Castile, Couti white lb 

Marseilles, white lb 

Mottled, coml tb 

Mottled, pure ft 

Turkish, green or white ft 

Powdered ft 

German green, Stiefel's tb 

Whale Oil ft 

SODA ASH lb 

Caustic, 98 per cent ft 

Caustic, 70 per cent (Drums) ft 

Caustic, white, sticks lb 

Bicarbonate ft 

Bromide lb 

Hyposulphite tb 

Hyposulphite, new process ft 

SOLUTION, Donavan's lb 

Fowler's ft) 

Goulard's ft 

SPERMACETI lb 

SPIRl IS, Brooklyn and Columbian gal. 

Less than 5 gals, can extra. 

Nitre, 0. S,P ft 

Nitre, 2-oz bots doz 



90 
13 
70 
20 
25 
17 
35 
65 

2 55<S 2 65 
08® 12 
60 
65 
35 
10 



7',<£. 
45® 
15® 
15® 
Ilia 
30® 



32® 
09® 
06® 

30® 



25® 26 
24® 25 

23}$® 24 J* 

230 21 

1 10 

01^ to 03 
30® 35 
35® 40 
25® 30 



60 
13® 16 



14® 
20® 
25® 
65® 

7n.,, 
2 50® 



14® 
35® 



5® 1 50 
0® 1 75 
75 
1 75 
45 
45 
30 
30 
35 
40 
10 
1 00 
45 
90 
04 
35 
03 
12 
12 
30 
03 



40® 
-10® 
25® 
25® 
30® 
35® 
07® 

40® 

02&® 

01 &@ 

08® 

09® 

26® 
01»/@ 
3 50® 3 65 

16® 18 

20® 25 

3 50 

75 

my 2 @ 05 

10® 12 
1 35® 1 40 

18® 25 

10® 
04#® 
04H® 
03%@ 

04® 

06® 

in,,. 

04® 

40® 



12 

06 

06 

06 

06 

08 

12 

06 

50 

20 

25 

30 

2 50 

60 

1 45® 1 50 

1 @ 2 00 

1 10 

1 35 

1 20 

50 

60 

1 00 

1 75 

2 7.", 
2 50 

75 
L6 



0,r 
HI.,,' 
117' .,„' 
lis,,,, 
10® 



13 

10 
12 
11 
35 

in 
00 

08 

us 
n:;,„, o:;i, 
42® 45 



ill,,, 
06® 

-|| I 



02}$® 

03tf@ 
04® 

;,.,,, 

50® 

1 50® 1 



55® 60 
1 50 



STRONTIUM, nitrate ft 14® 17 

STRYCHINE,, cryst., / 8 -oz bots oz 1 25 

Ciyst, 1-oz bots oz 1 00 

Powd., '/ 8 -oz bots oz 1 20 

Powd., 1-oz bots oz 95 

SUGAR MILK, powd lb 20® 25 

SULFONAL oz 1 35 

SULPHUR, crude, ground, Cal ft 02^® 03 

Flour ft 03%® 04}$ 

Flowers ft 04 @ 05 

Roll ft 03%® 05 

SYRUP. Iodide Iron, F. W. B. & Co ft 57® 60 

Rock Candy, bbls and }$ bbls gal 70® 75 

TAR, Pine, }$ pints doz 75 

Pine, pints doz 90 

Pine, quarts doz 1 50 

WATER, distilled, containers extra gal 10 

Orange Flower, containers extra gal 2 00® 2 25 

Rose, containers extra gal 2 00® 2 50 

WAX, Floor, powd ft 40 

Yellow, pure ft 27® 30 

White, pure ft 50® 55 

White, No. 1 ft 35® 40 

WHITE PRECIPITATE ft 1 20 

ZINC, metallic, shavings ft 20® 35 

Oxide, com'l ft) 14® 15 

Oxide, Hubbuck's lb 45® 5C 

Sulphate, com'l ft 06(5 08 

Sulphate, chem. pure ft 17® 20 

PROPRIETARY ARTICLES 

Controlled T>y F, W. Braun & Co. 

Braun's Carbolic Salve doz $125 

" Carbolic Soap doz 75 

" Condition Powder doz 1 00 

" Essence Jamaica Ginger doz 150 

•' Florida Water, lge doz 3 50 

" Florida Warer, small... doz 150 

" Sarsaparilla doz 4 00 

Syrup Tar and Wild Cherry doz 150 

Cal. Mission Eucalyptus Lozenges doz 150 

Cal. Mission Eucalyptus Plasters doz 1 50 

Cal. Mission Poison Oak Remedy doz 1 50 

Cal. Root Beer doz 80 

Cal. Mocking Bird Food doz 3 00 

Corouado Sea Salt doz 80 

Havdeu's Arnica Salve doz 1 00 

" Carbolic Salve doz 100 

Witch Hazel doz 1 00 

" Sanitary Towels, small gro 

" " medium gro 8 75 

" " large gro 4 00 

Hayden's Sachet Powder, & ft bots ft 3 00 

Hunter's Witch Hazel doz 1 75 

Matchless Sarsaparilla doz 5 00 

Matchless Wild Cherry Phosphates doz 1 75 

Swain's Carbolic Powder doz 1 50 

Tarine doz 1 75 

"T. B." Insect Fowder, 6-ft can ft 40 

" " " 1-ft " doz 5 50 

^-ft" doz 3 25 

" " " sml " doz 1 25 



BRAUN'S... 



Condition Powder 






IS A 



Well Established Remedy 



Having a good sale throughout Southern 
California and the Territories 



It is used for 



Horses, Cattle, Sheep and Poultry 

IT IS GOOD 

It Retails for S£5 cents 
It Costs $ 1 .OO Per Dozen 

You need it in your business ! 



MANUFACTURED 
AND SOLD BY 



F. W. BRAUN & CO. 



LOS ANGELES, CAL. 



VOLUME 7.] 



3-9S505 



LOS ANGELES, JULY, 1898. 



[NUMBER 8. 




/^©^ITKliy JQlH^fAL DEVOTEE TO TU 



TS'OPTHB E^TABL [f^te©IIg c f 







F. W. BRAUN & CO., WHOLESALE DRUGGISTS 



COLUMBIAN SPIRITS 



TRADE MARK 



THE EQUAL of ALCOHOL for all 
PURPOSES EXCEPT INTERNAL use. 

MANHATTAN SPIRIT CO. 

Sole Manufacturers, BUFFALO, N. Y. 



The Price to RETAILERS is 
$8 -Case of 50 glass bottles 




See that the 
Labels bear the well known 
RED DIAMOND MARK of the 
APOLLINARIS COMPANY, LIMITED. 



SOLE EXPORTERS: 
TH6 flPOLLINflRIS COMPANY, Ld., London 

JOHN CAFFREY, 21 Sutter St., San Francisco 
Representing United Agency Co., 503 Fifth Ave., New York 



PRICE LIST** 



FEB. 1, 1890, AND FEB. 1, 1891. 



Beef Peptonoids 6 ozs. 

Beef Peptonoids 1« " 

Liquid Peptonoids 16 " 

Liquid Peptonoids with Coca 16 " 

Peptonoids, Iron and Wine 16 " 

Phospho-Caffein Compound 2 " 

Phospho-Caffein Compound 4 '•' 

Phospho-Caffein Compound 8 " 

Phospho-Caffein Compound 32 " 



per dozen .f 


8 00 


<< 


18 00 


« 


O 00 


Xi 


9 OO 


a 


9 00 


H 


2 OO 


<« 


4 00 


a 


8 00 


u 


24 00 



WE GUARANTEE THE SALE OF ALL OUR GOODS. 






THE "ARLINGTON CHEMICAL* CO. 

YONKERS, N. Y. 



»^i^^:^^^^ 



CAP. 



CORRUGATED END. 




TUBE CONTAINING MENTHOL. 






THIS CUT ILLUSTRATES THE THREE PARTS OF 



Blanchard's Hard Rubber Pocket 

I n h 1 1 o r This is positively the Finest Menthol Inhaler 
llUMK I . ■ on the /Market 



Retails tor 50 Cents. 
Price, $4.00 per dozen. 



WHY NOT SELL THE BEST? 

BLANCHARD'S INHALER is put up in handsome easel cartons, an 
attractive advertisement and an ornament to any drug store. 



The l'nidc- Sin 



BLANCHARD MANUFACTURING CO., Cincinnati, O. 
icd by F. W. BRAUN & CO., Los Angelea and San Diego. 



50 YEARS' 
EXPERIENCE 




Trade Marks 

Designs 

Copyrights &c. 

Anyone sending a sketch and description may 
qulcklr ascertain our opinion free whether an 
Invention is probably patentable. Communica- 
tions si nci W confidential. Handbook on Patents 
sent lice Oldest agency for securing patents. 

Patents taken through Munn & Co. receive 
special notice, without c harg e, in the 

Scientific American. 

A handsomely Illustrated weekly. Largest clr- 
eolation of any scientific lournai. Terms, $3 a 
vear; four months, IL Sold by all newsdealers. 

MUNN & Co. 36,Broadwa > New York 

Branch Office, G25 F St., Washington, D. C. 



Jr/e Qalifor^ia Dru^ist 

A MONTHLY JOURNAL 

DEVOTED TO THE INTERESTS OF THE RETAIL DRUGGIST. 



Volume VII.] 



LOS ANGELES, CAL., JULY, 1898. 



[Number 8. 



Stye <?aliforpia Dra^ist 



PUBLISHED MONTHLY BY 



THE CALIFORNIA DRUGGIST PUB. CO. 

P. O. Drawer 406, Station C. - - LOS ANGELES, CAL. 
(To whom all Communications should be addressed.) 



F. S. LANGDON, ........ PRESIDENT 

J. Q. BRAUN, ... .... Treasurer 

R. A. ALLEN, ......... Editor 

TERMS OF SUBSCRIPTION. 

Per Year $1 00 

Single Copies 10 

ADVERTISING RATES. 

One Page $100 00 

Half Page 60 00 

Fourth Page 35 00 

Eighth Page 20 00 

Cards (per month) 1 50 

$&&* Advertisements for positions or assistants, or to buy or sell Drug 
Stores, are inserted free of charge. 

Items of interest to Pharmacists are solicited. 

The official organ of the San Diego Retail Druggists' Association. 

The official organ of the Los Angeles County Pharmaceutical Associa- 
tion. 



THE stamp tax on proprietary articles continues to be the 
absorbing topic of conversation in drug circles, and will 
continue to be until a definite and satisfactory disposition 
shall be made of the points in dispute. 

The recent ruling by Commissioner Scott by which free 
samples are required to be stamped seems to us a forced construc- 
tion of the law. Such samples having no "retail value" and 
not being "offered or exposed for sale." His decision also as to 
the proper stamping of bulk packages, which he says must be 
for the " full proportionate value of the article when put up in 
the smallest retail packages " seems illy adapted to the case of 
bulk perfumes, for they have no fixed retail price — and also 
are frequently sold in original half pint " bulk " packages to 
consumers. 

We think an appropriate way to handle the matter of bulk 
perfumes (to go no further) would be to require stamps for the 
regular jobbing price of the article and then require the 
stamping of each retail quantity sold, which latter in fact we 
suppose will have to be done anyhow. The double taxing in 
this case would be no worse than in the other, at all events. 

In the matter of chewing gum it will be seen that the article 
must be sold from original boxes only — same as cigars — and 
dealers will discontinue the practice of piling the gum in 
showcases, as many have been doing. 



Regarding physicians' prescriptions, which are exempt from 
tax, it should be remembered that the law says " mixed, put 
up, or compounded" on a physician's prescription. We are 
waiting for a more perfect explanation of the application of 
the law, but must assume that where a proprietary article is 
prescribed in original package, a stamp would be required, the 
same as if there were no prescription written. 

The scarcity of stamps has not been relieved at this writing 
(July 13), but we may console ourselves with the reflection that 
after a few more days we shall be able to get all of them we 
are willing to pay for. 



\ I J E took occasion in our April issue to call attention to some 
^* of the reasons which to our mind made the business of 
manufacturing perfumes separate and distinct from that oi the 
pharmacist, though holding that the preparation of toilet items 
was properly within his line, our principal thought in con- 
nection with the subject being that the pharmacist lacked an 
intimate knowledge of the proper materials as well as the art 
of the professional perfumer. An esteemed Eastern contem- 
porary whose pen was almost simultaneously devoted to the 
same subject, took an opposite view of the matter, advising 
the pharmacist to enter this field, and in a later article re- 
marked that the skill acquired in compounding medicines 
made the working knowledge of mixing perfumes easy to at- 
tain. It also pointed out that the principal materials of the 
perfumer's art are very few in number. 

We quite agree with our friendly critic that the pharmacist 
is abundantly able to compound any prescription, whether for 
pills, powders or liquid combination, and we know dozens of 
prescription clerks to whom we would entrust the preparation 
of formulas containing the deadliest of poisons with entire 
confidence. Skill, however, is not the question at issue, for 
the work of the perfumer is not primarily skill, but the de- 
velopment of an artistic sense, quite distinct from deftness. 
It is true that the educated druggist has a certain advantage in 
his knowledge of materials entering into fine perfumes, and 
providing he has the "gift" should succeed in this line beyond 
others. We have known a few such, just enough to empha- 
size the poiut we tried to make — that the perfumer is "born, 
not made," and that druggists generally will find it much 
more profitable to devote their spare time to pharmaceuticals 
rather than to perfumery. 



A STRONG effort is being made throughout the East to in- 
**■ duce the retail druggists to advance their prices on pro- 
prietary goods which have suffered so severely by reason of cut- 
rates. The time for such action, it is justly argued, is most 



THE CALIFORNIA DRUGGIST. 



opportune, and if druggists fail now, under the stimulus of the 
war tax, to " brace up " to the requirements of the times, they 
may never again find so favorable an opportunity. The presi- 
dent of the New York City Board of Pharmacy, Clarence O. 
Bigelow, says {Era) : "I think this is the best opportunity 
the druggists of this country have ever had to advance prices 
on cut goods to a living rate. The retail druggist who does 
not do so is simply lacking in business sense." 

We don't see how the matter could be put more strongly. 
We can state that the druggists of Los Angeles have made a 
general advance on "cut" goods, although not able, as yet, to 
restore full prices. Let us be thankful for what has been 
gained in this direction, and work together for still better 
things. 

\\ J"E print in this issue from the Bulletin of Pharmacy ) 
* ' Mr. E. T. Off' s paper on the avoidance of mistakes in 
prescription work, and commend it to our readers as an admir- 
able presentation of the subject. It is evident the writer has 
had experience in each kind of drug store alluded to. Mr. 
Off is now, as is well known, Secretary of the Sale & Son 
Drug Co., and manager of their prescription department. 



/CONCENTRATED Matchless Wild Cherry Phosphates, 
^-^ for Soda fountain use, in pint bottles — an article that has 
no superior — only 75 cents per pint. Supplied by F. W. 
Braun & Co. 

'"THE Centaur Company gives notice that their special offer 
of 1 dozen Castoria on a gross order (with window dis- 
play) will be withdrawn August 1st. The price of Castoria 
will not be advanced, however, by reason of the war tax. 



TT will be noticed that the announcement of the fall session 
* of the California College of Pharmacy appears in this 
issue. We are always glad to turn the thoughts of the youth- 
ful seeker after knowledge pharmaceutical to this very excel- 
lent institution, which is peculiarly our own, being a branch 
of the University of California and receiving the University's 
seal upon its diplomas. The greatly increased facilities of this 
excellent college make it one of the best in the land, and with 
the advantages offered of several hours per day which may be 
given to drug store work while pursuing the courses of study 
at the college, the student with limited means may be enabled 
to ,: work his passage " to a greater or less degree. The term 
opens September 28th, and all particulars may be obtained by 
addressing Wm. M. Searby, Dean, 400 Sutter St., San Fran- 
cisco. 

PHE Atlantic branch ol Uncle Sam's Universal Dispensary 

* has "caught up," as we hoped, and Surgeon Schley has 
performed about the greatest "operation" in the annals of 
of history ; so Cervera one and yet so successful ! Particularly 
pleasing is it to us that a Pacific Coast doctor, one Clarke, 
showed his ability in prescribing for bad blood, and that his 
"Oregon grape" was so efficacious. Three times three for U. 
S. U. D. 

HTHE following goods are not subject to the stamp tax : 

* Rat Paste. 
Rough on Rats. 
Squirrel Poisons. 
Insect Powders. 
Baking Powder. 

Shoe Dressings and Blackings. 
Infant Foods— and all Foods. 
Flavoring Extracts. 

Toilet Soaps, wrapped or unwrapped, if not medicated or 
having directions. 
Disinfectants. 
Butter Color. 



/^UR readers will find it desirable to preserve the rulings of 
^-^ the Commissioner of Internal Revenue regarding the 
stamping of goods, and the Druggist will, as far as practic- 
able, keep up with the latest decisions. Preserve them for 
reference. 

Patents Relating to Pharmacy Granted Hay 31, June 7, 
14, 21, and 28. 

Adelbert H. Alden, Lawrence, N. Y., India-rubber water-bag, 604,924. 
« „ ,, « 604,925. 

Lorenz F. Biesmeyer, Westphalia, Mo., Pessary, 604,958. 

Horatio E. Cook, Lake City, Fla., Syringe, 604,894. 

Annis B. Eighmy, Clifton Springs, N. Y., bed pan, 604,915. 

Herbert R. Hall, Brooklyn, N. Y., sanitary bowl, 604,983. 

Win. B. Hidden, Boston, Mass., inhaler, 604,935. 

Matthew J. Bogert, Demerest, N. J., pill-bottle, design, 28,731. 

Cyril P. Brown, Spring Lake, Mich., applicator, 605,386. 

Wm. F. Jobbins, Aurora, 111., apparatus for making caustic soda, 
605,102. 

John H. Kellogg, Battle Creek, Mich., inhaler, 605,436. 

Eugene Fournier, Paris, France, Syringe, 605,476. 

Karl Hohmann, Neukirchen, Germany, Speculum, 605,715. 

Alexander F. Holland, Berkeley, Cal., vaginal dilator, 605,547. 

Thomas S. Pitt, Boston, Mass., endoscopic instrument, 605,652. 

Elisabeth Seibert, Chicago, 111., vaginal syringe, 605,682. 

Charles A. Way, Charleston, N. H., tricycle for invalids, 605,530. 

Thomas W. McCue, Akron, Ohio, antiseptic surgical dressing, 606,019. 

Glenn B. Murray, Lakeland, Fla., cabinet for medicine, etc., 606,018. 

Christian Patteburg, Brooklyn, N. Y., tonsilotone, 606,078. 

Oscar B. Schier, Baltimore, Md., apparatus for pasteurizing and steril- 
izing milk, etc. 605,920. 

Joseph T. Commoss, New York, N Y., fumigator, 606,446. 

Carl F. Dewitt, Berlin, Germany, thermocauter, 606,380. 

Sussannah L. F'owler, Kensington, Md., abdominal supporter, 606,410. 

Francis Gizzi, New York, N. Y., disinfection apparatus, 606.338. 

Aaron Harris and C. Stahl, New York, N. Y., druggists and medicine 
label, 606,457. 

Wm. F. Le Seur, New York, N. Y., truss, 606,465. 

Robert W. Prescott, Cleveland, Ohio, atomizer, 606,240. 

John M. Scribuer, Balsover, Canada, iuvalid bed, 606,247. 



The new Ohio pharmacy law recognizes certificates from 
other boards of pharmacy in states which grant like recog- 
nition to holders of certificates from the Ohio board. It re- 
quires re-registration every three years. There are some im- 
portant features in the section relating to prosecutions for vio- 
lations of the law. The complaint is filed by the secretary of 
the board, and the prosecution is confided to the prosecuting 
attorney. All of the funds collected are paid to the treasurer 
of the board, and by him in turn paid monthly into the State 
treasury, where it is held as a fund for the use of the State 
Board of Pharmacy. 

The California Druggist, $1.00 per year. 



THE CALIFORNIA DRUGGIST. 



Atlanta, Ga., June 23d, 1898. 
Ed. California Druggist : 

Dear Sir ; The bill organizing a Hospital Corps in the 
U. S. Navy, has just passed both Houses of Congress — the 
House receding from the amendment limiting its operation to 
the present war in which the Senate refused to concur. The 
bill was as follows : 

To organize a Hospital Corps of the Navy of the United 
States ; to define its duties and regulate its pay. 

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives 
of the United States of America in Congress assembled, that a 
Hospital Corps of the United States Navy is hereby established, 
and shall consist of pharmacists, hospital stewards, hospital ap- 
prentices (first-class), and hospital apprentices ; and for this 
purpose the Secretary of the Navy is empowered to appoint 
twenty-five pharmacists with the rank, pay and privileges of 
warrant officers, and to enlist, or cause to be enlisted, as many 
hospital stewards, hospital apprentices (first-class), and hospi- 
tal apprentices as in his judgment may be necessary, and to 
limit or fix the number, and to make such regulations as may 
be required for their enlistment and government. Enlisted 
men in the Navy or the marine corps shall be eligible for 
transfer to the Hospital Corps, and vacancies occurring in the 
grade of pharmacists shall be filled by the Secretary of the 
Navy by selection from those holding the rate of hospital 
steward. 

Section 2 . That all necessary hospital and ambulance ser- 
vice at naval hospitals, naval stations, naval yards, and marine 
barracks, and on vessels of the Navy, Coast Survey, and Fish 
Commission, shall be performed by the members of said corps, 
and the corps shall be permanently attached to the Medical 
Department of the Navy, and shall be included in the effective 
strength of the Navy, and be counted as a part of the enlisted 
force provided by law, and shall be subject to the laws and 
regulations for the government of the Navy. 

Sec. 3. That the pay of hospital stewards shall be sixty 
dollars a month, the pay of hospital apprentices (first-class) 
twenty-four dollars a month and the pay of hospital appren- 
tices eighteen dollars a month, with the increase on account of 
length of service as is now or may hereafter be allowed by law 
to other enlisted men in the Navy. (Amended, I believe, to 
$30 and $20 respectively.) 

Sec. 4. That all benefits derived from existing laws, or 
that may hereafter be allowed by law to other warrant officers 
or enlisted men in the Navy, shall be allowed in the same 
manner to the warrant officers or enlisted men in the Hospital 
Corps of the Navy. 

Sec. 5. That all acts and parts of acts, so far as they con- 
flict with the provisions of this Act, are hereby repealed. 

This is the bill known as the Hale Bill, and was the result 
of the efforts of the Naval Department to secure such legisla- 
tion as was desired by the Pharmacists of the Union as far as 
was practicable. The bill first introduced by the American 
Pharmaceutical Association, requested the title of Pharmacists 
and the rank of warrant officers for all apothecaries in the 
United States Navy. Upon consultation by the Department of 
the Navy with the Naval Committees, it was found that al- 
though our bill has been recommended ' ' in toto ' ' by Dr. 
Tryon in his report last year that the Naval Committees were 
ot likely to accede to the material expense which would be 



involved — that is, hence, the Hale Bill was drawn up by Dr. 
Van Reypen, the present Surgeon General, which gives to 
pharmacists the titles they desire in the United States Navy. 
The number of warrant officers was reduced to twenty-five, 
and they are to be given the title of Pharmacists. The next 
rank will be that of Hospital Stewards, who will be accorded 
the pay of the former Apothecaries; then come the Hospital 
Apprentices — first and second class, whose pay will be $30 and 
$20 a month each, in place of $24 and $18 as in the above bill, 
if the amendment to that effect passed, as I think it did. This 
bill accords what the American Pharmaceutical Association 
started out to fight for — that is, a better recognition for the 
pharmacists in the United States Navy. All the pharmacists 
in the United States Navy, hereafter, will be warrant officers. 
This will give to the gentlemen who occupy these positions a 
considerably higher grade than the apothecaries have ever oc- 
cupied in the Naval service, and the whole tone of the Corps 
will be most decidedly elevated — even the pay of the second- 
class apprentices being considerably higher than that of the 
ordinary private. 

Permit us, through your columns, to most heartily thank, 
in the name of the American Pharmaceutical Association, 
each and every one who have aided us in this work for the 
professional advancement of pharmacy. We trust that every 
State will bear in precious remembrance the hearty and ener- 
getic work of their representatives on the Committee of the 
American Pharmaceutical Association, as without the valua- 
ble efforts which they so freely gave, in nearly every case, we 
would have never succeeded. The Naval Apothecaries, them- 
selves, deserve the heartiest praise for their capable and intelli- 
gent assistance in our campaign of education. Our committee 
feels most deeply indebted to the various heads of the Naval 
Department, and to the members of Congress, who recognized 
the justice of our claim and aided us so substantially in our 
efforts. Yours sincerely, 

George F. Payne. 



A New Cure For Insomnia. 

A physician who suffered for some years from insomnia, fol 
lowing a fall from a car, describes in the Journal of the Amer- 
ican Medical Association a new method of inducing sleep, 
which was tried successfully. The principle is to induce mus- 
cular fatigue by exercises carried out in bed. Eying on his 
back, the patient first reaches for the foot and head-board at 
the same time. He then raises his head half an inch ; at the 
same time he breathes slowly and deeply about eight inspira- 
tions to the minute, which are counted. After about twenty 
inspirations, the head, which begins to feel heavy, is dropped. 
The right foot is then raised (the reaching for the boards and 
counting being continued) and similarly dropped when fatigued. 
The left foot goes through the same process. The muscles 
which are used in reaching for the head and foot-boards are 
then relieved, and the body is elevated so that it rests on the 
head and heels. He then turns to the right side and reaches 
for the head and foot-boards again, and raises first the head and 
then the foot as before. The same process is gone through on 
the other side. Thus eight positions have been assumed and 
a large number of muscles used. If sleep has not been in- 
duced the same cycle is gone over again. — American Drug- 
gist. 



THE CALIFORNIA DRUGGIST. 



PROTECTING A LABEL 



United States Court Decision in a Patent Medicine Case. 

In the United States Circuit Court this morning Judge Kirk- 
patrick signed an order for a preliminary injunction, restrain- 
ing Frederick Killenberger, of New Brunswick, from selling a 
preparation called "Castoria," in a form and in a wrapper 
bearing a general pictorial resemblance to the original prepara- 
tion of that name, of which the Centaur Company of New 
York City is the proprietor. 

The Centaur Company (Charles H. Fletcher) made applica- 
tion some time ago through their attorneys, Wetmore & Jen- 
ner, of New York, for a preliminary injunction, pending suit 
against the defendant, claiming that the general form of the 
package wrapper was calculated and intended to deceive the 
public into believing that the preparation was that of the 
plaintiff. Killenberger' s label wrapper did not contain the 
same subject matter as that of the plaintiff, but the general re- 
semblance was close. He was represented by George S. Silzer, 
a New Brunswick lawyer. 

Judge Kirkpatrick's order is to the effect that "the defend- 
ant, his servants, agents, attorneys and each and every one of 
them, be and they are restrained until the further order of this 
court from directly or indirectly offering or exposing for sale 
any preparation called 'Castoria,' under the label or wrapper 
annexed, or any label or wrapper substantially the same, or 
under any combination of words, or lettering or arrangement 
thereof liable to create confusion in the minds of the public 
with the label or wrapper used by the complainant, or from 
dressing up and selling said goods in any way which will in 
any manner simulate the complainant's trade mark in its label 
or wrapper." — Newark News, May 18, 1898. 



The War Revenue Law 

Provides that on and after July 1st, 1898, stamp taxes shall 
be paid on checks, drafts, notes, etc., as follows : 

CHECKS. 

On each check, of whatever amount, a 2c. revenue stamp. 

DRAFTS. 

At sight or on demand, not drawing interest, a 2c revenue 
stamp. 

Drafts otherwise than at sight, two cents tor each $100, or 
fractional part thereof in excess of $100. 

NOTES. 

Promissory notes, two cents for each $100, or fractional part 
thereof in excess of $100. 

Section 9. — Provides that the person using or affixing the 
adhesive stamp shall write or stamp thereon the initials of his 
name and the date upon which the stamp shall be attached or 
used, so that the same shall not again be used. 

Penalty for not doing so : Misdemeanor. Fine of not less 
than $50 nor more than $500, or imprisonment for six months, 
or both. 

Penalty for failure to stamp with design to evade law : 
Misdemeanor. Fine, $200. 

1'he law requires that checks must be stamped by the drawer 
and stamps cancelled before delivery. The severe penalty for 
non-compliance attaches even if the stamp is afterwards sup- 
plied bv another; so be careful not to issue a check after July 
tst without stamping it. 



Emulsion of Cod Liver Oil. 

Irish moss, 15 ; water, 1,300. Make a decoction and strain. 
In 150 of this decoction dissolve sugar, 25; and add to the 
cold solution cod liver oil, 80. Shake well together in a bottle. 
A perfect inseparable emulsion will result, in which no oil 
globules will be visible, even with a lens.— Repertoire de 
Pharm. (3), ix., 479, after Giorn. de Pharm. de Trieste; 
Pharm. four. 

RULINGS ON SCHEDULE B. 



Commissioner Scott Decides Questions That Have Vexed 
the Drug Trade. 

The following rulings have been made by the Commissioner of Inter- 
nal Revenue, W. B. Scott, on several questions as to the application of 
the proprietary stamp tax which have vexed the drug trade : 

Q. Does the law require the stamping of chemical preparations and 
prepared drugs (some of which are patented, e. g., phenacetine, sulpho- 
nal, antipyrine, etc.), which have no fixed or retail price, and which are 
not sold in prepared packages by the retailers? 

A. The question is too general for a definite answer, but the articles 
mentioned have all been heJd to be taxable by this office. 

Q. Does the law require the stamping of malt extract preparations? 

A. All malt extract preparations, such as nutrine, anchortonique, etc., 
are held liable to this stamp tax. The fact that the manufacturer pays $2 
tax on each barrel of lager beer from which these extracts are manufac- 
tured has no bearing on the question of taxation. It is known that arti- 
cles which have once paid revenue tax enter largely into the composi- 
tion of patent medicines, distilled spirits, for instance, but it has never 
been held for that reason that these articles should be exempted from 
stamp tax. 

Q. Does the law require the stamping of food preparations that have 
medicinal qualities, such as Mellin's Nestle's, and Eskay's Food, and 
other infants' foods ? 

A. It has been ruled generally that pure food preparations are not 
iable to stamp tax, but if any one of these articles mentioned by you is 
advertised as having medicinal qualities, there might be a question in 
regard to its taxability. 

Q. How is the stamp tax to be administered on bulk goods, which 
have no fixed or advertised retail price, for example, on perfumer} 7 , 
which the manufacturer sells by the pound, and the retailer sells at 
whatever price he can get ? 

A. The ruling of this office in regard to bulk packages is as follows : 
All medicinal preparations, subject to the stamp tax, and all perfumeries 
and cosmetic articles are equally liable to the stamp tax when sold in 
what are termed bulk packages, as when sold in retail packages, and the 
value of the stamp or stamps to be affixed must correspond with the 
price charged for a single package, with its contents. This decision 
specially applies to imported bay rum, cologne waters, vaseline, and pe- 
trolatum, which are held to be cosmetic articles, and to bitters, claimed 
to be medicinal, when sold in kegs, half barrels, etc. Dealers may re- 
tail directly from such bulk packages, which have been properly stamped 
by the manufacturer or importer, drawing from the same in quantities to 
suit their customers, without any additional stamping, but the stamp at- 
tached to such bulk packages will only protect the original articles con- 
tained therein, and only protect that so long as it is kept within such 
stamped package. If bulk packages are broken and their contents 
drawn off into smaller vessels, thereby ceasing to be identified with the 
stamped package in which they were put up by the manufacturer or sold 
by the importer, such contents become liable to seizure if stamps are not 
affixed to the articles thus sold, or offered or exposed for sale. 

Q. When the law becomes operative how must the retailer stamp his 
goods which are selling at cut prices? To an article the advertising 
price of which is one dollar, but which the druggist sells for 70 cents, 
what stamp must be affixed ? 

A. The retailer must stamp the article according to the advertised re- 
tail price, which is affixed by the manufacturer. An article, the adver- 
tised price of which is one dollar, and which the druggist sells for 70 
cents, must have affixed 2 l / 2 cents in stamps. — New York Cow. 






THE CALIFORNIA DRUGGIST. 



Emergencies : How to Treat Them. 

BY W. H. GARRISON, PEARL, ILL. 
[Read before the Illinois Pharmaceutical Association.] 

My subject is " Emergencies : How to Treat Them," and 
at a first glance the pharmacist may well ask, "What has that 
to do with pharmacy ?" And, on the other hand, the physician 
who has not comprehended in its fullness the great purpose 
and object of his calling may throw up his hands in horror at 
the thought of the pharmacist rendering aid to the injured and 
thus apparently depriving him of a portion of his bread and 
butter. But upon a moment's reflection the pharmacist will 
readily see that while a knowledge of ' ' emergencies and how 
to treat them ' ' may not throw any great light upon the 
scientific side of pharmacy, it may nevertheless have a great 
deal to do with the peace of mind of the pharmacist and with 
his standing in the community, and hence bear directly on his 
pocket-book, either for "weal or woe." In other words, it 
has to do with the practical rather than with the scientific side 
of our profession. 

The American pharmacist is universally recognized as a 
public servant, and in order to maintain the dignity of his 
calling he must be ever ready to meet intelligently all emer- 
gencies, from the selling of a postage stamp at midnight to the 
administration of the proper antidote for hydrocyanic acid 
poisoning. But aside from all speculation, it is a fact that the 
pharmacist is the man who is often called upon suddenly, and 
when he least expects it, to come to the relief of some one who 
h.as met with some grave injury, either from accident or de- 
sign ; and if he is not informed to a reasonable extent, he is 
likely to make a blunder that will cost him his reputation and 
the unfortunate victim his life. Furthermore, there is abso- 
lutely no good reason why the pharmacist should bear having 
his hands tied with the claims of ignorance and allow his 
fellow man to perish or valuable time to be lost, simply because 
a physician who has not the proper conception of his calling 
may think of objecting to the pharmacist rendering aid to his 
patient in cases of emergency. 

Now, since the pharmacist is in point of fact the man who 
is most often called upon to render aid while the physician is 
being summoned, it becomes important that he should be 
fairly conversant with at least the principles underlying the 
proper treatment of emergencies that are most often met with. 
The field of emergencies is a broad one, and it is beyond the 
province of this paper to comment on all of them or even to 
mention them. I shall, therefore, refer briefly to a few only of 
the more common ones, such for instance as the arrest of 
hemmorhage of traumatic origin. I consider this first, because 
the pharmacist is not infrequently called upon to render aid in 
emergencies of this nature, and if he will but act promptly 
and with j udgment, he can not only save the life of the patient 
but he can also render the services of a physicion more valu- 
able in the after treatment of the wound, while at the same 
time bringing credit and satisfaction to himself. 

BLEEDING WOUNDS. 

Suppose a man is brought to your door with a frightful 
wound of the forearm which is bleeding profusely. 

What will you do ? The man may bleed to death before a 
physician can be summoned; prompt action is necessary. The 
pharmacist need not stop to reflect as to what artery has been 



severed or as to whether the wound is incised, lacerated or 
punctured. These are all in order for the physician, but to 
the pharmacist the great indication is to arrest the bleeding 
until the physician arrives. And he must not be carried away 
by the confusion of the moment, else he will be seen grasping 
a bottle of Monsell's solution, glycerite of tannin or some other 
styptic, and very diligently pouring it into the wound — which 
would be a great mistake, as styptics are only useful in par- 
enchymatous bleeding (i. e., capillary oozing) and not in 
arterial or veinous hemorrhage ; and even in parenchymatous 
bleeding they are not to be used if other means are at hand lor 
controlling it. On the contrary, the pharmacist who is properly 
informed and keeps his presence of mind will promptly tie an 
Esmarch elastic bandage around the arm just above the elbow, 
or if no Esmarch is at hand, he must simply use his common- 
sense and make use of a piece of rubber tubing that he may 
have about his percolators, or if he has none of this he can 
run to the show case and take the rubber tubing off from a 
fountain syringe and tie it tightly around the arm. The point 
to be remembered is, that an elastic bandage of any kind is 
more efficient in controlling hemorrhages than one that is non- 
elastic, and if the pharmacist remembers this he can usually 
find means of applying it, even if he be forced to use his own 
suspenders. 

After the bleeding is somewhat under control, the pharma- 
cist should at once turn his attention to the wound itself. And 
right here is where he can make himself of immense value or 
of equally great detriment, depending on whether or not he 
understands the principles underlying modern antiseptic sur- 
gery. If the pharmacist protects the wound properly, he will 
not only not be supplanting the physician, but, on the con- 
trary, he will be making the physician's work more valuable 
to the patient and more pleasant to the physician himself. 

ANTISEPTIC DRESSING. 

The pharmacist is not the judge as to whether the wound is 
or is not already infected, but it is his duty to make an effort 
to prevent any further opportunities of infection after it comes 
under his care, and to this end he should simply cover the 
wound with sterilized gauze, if at his command, and if not, 
then he can quickly make an antiseptic solution of bichlorid of 
mercury (i to 2000 or 1 to 3000), dip some clean absorbent 
cotton into it and cover the wound, allowing it to remain until 
the physician arrives. At all events, he must make no attempt 
to close the wound, especially with ordinary adhesive plaster, 
as this is beyond his sphere and likely to result in damage to 
the patient. 

And right here I want to condemn in no uncertain language 
the practice of covering a wound, be it ever so small, with ad- 
hesive plaster that has been moistened with the saliva of either 
the patient or the pharmacist. This may seem a trifling mat- 
ter, but is a common practice among the laity, and even among 
persons who should certainly have better judgment and train- 
ing. The practice is not only a filthy one, but is also the 
cause of no considerable amount of suffering, as the saliva is 
especially rich in pathogenic germs. 

The treatment that I have described for a wound in the fore- 
arm may be applied with proper variation to wounds of any 
part of either extremity. But suppose the wound is in the 
neck or some other locality where pressure cannot be utilized 
in the manner mentioned, then what shall we do? In answer 



THE CALIFORNIA DRUGGIST. 



it may be said that the underlying principle is the same. It is 
pressure that we want, and we may get it by packing the 
wound thoroughly with sterilized gauze or with clean absorb- 
ent cotton wet in an antiseptic solution, or if neither is avail- 
able, then the pharmacist may place his thumbs in the wound, 
and thus close the bleeding vessels ; however, this is a danger- 
ous practice, and should not be resorted to when other means 
are at hand. 

The pharmacist should cleanse his hands before making any 
attempt at dressing the wound, and this may be hastily done 
by washing them with soap and water and then dipping them 
in strong alcohol. These means are usually at hand and can 
be utilized quickly, and while they are by no means thorough, 
they are perhaps all that the pharmacist can make use of at 
the moment, unless he chances to have other antiseptic solu- 
tions available. 

INSOLATION OR SUNSTROKE. 

I shall now refer to insolation or "sunstroke," as it is a sub- 
ject that often interests the city pharmacist, and even occasion- 
ally the pharmacist of the country village as well. If a man 
is carried into your store prostrated by heat, you can render 
valuable service both to the individual and to the physician by 
removing the clothing from the shoulders and chest of the un- 
fortunate victim ; in fact, strip him to the waist, place him in 
a perfectly recumbent position, and have some one pour cold 
water from a height on to his neck and back, while you hastily 
procure some ice from your soda fountain or elsewhere. Break 
the ice into small pieces, fill an ice-bag and apply it to the 
man's head. You may even add salt to it, thus making a 
freezing mixture ; but it is of the utmost importance that such 
an application should not be allowed to remain in one position 
longer than a few moments, for in such an event the scalp 
would be frozen and devitalized, and serious injury result. If 
you have no rubber ice-bag, you can use an empty cork sack 
or a towel or such other material as may be at hand. The 
patient should be kept perfectly quiet until the physician ar- 
rives, and some stimulant may be administered, such as ether 
or ammonium carbonate. 

SYNCOPE, OR FAINTING. 

Another condition somewhat similar to the previous one is 
syncope from fright or injury or even possibly from joy, and 
the circumstances surrounding such emergencies are peculiarly 
calculated to be the cause of the pharmacist "losing his head," 
so to speak, as they usually occur under conditions of great 
excitement. 

When this accident occurs the victim in the majority of cases 
is a young lady, and she is, as a rule, promptly surrounded by 
a number of anxious friends or curious spectators or both, and 
the very first impulse is to " lift her up " ; but if the thought- 
ful pharmacist is present he will promptly and strenuously 
object to this proceeding, and will insist on keeping her in a 
perfectly recumbent position, and will at the same time loosen 
all clothing about the neck, chest and waist, and then sprinkle 
cold water over the face, neck and chest. The water should 
be sprinkled with considerable force, or poured from a height 
if the syncope is complete, but if only partial, then those pro- 
ceedings may be unnecessary, and the administration of 
stimulating inhalations may suffice. 

The most convenient inhalations are ammonia or amyl 



nitrite, but these are of little avail if the syncope is complete, 
as in that case the respiratory movements are almost absent. 
While these steps are being taken the anxious friends and 
over-curious onlookers should be urged to stand back and thus 
give the patient air, and in the majority of cases a few mo- 
ments only will suffice to enable you to note evidences of 
recovery ; the physician will arrive and the pharmacist's duty 
will have ended. 

BURNS AND SCALDS. 

In conclusion I shall refer briefly to the treatment of burns 
and scalds. True, there is but little for the pharmacist to do 
in this direction, but occasionally he is called upon for assist- 
ance in such accidents, and he should at least be aware of the 
fact that he can do but little, and thus avoid embarrassment. 
However, he may contribute quite considerably to the comfort 
of the victim by promptly adopting measures to exclude the 
air, and for this purpose a number of remedies have been 
suggested, but the time-honored carron oil possesses the great 
advantage of being nearly always at hand and is probably as 
efficacious as any of the newer remedies. Still, we may add 
about i per cent of thymol to the carron oil, and thus add to 
its antiseptic properties. 

We should thoroughly saturate a piece of clean gauze or 
absorbent cotton with this preparation and cover the affected 
surface, and if the burn is not quite extensive, this will suffice 
to bring a great deal of relief to the sufferer. If, however, the 
burn covers a large surface, it may be necessary to give an 
anodyne in addition to the foregoing treatment, and perhaps 
the best one is morphine, either hypodermatically or internally. 
This will give relief, and since the object of the pharmacist's 
efforts is to give temporary relief, he will have accomplished it 
and can await the arrival of the physician. 

I have now referred to a few of the emergencies that are 
most frequently encounteied, and I wish to emphasize the fact 
that what I have said is intended for the pharmacist and not 
the physician, and while it covers, as I believe, fairly well the 
duty of the pharmacist in the cases cited, it would by no 
means cover the duty of a physician in the same cases. The 
pharmacist occupies a middle ground between the physician 
and the layman, and while he is in no way competent to sup- 
plant the physician, and, indeed, has no inclination to do so, 
still, the public at large rightfully looks up to the pharmacist 
as a man of superior intellect and judgment, and expects him 
to be more competent to act in cases of emergency than is the 
ordinary man. 

As I said in the beginning, time will not permit me to more 
than hint at the subject of emergencies in this paper, but I 
would suggest that a more extended study of the subject might 
be interesting to the pharmacist and would widen the sphere 
of his usefulness and influence. 



1 






To Remove Anilin Stains from the Hands and Clothing. 

This is easily done by using a solution of sodium nitrite in 
dilute sulphuric acid — say i part of the nitrite in 70 parts of a 
1:400 aqueous solution of sulphuric acid. Put into a flask and 
let stand for 24 hours before using. Apply to the spot with a 
camel's hair pencil or a sponge. After disappearance of the 
stains wash the spot with plenty of clean water. — National 
Druggist. 



THE CALIFORNIA DRUGGIST. 



The Bulletin Prize Contest. 

The March Award of $25.00 made to Mr. E. T. Off, of Los Angeles, California, for an 

Excellent Paper on Precautions Against Errors 

in Prescription Compounding. 

(From the Bulletin of Pharmacy.) 

Pharmacies may admit of classification under three great 
heads. In each class prescriptions are compounded differently. 
I wish first to offer some advice concerning the methods used 
by stores in the first two classes, and then to explain a system, 
applicable to stores of the thir* category, which experience 
has proved to be as nearly perfect as human devices ever can 
be made. 

COMPOUNDING IN THE SMALL PHARMACY. 

In the small pharmacy there is always time carefully to fill 
and check all prescriptions. First request the customer to be 
seated for ten or fifteen minutes. After carefully reading the 
prescription proceed thoughtfully to prepare it, checking each 
ingredient as it enters the compound. When alone you are 
compelled to leave the unfinished prescription at any time to 
serve an impatient customer, and the checking enables you to 
return to your dispensing and continue where you left off. 
When the mixture is prepared, write the label and check back 
the entire prescription. Being positive of its correctness you 
are then ready to deliver it to the customer. In the small 
store, errors occur invariably through carelessness. 

IN THE CORNER PHARMACY. 

Next there is the corner pharmacy, where several clerks are 
employed. Generally speaking, this is the most unsatisfac- 
tory store in which to dispense prescriptions. My experience 
has been that more errors occur in this class of pharmacies 
than in any other. Whoever accepts the prescription from 
the customer generally fills it. But while doing so, trade in 
the store demands his assistance from time to time ; and this 
disadvantage, coupled with the annoyance of probably two or 
three other clerks trying to fill a prescription at the same time 
and in the same manner, often results in errors being made, 
regardless of how accurate the compounders may be. And 
then, too, the customer whose prescription you are filling ob- 
serves you waiting upon general trade, and before the stated 
"tenor fifteen minutes" have passed he will probably ask, 
*' How much longer will I have to wait ? " The most success- 
ful method I have found to prevent errors in this class of 
pharmacies is to fill your prescription and attempt nothing else 
at the same time, carefully "back-checking " the prescription 
after it is compounded. While one or two clerks are dispens- 
ing let the other two or three attend exclusively to general 
trade. The customer has greater confidence in the clerk if he 
remains with the prescription until it is delivered, and at the 
same time reputation and business are not imperiled by the 
possibility of error. 

Then there is the doctor who rushes into the prescription 
department and demands that this prescription be sent to Mrs. 
Jones immediately ; and in the next breath asks for a solution 
or two "to take with him,'' etc. This interruption not only 
causes delay, but increases the chances of an error. A physi- 
cian should, like all other customers, give his orders to the 
first clerk at leisure, and not force his wants upon those whose 
responsibilities at that time involve matters of life and death. 
Constant interruption and undue haste are the cause of more 
errors in this store than in any other class of pharmacies. 



AN EXCELLENT SYSTEM OF COMPOUNDING. 

The ideal pharmacy is where one or two exclusive prescrip- 
tion clerks are employed. The proportion of prescriptions 
being much greater, the possibility of error would seem also 
to be greater, calling for added preventive measures. But here 
system can be employed which, if carried out, renders this de- 
partment comparatively free from blunders. If from ninety to 
one hundred and ten prescriptions are compounded each day, 
this is sufficient business to warrant one man's giving his 
whole time to it. He should be kept wholly responsible, and 
should be made to do nothing else. 

You enclose this dispenser in a case with but one entrance, 
that in the rear, and not accessible either to other clerks or to 
physicians. Let there be one shelf divided in two parts, one 
part projecting into the outside store to be used for delivering 
and receiving prescriptions. 

Now let the clerk take a prescription from a customer. 
After glancing it over he hands the customer a check with the 
remark, ' ' It will take ten or twenty minutes — did you wish to 
wait or will you return later ? " After getting his answer, we 
make out a tag as follows : 



SALE & SON DRUG CO. 

Prescription Check. 

No 1 



SALE & SON DRUG CO. 

Prescription Check. 

No 13 



Send -baiting-win can- Waiting ~ wi ! lca11 - 

Takenby. .Of. Taken by . Sa,e . 

Dispensed by °? Dispensed by .9?.. 

Price ? aid Price ^ents 

Remarks Remarks 



200 Main street 
Soon 



Give Copy 



If it is a "wait," a line is drawn through the "will call," 
and vice versa. If it is " paid for," " to be sent c. o. d." or 
if copy is wanted, etc., there is ample room for record under 
"Remarks." Now, if the customer is well known to the 
clerk, he may write the name where the " No." is placed ; 
but this is not nearly so practical as giving a check and put- 
ting the number of the same on the tag. I can recall several 
instances where two persons of the same name were having 
prescriptions filled at the same time, and each would have re- 
ceived the other's medicine but for the observation of the 
manager. Again, a woman often does not like to give her 
name, especially in some instances. And, too, it often hap- 
pens that the clerk who first waited upon the customer steps 
out, and so it is that another clerk is made to take the 
finished prescription to perhaps three or four waiting custom- 
ers with the question, "Is your name Jones?" With the 
check system all that is necessary is, " What number have 
you, please?" It inspires confidence with the customer, 
who, as a rule, is very skeptical in regard to medicines, and 
appreciates the precautions taken against errors. It also has 
a tendency to relieve the worried clerk, as he knows the pre- 
scription can be delivered by another clerk should he[be busy 
when it is finished. These tags and brass checks should be 



s 



THE CALIFORNIA DRUGGIST. 



within easy reach of all clerks. The customer is given the 
check, the corresponding number being written on the tag, a 
corner of which is then moistened and attached to the pre- 
scription (in case of a refill, it is attached to bottle or box). 
Let us now turn to the prescription 1 case and follow the sys- 
tem there. A bell placed in the opening labeled "Incoming 
prescriptions " is tapped once to call the dispenser's attention. 
As the dispenser takes the prescription the salesman absolves 
all connection therewith. Occasionally there are as many as 
ten or fifteen prescriptions before the dispenser at the same 
time. While a few of these are "waits," the balance are 
" call" or " send." Now, as dispenser, the principal precau- 
tion is to prevent your mind from becoming confused. A man 
who gets " rattled " is unqualified for an exclusive dispenser, 
and has no business in a prescription case. Fill one prescrip- 
tion at a time, write the label, then ' ' backcheck ' ' the pre- 
scription, turning it over to observe if the physician desired 
anything else for the patient. Then tear off the tag ; wrap 
the bottle or box neatly, and paste tag, after having 
marked thereon your name and the price of the mixture, on 
outside wrapper. Tap the bell twice (which signifies that a 
prescription is ready) and place the finished product on the 
"outgoing" shelf. By using judgment, moving rapidly and 
systematically, the number of prescriptions one man can dis- 
pense in a day is surprising. By following the foregoing sys- 
tem he can fill and wrap from seventy-five to ninety prescrip- 
tions a day without an error from 10 A. m. to 6 p.m.; although 
with the heaviest " rush " in the afternoon he may need the 
assistance of another dispenser. 

GENERAL PRECAUTIONS. 

I have found that the immediate wrapping of all prescrip- 
tions ready for delivery is a most important check against 
errors, as the constant and promiscuous handling of a tag 
separated from the package will often cause " the wrong 
bottle to be handed to the right person." 

If one would carefully read the label before dispensing from 
any container, repeating the observation when returning same 
to its place, errors in dispensing would be greatly lessened. 
Always replace every bottle properly immediately after it is 
dispensed from. Finish one prescription completely before 
commencing another. Re-check all prescriptions. Observe 
that the scales balance before weighing each ingredient. 

It is desirable for accuracy to have solutions and tritura- 
tions of such drugs of a poisonous nature as are most used in 
small doses. Keep all poisons, their solutions and triturations 
separately, and in a closed case for that purpose only. 

Leave morphine sulphate in its original container, and you 
will then never confuse it with quinine sulphate. 

Have plain lettered labels on all parcels containing poison. 

It is necessary to have all tinctures, extracts, solutions, etc., 
systematically arranged and conveniently at hand. 

Probably four-fifths of all errors are caused by the dispenser 
trying to accomplish too much at the same time, and the other 
one- fifth are caused by sheer carelessness. 



Galen Duplex. 

(With salaams and apologies to Mr. Kipling.) 

As I was a-walkin' along the street when the theatre shut last night, 

I spied a winder a-blazin' red, and strolled in the shop for a light ; 

The boss was a-sweatin' an' workin' like mad, an' I sez to 'im, " 'Oo 

are you ? " 
Sez 'e, "I'm a chemist, a qualified chemist, a toff an' a shopman too." 
Now 'is work begins at 7 a.m., and his work is never through ; 
'E isn't exactly in ornery trade, nor of the professional crew ; 
'E's a sort o' pill-makin' harumf%)dite ; a toff an' a shopman too? 

You meet 'im all over the British Isles, a-sellin' all kinds o' things, 
Like 'baccy, an' packets o' tea, an' paint, an' sticky fly-papers, an' 

strings ; 
'E sleeps with a night-bell beside 'is 'ead, an' it wakens 'im np in a 

stew 
To find 'e's a chemist, a nocturnal chemist, a toff an' a shopman too ! 
For there isn't a man on top o' the earth gets sich potterin work to 

do— 
The public rail at 'is profits big, an' compare 'im to Shakespeare's Jew, 
While 'e earns a little, an' slaves a lot — a toff an' a shopman too ! 

'E gobbles 'is breakfast an' wolfs 'is lunch, with pennyworths in be- 

tweens 
O' " Blaud's " for anaemic nurserymaids, and four-penny "health 

salines ; " 
An' when colic or stummick ache twists us up, an' we dunno what's 

best to do, 
We run to the chemist, the courteous chemist, a toff an' a shopman 

too! 
'E thinks for us, an' prescribes for us, an' patches us up like new 
By giving us chlorodyne, fifteen drops, or seidlitz an' good old 

" blue " — 
'E's a pestle-an '-mortar Samaritan, a toff an' a shopman too ! 



To keep your 'ead in a counter crush, with customers all about, 

Is bad enough when they're fussy old maids, or peppery swells wit 

gout; 
But to stifle cuss-words o'er a creosote-pill is a toughish pellet to chew ; 
An' 'e does it, the chemist, the dignified chemist, a saint an' a shop 

man too ! 
It gives 'im fun ere 'e's well begun, an' it's nasty to sniff an' view 
But 'e makes an immaculate spherical pill with a coating no smel 

comes through — 
E's a patient, artistic philosopher, a toff an' a shopman too ! 



I 

I 



As a public we think we are wide awake, an' no doubt we're as smart as 

can be, 
But once in a while we get poison vile (which I 'ope it won't 'appen to 

me); 
An' it makes you think better o' Pestle & Co., an' the work they 'ave 

got to do, 
When you think o' the victims o' fiendish carbolic, tortured an' mur- 
dered too. 
Law-makers! there isn't no room for doubt, it's proved to be plain an 

true, 
That whether for lotions, or toothache, or drains, it ought to be sched 

uled by you, 
An' carefully sold by the registered chemist, our guardian an'shopma: 

too! 

Dunallia, in Chemist and Druggist. 



I' 

I 



Professor (to class in surgery): "The right leg of the 
patient, as you see, is shorter than the left, in consequence of 
which he limps. Now, what would you do in a case of this 
kind? " Bright student : " Limp too." 



Two years ago when every one was talking of the Queen's 
Jubilee, a gentleman friend of ours heard the following conver- 
sation between two Scotchwomen : "Can ye tell me, wumman, 
what it is they ca' a jubilee? " " Weel, it's this," said her 
neighbor. "When folks has been marrit twenty-five year, 
that's a silver weddiu'; and when they have been marrit fifty 
year, that's a gowden weddin'. But if the man's deid then, 
it's a jubilee." — Exchange. 



THE CALIFORNIA DRUGGIST. 



A Neglected Jubilee. 

We have seen little in the American papers about the jubilee 
of the Smithsonian Institution at Washington. That must be 
our excuse for not referring to it before. The institution was 
founded in 1846. The founder was an Englishman, who was 
proud of his connection with the Plantagenets. His mother 
was a Macie, and his father was Hugh Smithson, first Duke of 
Northumberland. He was christened James, and was known 
as James Macie until parliament allowed him to take the name 
Smithson, from which fact it may be gathered that his mother 
was not Duchess of Northumberland. James Smithson was 
scientifically inclined, and was particularly fond of chemistry. 
When he died, in 1829, aged 64, he left a will bequeathing his 
property, failing certain heirs or issue by them, "to the United 
States of America, to found at Washington, under the name 
of the Smithsonian Institution, an establishment for the in- 
crease and diffusion of knowledge among men." Mr. Smith- 
son's property was worth a little over half a million dollars, 
and his heirs became extinct in 1835, but the institution was 
not organized until 1846. Nobody knows why Mr. Smithson 
should have selected the United States for his bequest ; he had 
never been there, and had never shown particular interest in 
it, but he was eager to have the name of Smithson perpetuated. 
He succeeded in that so well that few Englishmen know, and 
perhaps as few Americans, that the Smithsonian Institution is 
of English origin. It is well that Mr. Smithson bequeathed his 
fortune to the United States. The people there have made 
good use of it. For fifty years the Institution has been doing 
good work in all branches of knowledge, especially science. It 
is modestly housed, has a small but capable staff, who work 
laboriously and write much. Had the 100.000/ been left to us 
we might have built a fine institution, composed chiefly of 
bricks and mortar, and let it stand for a generation or two as a 
Smithson memorial, then sold it as a warehouse. Americans 
have done better. "The Smithsonian Institution has cele- 
brated its fifty years of life by the publication of a massive 
volume, an elegant piece of bookmaking, adorned with fine 
portraits of its founder, secretaries, chancellors, and benefac- 
tors," which is the reason for this note. — Chemist and Drug- 
gist. 

"How One Small Head Could Carry all he Knew." (Goldsmith.) 

According to a writer on the Morning Leader the Isle of 
Wight contains a gentleman who is an 

Associate of the Pharmaceutical Society of Great Britain, by Examin" 
ation ; Certificated Dispenser of the Apothecaries' Society of London . 
Mei.iber of the Geological Association of London ; Certified Dispenser, 
First Class, Westminster College, etc., etc.; Family, Dispensing, Oper- 
ative, and Consulting Chemist ; Practical and Theoretical Pharmacist, 
Electrician, and Optician ; Naturalist, Geologist, Botanist, Perfumer, 
etc. 

That's just to begin with. He can pull your teeth, conduct 
toxicological investigations, and will see to taxidermy in all its 
branches. This by no means exhausts the list, for he is a 
valuer of antiquities and curiosities, and announces "lessons 
given on the mandolin, mandola, bow zither, philomela, Portu- 
guese manchetta, and Japanese fiddle." When the fat young 
lady told Dr. Johnson that she meant to travel abroad, he said 
pleasantly, "Do, my dear, you're too big for an island." The 
Leader man wonders how the man above described manages to 
keep inside the Isle of Wight. — C. and D. 



Personals. 

Mr. E. H. Baker of San Jose, made us a short call July 1st, 
during a visit he was making in Los Angeles. 

H. P. Wightman, Pima, Arizona, is spending a little time 
in Los Angeles and at the islands, in the way of a summer 
outing. 

W. B. Brazelton, lately with Arizona Copper Co., Clifton, 
has accepted a position with J. S. Williams & Co., Bisbee, 
Arizona. 

A fire occurred in H. Goodman's establishment, Phcenix, 
Arizona, June 22, occasioning a loss of $2000, fully insured. 
The loss was caused principally by water. 

Mr. N. N. Miller of Randsburg, is spending a few days in 
Los Angeles. He reports business moving along in good 
shape and the burnt-out town getting well restored. 

R. J. McClure has bought out A. Starbuck, Whittier, and 
we trust will be as successful in business in his new field as 
was his predecessor. Mr. McClure was formerly in business at 
University, Los Angeles. 

Dr. D. W. Rees, Needles, with Mrs. Rees, is spending a few 
weeks on the coast, pitching his tent " by the sad sea waves " 
at Redondo, where the fishing and surf bathing form most 
agreeable recreations during the heated term. 

Mr. T. L. McCutchen, lately with G. C. Altar, this city, has 
accepted a position with the Arizona Copper Co., Clifton, A. T. 
Mr. McCutchen will fill the position with credit, and will find 
himself associated with a pleasant company of young men. 

Mr. W. W. Leithead, the good looking representative of F. 
W. Braun & Co., on the "Kite Shape," is taking a vacation in 
Seattle and vicinity, A yachting cruise on the Sound is on 
his program. We wish him a jolly good time and a safe re- 
turn. 

G. C. Thaxter, Redlands, has sold his elegant store, and 
will enjoy a little period of rest from the drug trade. The 
business will henceforth be conducted under the name of the 
City Drugstore, under the management of Mr. C. S. Chestnut, 
who, we are certain, will maintain the high standing and popu- 
larity of this fine establishment. 



His Wife was an M. D. 

My wife went to college to become an M. D., 

And when she'd become one she came back to me, 

And, of course, while the subject was strongest upon her, 

She "diagnosed" me — and I guess I'm a goner. 

She said that she "feared I had endocarditis, 
With traces of neuro-dichrotic cystitis ; 
There were osseous abnormal sphenoidal dimensions, 
With ecchymosed hypno-nephritic retentions." 

She said I had "anchylosed, neurosed gastritis. 
Hepatic stagnation, acute meningitis, 
Meningeal hemorrhage, clearly pre-natal, 
Locomotor ataxia, lingering, but fatal." 

She said I "inclined toward brain aberration, 

When cardac murmurs disturbed circulation," 

Then added, in time "she would be more explicit." 

But I said " Nit, old girl ; this is quantum sufficit! " — Lancet. 



IO 



THE CALIFORNIA DRUGGIST. 



OUR ADVERTISERS. 



It will be of interest and value to the trade to consult our 
advertising columns, in which will be found represented the 
following firms and goods : 



A.. Gettleman Brewing Co. 
Allcock's Plasters. 
Ammonol Chemical Co. 
Antikamnia Chemical Co. • 
Apollinaris Co., Limited. 
Arlington Chemical Co. 
Beeman Chemical Co. 
Braun, F. W. & Co.'s Laboratory 

Products. 
California Fig Syrup Co. 
Cal. Mission Eucalyptus Lozenges. 
Centaur Company. 
Crown Perfumery Co. 
Davol Rubber Co. 
Etna Chemical Co. 
Goodrich, B. F. & Co. 
Coronado Corks. 
Hayden Manufacturing Co. 
Hubert, Prof. I. 
Jayne, Dr. D. & Son. 



Kondon Manufacturing Co. 

Kuhns, Arthur Company. 

Leiner, M. 

Levy, B. & Co. 

Ludwick, G. M. 

Mariani & Co. 

Mead, J. L., Cycle Co. 

Moore, H. H. & Sons. 

Munn & Co. 

N. Y. Pharmacal Association. 

Planten.H. & Son. 

Pond's Extract Co. 

Portuondo, Vicente. 

Taite, Jos. G. & Sous. 

T. B. Insect Powder. 

Thum, O. W. Co. 

Wells, A.J. Manufacturing Co. 

Whittemore Bros. & Co. 

Wyeth, John & Bro. 



Kurtz' Freckle Salve j* 

(ORIGINAL) *{ 

Manufactured only by C. F. HEINZEMAN J5 

Los Angeles, Cal. J* 

Trade Mark Registered. J^ 

New Goods Received by F. W. Braun & CO. 

Coca Cola, in bbls. and kegs, gal $1.50 to $ 1 75 

Adeps Lauie, Hydrous, Mercts, lb 60 

" Anhydrous, " lb 75 

Ovo P. and T. Cure, doz 9 00 

" Regulating Pills, doz 1 80 

Hoffman House Cigars, per 1000 $60.00 to 75 00 

Hoffman House Little Cigars, per 1000 7 75 

Yankee Girl Cigars, per 1000 35 00 

Fleck's Toothache Gum, doz 65 

N. N. Shampoo, 5c pkgs., 2 doz. box Ex 75 

Wrotropin, Yz g and 1 g, oz 1 35 

Moth Paper in rolls, each 50 

Hires' Ginger Ale, Carbonated, doz 2 00 

Becker's Comp. Digestive Tablets, sml., doz 1 00 

Villecabras Water, sml., doz 3 00 

Hires' Ginger Ale Extract, 1 lb., doz 8 50 

McEwen's (Pomona) Olive Oil, x /i pt., 2 doz. case 5 50 

" " " 1 pt., 2 " " 9 00 

" 2 pts., 1 " " 8 00 



" Bloody Designs." (Shakespeare.) 

"An American consumption-cure is being advertised very 
extensively in England, and among the numerous favorable 
certificates is one which states that 'out of a number of cases 
consumption treated therewith, only one proved unsatisfactory. 
The remedy has far surpassed our most sanguinary expecta- 
tions.'" — N. Y. Medical Record. 



Pacific Coast Drug Actenctj 



OFFERS FOR SALE 



First-Class Drug Stores 
and Medical Practices 

in all the Pacific States and Territories 

Clerks Registered, Provided and Employed. Partnerships 
Negotiated. Lists Sent Free. Correspondence Solicited. 

G. M. LUDWICK, 

S. E. Corner Second St. and Broadway, Room 201, Los Angeles, Cal. 



Three money-makers are offered to the trade this month by 
F. W. Braun & Co. in the Hayden Mfg. Co.'s Arnica Salve, 
Carbolic Salve and Witch Hazel Salve. They are very neatly 
put up in large-sized boxes, and retail at 25 cents. The un- 
iform price is $1 per dozen. Add some to your next order. 



WANTS, Etc., Etc. 

[Under this heading we will be pleased to publish FREE OF 
CHARGE, notices of clerks wanted, positions desired, stores for 
sale or exchange, propositions for purchasing , etc.'] 



FOR SALE — Neat little drug store in suburb of Los Angeles. All new 
goods. No dead stock. Established over three years. Nice 
neighborhood trade. Very little credit. Average daily cash sales 
$12. Rent $15. No clerk needed. Trade growing. Increase of sales 
for last 12 mouths over sales of preceding 12 months $600. Will invoice 
from $1300 to $1500. Satisfactory reasons for selling. Address "PHAR- 
MACIST," care California Druggist. 



FOR SALE — Small drug store, near the peat lands, Orange county. 
Drugs will invoice about $600. Lot and house $350. Good open- 
ing for doctor. Address F. W. BRAUN & CO., Los Angeles. 



FOR EXCHANGE— House and lot in Los Angeles, Cal., worth $1500 
for stock of drugs of like amount, in country town where cutting 
of prices is unknown. Address GEO. E. BLUE, 3129 S. MAIN, Los 
Angeles, Cal. 

FOR SALE — Wall Soda Fountain, 8 syrups; new patent draught 

tube ; marble slab, glasses, spoons, etc.; all complete, but without 

tanks. Used only one season. Will sell very cheap for cash. Inquire 
of F. W. BRAUN & CO., Los Angeles. 



FOR SALE — A drug store in good country town. No opposition ; 
nearest store seven miles. Stock clean ; fixtures good. Fine op- 
portunity for physician. Good reason for selling. Adress Quinine, 
care California Druggist, Los Angeles. 

FOR SALE — A full set of shelf bottles with glass labels, including set 
of Fluid Extract bottles in blue glass. Will sell cheap. Inquire 
of White & Bailey, San Bernardino, Cal. 



well located drug store in Los Angeles, with an in- 
e, value $1200. Expenses small. Owner not pharma- 
cist is reason for selling. Inquire of F. W. Braun & Co., Los Angeles 



COR SALE— A 

creasing trade, value $1200. 



He Mad to Advertise. 

The merchant swore by all the gods beneath the starry skies 
That, though he lived a thousand years, he'd never advertise, 
But ere a year, despite the boast he confidently flaunted, 
He ran an ad. beneath the head of 'Situations Wanted.' ' 

The .Id. Writer. 



FOR SALE — In coast city of Southern California, a drug business 
established over eight years. Stock about $2500; location first-class. 
Address M. H, care CALIFORNIA DRUGGIST. 

FOR SALE — A city drug store. Fine location. Good business. Low 
rent. Good reasons for selling. Address L, care F. W. BRAUN & 
CO. 

FOR SALE^— City drug business at a bargain. Stock about $1200, all 
clean and no dead stuff. Good location for a doctor. Inquire of F. 
W. BRAUN & CO., Los Angeles. 

FOR SALE— Elegant clean stock in the most progressive suburb of 
Los Angeles. Only drug store within twenty blocks. Best reasons 
for selling. Value about $2000. Inquire of F. W. BRAUN & CO. 
Los Angeles. 

FOR SALE — A good, long established drug business in this city. 
Price, $2500. Address "ADVANTAGEOUS," care CALIFORNIA 
DRUGGIST. 



THE CALIFORNIA DRUGGIST. 



ii 



PRICE LIST OF DRUGS, CHEMICALS, ETC. 



These prices are for quantities as ordinarily bought by average buyers, and include containers, unless 
otherwise indicated. Subject to market changes. 

For special quantities we will make special figures. 

F. W. BRA UN & CO., Los Angeles, Cal. 



ACETANILtD ..ft) 42® 45 

ACID. Acetic No. 8 lb 10® 25 

Acetic U. S. P ft 30 

Benzoic, Eng oz 16 

Benzoic, German oz 10 

Boracic ft) 14® 20 

Carbolic, crude ..gal 40® 50 

Carbolic, cryst, blk label, l-ft> tin ft 30® 32 

Carbolic, cryst, blk label, 5-ft tins ft 28® 30 

Carbolic, cryst, gold label, 1-ft bots ft 36®. 38 

Carbolic, cryst, gold label, 5-ft tin ft 33® 36 

Citric ft 37© 45 

Gallic oz 11® 12 

Hydrocyanic, dil oz 11® 12 

Hydrocyanic, cone, Scheele's oz 40® 45 

Hydrofluoric, 1-ozbots ea 45® 50 

Hydrofluoric, 4-oz bots ea 75 

Muriatic, coml., 6-ftbots ea 65® 75 

Muriatic, coml , carboy, $2 ft 3%@ 4 

Muriatic, C. P., 1-ftbots ft 35® 40 

Muriatic, C. P., 6-ftbots ft 25® 30 

Nitric, coml., 7-ft bots ea 1 00 

Nitric, coml., carboy, $2 ft 8® 9 

Nitric, C. P., 1-ftbots ft 35® 40 

Nitric, C. P., 7-ft bots ft 25® 30 

Oxalic ft 12® 15 

Pyrogallic, Merck's ft 3 00 

Pyrogallic, Merck's oz 26 

Salicylic ft 60® 70 

Salicylic oz 8® 10 

Salicylic, from oil wintergreen oz 54 

Sulphuric, coml., 9-ft bots .. .. ea 65® 75 

Sulphuric, coml., carboy, $2 ft 2'/® 2^i 

Sulphuric, C. P., 1-ft bots ft 35® 40 

Sulphuric, C. P., 9-ft bots ft 25® 30 

Tannic .....ft 1 15® 1 50 

Tartaric ft 38® 42 

A1COUOL, absolute, 1-qt bots ea 1 50 

Grain market 

Wood, 5 gal. lot to bbl. lot gal 90® 1 05 

Wood, less quantity, can extra gal 1 10 

ALUM, chrome ft 13® 15 

Dried (burnt alum) ft 12® 15 

Lump ft 3^@ 4 

Ground ft 5® 6 

Powdered ft 6® 8 

AMMONIA, cone, 26°, 5-pt bots ea 85 

Cone, bulk, can extra gal 75 

Bromide , ft 75 

Carbonate ft 12® 25 

Muriate, lump ft 13® 15 

Muriate, gran, coml ft 11® 15 

Muriate, gran, pure ft 16® 20 

Muriate, powd ft 20® 25 

Valerianate oz 27 

AMMONAL (Po. or Tablets) oz 1 00 

ANT1KAMNIA oz 1 00 

ANTIPYRIN (10 oz., 85c; 25 oz, 80c) oz 90 

AKISTOL (25 oz, $1.65) oz 180 

ARROWROOT, Bermuda ft 35 

ARSENIC, powd, white ft 10® 12 

BALSAM Copaiba ft 70® 85 

Fir, Canada ft 45® 50 

Peru ft 2 75® 3 00 

Tolu ft 75® SO 

BARK, Cinchona, red, true ft 50® 55 

Cinchona, red; powd.... ft 35<a> b'J 

Cinchona, yellow, Calisaya ft 50© 55 

Cinchona, yellow, powd ft 35® 60 

Sim, slab ft 12® 15 

Sim, ground ft 14® 18 

Elm, powd ft It,® 20 

Sassafras ft 12® 15 

Soap, slab ft 7® 10 

Soap, ground ft 10® 13 

Soap pwd ft 18® 20 

Soap, cut, 5c boxes doz 35 

Soap, cut, 10c bozes doz 60 

Wild Cherry.... ft 12® 15 

BAY RUM ". gal 2 50® 3 00 

F. W. B. & Co., y 2 pts doz 1 75 

F. W. B. & Co., pts doz 3 50 

BEANS, Tonka, Angostura ft 2 25® 2 50 

Vanilla, Mexican ft 14 50@15 50 

Vanilla, Tahiti ft 3 25® 3 50 

.BERRIES, Cubeb ft 25® 30 

Cubeb, powd ft 30® 35 

Juniper ft 9® 10 

BISMUTH, sub-carbonate ft 1 60® 1 70 

Sub-gallate oz 16 

Sub-nitrate ft 1 25® 1 35 

BLUE MASS ft 70® 75 

BLUE VITRIOL ft 4^@ 7 

BORAX, refined ft 8^® 12 

Powd ft &y 2 ® 12 

BUDS, Cassia ft 35® 38 

CALOMEL, American ft 80® 85 

English ft 1 10® 1 15 

Stock ft 55® 65 

CAMPHOR ft 37® 42 

CANTHARIDES, Chinese, powd ft 60® 65 

Russian, powd ft 1 00® 1 10 



CAPSICUM, African, pods ft 22® 25 

African, powd ft 20® 25 

CARAMEL (gal$150,can extra) ft 25 

CARBON, bisulphide, 1-ft bots doz 2 00 

Bisulphide, 2-ft bots doz 4 00 

Bisulphide, 1-gal caus ea 1 05® 1 15 

Bisulphide, 5-gal cans ea 3 75 

CARMINE, No 40 oz 35 

CHALK, French, powd ft 6%@ 8 

White, precip ft 10® 12 

White, prepared, drops ft 8® 10 

CHARCOAL, animal, gran ft 8® 12 

Animal, powd ft 8® 10 

Willow, powd , bulk ft 12® 15 

Willow, powd., 1-ft cartons ft 18 

Willow, powd., 54-ft cartons ft 20 

Willow, powd., i^-ft cartons .....ft 25 

CHLORAL HYDRATE, 1 fts ft 1 20® 1 30 

Y 2 fts ft 1 35® 1 40 

i/ fts ft 1 55® 1 60 

CHLOKOFORM, 1-ft tins ft 55® 57 

7-ft tins ft 52® 54 

Squibbs', 500-gm ea 1 15 

Squibbs', 250-gm ea 66 

Squibbs', 100-gra ea 26 

CLOVES ft 20 

Powd ft 25 

COBALT, powd ft 30 

COCAINE, hydrochlorate oz 3 25 

Hydrochlorate, % oz oz 3 35 

Hydrochlorate, '/3 oz ea 50® 55 

COCOA BUTTER ft 45® 55 

CODEINE, alk.,/ 8 oz oz 5 10 

Sulphate, % oz oz 4 75 

COLOCYNTH APPLE ft 90 

Powd ft 85 

COMPOSITION POWDER, / 8 -ftpkgsft 35 

COPPERAS, bbls, 1% ft 2® 3 

CORROSIVE SUBLIMATE ft 80® 85 

Powd ft 90® 95 

CREAM TARTAR, pure ft 27® 32 

CREOLIN". 1-ft and 5-ft bots ft 50® 55 

CREOSOTE, beech-wood ft 99® 1 10 

Coml ft 45® 50 

CURCUMA, powd ft 12® 15 

CUTTLE BONE ft 30® 35 

DEXTRINE ft 8® 12 

DOVER'S POWDER ft 125 

ETKONOGEN oz 37 

EMERY, flour ft 8® 10 

ERGOT, powd ft 50® 55 

ESSENCE PEPPERMINT,2-ozbot..doz 1 50 

ETHER, Nitrous, cone, 1-ftbots ft 1 20® 1 25 

Nitrous, cone , %-ft bots ft 1 35® 1 40 

Nitrous, cone, %-ta bots ft 1 55® 1 60 

Sulphuric, U. S. P.. 1880 ft 75® 80 

Sulphuric, cone, 1890 ft 80® 85 

Sulphuric, Squibbs', 500-gm ea 125 

Sulphuric, Squibbs', 250-gm ea 66 

Sulphuric, Squibbs', 100-gm ea 30 

EllCALYPTOL, Merck's oz 24 

EXTRACT, Cascara, fluid, F.W. B. &Co..ft 70 

Cascara, fluid, F. W. B. & Co.. 5-ft bots... ft 50 

Cascara, fl., arom., F.W.B. & Co., 1-ft bot.ft 80 

Cascara, fl., arom., P.W.B. & Co , 5-ft bot.ft 75 

Logwood, 15 and 25-ft boxes ft 12vB 13 

Logwood, 1-ft, %-ft> and y-9> boxes ft 15® 20 

Witch Hazel, distilled gal 65® 90 

Less than 5 gals, container extra. 
EXTRACTS, FLAVORING, 

Lemon, F. W. B. &Co., 2-oz doz 1 50 

Vanilla. F. W. B. & Co., 2-oz doz 1 75 

FLOWERS, Arnica ft 18® 20 

Chamomile, Eng ft 28® 30 

Chamomile, Ger ft 30® 35 

Lavender ft 12® 15 

Rosemary ft 40 

FOIL. Tin, Heavy ft 20® 25 

Tin, Medium ft 25® 30 

Tin, Light ft 30® 35 

FORMALDEHYD ft 55® 60 

FRUIT JUICES, F. W. B. & Co., qts., doz 5 00 

FRUITS, Crushed, F.W.B.&Co.,%gals ,doz 10 80 

FULLERS EARTH ft 6® 10 

GELATINE,, Cox's, sml doz 1 50 

French, gold label ft 60® 65 

French, silver label ft 40® 45 

French, bronze label ft 35® JO 

GLUE, Carpenter's ft 9® 12 

White ft 15® 18 

GLYCERINE, 50-ft cans ft 14® 14% 

10-ft cans ft 18 

2-oz bots doz 1 25® 1 50 

Schering's 1-ft bots ft 45 

Schering's 10-ft bots ft 40 

GLYCOLINE (gal., {1.50, can extra) ft 35 

GUM, Aloes, Barb ft 25® 30 

Aloes, Barb , powd ft 30® 35 

Aloes, Cape .. ft 20® 25 

Aloes, Cape, powd '...' ft 20® 25 

Aloes, Socotrine, true ft 45® 50 

Aloes, Socotrine, powd ft 50® 55 



Ammoniac ft, 40® 45 

Arabic, No. 1 lb 70® 75 

Arabic, No. 2 ft, 50® 55 

Arabic, powd., No. 1 ft 70® 75 

Arabic, powd., French ft 90® 1 00 

Arabic, sorts ft, 40® 45 

Asafetida ft 32® 35 

Asafetida, powd ft 45® 50 

Benzoin ft 50® 55 

Benzoin, powd ft 60® 70 

Catechu ft 9® 12 

Catechu, powd ft, 32® 35 

Guaiac ft 38® 40 

Guaiac, powd ft 45® 50 

Myrrh ft 35® 38 

Myrrh powd ft 38® 40 

Olibanum ft 25® 30 

Opium ft 4 00® 4 25 

Opium, powd ft 5 00® 5 20 

Shellac, orange ft 32® 35 

Shellac, orange, ground ft 35® 38 

Shellac, white ft 35® 40 

Shellac, white, powd ft 40® 45 

Spruce, tears ft 1 25® 1 35 

Tragacanth, flake ft 90® 95 

Tragacanth, sorts ft 45® 50 

Tragacanth, powd ft ] 00® 1 10 

HOFFMAN'S ANODYNE ft 65 

HOPS, pressed, % and %;-lbs ft 16® 20 

Pressed, oz ft 25 

HYDROGEN PEROXIDE, Mar- 

chand's, lbs doz 7 50 

Marchand's, %-lbs doz 5 50 

Marchand's, Ji'-lbs doz 3 75 

Marchand's. y a -lbs doz 2 25 

M. C. W., or P. & W.. 1 lbs doz 4 80 

M. C. W., or P. & W., %-lbs doz 3 00 

M. C. W., or P. & W., %-lbs doz 1 80 

Oakland, lib doz 6 00 

Oakland, ^-lbs doz 3 75 

Oakland, J^-lbs ....doz 2 50 

U.S. P., lib ft 35 

U.S. P., lib full doz 3 25 

HYDROZONE, 1-lb bots doz 10 50 

%-lb bots doz 7 25 

5^-lb bots doz 4 75 

y s -lb bots doz 2 25 

ICHTHYOL oz 50 

Ichthyol ft 6 50 

INDIGO ft 70® 75 

INSECT POWDER, Buhach, 6-lb cans. ft 50® 60 

Dalmatian, bulk ft 28® 40 

Hill's California, bulk ft 35® 45 

"T. B." 6-lb cans ft 40 

"T. B " lib cans doz 5 50 

"T. B," %-lb cans doz 3 25 

' T. B." small doz 1 25 

IODINE, re-subl oz 36 

Re-subl ft 3 60® 3 80 

IODOFORM oz 40 

Iodoform ft 3 81® 4 00 

IRON, carbonate precip ft 16® 18 

Chloride, solution ft 25® 35 

Iodide : oz 35 

Sul.-fulphate (Monsell oz 8 

Sub-sulphate (Monsel) ft 3J@ 40 

Sub-sulphate solution ft 25® 30 

Sulphate, dried ft 15® 20 

Sulphate, pure cryst., bulk ft 8® 10 

Sulphate, pure cryst., 1-lb bots ft 14® 18 

JUICE, Grape, Los Gatos, pts ...doz 4 00 

Grape, Welch's, y 2 pts doz 1 90 

Grape, Welch's, pints doz 2 75 

Grape, Welch's, quarts doz 5 25 

LANOLIN, Leibreich's ft 1 00 

LEAD, acetate, coml ft 16® 20 

Acetate, powd ft 20® 25 

Acetate, C. P ft 27® 30 

Sub-acet. solu., Goulard's ft 30® 35 

LEAVES, Bay ft 14® 15 

Buchu, long ft 30® 33 

Buchu, short ft 22® 25 

Rosemary, bulk ft 18® 20 

Sage, Y„s and %s ft 18® 20 

Sage, ozs ft 25 

Senna, Alex ft 30® 35 

Senna, Alex., powd ft 35 

Senna, Tinnevelli ft 18® 20 

Senna, Tinnevelli, powd ft 20® 25 

Uva Ursi ft 12® 15 

LEECHES, (25 or more, 8c.) ea 10 

LIME. Chloride, 35-ft cans ft 4% 

Chloride, Acme, 1-lb cans doz l 25 

Chloride, Acme, %-lb cans doz 80 

Chloride, Acme, ^-lb cans doz 45 

Chloride, Electron, 1-lb cans doz 1 20 

Chloride, Phoenix, 1-lb cartons doz 1 10 

LITHARGE ft 7%@ 10 

LONDON PURPLE ft 15® 20 



12 



THE CALIFORNIA DRUGGIST, 



LOZENGES, Licorice, 5-lb boxes ft 

Licorice, "Acme,'' 5-lb boxes ft 

Peppermint, 5-lb boxes ft 

LYtOPCUIUM ft 

LYE, concentrated icase, J3 5U) doz 

LYSOL, 1-lbbots ft 

MAGNESIA, Calcined, 1-lb tin ft 

Carbonate, Jenniug's, 2 and -1-oz ft 

Carbonate, K. & M., 4-oz., 2 oz. and 1 oz..ft> 

Carbonate, K. & M., powdered ft 

Carbonate, K. & M., S. S ft 

Eff. citrate. Herring's doz 

MANGANESE, black oxide ft 

MANNA, large flake -ft 

Small flake ft 

MENTHOL, (oz. 30c ) ft 

MERCURY ft 

Bi-sulphate ft 

Iodide, green oz 

Iodide, red oz 

MOKPHINE, sulph., '/a oz oz 

Sulph., y s oz., 214 oz - t> xs oz 

Sulph., 1 oz tins oz 

Sulph., o-oz tins oz 

MOSS, Iceland ft 

Irish ft 

MUMC. Canton, 1-oz bxs oz 

Tonquin, '/% oz bots ea 

MUSTARD Co!burn's,6 lb cans ft 

Ground California ft 

NAPHTHALINE, balls, cakes or flakes..ft 

NUTMEGS ft 

Ground ft 

NUTS, Areca ft 

Areca.powd ft 

Kola ft 

NUX VOMICA ft 

Powdered ft 

OIL, Almond, bitter oz 

Almond, sweet ft 

Amber, rect ft 

Anise ft 

Bay oz 

Benne (can extra) gai 

Bergamot, Sanderson ft 

Bergamot, Sicilian ft 

Cassia ft 

Castor "A A" gal 

Castor, machine gal 

Castor, special com'l gal 

Less than 5 gals., can extra. 

Cedar, coral ft 

Cedar, pure ft 

China nut (can extra) gal 

Cloves ft 

Cocoanut ft 

Cod liver, Norwegian (can extra) gal 

Cottonseed gal 

Less than 5 gal., can extra. 

Croton ft 

Cubebs ft 

Eucalyptus ft 

Geranium Rose oz 

Hemlock, pure ft 

Lard gal 

Less than 5 gal can extra. 

Lavender flowers ft 

Lavender, garden ft 

Lemon, Sanderson ft 

Lemon, Sicilian ft 

Mustard, Essential oz 

Neatsfoot (less than 5-gal. can extra) ...gal 

Olive, California, qts doz 

Olive, Italia, 1 gal cans gal 

Olive, Malaga, can extra gal 

Orange, bitter ft 

Orange, sweet ft 

Origanum ft) 

Pennyroyal ft 

Peppermint Hotchkiss ft 

Peppermint, Western ft 

Pinus Sylvestris ft 

Rhodium oz 

Rose oz 

Rosemary flowers ft 

Sandalwood, Eng oz 

Sandalwood, Ger ft 

Sassafras ft 

Sewing Machine, Nye's, small doz 

Sewing Machine, Nye's, large doz 

Sperm, Nye's crystal gal 

Sperm, pure, w. b gal 

Less than 5 gal can extra. 

Spike ft 

Turpentine, rect., Merck ft 

Cnion salad gal 

Less than 5 gal can extra. 

Wintergreen ft 

Wormwood ft 

OIL (JAKK, ground It. 

OINTMENT, Citrine ft 

Mercurial, !', in ft 

Mercurial '/ 2 m ft 

Zinc, benz. oxide ft) 

ORANGE PEEL ft) 

PAPOID, % or 1-oz bots oz 

PARAFFIN ft 

PARIS GREEN ft 

l's, %'S, Vi'S It. 

PETROLATUM, ex. amber II. 

Snow while It. 

1'IIENACETIN (2502S. .95) oz 

l'HOSI'IIORIJS, 11-lb cans ft 

1-lfi cans It. 

% arid "4-cans It. 

PLASTER PARIS II. 

Dentist's ft 

POISON, purple ft 



14 

50@ 55 

90 

65 

05 

5 

IS® 25 

35 

60 

2 00 

(',<« S 

90® 1 00 

60@ 65 

2 85(5 :: 10 

78(a 85 

65® 70 

25 

26 

2 50(5 2 80 

2 45® 2 75 

2 25® 2 55 

2 21 im '_' 50 

15 

20 

35 

4 50 



14® 
4® 
60(5 
65® 
30® 
35® 
25® 
L5(| 
20® 



25® 

50® 55 

2 40@ 2 60 

15(6 50 

I. I".... 1 25 
; |n„, 3 60 

3 00® 3 20 
2 25® 2 50 
1 25® 1 35 

45® 50 
75® SO 

40® 50 
75® 80 
65® 75 
90® 1 10 
20® 30 
1 10@ 1 25 
55® 70 

1 35® 1 5(1 

1 50® 1 75 
65® 75 

l',5,„ 75 

-,:«,< mi 
75® 85 

2 25® 2 40 
75® 80 

2 00® 2 20 

1 25® 1 50 

65 

?:„„ si i 

12 00 

2 10 

1 mi,,, i 25 

4 50® 4 75 

2 25® 2 50 
511,,,. Oil 

1 50(« 1 75 

I 85® 2 10 

1 30® 1 511 

1 I'll,,, 1 III 

in,,, 75 

7 50<§ in i«' 

1 50® 1 65 

50 

3 00® 3 25 
75® 85 

45 





1 25 


25® 
75® 


35 
45 

so 


1 70® 
■1 00® 
02'/® 

,l>,',- 

60® 


1 90 

5 on 
03 
(15 
55 
0.5 
75 


15® 


18 




2 00 


10® 


15 


20® 


25 
30 




9 
80 




1 00 


75 
86 

1 Ii5 


02@ 

ni„, 


05 
08 


08® 


10, 



POTASH. Babbift's, (case S3.50) doz 

Caustic, crude ft 

Caustic, white, stick ft 

Bichromate It. 

Carbonate ft 

Chlorate ft 

Cyanide, ruining ft 

Cyanide, pure granular ft 

Iodide ft 

Nitrate ft 

Permanganate ft 

Prussiate, red ft 

Prussiate, yeilow 11. 

PUMICE STONE, lump ft 

Powd ft 

QUASSIA, Chips.... lb 

QUININE, 1-oz bottle oz 

1 oz tin oz 

5-oz tin oz 

25-oz tin oz 

50-oz tin oz 

100-oztin oz 

RED PRECIPITATE ft 

RESIN ft 

ROOT, Aconite ft 

Althea, cut ft 

Blood ft 

Blood, powd .ft 

Calamus, peeled ft 

Gentian ft 

Gentian, powd ft 

Ginger, African _. ft 

Ginger, Jamaica ft 

Goldenseal ft 

Goldenseal, powd lb 

Ipecac, powd ft 

Licorice, select lb 

Licorice, cut ft 

Licorice, powd ft 

Orris, powd ft 

Rhubarb ft 

Rhubarb cubes ft 

Rhubarb fingers ft 

Rhubarb, powd ft 

Rhubarb, powd., Allen's. Eng lb 

Sarsaparilla, Hond ft 

Sarsaparilla, Hond, gro ft 

Sarsaparilla, Mex lb 

Sarsaparilla, Mex., gro .ft 

Valerian ft 

Valerian, powd ft 

ROTTEN STONE, powd ft 

SACCHARIN, 25 gm. cartons ea 

SAFFRON, American.. .'.ft 

Spanish oz 

SAL EPSOM ft 

Epsom 4-oz cartons doz 

Glauber ft 

Nitre, cryst ft 

Nitre, powd ft 

Rochelle lb 

Soda ft 

SALOL, (oz30) ft 

SEED, Anise, Ital lb 

Anise, powd ft 

Bird, mixed, 1-lbs., 00-lb case case 

Bird, mixed, 1 ft doz 

Canary lb 

Caraway ft 

Cardamom ftj 

Celery ft> 

Coriander lb 

Flax, cleaned tb 

Flax ground tb 

Hemp lb 

Millet ft 

Mustard ft 

Poppy, blue ft 

Rape tb 

Sabadilla, powd lb 

Worm, American ft 

Worm, Levant lb 

SEIDLITZ MIXTURE lb 

Powders, single, 100s box 

Powders, :','s doz 

Powders, 6's doz 

Powders. 10s doz 

SHEEP DIP, Carbolic gal 

Little's 1 gal cans gal 

Little's 5 gal cans gal 

SNUFF, Garrett's Scotch, blads ..ft 

Garrett's Scotch, 1 oz tins doz 

Garrett's Scotch, 2-oz tins doz 

Garrett's Scotch, -1-oz tins doz 

Garrett's Scotch, 6 oz bots doz 

Lorillard's Maccahoy, 4-oz bots doz 

Lorillard's Rappee. I oz bots doz 

SOAP, Castile, Conti white It. 

Marseilles, white lb 

Mottled, coral [h 

Mottled, pure lb 

Turkish, green or white ft 

Powdered lb 

German green, Stiefel's.. lb 

Whale Oil Ih 

SODA ASH ft 

Caustic, 98 per cent lb 

Caustic, 7U per cent (Drums) Ih 

Caustic, white, sticks ft 

Bicarbonate lb 

Bromide lb 

Hyposulphite ft 

Hyposulphite, new process ft 

SOLUTION, Douavan's lb 

Fowler's ft 

Goulard's lb 

SPKRM ACETI ft, 

SPIRITS, Brooklyn and Columbian gal. 

Less th:m 5 gals, can extra. 

Nitre, U. S. P lb 

Nitre, 2-oz bots doz 



90 

7i,i,7 13 
45® 70 
15® 20 
15® 25 
14® 17 
30(5. 55 
65 
2 55® 2 65 
08® 12 
UK,. I'm 
OIK,, 05 
32® 35 
09® 
06® 



40® 
40® 
25® 

25„(' 
::u,„, 
35® 
07® 



40 
10 
1 00 
40® 45 



1 12 Ma 



01',,® 03 

os@ 12 

09® 12 

26® 30 

01'i® 03 

3 50® 3 65 

10® 18 

20® 25 

3 50 

75 

03 y 2 @ 05 

10® 12 

1 35® 1 40 

18® 25 

10® 12 

04i /4 '@ 06 

04^® 06 

03!/ 2 @ 06 

04® 06 



in,,. 
04® 



28® 



12 

00 

50 

20 

25 

30 

2 50 

60 

1 45® 1 50 

1 i,,. 2 no 

1 10 

l 35 

1 20 

50 

0,0 

l oo 

1 75 

2 75 
2 50 
2 75 

10 
15 
10 
12 
11 
35 
IU 
06 
08 
08 



13® 
10® 

<i7' i,. 
08® 
10® 



04® 
06® 

01V" 



03® 03U 
42® 45 
02J4® 

03K® 
04® 

25<g 

30® 

50® 



29® 
27® 
24® 
23® 

22M(« 21'; 

22® 24 

1 10 

Ol^to 03 
30© 3c 
35® 40 
25® 30 
oil® 35 
60 
13® 16 
14® 18 
20® 25 
25® 29 
65® 70 
70® 7,5 

2 50® 2 75 

13® 15 

30 

1-1® 18 

35® 40 

75 

1 25® 1 50 

1 50® 1 75 



1 75 
45 
45 
30 
30 



1 ' - 1 75 

55® 60 
1 50^ 



14® 


17 




1 25 




1 00 




1 20 




95 


20(5 


25 




1 35 


n2i 4 (,5 


03 


o:v<„@ 04 % 


04 ,5, 


05 


0,': 0, 


05 


57® 


00 


70® 


75 




75 




90 




1 50 




10 


2 00® 


2 25 


2 00® 


2 M 
40 
30 


27® 


50® 




55„, 


40 




1 20 


20® 


35 


14® 


15 


45® 


.1 


00(„ 


08 


17® 


20 



STRONTIUM, nitrate ft 

STRTCHINE,, cryst., >< 8 oz bots oz 

Ciyst., 1-oz bots oz 

Powd., ' s-oz bots oz 

Powd., 1-oz bots oz 

SFGAR MILK, powd ft 

SULFONAL oz 

SULPHUR, crude, ground, Cal ft 

Flour ft, 

Flowers ft 

Roll ft 

SYRUP, Iodide Iron, F. W. B. & Co ft 

Rock Candv. bbls and \ 2 bbls gal 

TAR, Pine, % pints doz 

Pine, pints '. doz 

Pine, quarts doz 

WATER, distilled, containers extra gal 

Orange Flower, containers extra gal 

Rose, containers extra gal 

WAX, Floor, powd ft 

Yellow, pure, ft 

White, pure ft 

White, No. 1 ft 

WHITE PRECIPITATE lb 

ZINC, metallic, shaviugs ft 

Oxide, com'l ft 

Oxide, Hubbuck's ft 

Sulphate, com'l ft 

Sulphate, chem. pure ft 

PROPRIETARY ARTICLES 

Controllea by F. W. Brnun & Co. 

Brauu's Carbolic Salve doz J 

" ■ Carbolic Soap doz 

" Condition Powder doz 

" Essence Jamaica Ginger doz 

•' Florida Water, lge doz 

" Florida Warer, small doz 

" Sarsaparilla doz 

" Syrup Tar and Wild Cherry doz 

Cal. Mission Eucalyptus Lozenges doz 

Cal. Mission Eucalyptus Plasters doz 

Cal. Mission Poison Oak Remedy doz 

Cal. Root Beer doz 

Cal. Mocking Bird Food doz 

Coronado Sea Salt doz 

Hayden's Arnica Salve ..doz 

" Carbolic Salve doz 

Witch Hazel doz 

" Sanitary Towels, small gro 

" " " medium gro 

" large gro 

Hayden's Sachet Powder, % ft bots ft 

Hunter's Witch Hazel doz 

Matchless Sarsaparilla doz 

Matchless Wild Cherry Phosphates doz 

Swain's Carbolic Powder doz 

Tarine doz 

"T. B." Insect Powder, 6-ft can ft 

" 1-ft " doz 

" " J^-ft " doz 

" sml " doz 



BRAUN'S... 



Condition Powder 



IS A 



Well Established Remedy 



Having a good sale throughout Southern 
California and the Territories 



It is used for 

Horses, Cattle, Sheep and Poultry 

IT IS GOOD 

It Retails for 25 cents 
It Costs .$ 1 .00 Per Dozen 

Yon need it in your business ! 



MANUFACTURED 
AND SOLD BY 



F. W. BRAUN & CO. 



LOS ANGELES, CAL. 



LOS ANGELES, AUGUST, 1898. [NUMBERS. 




&(M™iYJ@iLfi^U. DEVOTE TO TOE l!ffe[F^§7§©IFTHE ^ETABL fiH^IIJeeilS'f 




F. W. BRAUN & CO., WHOLESALE DRUGGISTS 



COLUMBIAN SPIRITS 



TRADE MARK 



THE EQUAL of ALCOHOL for all 
PURPOSES EXCEPT INTERNAL use. 

MANHATTAN SPIRIT CO. 

Sole Manufacturers, BUFFALO, N. Y. 



The Price to RETAILERS is 
$8— Case of 50 glass bottles 




See that the 
Labels bear the well known 
RED DIAMOND MARK of the 
APOLLINARIS COMPANY, LIMITED. 



SOLE EXPORTERS: 
The flPOLWNflRIS COMPANY, Ld., 



London 



JOHN CAFFREY, 21 Sutter St., San Francisco 
Representing United Agency Co., 503 Fifth Ave., New York 



LMCTOPGPTI NG 



LACTOPEPTINE Powder, in ounces, per dozen $8 00 

LACTOPEPTINE Powder, in half-pound bottles, per pound 9 60 

Lbs. per doz. 5-ft Bot. Ea. 

LACTOPEPTINE Elixir $12 00 $4 50 

LACTOPEPTINE Elixir with Bismuth 12 00 4 50 

LACTOPEPTINE Elixir with Strychnia and Bismuth 12 00 4 50 

LACTOPEPTINE Elixir with Calisaya 12 O0 4 50 

LACTOPEPTINE Elixir with Calisaya, Iron and Bismuth 12 00 4 50 

LACTOPEPTINE Elixir with Gent'ian and Chloride of Iron 12 00 4 50 

LACTOPEPTINE Elixir with Phosphate of Iron, Quinia and Strychnia 12 00 4 50 

LACTOPEPTINE Liquid 12 00 4 50 

LACTOPEPTINE with Beef, Iron and Wine 9 00 3 25 

Per Doz. 6-lt> Bot. 

LACTOPEPTINE Syrup with Phosphates $12 00 $5 50 

NEW YORK PHARMACAL ASSOCIATION, Yonkers, N. Y. 



3^3^ 



CAP. 



CORRUGATED END. 



TUBE CONTAINING MENTHOL. 




THIS CUT ILLUSTRATES THE THREE PARTS OF 



Blanchard's Hard Rubber Pocket 

I n h 1 1 o r This is positively the Finest Menthol Inhaler 
lllllaiei . ■ on the Market 



Retails for 50 Cents. 
Price, $4.00 per dozen. 



WHY NOT SELL THE BEST? 

BLANCHARD'S INHALER is put up in handsome easel cartons, an 
attractive advertisement and an ornament to any drug store. 



BLANCHARD MANUFACTURING CO., Cincinnati, O. 

-The Trade Supplied by F. W. BRAUN & CO., Los Angeles and San Diego. 



50 YE< 
EXPERIENCE 




Trade Marks 
Designs 
Copyrights Ac. 

Anvone sending a sketch and description may 
quickly ascertain our opinion free whether an 
invention is probably patentable. Communica- 
tions strictly confidential. Handbook on Patents 
sent free. Oldest apencv for securing patents. 

Patents taken through Munn & Co. receive 
special notice, without c harg e. In the 

Scientific American. 

A handsomely illustrated weekly, largest cir- 
culation of any scientific journal. Terms, »3 a 
year: four months, $L Sold by all newsdealers. 

MUNN &Co. 361Broad ^ New York 

Branch Office, 625 F St., Washington, D. C. 



Jfye Qalifor^ia Dru^ist. 

A MONTHLY JOURNAL 

DEVOTED TO THE INTERESTS OF THE RETAIL DRUGGIST. 



Volume VII.] 



LOS ANGELES, CAL., AUGUST, 1898. 



[Number 9. 



51?e ^alifor9ia Dm^ist 

PUBLISHED MONTHLY BY 

THE CALIFORNIA DRUGGIST PUB. CO. 

P. O. Drawer 406, Station C. - - LOS ANGELES, CAL. 
(To whom all Communications should be addressed.) 



F. S. LANGDON, ........ PRESIDENT 

J. Q. BRAUN, ... .... Treasurer 

R. A. ALLEN, . . . . . . . . . Editor 

TERMS OF SUBSCRIPTION. 

Per Year $1 00 

Single Copies 10 

ADVERTISING- RATES. 

One Page $100 00 

Half Page 60 00 

Fourth Page 35 00 

Eighth Page 20 00 

Cards (per month) 1 50 

BgF" Advertisements for positions or assistants, or to buy or sell Drug 
Stores, are inserted free of charge. 

Items of interest to Pharmacists are solicited. 

The official organ of the San Diego Retail Druggists' Association. 

The official organ of the Los Angeles County Pharmaceutical Associa- 
tion. 



MEMBERS of the American Pharmaceutical Association, 
and all others desiring to connect themselves with this 
leading body of American pharmacists, will bear in mind the 
coming meeting at Baltimore, throughout the week, beginning 
Monday, August 29. Be prompt in notifying local secretary, 
Henry P. Hyson, 423 N. Charles street, of your wish for hotel 
or other accommodations ; and be as explicit as possible re- 
garding your wants as to rooms, location, price, etc. 



"PHE wholesale trade are not free from trouble in the matter 
* of war taxes, although it has been assumed that they 
were able to pass over to the retailer the bulk of taxation. 
There are many special burdens given them to bear which are 
not felt by the retail dealer, which additions to the expense of 
doing business are cheerfully acquiesced in as part of the duty 
of patriotic citizens. These remarks are suggested by a criti- 
cism upon certain manufacturers which is made by an Eastern 
jobber, who complains that a considerable burden of taxation 
assumed to be paid by the manufacturers is shifted upon the 
jobber by reducing his discounts, and that the cry "no ad- 
vance in prices," and the headline "we pay the tax," are 
statements with a "string" on them, as it were. The instance 
given is not a solitary one by any means, but it serves to illus- 
trate one of the conditions of the present situation. 



DACIFC DRUG TOPICS for July comes to us greatly im- 
A proved in quality and appearance. The editorial work of 
Dr. G, A. Cutler shows a familiarity with the pen and scissors 
only to be acquired by long experience. Two drug journals 
in Los Angeles give us a metropolitan air, for certain. We ex- 
tend our hand to you, doctor. 



A MONG the larger advertisers of Druggists' goods, the 
^*- Florence Manufacturing Co. are prominent. The de- 
mand they have created for their Prophylactic Tooth Brushes 
is something enormous, and indicates the appreciation with 
which the public receives a really excellent article. E. W. 
Braun & Co. are large purchasers of these goods. 



A T the annual meeting of the Kansas Pharmaceutical Asso- 
** ciation, a committee was appointed to wire a protest to 
the Kansas members of Congress against the feature of the 
war tax bill requiring the stamping of stock on hand, which 
we think was a bit of mistaken zeal, and we now see was a need- 
less waste of time and money. The government needs the 
revenue and druggists suffer no hardship on account of " stock 
on hand." 



A T the Indiana Pharmaceutical Association meeting, June 
**■ 8th and 9th, the attendance was 185. It was agreed, in 
a general discussion of the subject, that the War Revenue 
Stamp Tax was a wise and just measure, only, as some thought, 
the tax was too small. Surely the patriotism of the Hoosier 
druggist is "above proof," and " C. P." 

The officers elected for the ensuing year are as follows : 
President, F. H. Burton, Evansville ; Vice-Presidents, F. D. 
Warner, C. E. Elliott and F. W. Weisner ; Secretary, Arthur 
Timbertake, Indianapolis ; Treasurer, Grau G. Allen, Indian- 
apolis ; Executive Committee, C. W. Eichrodt, Bruno Knoefel 
and Otto C. Bastian. 

THE Ohio Pharmaceutical Association, at its recent rneet- 
*■ ing in Columbus, were favored by a report from the Sec- 
retary of the Cooperative Fire Insurance Company, in which 
it was shown that the plan had been quite successful in its ope- 
rations, which doubtless means that the druggists have been 
adequately protected, and at a saving from old time rates. 
Pass this scheme along, gentlemen, we need it over here. 

Prof. J. H. Beal, of Scio, was elected President of the O. P. 
A. for the coming year ; E. C. Hopp, Cleveland, is to fill the 
Secretary's position ; and J. H. Von Stein, Upper Sandusky, 
the Treasurer's. Next year's meeting is to be held on board a 
steamer during a lake trip, if practicable, otherwise at Put-in- 
Bay. 



THE CALIFORNIA DRUGGIST. 



P W. BRAUN & CO. are having a good trade in their fine 
■*• ■ Fruit Juices for the soda fountain. The hot August 
weather has its compensations for the druggist who serves cold 
drinks. 

T""HE Colorado Pharmaceutical Association, at its Manitou 
' meeting in June agreed, by vote, that wood alcohol 
should be labeled wood spirit, to distinguish it from the ordi- 
nary alcohol. We like the idea, and would be glad to see it 
adopted generally. 

Y\ J"E acknowledge the receipt of Proceedings of Missouri 
Pharmaceutical Association, 1898, from Secretary H. 
M. Whelpley, which contains much of interest, as might be ex- 
pected of perhaps the liveliest State Pharmaceutical Associa- 
tion in the country. 

\\ 712, are glad to see the name of Wallace M. Hefton on 
the list of successful candidates for Licentiate in Phar- 
macy at the July examination. Mr. Hefton is in the employ 
of H. C. Fallin, Hanford, and is one of the young men whom 
it is a pleasure to know. 

T"HE State Board of Pharmacy, at their late meeting in San 
* Francisco, indicated their purpose to make it warm for 
those who are illegally engaged in business as pharmacists. 
This is what the Board was organized to do, but they have 
been quite lenient, heretofore, in their handling of the matter. 
Perhaps the war spirit may be moving them to do something 
for their country. Let all delinquents prepare to buckle on 
their armor for a fight or take to the woods ! 



War Tax Rulings which are of Interest. 

/^RDINARY receipts require no stamp. Orders for money 
^-^ on merchants or others require two-cent stamp, same as 
checks on bank. 

Withdrawal of Savings bank deposits, where book is pre- 
sented without drawing a check, requires no stamp. 

Duplicate bills of lading (inland) require one-cent stamp 
each. 

Telegraph messages are required to be stamped by the per- 
son who makes, signs, or issues the same. 



In cases where the consideration in a deed is nominal, the 
actual value of the property conveyed should govern the 
amount of the stamp required. 

Original lease requires a stamp. No stamp is required on 
copy executed by the parties at the time of the original lease. 

A ten-cent stamp is sufficient upon a proxy for use in voting 
at an election of officers of an incorporated company, without 
regard to the number of signatures. 

In regard to the cancellation of internal revenue adhesive 
stamps, the initials of the party and the year only will be 
sufficient. 

Old stamps issued under repealed acts cannot be used in 
lieu of stamps required by the present law. 

In the matter of requiring free samples to be stamped, the 
Attorney -General has reversed the ruling before made, and de- 
cides, quite properly, that no stamps are required upon them. 
This is a great relief to manufacturers. 

In the stamping of bulk packages of perfumes the manu- 
facturer is supposed to fix a retail price for the goods, and to 
stamp the packages accordingly. If this is done in good 
faith no objections will be made if prices are varied more or 
less in retailing. 

Articles retailing for less than five cents are not exempt for 
that reason. They may, however, be packed together in 
packages not exceeding five cents total value, under one band 
or wrapper, which is stamped, but each separate package must 
have printed thereon the words " sold from a duly stamped 
package." 

Imported bay rum is not exempt from stamping, nothwith- 
standing the fact that it has paid an import duty. 



'"THE Missouri Pharmaceutical Association held its twentieth 
annual meeting June 7th to 12th, and its five days' pro- 
gram was characterized by the good things that make its 
meetings so popular with the pharmacists of the State. The 
social features of these gatherings mean a great deal as pro- 
moters of harmony among its members, while the business 
and professional parts of the program have abundant attention. 
Twenty-three new members were added this year, and the re- 
port of treasurer Mittlebach showed a satisfactory condition of 
the finances. 

The position of the association on the question of recognition 
of College of Pharmacy diplomas by the State Board of Phar- 
macy was shown to be adverse to such recognition. "Examin- 
ation or nothing " we suppose is the rule in Missouri, there- 
fore. Jefferson City is the place chosen for next year's meeting 
and the new officers elected are, President, T. A. Moseley, Har- 
risonville ; Vice-Presidents, C. L. Wright, T. F. Hagenow and 
Miss F. De Wyl ; Secretary. H. M. Whelpley, of St. Louis. 



Do Not Stamp 

Beef Extract. 
Beef Jelly. 
Beef Juice. 
Beef Meal. 
Bird Gravel. 
Bird Manna. 
Butter Color. 
Chlorides, Platts'. 
Chocolate. 
Cocoa. 

Dyes, Diamond or Household. 
Disinfectants, when solely such. 
Exterminators, Insect or Rat. 
Fly Paper or Poison. 

Foods, Infant or Invalid, unless medicinal. 
Ginger Ale. 
Liquid Rennet. 

Phosphates, Wild Cherry, for summer drinks. 
Plaster, Surgeons' Adhesive. 
Powder, Insect. 
Poison, Squirrel or Gopher. 
Rat-cheese. 

Root Beer, either in dry or liquid form. 
Rough on Rats. 
Sea Salt. 
Sapolio. 

Soaps, unless medicinal, or recommended as having curative 
or cosmetic properties. 

Tablets, Malted Milk, Rennet, Root Beer. 
Waters, natural mineral. 






THE CALIFORNIA DRUGGIST. 



NOW that the war clouds are passing away, the army and 
navy called off, and the wits and punsters have no further 
call to make sport of the enemy , we may take the occasion to look 
about us and estimate our personal damages. As druggists, 
we may safely assume that we are bearing our full proportion, 
and a little more, of the war expenses. The druggist is second 
to none in patriotic devotion to his country, and his assess- 
ments in these war times seem to argue that our law makers 
have acted upon that assumption in sizing him up for revenue. 
With the coming of peace let us hope that the reduction or 
abandonment of the stamp taxes will follow as speedily as the 
needs of the government will permit, and that when the next 
occasion for special taxation arises a more equitable propor- 
tion may fall upon the drug store. 



Business Personals. 

Dial & Palmer, Redondo, succeed E. M. Dial & Co. 



Edmiston & Harrison succeed C. E. Bean, corner Vermont 
and Jefferson aves. 

Dr. D. J. Brannen, Flagstaff, made us a call a few days ago. 
The doctor makes his visits all too seldom.- 



Walter Kabisius has bought the pharmacy, corner Sixth 
and Olive streets, formerly owned by R. J. Knox. 



Dr. C. W. Miller, of Phcenix, Ariz., visited Eos Angeles 
the middle of July for a summer outing of several weeks. 



The National Pharmacy (H. E. Fellows) is successor to R. 
W. Borthwick, Sixteenth street and Grand ave., this city. 



C. E. Bean has gone to Porterville, Tulare county, and suc- 
ceeds P. C. Montgomery in the drug business in that place. 



Eaux is hustling to keep up with his perfume orders these 
days. He is making a large shipment this week to New York 
city. 

The many friends of Frank Amlar in Los Angeles will be 
interested to hear of his marriage, July 7, to Miss Kate 
O'Brien of St. Louis, who has long been employed as teleg- 
rapher in the same house with Mr. Amlar. 



The Catalina Pharmacy, corner Seventh and Alvarado streets, 
has been purchased by Mr. Sam Sollenberger. It is a neat and 
attractive little store, and we trust will prove a profitable in- 
vestment in the hands of its new proprietor. 



C. H. Lewis has taken the corner store — Fourth and Broad- 
way — next to his former location, and thereby greatly im- 
proved his situation. Doubtless his business will show a 
marked increase in consequence of this favorable change. 



Dr. H. B. Fasig has bought out G. C. Altar, 531 Downey 
ave., by which purchase he returns to his old place of busi- 
ness. Having taken a medical degree since his temporary re- 
tirement from trade, Dr. Fasig is now equipped for either 
branch. We wish him lots of success. 



San Diego Items. 

Mr. D. S. Lacy is at his old post as manager of the Coro- 
nado Pharmacy. 

Geo. Irwin, with Strahlmann & Co., spent his vacation at 
La Jolla with his family. 



Strahlmann & Co.'s new front adds greatly to the appear- 
ance of this popular store. 



Mr. P. C. Caraway assists Mr. Hooker at Chase's pharmacy 
in the absence of Mr. Chase. 



Mr. and Mrs. Parrett have gone to Alpine for a change of 
air and the benefit of Mrs. Parrett's health. 



L- E. Corbin's Pharmacy, corner Fifth and D streets, will 
soon have a fine new front. Work is now under way. 



Mr. F. H. Furnald was recently passing around the cigars 
and smiling as he said, "smoke with me, its a daughter." 



Mr. E. Strahlmann has returned from Alpine, leaving Mrs. 
Strahlmann and the family there, where they will stay for 
some time. 

Ferris & Ferris moved on Aug. 10th to the northeast corner 
of Fifth and H streets. This is a fine corner and Ferris & Fer- 
ris make it very attractive. 



C. A. Chase, accompanied by his father, Major Levi Chase, 
left on the Santa Rosa on July 16th, for a trip to the north. 
Recreation the order of the day, business a tabooed subject. 



Lynn Boyd of National City while driving in Poway was 
badly injured, owing to the harness breaking, which caused 
the team to run away. A broken cheek bone, dislocated 
fingers, and a severe shaking up is the list of injuries. 



W. J. Wolff returned from his eastern trip to Southern Cali- 
fornia, to enter into a life partnership with an estimable lady, 
Miss Maud Harper. The new firm have returned from their 
wedding trip and are now at home at 1242 Second street. 



Supplied Bogus Apollinaris. 

Thomas Henry Dillon, of No. 1,319 Arch street, Philadelphia, 
against whom Judge Butler, of the United States Court, ren- 
dered a decision on Monday, has been taken to Moyamensing 
Prison. He was accused of refilling bottles bearing genuine 
Apollinaris labels and also of using counterfeits of the Apolli- 
naris labels. — Philadelphia Record. 



Ballyhooly Lemonade. 

This is how they make "whisky" in Ireland, according to 
District Inspector Bell: 2 gals, of new whisky, 1 gal. of rum, 
y 2 gal. of "finish", 1 dr. of sulphate of copper, and 2,% gals, 
of water. This particular "pison" owes its merit as "hard 
sthuff " to the S. V. M. and blue stone. It is sold as " fine 
ould Irish," said the Constabulary inspector to the Licensing 
Commission the other day. 



THE CALIFORNIA DRUGGIST. 



The First Drug Store in Germany* 

No record of a drug store appears in Germany prior to 1627, 
when we find one at Munster. Apparently it was not an over- 
popular institution, for it took eighteen years for a similar 
establishment to make its appearance, this time at Augsburg. 
In 131 8 a pharmacy was established at Hildesheim. This re- 
mained the property of the church there until 1365, when the 
city took control and began to dispense drugs. Although no 
record appears of other drug stores in Germany during the 
Middle Ages, it is probable that they existed. A parchment 
ordinance of 1350 of the city of Nuremberg shows clearly that 
the separation between medicine and pharmacy must at this 
time have been recognized. It ordains that the druggist shall 
conscientiously fill all written and verbal orders according to 
his best ability ; that he shall use none but pure drugs ; that 
he shall treat rich and poor with equal courtesy ; that he shall 
be modest in his charges, and not demand more than he needs 
to feed and clothe himself and those dependent upon him, 
allowing a reasonable advance on the price of the drug as a 
compensation for his services. 

We find also at this time a record of a woman druggist. On 
an ancient memorial of an apothecaries' guild at Ulm is a 
record as follows: "In 1383 died Margareta, Hainczen 
Winkel's daughter, apothecaress. " The woman is pictured as 
standing on a dog, regarded as an unclean beast during the 
Dark Ages, this position indicating that she has trodden all 
carnal and earthly desires under foot. Field pharmacies were 
established in Germany in time of war toward the end of the 
sixteenth century. At this time the business of the druggist 
changed considerably ; he ceased to be a retailer of sugar, 
spices, and confections, devoting his attention to his drugs. 
His education was still largely based on his trade experiences, 
although those who adopted the profession were obliged to 
possess a rudimentary knowledge of Latin. The apprentice- 
ship lasted from five to six years, and at the end of this time 
the apprentice was by his master created a journeyman. The 
journeyman apothecary was usually obliged to pass an ex- 
amination before the Decanum Collegii at the time of applying 
for a situation. — LippincotV s. 



Seidlitz Powders — Epsom Salts — Origin of the Names. 

The original preparation to which the name of ' ' Seidlitz 
Powders" was given, was a "mass," or the solid saline in- 
gredients, after the evaporation, of the waters of the springs 
at Seidlitz, a watering place near Borix, in Bohemia. The 
powders were, subsequently, devised in order that the solutions 
of the salts (the principal of which is magnesium sulphate) 
might be made effervescent like those of the springs. The 
original name was " Pulvis aerophorus Seidlitzensis." Some 
time in the latter quarter of the last century English physicians 
commenced using the potassium and sodium tartrate, now 
used in preparing seidlitz powders, in place of magnesium sul- 
phate, on account of the milder action of the former. The 
action of the English physicians was followed on the Conti- 
nent, and "Seidlitz Powders," prepared after the English 
formula, came into use under the name of "Pulvis Seidlitzensis 
Anglorum," "English Seidlitz Powder," to distinguish it from 
the pulverized mass, consisting mostly of magnesium sulphate, 
of the Seidlitz Springs. 

Epsom salt gets its name from the waters of the springs at 
the town of Epsom, in England, which are very similar to 
those of Seidlitz. — National Druggist. 



Oil for Appendicitis. 

Dr. M. O. Terry, Surgeon-General of the National Guard 
of New York, advocates the use of oleaginous cathartics for 
treatment of appendicitis, declaring that of fifty-one cases 
under his personal supervision, forty-nine were successfully 
handled without operation. This treatment {Med. Times) is 
as follows : At first cathartics of castor oil and sweet oil, fol- 
lowed by hot water, are given, until the bowels are thoroughly 
cleaned out. This treatment is followed by enemas of glycerin 
and sweet oil. Flaxseed poultices soaked in sweet oil are 
kept on the abdomen. The diet is restricted to very light, 
easily digested foods. The oil treatment, Dr. Terry says, re- 
moves the friction of the inflamed tissues and relaxes them 
during resolution. In this way, he says, he has cured cases 
of chronic, recurrent appendicitis. To prevent a return of the 
trouble, after the original treatment, he prescribes a table- 
spoonful of sweet oil, followed by a glass of hot water, be- 
fore each meal for several weeks. — Western Druggist, June, 
1898. 



Nitrate of Lead in Ingrowing Nails. 

In la Semaine medicate of a recent date is an appeal to those 
having in charge the treatment of ingrowing nail, to resort 
less to surgery and recur rather to the former method ot treat- 
ment with lead nitrate — the remedy that had proved so suc- 
cessful in the hands of Chailloux, Tardif, Monprofit, etc., and 
which the writer thinks deserves to be resurrected from the 
limbo of forgotten methods. It is, the writer declares, nearly 
infallible, very slightly painful, very easy of application, and 
except in very severe cases, permits the patient to confine his 
usual occupations. The following is the process, or method of 
employment : Insert between the nail and the fungus growth 
surrounding it, a bit of absorbent cotton, sufficiently large to 
cover the entire nail. This must be carried, with a little 
spatula, or a whittled match end will answer, quite to the bot- 
tom of the periungual groove, leaving the free end to cover 
the nail. This done, roll in the fingers another pledget of 
cotton batting, which is placed longitudinally (parallel to the 
ungual groove) to the limit of the healthy flesh. In this 
manner we obtain a sort of drainage for the diseased flesh, 
which latter is dusted with lead nitrate, finely powdered. The 
cotton is then folded backward, quite covering the part and 
the little roll of cotton batting. Cover the whole with a bit 
of wadding and fix in place by a little bandage of dampened 
tarletan. This dressing must be renewed daily. At the end 
of three or four days the fungosities will be found to be re- 
placed with a parchment-like tissue, at the edge of which the 
border of the ingrowing nail can be seen. From this point on, 
the use of the nitrate ceases, and the treatment consists in 
raising the edge of the nail, by shoving under it a bit of cotton 
wadding, which is accomplished in two or three treatments at 
the outside. The patient can now take charge of the case, 
and keep the nail growing in the proper direction by support- 
ing the free edge with pledgets of cotton. In case of a re- 
currence, the treatment must be repeated ab initio. — National 
Druggist. 



THE CALIFORNIA DRUGGIST. 



Practical Formulae. 

Witch Mouth-wash. 



Oz 



Distilled witch-hazel 18 

Honey of roses 4 

Tr. of myrrh 4 

Tr. of cinchona 4 

Glycerine of borax 2 

Mix and filter. 

One part of this solution to four parts of water for rinsing 
the mouth. For sore mouth, irritable or sore gums. 

Witch Complexion-Beautifier: 

Oz 

Distilled witch-hazel 12 

St. Thomas bay-rum 8 

Depurated cucumber-juice 4 

Glycerine of borax 3 

Water of ammonia 3 

Tr. of benzoin 2 

Mix and filter. 

Apply several times a day to the complexion with a soft 
sponge. — G. H. Dubelle in Practical Druggist. 

Witch-Jelly. 

Oz 

Distilled witch-hazel 16 

Glycerine of borax. 8 

French rose-water 4 

Orange-flower water 3^ 

Finest gelatine ^ 

Make into a jelly. This preparation to be put up in flexible 

metallic tubes. 

Witch Freckxe Lotion. 

Oz 

Distilled witch-hazel 16 

Eau de Cologne 8 

Glycerine ! 3^ 

French rose-water 3 

Chloride ammonium 1 

Corrosive sublimate % 

Mix and filter. 

To be applied night and morning with a soft sponge, allow- 
ing it to dry on the skin. 

Hkadache-Powder. 

Asked for a powder that will invariably bring back the cus- 
tomer, recommend itself, and make business brisk, Mr. A. E. 
Ebert suggests the following in Meyer Brothers' Druggist : 

Cerium oxalate 1 av. oz. 

Sodium bicarbonate 1 av. oz. 

Magnesium carbonate 120 gr. 

Liquorice-root, powdered 120 gr. 

Acetanilide 4 av. oz. 

Oil of coriander 5 drops. 

Oil of nutmeg 3 drops. 

Mix. Reduce to a very fine powder ; divide into io-grain 
powders, wafers, or capsules, or make into tablets or pills of 
5 grains each. One powder (wafer, etc., or two tablets or 
pills) to be taken with water. Repeat the dose in fifteen min- 
utes, if necessary. 

Patient : "I am so much better to day, doctor, I really feel 
as if I could bear almost anything." 

Doctor: " Ah, glad to hear it. Permit me to present my 
bill." 

(Patient has relapse.) 



Dressing for Enameled Carriage Tops. 

In a wide-mouthed glass bottle or jar, digest 2 ozs. of India 
rubber cut up into shreds with i pound of oil of turpentine. 
Let stand without shaking for two days, then stir with a clean 
wooden spatula or stick. Add another pound of oil of turpen- 
tine and stir frequently until solution is complete. Let stand 
a day or two, and then decant 24 ozs. of the solution and add 
it to 2 lbs. of the best white copal varnish, and mix thoroughly. 
Finally add 24 ozs. of boiled linseed oil, and heat the mixture 
over a sand bath, with frequent stirring until homogeneous. 
This is the celebrated enameled leather dressing of Champag- 
nat Its manufacture requires some time and labor, but its 
excellence makes up for all trouble it costs. Here is one more: 

Dark shellac 15 parts. 

Rosin 5 parts. 

Castile soap, shaved 3 parts. 

Venice turpentine 11 parts. 

Rosin oil 1 part. 

Alcohol 90° 85 parts. 

Mix and put on the water bath, apply a gentle heat, and 
stir constantly until solution of the solids is complete. Now 
add 1 Yz parts of nigrosine (alcohol-soluble) and continue the 
heat until the mixture is uniform throughout. — National 
Druggist. 

Restoring Tarnished Gold. 

According to the Jewellers' Circular, the following mixture 
is an excellent one for restoring gold which has become tarn- 
ished : 

Sodium bicarbonate oz. 20 

Chlorinated lime oz. 1 

Common salt oz. 1 

Water oz. 16 

Mix well and apply with a soft brush. A very small quan- 
tity of the solution is sufficient for effecting the desired pur- 
pose, and it may be used either cold or lukewarm. Plain 
articles may be brightened equal to new by putting a spot or 
two of the liquid upon them from the stopper of the bottle, 
and lightly brushing over the surface with fine tissue paper 
until sufficiently, dried off to accomplish the object intended. 



How to Make a Mustard Plaster.. 

Dr. Sharpsnel says : Never place a cold mustard plaster on 
a patient. The shock is like a sudden plunge into cold water. 
Before you commence to mix the paste be sure you have all the 
necessary material at hand. First put a large plate where it 
can get warm, not hot. Then stir the mustard and flour 
thoroughly together before you add the water, which should 
be tepid ; stir in enough water to make a paste about the con- 
sistency of French mustard. Place your cloth (an old hand- 
kerchief is best) on the warm plate, spreading the paste in the 
middle of it, leaving a margin wide enough to lap well over on 
all sides. Do not remove paste from the plate until ready to 
apply. Place a folded cloth between paste and patient's cloth- 
ing. — Prac. Drug. 

A Child's Deduction. — Little Robert : " Papa, do camels 

come from Kentucky ? " 

Papa : " No. What makes you ask that ? " 

Little Robert : " Our teacher told us today that camels can 

go for weeks at a time without water." — Chicago News, 



THE CALIFORNIA DRUGGIST. 



" Hen Persuader." 

Under this name, with an alias of "hen-fruit stimulator", 
a poultry journal brought out the following some years ago, 
giving the formula a strong endorsement : 

Iron sulphate 1 part. 

Red-pepper pods 1 part. 

Black pepper 2 parts. 

Lime phosphate 8 parts. 

Bread crust or crackers 8 parts. 

Fcenugreck 4 parts. 

Powder the ingredients, and add four parts of clean white 
sand. If preferred, well boiled white beans may be used in- 
stead of the bread crust. The beans should be pressed through 
a colander to remove the hull, and then worked up with the 
powders. Label as follows : For every dozen hens, add one 
level tablespoonful of the powder to the ordinary food, mixing 
it thoroughly, so that it may be as evenly distributed as possi- 
ble. The same journal recommends giving the hens, once or 
twice a week, lean beef, finely minced with a little red pepper 
or cayenne in powder, and powdered eggshells or dry bone 
dust, which substances, by the way, may be used instead of 
lime phosphate, by taking double the quantity. — National 
Druggist. 

Some English Prescription Difficulties. 

At a recent meeting of the Liverpool Pharmaceutical Society, 
reported in the London Pharmaceutical Journal, R. H. Mitch- 
ell presented a batch of dispensing difficulties he had had to sur- 
mount of late. The first was 

Vapor creasoti 2 ozs. 

One teaspoonful in a pint of hot water as an inhalation. It was 
evident that the prescriber did not intend the vapor of the 
Pharmacopoeia to be sent, so what did he mean? Two 
drachms of creosote with directions for use were dispensed by 
Mr. Mitchell. Mr. Wyatt thought it was the vapor of the 
London Throat Hospital Pharmacopoeia, containing creosote, 
light carbonate of magnesia and water to be used by teaspoon- 
fuls, that the doctor had in mind. The second was for 24 pills: 

Creasoti 1 mm. 

Zinci valer 3 grs. 

Fiat pastillus mitte xxiv. 

These required curd soap, 6 grains ; liquorice powder and com- 
pound powder of tragacanth, of each, 25 grains, to make a 
decent mass, and the zinc salt was well dried on a water bath 
before using. 

A third prescription for pastils ran as follows : 

Cocainae hydrochlor 1-10 gr. 

Menthol y z gr. 

Acid tannic 2 grs. 

Fiat pastillus mitte xx. 

The glyco-gelatin base used became semi-liquid when the tan- 
nin was added, and nothing could be done to remedy the fail- 
ure. The prescriber finally ordered the glyco-gelatin to be re- 
placed with fruit paste, when, of course, all trouble was over. 
Although a great chemical error was undoubtedly committed 
in prescribing tannic acid with gelatin, yet Messrs. Wokes and 
Wyatt said that pessaries containing such a combination had 
been dispensed by them repeatedly with success by taking care 
to dissolve the tannic acid in some glycerine and adding it to 
the gelatin mass when just cold enough to run into the moulds. 
— American Druggist. 



Paper Barometer. 

Paper barometers are made by impregnating white blotting 
paper in the following liquid, and then hanging up to dry : 

Cobalt chloride 1 oz. 

Sodium chloride y z oz. 

Acacia % oz. 

Calcium chloride 75 grs. 

Water 3 ozs. 

The amount of moisture in the atmosphere is indicated by 
the following colors : 

Rose red rain 

Pale red very moist 

Bluish red moist 

Lavender blue nearly dry 

Blue very dry 

— Mercks Rep. 

Experiments Regarding the " Setting" of Plaster of Paris. 

J. A. Belcher reports (Treatment) the results of experiments 
undertaken to determine the effect of various agents on the 
"setting" of plaster of Paris : " Two drams of plaster, mixed 
with one dram of a five per cent solution of sodium chloride, 
hardened in two minutes. Mixed with one dram of a five per 
cent solution of sugar, it hardened in three minutes and a 
half. Mixed with one dram of one per cent sodium chloride 
solution, it hardened in five minutes. Mixed with one dram 
of an 0.5 per cent sodium chloride solution, it hardened in five 
minutes, Mixed with one dram of a five per cent calcium 
chloride solution, it hardened in six minutes and a half. Mixed 
with one dram of tap water, it hardened in nine minutes. 
Mixed with one dram of distilled water, it hardened in nine 
minutes. Mixed with one dram of saturated solution of 
sodium chloride, it hardened in eighteen minutes. Mixed with 
one dram of a five per cent solution of glycerine in distilled 
water, it hardened in nineteen minutes. Mixed with one dram 
of a five per cent solution of white of egg in distilled water, it 
hardened in twenty minutes. Mixed with one dram of a ten 
per cent solution of white of egg in distilled water, it hardened 
in twenty-five minutes. Mixed with one dram of a ten per 
cent solution of glycerin in distilled water, it hardened in 
thirty-five minutes. Mixed with one dram of a twenty-five 
per cent solution of glycerin in distilled water, it hardened in 
sixty minutes. These figures tell, says Mr. Belcher, their own 
tale, and show that where it is of importance to make plaster 
of Paris to set rapidly it should be mixed with a five per cent 
solution of common salt, and this may be made roughly by 
adding a tablespoonful of salt to a pint of water. — Drug Cir- 
cular. 



American dentistry seems to maintain its prestige amongst 
the crowned heads of Europe. A well known Paris prac- 
titioner, Dr. John H. Spaulding, has just been seut for to St. 
Petersburg to attend professionally some members of the im- 
perial family there. Dr. Spaulding had the somewhat unique 
distinction of being dentist to the late Dr. Thomas W. Evans. 
— Chemist and Druggist. 



" Does your wife do much fancy work ? " " Fancy work ? 
She won't even let a porous plaster come into the house with- 
out crocheting a red border round it and running a yellow rib- 
bon through the holes." — Tit Bits. 



THE CALIFORNIA DRUGGIST. 



Chalk,* Its Origin, Formation and Preparation. 

BY ARTHUR E. COLE. 

To the geologist the origin of chalk forms a most interesting 
Study, marking, as it does, a very important period in the 
division of geologic time, called first in England and France 
" Cretaceous," where the principal formation representing the 
period is of chalk. The life of the period is profusely repre- 
sented by fossils. Chalk is a sedimentary rock of great extent 
occupying a large portion of Great Britain and France, attain- 
ing in some places a thickness of a thousand feet. It is found 
also in Belgium and Denmark, and in detached patches through 
Central Europe, extending southward to North Africa and 
eastward as far as the shores of the Ural in Central Asia, much 
of it having the same general characteristics as the English. 
This area is as great as Europe and many times greater than 
the Mediterranean Sea. Chalk is distinctly of animal origin 
and is composed mostly of the shells or carapaces of micro- 
scopic marine animals. According to Ehrenberg, an inch cube 
of it contains millions of fragments and complete shells of one 
small tribe of animals, and would be identical with a corres- 
ponding cube of mud taken from the bottom of the Atlantic 
Ocean and mixed with mud from the bottom of the river 
Thames. 

Those who have devoted their lives to the study of geology 
give us every reason to suppose that chalk is the sediment of a 
vast sea that at one time covered the face of the globe where it 
is now to be found, which has since become dry land through 
a change in the earth's surface, in some places caused by vol- 
canic action and in others so gradual as not to interrupt the 
surrounding animal and vegetable life ; a change occupying 
probably thousands of years. 

The strata often contain flint nodules distributed in layers, 
which we are forced to assume were only an occasional deposit 
of concretionary origin. Most of us know that numerous 
shells, fragments of star fish and corals, and even perfect skel- 
etons of fishes covered with scales are occasionally lound in it. 

It is a peculiar fact that chalk in its integrity is almost en- ! 
tirely confined to the Southeast coast of England. While i 
found in abundance in France, it soon passes into a hard lime- 
stone in the interior, losing its peculiar texture towards the 
South, though the actual composition of the chalk and the 
limestone it passes into remains nearly the same. In Den- 
mark it appears in. a soft limestone, and in Belgium a crumb- 
ling mass takes the place of pure chalk. 

The minute particles which form chalk are held together 
only by adhesion, not crystalized in any degree, which condi- 
tion explains some of its peculiarities, such as its earthy tex- 
ture, making it useful for writing, drawing, etc., and its ex- 
treme absorbancy. It is impossible to remove all the water 
from it with moderate heat, and when saturated a block meas- 
uring 12 inches each way will contain two gallons of water, 
nearly one-third of its total content. 

Its impress on the country it occupies is very marked, differ- 
ing with the conditions to which it is exposed. Off from the 
Isle of Wight we see it in the Needles, which rise abruptly 
out of the water hundreds of feet high, looking like ruined 



* This article was prepared by its writer, of the Thomas manufacturing Company, 
Baltimore, Md., in response to the Era's request. The description of the manufacture 
of chalk refers entirely to the process employed by that house, and its machinery is 
different from anything else of the kind. 



columns, solitary and magnificent, some leaning towards each 
other and meeting at the top, forming an archway, as if the 
water, together with the inexorable hand of time, had gradu- 
ally worn through them. Again we have it in the cliffs on 
the coast, rugged and picturesque, rising almost perpendicu- 
larly up from the water's edge. Dover Castle is situated on the 
top of one of these cliffs, perched 320 feet above the sea level, 
forming one of the oldest and most formidable fortifications in 
the kingdom ; it takes over 20,000 men to man its ramparts 
and bastions. Here is also the old debtor's prison. 

Where the surface has been cut away the pure white chalk 
cliffs can be seen for miles out at sea, as far as the opposite 
shores of France, on a clear day shining bright in the sunlight, 
from which England derives her name of Albion. On the 
other hand, the inland scenery is peculiarly soft and peaceful, 
with an undulating softness and richness of green nowhere 
else to be found, with here and there the white rock peeping 
through, contrasting strongly with the wild scenery of the 
coast. 

Chalk is almost pure carbonate of lime ; it usually contains 
5 per cent of water with some free silica and ferric oxide, be- 
sides minor impurities; specific gravity 2.4 to 2.6. Not being 
soluble in water it is purified by elutriation or washing in 
water, the ferruginous and siliceous particles subsiding first, 
while the pure chalk particles remain suspended. This is ac- 
complished by grinding the chalk stone in water, and, after 
passing through a sieve, allowing it to run for some hundred 
feet or more through a ziz-zag trough, the coarser impurities 
going quickly to the bottom and remaining there, while the 
water containing now only chalk in almost a pure state passes 
on into large tanks. The first tank when filled overflows into 
the second, and the second into the third, and so on, the last 
tank receiving only the finest chalk that has remained sus- 
pended longest. The water is then evaporated, leaving the 
chalk of various grades in the different tanks. The finest pre- 
pared chalk (Thomas' English) is manufactured from that 
taken from the last tank, or longest suspended, being the 
purest and smoothest chalk obtainable. It is then dried and 
bleached in the open air, bolted to remove any foreign parti- 
cles, and then again run through a water process, after which 
by means of an ingenious device, in a pasty state, it is molded 
into the popular shaped cones so well known, and dried by ar- 
tificial heat in such a way as to leave it soft and velvety, yet 
firm enough to stand handling and transportation with a mini- 
mum loss from powdering. 

As chalk is used largely for medical purposes, and as a toilet 
article, it is important that care should be exercised in procur- 
ing the best and purest. — Era. 

Solder for Aluminum. 

Mr. Joseph Richards has read a paper before the Franklin 
Institute, in which he details the results of his attempts to 
find a suitable solder for aluminum. Tin attaches itself by 
forming an alloy at the junction, but this alloy soon decom- 
poses ; zinc also proves unsatisfactory, and the use of silver 
chloride, which has been recommended as a flux for ordinary 
tin solder, is not successful. The author recommends allumi- 
num one part, a ten per cent phosphor-tin one part, zinc 1 1 
parts, and tin 29 parts. The phosphorus seems to be an es- 
sential ingredient. 



THE CALIFORNIA DRUGGIST. 



- 



Liquid Air. 

It is not long since the expansive power of water reduced 
to steam revolutionized the world of industry. While in the 
midst of its triumph, a still greater force, more subtle, far 
more reaching and almost invincible, was developed in electric- 
ity. Standing on the threshold of the development of this 
almost spiritual, and what would have been considered less 
than a century ago, miraculous power, another adaptation of 
force rises before us, in liquid air, completing a trinity for the 
development of power, which places in the hands of man a 
mastery of the forces of nature. By a simple and inexpensive 
mechanical contrivance Mr. Chas. B. Tripler has succeeded in 
compressing eight hundred cubic feet of air into one foot, 
when it becomes divested of the heat derived from the sun, 
assumes a liquid form, in temperature 312 degrees below zero, 
and yet in a condition to be transported with ease and safety. 
In the expansion of this liquid air, as it returns to its gaseous 
state, is a power which will fill an important place in the great 
trinity of developing forces, steam, electricity and air. 

In medicine and surgery we see the possibility of furnishing 
air absolutely free from germs, of cooling the hospital wards, 
even in the tropics, to any desired temperature, and in yellow 
fever wards preventing contagion to nurses and facilitating the 
convalesence of the patients by keeping the air below frost 
point. With a pure, cool, germless air at our disposal in our 
homes, there would be no need of sending our patients to the 
mountains or the seashore for consumption or asthma, but 
every home might be made, to a certain extent, a sanitarium 
in itself. — Medical Times. 



Rules for the Prescription Counter. 

F. R. W. Perry writes to the Bulletin of Pharmacy that the 
following rules, neatly type written, occupy a prominent po- 
sition at his prescription counter: • (1) Keep the prescription 
scales clean, and when they are not in use keep them covered. 
(2) Keep the dispensing bottles well filled and always perfectly 
clean. (3) Keep everything in its proper place. (4) After 
using a utensil, or a dispensing bottle, do not leave it on the 
prescription counter, but place it back where it belongs. (5) 
When compounding prescriptions do not carry on a conversa- 
tion with any one. (6) Keep customers out from behind the 
prescription case. (7) Label every package of drugs sent out, 
and when a poison, be sure and give the antidote. (8) When 
compounding prescriptions do not let your mind wander off to 
something else, but remember that you hold in your hands the 
life of a human being, and act accordingly. (9) Always 
charge prescriptions, or any other goods, before wrapping them 
UP- _____ 

Don't join a " Don't Worry " Club. Don't try not to worry. 
While contentment is a pleasing virtue, the people you know 
who are contented would be better off if they worried more. 
Absolute contentment and indifference to the troubles of to- 
morrow will land anyone in the poor-house. The cow doesn't 
worry, neither does the clam, but people are built to worry, 
and it was intended that they should. On the other hand, if 
you worry much it will land you in the insane asylum. It is 
the insane asylum on the one hand and the poor-house on the 
other ; the point is to worry just enough to keep out of both of 
them. — Atchison Globe. 



Important to Mothers. 

The manufacturers of Castoria have been compelled to spend 
hundreds of thousands of dollars to familiarize the public with 
the signature of Chas. H. Fletcher. This has been necessi- 
tated by reason of pirates counterfeiting the Castoria trade- 
mark. This counterfeiting is a crime not only against the 
proprietors of Castoria, but against the growing generation. 
All persons should be careful to see that Castoria bears the 
signature of Chas. H. Fletcher, if they would guard the health 
of their children. Parents and mothers, in particular, ought 
to carefully examine the Castoria advertisements which have 
been appearing in this paper, and to remember that the wrap- 
per of every bottle of genuine Castoria bears the fac-simile 
signature of Chas. H. Fletcher, under whose supervision it has 
been manufactured continuously for over thirty years. — Phila. 
Bulletin. 

Way to Kill Mosquitoes. 

Two and one-half hours are required for a mosquito to de- 
velop from its first stage, a speck resembling cholera bacteria, 
to its active and venomous maturity. The insect in all its 
phases may be instantly killed by contact with minute quan- 
tities of permanganate of potassium. It is claimed that one 
part of this substance in 1500 of solution distributed in mos- 
quito marshes will render the development of larvae impossi- 
ble ; that a handful of permanganate will oxidize a ten-acre 
swamp, kill its embryo insects, and keep it free from organic 
matter for thirty days at a cost of twenty-five cents ; that with 
care a whole State may be kept free of insects pests at a small 
cost. An efficacious method is to scatter a few crystals widely 
apart. A single pinch of permanganate has killed all the 
germs in a thousand-gallon tank. — The Public Health Journal. 



Decolorizing Reddened Carbolic Acid. 

One of our exchanges (says Bull. Phar. ) gives a process for 
accomplishing this which is said to be both cheap and effective: 
Prepare a saturated solution of stannous chloride. As a very 
small quantity is needed, a drachm of it will go a great ways. 
Liquify the carbolic acid with about five per cent of water ; 
add to each pound of acid about eight drops of the tin chloride 
solution, and allow it to stand in a warm place. If heated in 
a water-bath the process will be greatly hastened. Should the 
carbolic acid not become decolorized after thirty minutes' 
standing, add another drop or two of the tin salt solution. Too 
much salt turns the carbolic acid green, and if this happens all 
one has to do is to add more carbolic acid. 



It has been six years since Dr. Krukenberg first suggested 
applying the principle of the pendulum to an apparatus to 
correct stiff articulations. Prof. Nebel has now perfected a 
small instrument for the purpose which accomplishes the de- 
sired result with astonishing rapidity and ease. It is attached 
to a small board clamped to the edge of a table, on which the 
hand rests, with the pendulum swinging freely below. It can 
be adjusted to any size and to any part of the hand or wrist. 
He states that patients who used to resist and scream at all his 
manual attempts to render mobile their joints, now accomplish 
it alone, with this simple little apparatus, in an incredibly 
short time. — Zlschrft. f. Orthop. Chir. 



THE CALIFORNIA DRUGGIST. 



Black Ink. 

Mix in a flask ioo gm. tannin, ioo gm. water, 200 gm. solu- 
tion of ferric chloride (10 per cent), and 10 gm. crude hydro- 
chloric acid (sp. gr. 1.16), and heat at 80 to 90 C. during 10 
hours. Then dilute with 700 gm. water, and heat an hour 
longer, replacing the evaporated water from time to time. Let 
it settle two weeks, filter and bring the weight up to 1000 gm. 
— Sudd. Ap. Ztg. 

Curd Soap. 

This term has been applied to a nearly neutral soap formed 
from soda and fine tallow. The general process of making 
soap of this kind is simply to boil the lye with the grease. 
Soda means what is often called caustic soda (NaOH), a 
solution of which, in water, constitutes the " lye." The boil- 
ing is continued until a thick tenacious mass is formed. An 
excess of lye is then added, which causes a separation of the 
soap. The soap may be purified by dissolving in hot water 
and re-separating by a strong solution of common salt. — Drug- 
gist Circular. 

In a word, the most valuable asset of the average business 
man is reputation. For a definition of this word we might 
consult Webster, but prefer to try and define it ourselves : 

It is an intangible, invisible and really indefinable some- 
thing that cannot be seen, nor felt, nor weighed, nor meas- 
ured, nor melted, nor solidified. Nor can you levy on it, or 
arrest it, much less imprison or hang it . You can hurt it, but 
not kill it ; sell it, but not deliver it except in part. It is not 
substance, nor spirit, and yet it exists, and it is of great value. 
— Ex. 

At the Counter. 

"Gonyer Wackham " is Stowmarket way for translating 
gum guaiaei. 

"A Pennorth of tepid water": doctor's ordered it for 
bathing piles with. 

" is of Brodmastasum " is Lincolnshire shorthand for bro- 
mide of potassium. Sent by Mr. R. J. Watson, of Caistor. 

' ' Tynture of Mirth, ' ' ' ' Sulferys sin, " " eceeasid for corns, ' ' 
and "Scotch and heel" are specimens from " Midlander's " 
budget. 

Fonetic Facts. — " Penn'orth o' peanner twine to go on 
the baby's chest" (vin. ipecac). " 2d. camferated fore 
o'clock." 

" A Penny headache cracker, " said an Oldham kid. And 
the chemist supplied him with a cachet and a French lesson at 
the same time. 

" 1 Maner, 1 tarkerubber, 1 hansed, 1 logdom," is a for- 
mula sent by Messrs. Toplis & Bradely, Staveley. " Ackey 
fourtyess," which they also send an order for, shows the fate 
of classical titles when they come into tbe hands of the pro- 
letariat. 

"Essence of Elliman," " Goulard of lime," "1 ounce of 
effervesence," "Election of Cena " (? Liberal victory), "id 
sink powder and id rose water." The last order is a telling 
reminder of the ups and downs of the chemist's life. — Thomas 

POSTLETHW AITE . 



From Derbyshire. — Small boy with an exaggerated respect 
for the chemist's olfactory sense : " Please you've got to 
smell in 'ere and I want an ounce." Glycerine was required. 

" Savalverallott " is the plucky attempt of a Peckham pur- 
chaser. Another sends for a " penny teasing-powder. " Mr. 
T. E. Polley, 187 High street, Peckham, contributes the 
above. 

At a Chester Counter. — " Kittens in six powders." (Keat- 
ing' s supplied.) Note handed in : "Plese give the girl a 
powder for the baby — twelve months." Spoken: "Will it 
remove the baby's bowels ? " "Plese lett her is steal a penny- 
royle pills." 

A Lowestoft correspondent sends us some items, many of 
which have appeared before. We note that " boiling powder" 
is how they ask for citrate of magnesia in Lowestoft. "Steaven 
teeth and powder for a child." " 1 peneth of the elephant blew 
for swelled face id." "1 penny burden-de-pitch." " id. of 
sweats for cold feets." 

In a Chemist's Shop at Plaistow. — Little girl : " Penn'orth y 
Bratsenellis." Chemist : " Don't know such a thing ; you've 
come to the wrong shop." L. G. goes out. Re-enters with 
scond L. G.: "Please, she wants Plaster Harris — its black 
stuff. ' ' Chemist : ' ' What is it for ? " Second L. G. : "To 
stop the baby having its titty ! " C. : " Oh ! Bitter aloes ? " 
Both L. G. : " Yes ; that's it." 

Messrs. Matthews & Son, Leyton, noted the following in 
their Diary for 1897, as among the curiosities asked for : "A 
three-three-farthing bottle of glycerin and lime-juice." "A 
penny bottle of best citrate of magnesia. " "A ounce of 
chloride- of-lime cough-lozenges." " A pen'orth of little white 
shirt-buttons — for sore throats." "A pen'orth of human 
teeth." We have exhibited cleaned teeth in window as a 
sign that we "extract." Served with a handful, applicant 
then asked if we sold skulls, which, however, was too tall an 
order. — Chemist and Druggist. 



California State Board of Pharmacy. 

• San Francisco, July 16, 1898. 

The California State Board of Pharmacy met at the College 
of Pharmacy, 113 Fulton street, San Francisco, on the 13th 
to 1 6th inst. Present : Messrs. W. M. Searby, S. L. Waller 
and C. A. Seifert of San Francisco, E. A. Baer of Bakersfield, 
S. Oberdeener of Santa Clara, and A. G. Orena of Los An- 
geles. Mr. Sale of Los Angeles was absent. 

Messrs. E. C. Whiting, T. Allen, H. E. Turpin, W. R. 
Monroe, A. J. Dibert, C. D. Hakes, C. R. McNulty and Nora 
B. Curtis were registered as Graduates in Pharmacy. 

Messrs. Andrew D. Fretz and Wallace M. Hefton passed a 
satisfactory examination and were registered as Licentiates. 
Paul Herbing was registered as Licentiate on Diploma. 

The following were registered as Assistants : A. Leavell, 
E. A. Cockburn, A. Spires, W. A. Madden, Kate R. Chaig- 
neau, L. Welti, C. Evers, D. R. Terwilliger, and L. C. Jacobs. 

It was resolved to vigorously apply the law to all who are 
carrying on business as Pharmacists in an illegal manner. 

The next meeting of the Board will be held at Los Angeles 
on the 5th, and at San Francisco on the 12th, of October, 1898. 

John C advert, Secretary. 



IO 



THE CALIFORNIA DRUGGIST. 



OUR ADVERTISERS. 



It will be of interest and value to the trade to consult our 



advertising columns, in which 
following firms and goods : 
A. Gettleman Brewing Co. 
Allcock's Plasters. 
Ammonol Chemical Co. 
Antikamnia Chemical Co. 
Apollinaris Co., Limited. 
Arlington Chemical Co. 
Beeman Chemical Co. 
Braun, F. W. & Co.'s Laboratory 

Products. 
California Fig Syrup Co. 
Cal. Mission Eucalyptus Lozenges. 
Centaur Company. 
Crown Perfumery Co. 
Davol Rubber Co. 
Dean & Son. 
Etna Chemical Co. 
Florence Manufacturing Co. 
Goodrich, B. F. & Co. 
Coronado Corks. 
Hayden Manufacturing Co. 
Hubert, Prof. I. 



will be found represented the 



Jayne, Dr. D. & Son. 

Kondon Manufacturing Co. 

Kuhns, Arthur Company. 

Leiner, M. 

Levy, B. & Co. 

Ludwick, G. M. 

Mariani & Co. 

Mead, J. L., Cycle Co. 

Moore, H. H. & Sons. 

Munn & Co. 

N. Y. Pharmacal Association. 

Planten, H. & Son. 

Pond's Extract Co. 

Portuondo, Vicente. 

Taite, Jos. G. & Sons. 

T. B. Insect Powder. 

Thum, O. W. Co. 

Wells, A.J. Manufacturing Co. 

Whittemore Bros. & Co. 

Wyeth, John & Bro. 



Pacific Coast Dru g Agen cy 

OFFERS FOR SALE 

First-Class Drug Stores 
and Medical Practices 

in all the Pacific States and Territories 

Clerks Registered, Prooided and Employed. Partnerships 
Negotiated. Lists Sent Free. Correspondence Solicited. 

G. M. LUDWICK, 

S. E. Corner Second St. and Broadway, Room 201, 



Los Angeles, Gal. 



Three money-makers are offered to the trade this month by 
F. W. Braun & Co. in the Hayden Mfg. Co.'s Arnica Salve, 
Carbolic Salve and Witch Hazel Salve. They are very neatly 
put up in large-sized boxes, and retail at 25 cents. The un- 
iform price is $1 per dozen Add some to your next order. 



Etc. 



i Kurtz' Freckle Salve £ 

2 (ORIGINAL) Vf 

7L Manufactured only by C. F. HEINZEMAN J5 

/| Los Angeles, Cal. r 

71 Trade Mark Registered. R 

Berlin Adopts Storage Battery. 

A cable dispatch announces that the city of Berlin, after ex- 
haustive trials of all known systems of street railway propul- 
sion, has adopted storage battery traction as the best attainable. 
The city will at once proceed to equip 900 cars with storage 
battery power. 

The okra {Hibiscus czsculentus, or Abelmoschus cesculentus) , 
which grows so luxuriantly throughout the Southern States, 
is, of all plants with which we are acquainted, the richest in 
mucilage. The fruit, leaves, stalk, and even the root, abound 
in that principle, and it seems strange that the plant has not 
been utilized as a supply of the same, especially as mucilage 
derived from it is absolutely free from color, odor, and taste, sur- 
passing in this respect that substance derived from any other 
source whatever. The root is especially valuable in this 
respect, furnishing twice as much mucilage as any other por- 
tion of the plant, weight for weight. Deprived of its cortex, 
and powdered, the root furnishes a powder white as snow, 
extraordinarily rich in mucilage, tasteless, and far superior to 
marshmallow in every respect ; and yet, except in the domestic 
practice of the negroes and the Creoles of the Gulf coast, we 
know of no uses to which it is put. Hundreds, if not thou- 
sands, of tons of the root may be had for the asking every 
year, and it would seem that some use might be made of it. — I 
National Druggist. 

She (at the reception): Well, Mr. Rott, how is poetry now ? 

Mr. Rott (rising young poet) : Very dull, indeed. Patent 
medicine verses bring only 5s. a hundred words, no activity at 
all in porous plaster ads., and in the slump of prices yester- 
day children's food rhymes went down thirty points in fifteen 
minutes. — Tit Bits. 



WANTS, Etc. 

[Under this heading we will be pleased to publish FREE OF 
CHARGE, notices of clerks wanted, positions desired, stores for 
sale or exchange, propositions for purchasing, e.'c.~\ 



POSITION WANTED— By thoroughly competent drug clerk for tem- 
porary or substitute work. Address B, care F. W. BRAUN & CO. 



WANTED — Position by registered drug clerk, unmarried. Has had 
long experience in prescription work. Address S, care F. 



W. 



BRAUN & CO. 



FOR SALE — Neat little drug store in suburb of Los Angeles. All new 
goods. No dead stock. Established over three years. Nice 
neighborhood trade. Very little credit. Average daily cash sales 
$12. Rent $15. No clerk needed. Trade growing Increase of sales 
for last 12 months over sales of preceding 12 months $600. Will invoice 
from $1300 to $1500. Satisfactory reasons for selling. Address "PHAR- 
MACIST," care California Druggist 



FOR SALE — Small drug store, near the peat lands, Orange county 
Drugs will invoice about $600 Lot and house $350. Good open- 
ing for doctor. Address F. W BRAUN & CO., Los Angeles. 



I 



FOR EXCHANGE— House and lot in Los Angeles, Cal., worth $1500 
for stock of drugs of like amount, in country town where cutting 
of prices is unknown. Address GEO. E. BLUE, 3129 S. MAIN, Los 
Angeles, Cal. 



FOR SALE — A well located drug store in Los Angeles, with an in- 
creasing trade, value $1200. Expenses small. Owner not pharma- 
cist is reason for selling. Inquire of F. W. Braun & Co , Los Angeles 

FOR SALE — In coast city of Southern California, a drug business 
established over eight years. Stock about $2500 ; location first-class. 
Address M. H., care CALIFORNIA DRUGGIST. 

FOR SALE — A city drug store. Fine location. Good business. Low 
rent. Good reasons for selling. Address L, care F. W. BRAUN & 
CO. 

FOR SALE — City drug business at a bargain. Stock about $1200, all 
clean and no dead stuff. Good location for a doctor. Inquire of F. 
W. BRAUN & CO., Los Angeles. 

FOR SALE— Elegant clean stock in the most progressive suburb of 
Los Angeles. Only drug store within twenty blocks. Best reasons 
for selling. Value about $2000. Inquire of F. W. BRAUN & CO. 
Los Angeles. 

FOR SALE — A good, long established drug business in this city. 
Price, $2500. Address " ADVANTAGEOUS," care CALIFORNIA 
DRUGGIST. 






Dentifrice for Dark Enamel. 

The following is a dentifrice recommended for the use of 
sons the enamel of whose teeth has become discolored. 

Chlorate of potash \)4 drs. 

Powdered boracic acid 3 drs. 

Carb. of magnesia (heavy) 3 drs. 

Precipitated chalk 3 drs. 

Ess. of peppermint 5 dps. 

— L ' Odontologie. 



per- 



THE CALIFORNIA DRUGGIST. 



ii 



PRICE LIST OF DRUGS, CHEMICALS, ETC. 

These prices are for quantities as ordinarily bought by average buyers, and include containers, unless 
otherwise indicated. Subject to market changes. 

For special quantities we will make special figures. 

F. W. BRA UN & CO., Los Angeles, Cal. 



ACE1ANIL1D ft 42® 45 

ACID, Acetic No. 8 ft 10® 25 

Acetic U. S. P ft 30 

Benzoic, Eng oz 16 

Benzoic, German oz 10 

Boracic ft 14® 20 

Carbolic, crude gal 40® 50 

Carbolic, cryst, blk label, 1-ft tin ft 30® 32 

Carbolic, cryst, blk label, 5-ft tins ft 28® 30 

Carbolic, cryst, gold label, 1-ft bots ft 36® 38 

Carbolic, cryst, gold label, 5-ft tin ft 33® 36 

Citric ft 38® 46 

Gallic oz 11® 12 

Hydrocyanic, dil oz 11® 12 

Hydrocyanic, cone, Scheele's oz 40® 45 

Hydrofluoric, 1-oz bots ea 45® 50 

Hydrofluoric, 4-oz bots ea 75 

Muriatic, coml., 6-ft bots ea 65® 75 

Muriatic, coml, carboy, $2 ft 3%@ 4 

Muriatic, C. P., 1-ft bots ft 35® 40 

Muriatic, C. P., 6-ft bots ft 25® 30 

Nitric, coml., 7-ft bots ea 1 00 

Nitric, coml., carboy, $2 ft 8® 9 

Nitric, C P., 1-ft bots ft 35® 40 

Nitric, C. P., 7-ft bots ft 25® 30 

Oxalic ft 12® 15 

Pyrogallic, Merck's ft 3 00 

Pyrogallic, Merck's oz 26 

Salicylic ft 60® 70 

Salicylic oz 8® 10 

Salicylic, from oil wintergreen oz 54 

Sulphuric, coml., 9-ft bots .. .. ea 65® 75 

Sulphuric, coml., carboy, $2 ft 2^@ 2% 

Sulphuric, C. P., 1-ft bots .ft 35® 40 

Sulphuric, C P., 9-ft bots ft 25® 30 

Tannic ft 1 15® 1 50 

Tartaric ft 38® 42 

ALCOHOL, absolute, 1-qt bots ea 1 50 

Grain market 

Wood, 5 gal. lot to bbl. lot gal 90® 1 05 

Wood, less quantity, can extra gal 1 10 

ALUM, chrome ft 13® 15 

Dried (burnt alum) ft 12® 15 

Lump ft 3y 2 ® 4 

Ground ft 5® 6 

Powdered ft 6® 8 

AMMONIA, cone, 26°, 5-pt bots ea 85 

Cone, bulk, can extra gal 75 

Bromide ft 75 

Carbonate ft 12® 25 

Muriate, lump ft 13® 15 

Muriate, gran, coml ft 11® 15 

Muriate, gran, pure ...ft 16® 20 

Muriate, powd ft 20® 25 

Valerianate...- oz 27 

AMMONAL (Po. or Tablets) oz 1 04 

ANT1KAMNIA oz 1 00 

ANXIPTRIN (10 oz., 85c; 25 oz, 80c) oz 90 

ARISTOL (25 oz, $1.65) oz 180 

ARROWROOT, Bermuda ft 35 

ARSENIC, powd, white ft 10® 12 

BALSAM Copaiba ft 70® 85 

Fir, Canada s ft 45® 50 

Peru ft 2 75® 3 00 

Tolu ft 75© 80 

BARK, Cinchona, red, true .... ft 50® £5 

Cinchona, red; powd ft 35r<u 60 

Cinchona, yellow, Calisaya ft 50© 55 

Cinchona, yellow, powd ft 35® 60 

Sim, slab ft 12® 15 

Elm, ground ft 14@ 18 

Elm, powd ft lo@ 20 

Sassafras ft 12® 15 

Soap, slab ft 7® 10 

Soap, ground ft 10® 13 

Soap pwd ft 18® 20 

Soap, cut, 5c boxes doz 35 

Soap, cut, 10c bozes doz 60 

Wild Cherry ft 12® 15 

BAT RUM gal 2 50® 3 00 

F. W. B. & Co., y 2 pts doz 1 75 

F. W. B. & Co., pts doz 3 50 

BEANS, Tonka, Angostura ft 2 25® 2 50 

Vanilla, Mexican ft 14 50@15 50 

Vanilla, Tahiti ft 3 25® 3 50 

BERRIES, Cubeb ft 25® 30 

Cubeb, powd ft 30® 35 

Juniper ft 9® 10 

BISMUTH, sub-carbonate ft 1 70® 1 80 

Sub-gallate oz 17 

Sub-nitrate ft 1 35® 1 45 

BLUE MASS ft 70® 75 

BLUE VITRIOL ; ft 4^@ 7 

BORAX, refined ft 8%® 12 

Powd ft 8%© 12 

BUDS, Cassia ft 35® 38 

CALOMEL, American ft 80® 85 

English ft 1 10® 1 15 

Stock ft 55® 65 

CAMPHOR ft 37® 42 

CANTHARIDES, Chinese, powd ft 60® 65 

Russian, pjwd ft 1 00® 1 10 



CAPSICUM, African, pods ft 

African, powd ft 

CARAMEL (gal $1 50, can extra) ft) 

CARBON, bisulphide, 1-ft bots - doz 

Bisulphide, 2-ft bots doz 

Bisulphide, 1-gal cans ea 

Bisulphide, 5-gal cans ea 

CARMINE, No 40 oz 

CHALK, French, powd ft 

White, precip ft 

White, prepared, drops ft 

CHARCOAL, animal, gran ft 

Animal, powd ft) 

Willow, powd ,bulk ft 

Willow, powd., 1-ft cartons ft 

Willow, powd., ^-ft cartons ft 

Willow, powd., %-ft cartons ft 

CHLORAL HYDRATE, 1 fts ft 

% fts ft 

% fts ft 

CHLOROFORM, 1-ft tins ft 

7-ft tins ft 

Squibbs', 500-gm ea 

Squibbs', 250-gm ea 

Squibbs', 100-gm ea 

CLOVES ft 

Powd ft 

COBALT, powd ft 

COCAINE, hydrochlorate oz 

Hydrochlorate, % oz oz 

Hydrochlorate, Ys oz ea 

COCOA BUTTER ft 

CODEINE, alk., y s oz oz 

Sulphate, % oz oz 

COLOCTNTH APPLE ft 

Powd ft 

COMPOSITION POWDER, i/ 8 -ftpkgsft 

COPPERAS, bbls, 1% ft 

CORROSIVE SUBLIMATE ft 

Powd ft 

CREAM TARTAR, pure ft 

CREOLIN, 1-ft and 5-ft bots ft 

CREOSOTE, beech-wood ft 

Coml ft 

CURCUMA, powd : ft 

CUTTLE BONE ft 

DEXTRINE ft 

DOVER'S POWDER ft 

EIKONOGEN oz 

EMERY, flour ft 

ERGOT, powd ft 

ESSENCE PEPPERMINT, 2-oz bot..doz 

ETHER, Nitrous, couc, 1-ft bots ft 

Nitrous, cone, %-ft bots ft 

Nitrous, cone, J^ -ft bots ft 

Sulphuric, U. S. P.. 1880 ft 

Sulphuric, cone, 1890 ft 

Sulphuric, Squibbs', 500-gm ea 

Sulphuric, Squibbs', 250-gm ea 

Sulphuric, Squibbs', 100-gm ea 

EUCALYPTOL, Merck's oz 

EXTRACT, Cascara, fluid, F. W. B. & Co..ft 
Cascara, fluid, F. W. B. & Co.. 5-fc bots.. .ft 
Cascara, fl.,arom., F.W.B. &Co., 1-ft bot..ft 
Cascara, fl., arom., F.W.B. & Co , 5-ft bot..ft 

Logwood, 15 and 25-ft boxes ft 

Logwood, 1-ft, l /2-9> and \i-9> boxes ft 

Witch Hazel, distilled gal 

Less than 5 gals, container extra. 
EXTRACTS, FLAVORING, 

Lemon, F.W.B. & Co., 2-oz doz 

Vanilla, F. W. B. & Co., 2-oz doz 

FLOWERS, Arnica ft 

Chamomile, Eng ft 

Chamomile, Ger ft 

Lavender ft 

Rosemary ft 

FOIL. Tin, Heavy ft 

Tin, Medium ft 

Tin, Light : ft 

FORWALDEHYD ft 

FRUIT JUICES, F. W. B. & Co., qts., doz 
FRUITS, Crushed. F.W.B.& Co., J^gals ,doz 

FULLERS EARTH ft 

GELATINE,, Cox's, sml doz 

French, gold label ft 

French, silver label ft 

French, bronze label ft 

GLUE, Carpenter's ft 

White ft 

GLYCERINE, 50-ft cans ft 

10-ftcans ft 

2-oz bots doz 

Schering's 1-ft bots ft 

Schering's 10-ft bots ft 

GLYCOLINE (gal., $1.50, can extra) ft 

GUM, Aloes, Barb ft 

Aloes, Barb , powd ft 

Aloes, Cape ft 

Aloes, Cape, powd ft 

Aloes, Socotrine, true ft 

Aloes, Socotrine, powd ft 



22® 



25 
25 
25 

2 00 
4 00 
1 05 

3 75 
35 

8 
12 
10 
12 
10 



12® 


15 




•18 




20 




25 


1 60® 


1 70 


1 55® 


1 80 


1 95® 


2 00 


55® 


57 


52® 


54 




1 15 




66 




26 




20 




25 




30 




3 25 




3 35 


50® 


55 


45® 


bo 




b 10 




4 75 




90 




85 




35 


2® 


3 


80® 


85 


90® 


9b 


27® 


32 


55® 


60 


99® 


1 10 


45® 


bO 


12® 


lb 


30® 


35 


8® 


12 




1 2b 




37 


8® 


10 


50® 


50 




1 bO 


1 20® 1 25 


1 35® 


1 40 


1 55® 1 60 


75® 


80 


80® 


85 




1 2b 




66 




30 




24 




■70 




50 




80 




.5 


12 A 


13 


15® 


20 


65® 


90 




1 bO 




1 7b 


18® 


20 


28® 


30 


30® 


35 


12® 


15 




40 


20® 


25 


25® 


30 


30® 


3b 


55® 


60 




b 00 


10 8- 


6® 


10 




1 bO 


60® 


65 


40® 


45 


35® 


40 


9® 


12 


15® 


18 


15^@ 1 




18 


1 25® 


1 50 




4b 




40 




35 


25® 


30 


30® 


35 


20® 


25 


20® 


2b 


45® 


bO 


50® 


55 



Ammoniac ft, 40® 4b 

Arabic, No. 1 ft 70® 75 

Arabic, No. 2 ft 50® 55 

Arabic, powd., No. 1 ft 70® 75 

Arabic, powd., French ft 90® 1 00 

Arabic, sorts ft 40® 45 

Asafetida ft 32® 35 

Asafetida, powd ft 45® 50 

Benzoin ft, 50® 55 

Benzoin, powd ft 60® 70 

Catechu ft 9® 12 

Catechu, powd ft 32® 35 

Guaiac ft 38® 40 

Guaiac, powd ..ft 4b@ 50 

Myrrh ft 3b@ 38 

Myrrh powd ft 38® 40 

Olibanum Jb 2b® 30 

Opium ft, 4 00® 4 25 

Opium, powd ft 5 00® 5 20 

Shellac, orange ft 32® 35 

• Shellac, orange, ground ft 35® 38 

Shellac, white :....ft> 35® 40 

Shellac, white, powd ft 40® 45 

Spruce, tears ft 1 25® 1 35 

Tragacanth, flake ft 90® 95 

Tragacanth, sorts ft 45® 50 

Tragacanth, powd ft 1 00® 1 10 

HOFFMAN'S ANODYNE ft 65 

HOPS, pressed, % and J^-lbs ft 16® 20 

Pressed, oz ft 25 

HYDROGEN PEROXIDE. Mar- 

chand's, lbs doz 7 50 

Marchand's, %-lbs doz 5 50 

Marchand's, %-lbs doz 3 75 

Marchand's. J4-lbs doz 2 25 

M. C. W., or P. & W., 1 lbs doz 4 80 

M C. W., or P. & W., %-lbs doz 3 00 

M. C. W., or P. & W., 14-lbs doz 1 80 

Oakland, lib doz 6 00 

Oakland, 54-lbs doz 3 75 

Oakland, J{-lbs doz 2 50 

U.S. P., lib ft 35 

U.S. P., lib full doz 3 25 

HYDROZONE, 1-lb bots doz 10 50 

%-lb bots doz 7 25 

Ji-lb bots doz 4 75 

Vs-\b bots doz 2 25 

ICHTHYOL oz 50 

Ichthyol ft 6 50 

INDIGO ft 70® 75 

INSECT POWDER, Buhach, 6-lb cans.ft b0@ 60 

Dalmatian, bulk ft 28® 40 

Hill's California, bulk ft 35© 45 

"T. B." 6-lb cans ft 40 

" T. B " 1-lb cans doz 5 50 

" T. B," %-lb cans doz 3 25 

' T. B." small doz 1 25 

IODINE, re-subl oz 36 

Re-subl ....ft 3 60® 3 80 

IODOFORM oz 40 

Iodoform ft 3 81® 4 00 

IRON, carbonate precip ft 16® 18 

Chloride, solution ft 25® 35 

Iodide oz 35 

Sub-fulphate (Monseli oz 8 

Sub-sulphate (Monsel) ...ft 3}@ 40 

Sub-sulphate solution ft 25® 30 

Sulphate, dried ft 15© 20 

Sulphate, pure cryst., bulk ft 8© 10 

Sulphate, pure cryst., 1-lb bots ft 14© 18 

JUICE, Grape, Los Gatos, pts doz 4 00 

Grape, Welch's, y 2 pts doz 1 90 

Grape, Welch's, pints doz 2 7b 

Grape, Welch's, quarts doz b 25 

LANOLIN, Leibreich's ft 1 00 

LEAD, acetate, coml ft 16® 20 

Acetate, powd ft 20® 25 

Acetate, C. P ft 27® 30 

Subacet. solu., Goulard's ft 30© 35 

LEAVES, Bay ft ' 14© 15 

Buchu, long ft 30© 33 

Buchu, short ft 22® 25 

Rosemary, bulk ft) 18© 20 

Sage, %s and %s ft 18® 20 

Sage, ozs ft 25 

Senna, Alex ft 30® 35 

Senna, Alex., powd ft 35 

Senna, Tinnevelli ft ,18® 20 

Senna, Tinnevelli, powd ft 20® 25' 

UvaUrsi ft 12® 15 

LEECHES, (2b or more, 8c.) ea 10 

LIME. Chloride, 35-ft cans _ .ft 1% 

Chloride, Acme, 1-lb cans doz 1 25 

Chloride, Acme, %-lb cans doz 80 

Chloride, Acme, J^-lb cans doz 45 

Chloride, Electron, 1-lb cans doz 1 20 

Chloride, Phoenix, 1-lb cartons doz 1 10 

LITHARGE ft 7^@ 10 

LONDON PURPLE ft 15© 20 



12 



THE CALIFORNIA DRUGGIST. 



LOZESGES, Licorice, 5-lb boxes ft 24 

Licorice, "Acme," 5-lb boxes ft 35 

Peppermint, 5-lb boxes ft 15 

LYCOPODIUM ft 50® 55 

LYE, concentrated (case, $3.50) doz 90 

LYSOL, 1-lb bots ft 65 

MAGNESIA, Calcined, 1-lb tin ft 65 

Carbonate, Jenning's, 2 and -1-oz ft 5 

Carbonate, K. & M., 4-oz., 2 oz. and 1-oz.. ft IS® 25 

Carbonate, K. & M., powdered ft 35 

Carbonate, K. & M., S. S ft 60 

Eff. citrate, Herring's doz 2 00 

MANGANESE, black oxide ft 6@ 8 

MANNA, large flake ft 90® 1 00 

Small flake ft 60® 65 

MENTHOL, (oz. 30c.) ft 2 85® 3 10 

MERCURY ft 78® 85 

Bi-sulphate ft 65® 70 

Iodide, green oz 25 

Iodide, red oz 26 

MORPHINE, sulph., % oz oz 2 60® 2 90 

Sulph., }^oz.,2%oz. bxs oz 2 55® 2 85 

Sulph., 1-oz tins oz 2 35® 2 65 

Sulph., 5-oz tins oz 2 30® 2 60 

MOSS, Iceland ft 15 

Irish ft 20 

MUSK, Canton, 1-oz bxs oz 35 

Tonquin, % oz bots ea 4 50 

MUSTARD Colburn's,6 lb cans ft 28 

Ground California ft 14@ 15 

NAPHTHALINE, balls, cakes or flakes..ft> 4® 8 

NUTMEGS ft 60® 65. 

Ground ft 65® 70 

NUTS, Areca ft 30® 35 

Areca.powd ft 35® 40 

Kola ft 25® 35 

NUX VOMICA ft 15® 20 

Powdered ft 20® 25 

OIL, Almond, bitter oz 65 

Almond, sweet lb 25® 45 

Amber, rect ft 50® 55 

Anise ft 2 40® 2 60 

Bay oz 45® 50 

Benne (can extra) gal 1 15® 1 25 

Bergamot, Sanderson ft 3 40® 3 60 

Bergamot, Sicilian ft 3 00® 3 20 

Cassia ft 2 25® 2 50 

Castor "A A" gal 1 25® 1 35 

Castor, machine gal 45® 50 

Castor, special com'l gal 75® 80 

Less than 5 gals., can extra. 

Cedar, coinl ft 40® 50 

Cedar, pure ft 75® 80 

China nut (can extra) gal 65® 75 

Cloves ft 95® 1 15 

Cocoanut ft 20® 30 

Cod liver, Norwegian (can extra) gal 1 10® 1 25 

Cottonseed gal 55® 70 

Less than 5 gal., can extra. 

Croton ft 1 35® 1 50 

Cubebs ft 1 50® 1 75 

Eucalyptus . ft 65® 75 

Geranium Rose oz 65® 75 

Hemlock, pure ft 75® 80 

Lard gal 75@ 85 

Less than 5 gal can extra. 

Lavender flowers ft 2 25® 2 40 

Lavender, garden ft 75® 80 

Lemon, Sanderson ft 2 00® 2 20 

Lemon, Sicilian ft 1 25® 1 50 

Mustard, Essential oz 65 

Neatsfoot (less than 5-gal. can extra) ...gal 75® 80 

Olive, California, qts doz 12 00 

Olive, Italia, 1 gal cans gal 2 10 

Olive, Malaga, can extra gal 1 00® 1 25 

Orange, bitter ft 4 50® 4 75 

Orange, sweet ft 2 25® 2 50 

Origanum lb 50® 60 

Pennyroyal ft 1 50® 1 75 

Peppermint Hotchkiss ft 1 85® 2 10 

Peppermint, Western ft 1 30® 1 50 

Pinus Svlvestris lb 1 20® 1 40 

Rhodium oz 40® 75 

Rose oz 7 50@10 00 

Rosemary flowers ft 1 50® 1 65 

Sandalwood, Eng oz 50 

Sandalwood, Ger ft 3 00® 3 25 

Sassafras ft 75® 85 

Sewing Machine, Nye's, small doz 45 

Sewing Machine. Nye's, large doz 75 

Sperm, Nye's crystal gal 75 

Sperm, pure, w. b gal 1 25 

Less than 5 gal can extra. 

Spike lb 25® 35 

Turpentine, rect., Merck lb 45 

L'nion salad gal 75® 80 

Less than 5 gal can extra. 

Wintergreen ft 1 70® 1 90 

Wormwood lb 4 00® 5 00 

OIL CAKE, ground ft 02^® 03 

OINTMENT, Citrine ft 65 

Mercurial, ' ; in lb "<"'.- 

Mercurial '/< m lb 60® 65 

Zinc, beuz. oxide lb 75 

ORANGE PEEL lb 15® 18 

PAPOID, % or 1-oz bots oz 2 00 

PARAFFIN lb 10® 15 

PARIS GREEN ft 20® 25 

l's, l A's, U'a ft) '_>■'».. 10 

PBTROI.ATUM, ex. amber lb 6K@ 9 

Snow while lb 25® 30 

PHENACETIN (25 ozs. .95) oz 1 00 

PHOSPHORUS, 11-ft cans lb 75 

1-lb cans lb 88 

^and^-cans lb 95<g I 05 

PLASTER PAKIS It, 02® 05 

Dentist's ft 04® 08 

POISON, purple lb 08® . JO 



POTASH, Babbitt's, (case $3.50) doz 

Caustic, crude ft 

Caustic, white, stick ft 

Bichromate ft 

Carbonate ft 

Chlorate ft 

Cyanide, mining ft 

Cyanide, pure granular ft 

Iodide ft 

Nitrate ....ft 

Permanganate ft 

Prussiate, red ft 

Prussiate, yellow ft 

PUMICE STONE, lump ft 

Powd lb 

QUASSIA, Chips ft 

QUININE, 1-oz bottle oz 

1-oz tin oz 

5-oz tin oz 

25-Oz tin oz 

50-oz tin oz 

100-oz tin oz 

RED PRECIPITATE ft 

RESIN , ft 

ROOT, Aconite ft 

Althea, cut .*. ft 

Blood ft 

Blood, powd ft 

Calamus, peeled ft 

Gentian ft 

Gentian, powd ft 

Ginger, African _ ft 

.Ginger, Jamaica ft 

Goldenseal ft 

Goldenseal, powd ft 

Ipecac, powd ft 

Licorice, select ft 

Licorice, cut ft 

Licorice, powd ft 

Orris, powd ft 

Rhubarb ft 

Rhubarb cubes ft 

Rhubarb fingers ft 

Rhubarb, powd ft 

Rhubarb, powd., Allen's, Eng ft 

Sarsaparilla, Hond ft 

Sarsaparilla, Hond, gro ft 

Sarsaparilla. Mex ft 

Sarsaparilla, Mex., gro ft 

Valerian ft 

Valerian, powd ft 

ROTTEN STONE, powd ft 

SACCHARIN, 25 gm. cartons ea 

SAFFRON, American... ft 

Spanish oz 

SAL EPSOM ft 

Epsom 4-oz cartons doz 

Glauber ft 

Nitre, cryst ft 

Nitre, powd ft 

Rochelle ft 

Soda ft 

SALOL, (oz30) ft 

SEED, Anise, Ital ft 

Anise, powd ft 

Bird, mixed, 1-lbs., 60-lb case case 

Bird, mixed, 1 ft doz 

Canary ft 

Caraway ft 

Cardamom ft 

Celery ft 

Coriander ft 

Flax, cleaned ft 

Flax, ground .....ft 

Hemp ft 

Millet ft 

Mustard ft 

Poppy, blue ft 

Rape lb 

Sabadilla, powd ft 

Worm, American ft 

Worm, Levant ft 

SEIDLITZ MIXTURE ft 

Powders, single, 100s box 

Powders, 3's doz 

Powders, 6's doz 

Powders, 10s doz 

SHEEP DIP, Carbolic gal 

Little's 1 gal cans gal 

Little's 5 gal cans gal 

SNUFF, Garrett's Scotch, blads lb 

Garrett's Scotch, 1-oz tins doz 

Garrett's Scotch, 2-oz tins doz 

Garrett's Scotch, 1-oz tins doz 

Garrett's Scotch, 6 oz bots doz 

Lorillard's Maccaboy, 4-oz bots doz 

Lorillard's Rappee. 4-oz bots doz 

SOAP, Castile, Conti white ft 

Marseilles, white lb 

Mottled, coml lb 

Mottled, pure lb 

Turkish, green or white lb 

Powdered th 

German green, Stiefel's th 

Whale Oil ft 

SODA ASH ft 

Caustic, 98 per cent lb 

Caustic, 70 per cent (Drums) lb 

Caustic, white, sticks lb 

Bicarbonate ft 

Bromide ft 

Hyposulphite lb 

Hyposulphite, new process lb 

SOLUTION, Douavan's lb 

Fowler's ft 

Goulard's lb 

SPERMACETI ft 

SPIRITS. Brooklyn and Columbian gal. 

Less than 5 gals, can extra. 

Nitre. U.S. P ft 

Nitre, 2-oz bots doz 





90 


1 l A@ 


13 


45® 


70 


15® 


20 


15® 


'Jo 


14® 


17 


30® 


3o 




6o 


2 50® '. 


! 55 


08® 


12 


40® 


60 


60® 


65 


32® 


35 


09® 


to 


06® 


08 




Til 


29® 


31 


27® 


29 


24® 


26 


23® 


25 


22H® 24^ 


22® 


24 


■ 


10 


OlUto 
30® 


03 
35 


35® 


40 


25® 


30 


30® 


35 




60 


13® 


16 


14® 


18 


20® 


25 


25® 


:>9 


60® 


65 


65® 


7(1 


2 50® 2 75 


13® 


15 




30 


14® 


18 


35® 


40 



1 25® 1 50 



40® 
40® 
25® 
25® 
30® 
35® 
07® 



1 75 



45 
45 
30 

30 
35 
40 
10 
1 00 
45 
90 

02fc@ 04 
35 
03 
12 
12 



40® 



OVA® 
08® 



26® 
01 'A® 03 
3 50® 3 65 

16® 18 

20® 25 

3 50 

75 

03 H® 05 

10® 12 
1 35® 1 40 



10® 
04^® 
04V 4 @ 
03^2® 

04«r 

00(S>. 

04® 
40® 



28® 30 

2 50 

60 

1 45® 1 50 

1 @ 2 00 

1 10 

1 35 

1 20 

50 

60 

1 00 

1 75 

2 75 
2 50 
2 7.1 

16 
13 
10 
12 
11 
35 
40 
06 

lis 
lis 



13® 
10® 

07',(»i 
08® 
10® 



04® 
06® 

Ml f@ 

02%@ 08 

12m> 15 
02H@ 04 
65 
05 
06 
hi 
85 
85 
55 
1 50® 1 75 



08WO 

04® 

25® 
30® 



55® 



60 
1 50, 



STRONTIUM, nitrate ft 14® 

STRYCHINE., cryst., y t -oz bots oz 

Cryst., 1-oz bots oz 

Powd., Yi-oz bots oz 

Powd., 1-oz bots oz 

SUGAR MILK, powd ft 20® 

SULFONAL oz 

SULPHUR, crude, ground, Cal ft 02jf@ 

Flour ft 03 : K@ 

Flowers ft 04 @ 

Roll ft 03%® 

SYRUP. Iodide Iron, F. W. B. & Co ft 57® 

Rock Candy, bbls and S A bbls gal 70® 

TAR, Pine, l A pints doz 

Pine, pints doz 

Pine, quarts doz 

WATER, distilled, containers extra gal 

Orange Flower, containers extra gal 2 00® 

Rose, containers extra gal 2 00® 

WAX, Floor, powd ft 

Yellow, pure ft 27® 

White, pure ft 50® 

White, No. 1 ft 35® 

WHITE PRECIPITATE ft 

ZINC, metallic, shavings ft 20® 

Oxide, com'l ft 14® 

Oxide, Hubbuck's ft 45® 

Sulphate, com'l ft 06® 

Sulphate, chem. pure ft 17® 

PROPRIETARY ARTICLES 

Controlled by F. W. Braun & Co. 

Braun's Carbolic Salve ..." doz 

" Carbolic Soap doz 

" Condition Powder doz 

" Essence Jamaica Ginger doz 

•' Florida Water, lge doz 

" Florida Warer, small... doz 

" Sarsaparilla doz 

" Syrup Tar and Wild Cherry doz 

Cal. Mission Eucalyptus Lozenges doz 

Cal. Mission Eucalyptus Plasters ...doz 

Cal. Mission Poison Oak Remedy „doz 

Cal. Root Beer doz 

Cal. Mocking Bird Food ..doz 

Corouado Sea Salt doz 

Hayden's Arnica Salve doz 

" Carbolic Salve doz 

" Witch Hazel doz 

" Sanitary Towels, small gro 

" " " medium gro 

" " large gro 

Hayden's Sachet Powder, H ft bots ft 

Hunter's Witch Hazel doz 

Matchless Sarsaparilla i..doz 

Matchless Wild Cherry Phosphates doz 

Swain's Carbolic Powder doz 

Tarine doz 

"T. B." Insect Powder, 6-ft can ft 

" " " 1-ft " doz 

" " " }^-ft " doz 

" " " sml *' doz 



17 

1 25 

1 00 

1 20 

95 

25 

1 35 

03 

04 'A 

05 

05 

60 

75 

75 

90 

1 50 
10 

2 25 
2 50 

40 
30 
55 
40 
1 20 
35 
15 
5C 
08 
20 



$1 25 

75 

1 00 

1 50 

3 50 
1 50 

4 00 
1 50 
1 50 
1 50 
1 50 

80 
3 00 

80 
1 00 
1 00 
1 00 
3 50 

3 75 

4 00 
3 00 
1 75 

5 00 
1 75 
1 50 
1 75 

40 
5 50 
3 25 
1 2.3 



BRAUN'S... 

California 
Condition Powder 




IS A 



Well Established Remedy 



Having a good sale throughout Southern 
California and the Territories 



It is used for 



Horses, Cattle, Sheep and Poultry 

IT IS GOOD 

It Retails for i£5 cents 
It Costs $1.00 Per Dozen 

You need it in your business ! 



MANUFACTURED 
AND SOLD BY 



F. W. BRAUN & CO. 



LOS ANGELES, CAL. 



VOLUME 7.] LOS ANGELES, SEPTEMBER, 1898. [NUMBERS 

THE* 




^©^THiyjIOlill^llAL rioter to 



^ESTSW'TCIE RETAIL fiH^IUlGeilS'f 






396-84 




F. W- BRAUN & CO., WHOLESALE DRUGGISTS 



COLUHBIAN SPIRITS 



TRA.DE MARK 



THE EQUAL of ALCOHOL for all 
PURPOSES EXCEPT INTERNAL use. 

MANHATTAN SPIRIT CO. 

Sole Manufacturers, BUFFALO, N. Y. 



The Price to RETAILERS is 
$8— Case of 50 glass bottles 




See that the 
Labels bear the well known 
RED DIAMOND MARK of the 
APOLLINARIS COMPANY, LIMITED. 



. SOLE EXPORTERS: 
The flPOLWNflRIS COMPANY, Ld., London 

J. S. ANDERSON, 21 Sutter St., San Francisco 
Representing United Agency Co., 503 Fifth Ave., New York 



PRICE LIST** 



FEB. i, 1890, AND tEB. 1, 1891. 

Beef Peptonoids 6 ozs., per dozen $ t> 00 

Beef Peptonoids 16 " " 1» OO 

Liquid Peptonoids 16 " " 9 12 

Liquid Peptonoids with Coca 16 " " 9 12 

Peptonoids, Iron and Wine. 16 " " 9 \£ 

Phospho-Caffein Compound 3 " " 2 25 

Phospho-Caffein Compound 4 " " 4 fiO 

Phospho-Caffein Compound 8 " " 9 00 

Phospho-Caffein Compound S3 " " 24 OO 

WE GUARANTEE THE SALE OF ALL OUR GOODS. 



THE AHMNGTO^ CHEMICAL GO. 

YONKERS, N. Y. 



CAP. 



CORRUGATED END. 



TUBE CONTAINING MENTHOL. 




THIS CUT ILLUSTRATES THE THREE PARTS OF 



Blanchard's Hard Rubber Pocket 

Inki1/*f This is positively the Finest Menthol Inhaler 
IHUalCI • - on the Market 



WHY NOT SELL THE BEST? 



Retails for 50 Cents. 
Price, $4.00 per dozen. 



BLANCHARD'S INHALER is put up in handsome easel cartons, an 
attractive advertisement and an ornament to any drug store. 



BLANCHARD MANUFACTURING CO., Cincinnati, O. 

The Trade Supplied by F. W. BRAUN & CO., Los Angeles and San Diego. 



50 YEARS' 
RIENCE 




Trade Marks 
Designs 
Copyrights &c. 

Anvone sending a sketch and description may 
quickly ascertain our opinion free whether an 
invention is prohablv patentable. Conimunica- 
tlonsstrictly confidential. Handbook on Patents 
sent free. Oldest agency for securing patents. 

Patents taken through Munn & Co. receive 
special notice, without c harg e. In the 

Scientific American. 

A handsomely Illustrated weekly. Largest cir- 
culation of any scientific Journal. Terms. $3 a 
year ; four months, $L Sold by nil newsdealers. 

MUNN &Co. 36,Bfoad " a > New York 

Branch Office, 625 P St., Washington, D. C. 



Jr/e Qaliforpia Dru^ist. 

A MONTHLY JOURNAL 

DEVOTED TO THE INTERESTS OF THE RETAIL DRUGGIST. 



Volume VII.] 



LOS ANGELES, CAL., SEPTEMBER, 1898. 



[Number 10. 



5l?e ^aliforpia Dru^ist 



PUBLISHED MONTHLY BY 



THE CALIFORNIA DRUGGIST PUB. CO. 

P. O. Drawer 406, Station C. - - LOS ANGELES, CAL. 
(To whom all Communications should be addressed.) 



F. S. LANGDON, ........ President 

J. Q. BRAUN, ... .... Treasurer 

R. A. ALLEN, ......... Editor 

TERMS OF SUBSCRIPTION. 

Per Year $1 00 

Single Copies -10 

ADVERTISING RATES. 

One Page $100 00 

Half Page 60 00 

Fourth Page 35 00 

Eighth Page 20 00 

Cards (per month) 1 50 

S^" Advertisements for positions or assistants, or to buy or sell Drug 
Stores, are inserted free of charge. 

Items of interest to Pharmacists are solicited. 

The official organ of the San Diego Retail Druggists' Association. 

The official organ of the Los Angeles County Pharmaceutical Associa- 
tion. 



T""HERE is a wide-spread feeling among the druggists of this 
* country that the patent medicine manufacturers have 
been taking the occasion presented by the war stamp tax to 
make material and uncalled-for advances in the prices of their 
commodities, not paying the tax imposed upon them, but 
passing it over to burden the retailer, who has no recourse on 
his part, but who must pay the tax out of his profits. The 
advances made over and beyond the actual value of the stamps 
are undoubtedly the main cause of the irritation shown by the 
druggists, who are expressing themselves energetically in their 
denunciation of the manufacturers. Letters of individual 
druggists to the drug journals and resolutions by pharmaceuti- 
cal associations, all filled with the spirit of resistance and the 
promise of boycott point to the wide-spread feeling the subject 
has awakened. The manufacturers are coming forward now 
with various excuses and explanations, and in some cases a 
direct concession to the demands of the retailers. The subject 
occupies so much of the attention of the drug journalism of the ' 
time that our readers will doubtless be glad to note the points 
on both sides the question, and we print on another page the 
resolutions of the St. Louis Pharmaceutical Association as an 
example of the action many associations are taking, and on 
the other hand the reply of Dr. R. V. Pierce to a resolution of 
of the Indiana Pharmaceutical Association which contained 
an appeal to manufacturers to reconsider and abandon their 



advanced prices. Dr. Pierce is one of the best known and 
most liberal-minded of the great manufacturers, and his words 
will carry greater weight with those addressed from their 
knowledge of the earnest efforts he has made in the past 
to promote the interests of the retail drug trade. In our 
opinion the druggists have abundant reason for their action in 
this matter, although instances may easily be found where 
some advance in price is amply justified by existing facts. 
The controversy threatens a regular upheaval in the friendly 
relations heretofore existing between the manufacturers and 
the retailers, which it will be the part of wisdom to avert, for 
neither party can afford to lose the other's friendship and co- 
operation. 

"THE prosecutions of Scott & Bowne, by the Dairy and Food 
* Commission of Ohio, have caused trouble for the Com- 
missioner, Mr. Blackburn, who has now been sued for dama- 
ges in the sum of $200,000 by Scott & Bowne. The history of 
the suits against Scott's Emulsion is well known to the drug 
fraternity and need not here be repeated. It seems evident 
that Mr. Blackburn was the victim of a put up job and is en- 
titled to sympathy in his awkward position in the matter. The 
astute chemists who testified that they found morphine in the 
preparation were discredited by positive proofs of the error 
of their conclusions. Mr. Blackburn was served with the 
papers in the suit while on a trip to New York. 

AS an indication of the greatness of Uncle Sam's business, it 
is only necessary to note the fact that on the 30th of 
June, the day before the Stamp Tax went into effect, 180 mil- 
lions of stamps had been sent out to the different Internal 
Revenue Collectors by the Treasury Department. In the dis- 
tribution the Pacific Coast was first attended to, and the large 
cities of the Atlantic Coast received attention last. When we 
consider what a small portion of the demand was then supplied, 
and how for several weeks thereafter the Department could not 
catch up with the wants of the public, we may begin to realize 
the immensity of the job, and the bigness of our uncle's do- 
mains. 

AMONG the first of the large patent medicine manufacturers 
to recede from advanced war tax prices was the Dr. Miles 
Medicine Company on their dollar goods. The Kilmer Com- 
pany's goods, the Hyomei articles, and Hagee's Emulsion 
are also in the category. The Munyon Company and Dr. 
R. H. Kline now advise us of their return to former prices, 
and as the retreat has begun we expect to see many other* 
join in, the obvious purpose being to conciliate the drug trade. 
We trust this commendable spirit may spread widely among 
the proprietors and the threatened war upon "patents" be 
averted by their concessions. 



THE CALIFORNIA DRUGGIST. 



DO you manufacture any preparations, or put up anything 
in proprietary shape requiring stamps ? If so, you are 
required to furnish a monthly statement of such manufactures 
to the Collector of Internal Revenue, the failure to do which 
rendering you liable to a heavy penalty. Don't overlook this 
matter. 

'"THE Collector of Internal Revenue has issued a circular to 
the druggists notifying them to make a report, with affidavit, 
of all sales of goods requiring stamps which were sold un- 
stamped, since the law went into effect. Druggists who have 
not realized the necessity of keeping an account of such sales, 
and are therefore without the data from which to make the 
required report, are liable to find themselves in trouble. 



2. All medicinal patent articles and preparations must be 
stamped. 

3. All medicinal trade-mark articles and preparations must 
be stamped. 

4. All medicinal articles compounded by any formula, pub- 
lished or unpublished, which are put up in a style or manner 
similar to that of patent, trade-mark or proprietary medicines 
in general, or which are advertised on the package or other- 
wise as remedies or specifics for any ailment, or as having any 
special claim to merit, or to any peculiar advantage in mode of 

I preparation, quality, use or effect, must be stamped. 



THE Pacific Borax and Redwood Chemical Company (head- 
*■ quarters in London) held their annual meeting July 29th. 
It was shown by their books that a net profit of ,£88,372 was 
made last year, which was 50 per cent better than the previous 
year. These figures show how easy it is for trusts to make 
money. Absorb all competitors, control the market, and ad- 
vance prices. This is the modern business method in its full 
development. 

THE U. S. Department of Agriculture has issued, from its 
Division of Botany, a bulletin (No. 20) entitled, "Prin- 
cipal Poisonous Plants of the United States, by V. K. Chest- 
nut," which is a valuable contribution to the literature of the 
subject, bringing together as it does, in convenient form, infor- 
mation regarding many of the widely distributed noxious 
plants of our country. Illustrations of thirty-four different 
plants, which accompany the description, very clearly present 
them to the eye, so that after a careful reading of the bulletin 
one could have no excuse for making mistakes in their identity. 
The deadly amanitas, of the toadstool or mushroom family, are 
perhaps the most important plants described, considered from the 
standpoint of fatal accidents, and these come first in the order 
of description. Every druggist should send to the department 
for a copy of Bulletin 20. 



DELOW we copy from a circular issued by the Commis- 
*~* sioner of Internal Revenue, in condensed form, a recapitu- 
lation of the law governing the stamping of goods. Little new 
light is thrown upon the subject thereby, although by study of 
same some questions that arise may be settled. The Era pub- 
lishes in its Special War Tax Edition, No. 2, a large number of 
rulings of the Commissioner, from which a few new "pointers" 
may be gleaned. They, for the most part, however, only 
settle individual cases, and for that reason are of small value 
to the general public. It is noticeable that crude musk and 
cold pressed castor oil are required to be stamped — the former, 
doubtless, because it is used for perfume, and the latter, prob- 
ably, through a misconception of the facts. We confess to a 
feeling of discouragement when contemplating the labyrinth 
in which the poor druggist is wandering in these days of pro- 
prietary stamps, and long for the day when the pruning knife 
of common sense shall be applied to the law. 

RECAPITULATION . 

1. All medicinal propr ietary articles and preparations must 
be stamped. 



Pharmacists Recognized in the Army and Navy. 

The bill before Congress giving the pharmacists attached to 

I the Army and Navy hospitals, dispensaries, etc., and to which 

] we have several times referred in the past, has finally passed 

1 both houses, and been signed by the President, and is, there- 

; fore, a law. Hereafter the pharmacist will rank as a warrant 

officer, with the pay and privileges of the same, and the grade 

I and title of ' ' pharmacist. ' ' Before and up to the passage 

of this act, he ranked as merely an enlisted man, and messed 

with the common sailors or soldiers. 

The credit for the agitation which brought about this most 
desirable change in the status of the druggist in the Army and 
Navy, is due very largely to Dr. George F. Payne, State 
Chemist of Georgia, who, at the meeting of the American 
Pharmaceutical Association, held at Asheville, N. C, four 
years ago ('94), introduced a resolution calling for the appoint- 
ment of a committee to memorialize Congress on the standing 
of pharmacists in the Army and Navy, and to secure legisla- 
tion giving them proper rank and standing. The committee 
was promptly named, and Dr. Payne was made chairman of 
it. Since then the " Committee on the Status of Pharmacists 
in the Service of the United States," as it was called, has 
labored most industriously and pertinaciously, at all times, in 
and out of season, to effect the end for which it was appointed. 
It called to its aid the pharmaceutical and secular press, 
brought individual influence to bear upon Congressmen and 
Senators, and finally achieved success. 

This is another illustration of what united and organized 
effort can accomplish, even in the face of long established 
usage, official prejudice, and the proverbial slowness of action 
of our National Legislature in such matters, and as such it 
should prove an useful object lesson to those who "see no good 
in associations," of whom there are far too many in the pro- 
fession of pharmacy. — National Druggist. 



It is an interesting fact that yellow fever only appears on 
the Atlantic side of the continent. It is liable to visit our 
Atlantic cities any year, but heretofore it has been unknown 
in San Francisco or any of the towns on the Pacific coast. 
Even on the Isthmus of Panama its ravages are confined to 
the Atlantic side of the Isthmus. The cause of the exemption 
of the Pacific coast from the ravages of this terrible disease is 
as yet unknown. Yellow fever is not, as has been often as- 
serted, confined to the white race. Negroes are not immune, 
although much less subject to the disease, particularly those 
of pure African blood. Those with an Anglo-Saxon strain in 
them are quite as liable to the disease as the white. — Medical 
Times. 



THE CALIFORNIA DRUGGIST. 



Opening of the College of Pharmacy. 

In a few days the faculty and students of the California College of Phar- 
macy will be hard at work again. The preliminary examinations will begin 
on Monday morning, September 26th, occupying two days; and on Wednes- 
day morning, the 28th, students will be assigned to their seats in the lec- 
ture hall and their benches, lockers and apparatus in the chemical, phar- 
maceutical and microscopical laboratories. From this time on they will 
be kept very fully occupied during the morning hours, from 8:30 to 12:30 
every day in the week except Sunday, 

The directors had hoped to be in their new building, which forms a 
part of those erected for the Affiliated Colleges near Golden Gate Park, 
at the opening of this term ; but owing to the absence of sewers, a proper 
water supply, and some other matters which will take a little further 
time to adjust, they did not feel that it was best to enter there just at 
present. Accordingly the old College property on Fulton street has 
been put in first-class order for teaching, and everything is in splendid 
condition for effective work in that direction. 

The Senior Class this year will be small, owing to the fact that last 
year's Junior Class was smaller than usual, and of these six or eight en- 
listed and have gone to Manila and elsewhere. Indications point to a 
large Junior Class. The entrance requirements having been raised some 
years ago so as to cover the first year's work in the High Schools, the 
number of young men offering themselves now as students who are 
graduates of High Schools and other good secondary schools, is steadily 
increasing. This is a most hopeful sign ; for it has been the aim of the 
directors and faculty to encourage those who desire to follow pharmacy 
to remain at school until they were prepared to matriculate at Berkeley. 
It will take some years before so liberal an education as this can be de- 
manded of all applicants. But druggists would be doing a good work 
if they would use their influence with parents and young men looking 
to pharmacy as their vocation, if they would urge them to remain at 
school long enough to meet these conditions. The young man who 
comes to the College of Pharmacy with an education equal to that of 
our High School graduates, always makes good progress and finds his 
work in college comparatively easy, while the one who has not had a 
good school education finds it exceedingly hard. 

The curriculum for the ensuing year calls for four hours' work per day, 
six days in the week for twenty-eight weeks, exclusive of Christmas and 
other holidays. This amount of college work also necessitates a certain 
amount of studying at home, but as there is nothing to be done at col- 
lege after 12:30 daily, an industrious student can find plenty of time to 
work several hours a day in a store, and do all of the studying re- 
quired besides. The course has been purposely so arranged, in order to 
enable young men of limited means to earn a portion of their expenses 
while at college. Already quite a number of prospective students have 
found positions with college privileges, and the Dean and directors will 
do all they can to place others who will come later in like positions. 

The College has never been in better condition to do good experi- 
mental and didactic teaching, and the circumstances have never been 
more favorable for those students who have to work their way through 
college. The extent and character of the instruction given is not ex- 
ceeded, we believe, by any other college for the degree of Graduate in 
Pharmacy. Where a higher degree is given, several colleges have added 
a third year, or in some other way increased the time and expense for 
those who desire the additional honor and have the means to meet the 
expense. The California College of Pharmacy will, in all probability, 
do the same in the year 1900. 

Professor Searby, Dean of the California College of Pharmacy, recom- 
mends all young men already in the drug business to take one of two 
courses of action, either to go to college and become a Graduate in Phar- 
macy, or to get out of the drug business. He believes that the scientifi- 
cally educated pharmacist will always have the advantage over the one 
who simply crams to get through the State Boards ; and that in the 
course of ten or twenty years the college graduates will so fully occupy 
the ground, that those less scientifically taught will have a hard time of 
it. This matter certainly deserves the serious thought of all young men. 



Patents Relating to Pharmacy, July and August. 

John B. Campbell, Cincinnati, Ohio, Electric extraction of poisons, 
606887. 

Hanna Koorie, New York, N. Y., Hair tonic, 606723. 



Wm. R. Park, Taunton, Mass., Injector, 606766. 

James H. Pottinger, Franklin, Ind., Spraying device, 606811. 

Abbott Loring, Boston, Mass., Atomizer, design, 28976. 

Christian W. Meinecke, Jersey City, N. J., design, Tip for atomizers or 
similar articles, 28975. 

Amos Sawyer, Hillsborough, 111., design, Tongue depressor, 28973. 

Emile Andreoli, London, England, Apparatus for manufacturing ozone, 
607007. 

Abija B. Bennett, Opelika, Ala., Invalid bed, 607011. 

John S. Dunlap, Chicago, 111., Means for making infusions, 607352. 

James Hardman, Jr., Belleville, N. J., Water bag or bottle, 607235. 

James Hardman, Jr., Belleville, N. J., Water bag, 607236. 

Karl Hock, Aschaffenburg, Germany, Pharmaceutical compound and 
making same, 607172. 

Wm. C. Huff, St. Paul, Ark., Ankle-brace, 607243. 

Joseph Koetschet, St. Fons, France, Making aldehyde-benzoic acid, 
607056. 

Louis O. Lawrason, London, Canada, Sanitary ejector, 607753. 

Charles S. Smith, Providence, R. I., Surgical apparatus, 607666. 

Wm. G. Ashburner, Dalton-in-Furness, England, Disinfecting appara- 
tus for water closets, etc., 607818. 

August Bauschlicher, Zbirow, Austria-Hungary, Process of and appa- 
ratus for making acetone, 608019. 

Willard E. Dow, Braintree, Mass., Electric light for surgical purposes, 
608109. 

Hermann Mohner, Berlin, Germany, Producing ammonia, 607943. 

Evelyn Pierrepont, London, England, Shield for corns, 607650 

Charles S.Smith, Providence, R. I., Obstetrical apparatus, 608083. 

Richard C. Ulbrich, Boston, Mass., Humidifier, 607970. 

Edwin W. Grove, St. Louis, Mo., Preparing medicinal compounds, 
609342. 

Wilbert S. Kail, Scio, Ohio, Syringe, 609353. 

Arthur B. Kendrick, Philadelphia, Pa., Elastic stocking, 609031 . 

Ferdinand King, New York, N. Y., Syringe nozzle, 609280- 

Heinrich Burger, Lichtenthal, and T. Lutz, Baden-Baden, Germany, 
Bandage, 609497. 

JohnW. Frerich and J. H.Frerich, Alvord, Iowa, Ankle-brace, 609538. 

Zera L. Hayden, Cedar Rapids, Iowa, Vaginal syringe, 609432. 

Reinhold H. Wappler, New York, N. Y., Electromedical apparatus, 
609639. 

Marian N. Clarke, Wilkesbarre, Pa., Electrode for medical purposes, 
609875. 

George H. Tuttle, Cambridge, Mass., Inhaler, 609923. 

Benjamin T. Winchester, Baltimore, Md., Hypodermic syringe, 609982. 

Decatur D. Dennis, St. Louis, Mo., Truss, 608444. 

Frank M. Gropleyand E. H. Peters, Cincinnati, Ohio, Sprayer, 608391. 

Heinrich Soidel, Vienna, Austria-Hungary, Mordant from sulfite-cel- 
lulose lyes, 608231. 

Emile Sterne, Paris, France, Capsule or container for containing com- 
pressed or liquified gases, 608349. 

Nelson M. Watson, Detroit, Mich., Coin-controlled medical battery, 
608496. 

Walter E- Dewey, Philadelphia, Pa., design, Vaginal syringe, 29141. 

Ross Morris, Clarksburg, W. Va., design, Medicated air-head, 29140. 

Joseph H. Kastle, M. L. Ravitch, and A. S. Lowenhart, Lexington, 
Ky., Vaporizer, 608967. 

Valentin Koch, Geneva, Switzerland, Inhaling apparatus, 608873. 

Alexander McKnight, New York, N. Y., Invalid bed, 608619. 

Benjamin F. Morningstar, New York, N. Y., Medicine spoon, 608890. 

Lazarus Silverman, Chicago, 111., Surgical and other dressing and pad, 
608921. 

Wm. Taylor, Edinburgh, Scotland, Apparatus for heating air for 
therapeutic or other purposes, 608928. 

Aime M. Villon, New York, N. Y., Manufacturing ethylic alcohol, 
608652. 



Boracic Acid in Cream. 

An English shopkeeper who was charged (July 29th) with 
selling cream in which was 23 grains of boracic acid to the 
pint, was discharged by the court after competent testimony to 
the effect that the preservative was entirely harmless.— C.& D. . 



THE CALIFORNIA DRUGGIST. 



The New Movement in the West. 



the coffer by measure of Prof. Greaves will hold 6,000 



The movement started among the retail druggists of the pounds troy of 5,760 grains to the pound ; 5,000 pounds avoir- 



West to form an organization which shall have for its object 
the furtherance of the commercial interests of its members, 
seems to be assuming definite shape. As will be noted in our 
news columns, a call for a delegate convention to meet simul- 
taneously with the National Wholesale Druggists' Association foot sphere. — Phar. Era 
and the Proprietary Association of America has been issued by 
the Chicago Retail Druggists' Association, and the meeting 
will take place in St Louis, on October 17th. All the signs 
point to a schism in the ranks of the American Pharmaceutical 
Association, for the movement is nothing if not an expression 
of a lack of confidence in that association. Whether this be a 
result of the constant effort on the part of men prominent in 
affairs of the A. Ph. A. to belittle the work of the commercial 
section of that body, it is not for us to say 



dupois of 6,912 grains to pound; and 4,800 pounds apothe- 
caries of 7,260 grains to pound ; also 600 troy gallons and 500 
avordupois gallons of water- No measure but the one foot 
rule will produce these results, and it is the radius of the two 



St. Louis, Aug. 6, 1898. 
At a meeting of the St. Louis Apothecaries' Association, 
held this day, the following resolutions were unanimously 
adopted : 

Whereas, we recognize that emergencies in the affairs of 
Government arise, when it is necessary that the revenue 
should be increased and consequently that additional taxes 
The fact re- 1 shall be imposed upon the people, therefore be it 



mains, however, and it has been commented upon over and | Resolved, that it is the duty of patriotic citizens, individu- 
over again in the meetings of both State and County or- Lily and collectively, to give cheerful support to any law, for 
ganizations of retail druggists, that the American Pharma- 1 suc h purpose, which our Representatives in Congress assembled 
ceutical Association has never proved a bulwark of strength j have in their wisdom seen fit to enact. 

for retail druggists when their commercial interests have been j r ESOLVEDi that we indignantly pro test against the attitude 
v. i meets assumed toward a just regulation by many Manufacturers of 

Patent and Proprietary Medicines, men with whom we have 



in forty-sixth annual convention at Baltimore, Md., on August 
29th, and it will be interesting to learn what it proposes to do 



more or less intimate trade relations, but in whom, however, 



in the present emergency. Will it concede the necessity for ( the patriotic impulse t0 support lhe Government which pro 
an independent national organization of retail druggists which 
shall concern itself solely with the business problems confront- 
ing the trade ? Or will it resolve to take a more active interest 
in the business affairs of its members, and see to it that their 



commercial welfare shall find equal attention at its hands with 
the subjects pertaining to the science of pharmacy ? This is a 
question which deserves, and should receive, the highest con- 
sideration from the American Pharmaceutical Association. 
— American Druggist. 



Derivation of Measures. 

In an exceedingly interesting letter to the Scientific Ameri- 
can, W. F. Quinby, of Wilmington, Del., says that the meas- 
ures which we call avoirdupois are derived from the one foot 
cube ; and the troy and apothecaries' weights and measures are 
derived from the one foot sphere, the grain being 0.004 cubic 
inch of water, and 250 grains in the cubic inch of water. 



tects them and gives them special privileges, is entirely 
lacking. 

Resolved, that in their overreaching selfishness, evidenced 
by the advance in prices of their products, not only to evade 
a moderate tax imposed upon them, but also to increase their 
profits two or three times the amount of this tax, they deserve 
the condemnation of all good citizens. 

Resolved, that the arguments used by some, that the re- 
vised and advanced prices are calculated to benefit the retail 
dealer are labored, evasive, and prove nothing, except that the 
patriotism of a selfish and narrow-minded man vanishes as 
soon as he is asked to establish it in a concrete and substantial 
way. 

Resolved, that those Manufacturers who say, "We pay the 
tax," they, who by doing their plain and simple duty, have 
brought themselves in strong contrast with the ones whose 



The one foot sphere is peculiar. It is 3. 1416 feet in circum- 1 course we condemn, are entitled to receive our indorsement 



ference. It has a surface of 3. 14 16 square feet. It will con- 
tain the apothecaries' pint of 28.8 cubic inches 31.416 times. 
It will contain 31.416 apothecaries' pounds of water or wine 
of 7,200 grains to the pound, and 31.416 troy pounds of wheat 
of 5,760 grains to the pound. If there are eight pints in a 
gallon it is equal to 230.4 cubic inches, which has been rounded 
off by legislation to 231. 

The two foot sphere will contain 31.416 of these gallons, and 
314 16 pounds troy of water or wine. This was probably the 
origin of the old wine barrel, which is now set down at 31^ 
gallons. Two of these barrels will make a hogshead of 62.- 
832 gallons, now rounded off to 63. Four of these barrels 
will make a pipe or butt of 125 664 gallons, rounded off to 126. 
Eight of these barrels, or the four foot sphere, will make a 
tun of wine of 251.328 gallons, now rounded off to 252. Ten 
of these barrels will make a chaldron. A tun of wine will 
just balance a chaldron of wheat. The outside content of 



and support, and that our future hearty cooperation with them 
is hereby pledged. J. M. Good, 

John H. Allen, 
H. F. Hassebrock, Sol. Boehm, 

Secretary. Committee. 



Value of Graphite as a Lubricator. 

According to R. H. Thurston, graphite is three times more 
effective in water than the best sperm oil, and six times more 
than an equal quantity of ordinary lubricating oil. But 
graphites are not all equal in value. That which is in flakes 
or scales, as it is found only in limited quantity in Ceylon and 
Ticonderoga, is much more valuable than that in powder form. 
The latter contains minute quantities of quartz, which causes 
some friction. To manufacture artificially a flaky graphite en- 
tirely free from quartz, requires very complicated process. — 
Chem. Ztg. 



THE CALIFORNIA DRUGGIST. 



Soap Profits. 

Pears' soap is, as everybody has been saying for some time 
past, shortly to be amalgamated with the Apollinaris Company. 
As there appears to be an idea among Apollinaris shareholders 
that Pears' business is a declining one, it may be interesting 
to give the actual figures. For the past year the net profits 
were 62,046/., and for the previous four years, that is to say, 
since the company was incorporated, the profits have fluctu- 
ated between something over 45,000/. and just under 71,000/. 
The difficulty with which the management of Pears' have to 
contend is that there is too much money — no less a sum than 
123,915/. being invested in Consols, Metropolitan Consolidated 
Stock, and the company's debenture stock. As 10 per cent in- 
terest is being paid on the capital, it is obvious that a loss 
must be created in this way. The last balance-sheet up to the 
end of June, showed that even if the assets were broken up, 
they would be practically sufficient to liquidate the capital 
without any loss to the holders. — Daily Mail (London). 



every instance post-mortem examination discovered the presence 
of disease. Professors M'Fadyean, Macqueen, Pemberthy, 
William Hunting, F. R. C. S., and Veterinary- Major Nunn all 
agreed with Mr. Taylor as to the value of mallein for diagnos- 
tic purposes in detecting the early stages of glanders, and a 
resolution was unanimously carried, " That this meeting is con- 
vinced that the experience possessed by British veterinarians 
has thoroughly established the reliability of mallein for 
diagnostic purposes in horses suspected of glanders. ' ' — C. and D. 



Sulphur Vivum. 

(G. H. H.) "Sulphur Vivum" is a synonym for native im- 
pure sulphur. Sulphur is either obtained from sulphur earths 
or from the native iron and copper sulphides. The sulphur 
earths are placed in earthen pots set in oblong furnaces of brick 
work. From the upper and lateral part of each pot a tube 
proceeds obliquely downward, which communicates with the 
upper part of a similar pot, situated outside the furnace, and 
perforated near its bottom, to allow the melted sulphur to flow 
into a vessel containing water, conveniently placed to receive 
it. Fire being applied, the sulphur rises in vapor, leaving the 
impurities behind, and, being condensed again, flows from the 
perforated pot into the vessel containing the water. Sulphur 
as thus obtained is called "crude sulphur," and contains about 
1- 1 2 of its weight of earthy matter. For purification it is 
generally melted in a cast iron vessel. When the fusion is com- 
plete, the impurities subside, and the purer sulphur is dipped 
out and poured into cylindrical wooden moulds, which give it 
the form of solid cylinders, called in commerce "roll sulphur" 
or "stick brimstone." The dregs of this process, ground to 
powder, constitute what is known as "sulphur vivum." An- 
other synonym for this impure sulphur is "horse brimstone." 
For the further purification of sulphur, consult some one of 
the dispensatories. — Era. 



Mallein for Glanders. 

In the last edition of "Veterinary Counter-practice" (page 
101) it is stated that mallein, an extract of the products of the 
bacillus of glanders (B. Mallei), is being largely used for di- 
agnosing the disease. It may be obtained with full instruc- 
tions as to its use, from Messrs. Willows, Francis, Butler & 
Ayscough Thompson, 40 Aldersgate street, E. C. Its merits 
are evidently becoming more widely appreciated. At a meet- 
ing of the Central Veterinary Medical Society, held on March 
3, Mr. W. E. Taylor, M. R. C. V. S., veterinary surgeon to 
the London Road-car Company, read a paper on " Mallein and 
its Uses," in which he insisted that mallein was an infallible 
test for glanders when no clinical symptoms were present, and 
the horse appeared to be in perfect condition. He had tried it 
on 4,000 horses within the last few years ; all the horses that 
reacted to an injection of mallein were slaughtered, and in 



Change of Representatives. 

On Sept. 1st, Mr. J. S. Anderson succeeded Mr. John Caffrey 
as the California representative of the United Agency Com- 
pany, New York, in the handling of the celebrated natural 
mineral waters— Apenta, Apollinaris, Johannis and Friedrieks- 
hall. Mr. Anderson, who is widely and favorably known to 
the trade in connection with the business of his house, has es- 
tablished his office at 2 1 Sutter street, San Francisco. We ex- 
tend a cordial welcome to Mr. Anderson and trust that the 
coast business of his house will assume larger proportions than 
ever under his management. 



A Fighting Pharmacist. 

Louis Lotz, a graduate of the class of '96 of the New York College of 
Pharmacy, who enlisted in the United States Navy about two months 
ago, and was assigned to the collier and supply ship Kingtoir, since then 
renamed Caesar, has just sent home a lot of relics of the naval engage- 
ment off Santiago on July 3d, when Admiral Crevera's fleet was de- 
stroyed, and they are now on exhibition at his father's drug store, on 
Morris avenue, near 152d street, New York city. The letter which ac- 
companied them gives the following account of his experiences. On 
June 28th he was one of a party of thirty, made up in part of surgeons 
and apothecaries, who were ordered to the hospital camp of the Seventy- 
First Regiment New York Volunteers, stationed near Santiago, on Sib- 
ony Hill. On the way to the camp they were surprised by twenty Span- 
iards, who were lying in ambush. One of the Spanish soldiers made a 
dash with a sword for Mr. Lotz, and inflicted a flesh wound on his left 
arm, whereupon the apothecary shot the Spaniard, killing him in- 
stantly. His shooting of the Spaniard had the effect of arousing the 
other nineteen soldiers and a general fight took place, with the result of 
wounding six more Spaniards and the capture of the entire lot, while 
the Americans, as usual, suffered no loss, excepting the slight wound 
received by Mr. Lotz. A day or two later, when the surgeons and 
apothecaries returned, they found the skeleton of the dead Spaniard 
where he was shot two days previously, the vultures having devoured 
all the flesh. Upon arriving on his vessel, he received orders to take 
the place of one of the apothecaries who had been taken ill on the 
Cruiser Brooklyn, so that on the memorable 3d of July, he was a spec- 
tator and participated in the naval battle. One of the Spanish shells 
passed clean through the sick bay, while he was in the latter, but 
neither he nor anyone else therein was hurt. The captain of the Brook- 
lyn made him a present of a pearl-handled revolver, and some of the 
fragments of the Spanish shells, as also a few small shells, the latter 
forming part of the collection of relics now on exhibition at his father's 
pharmacy. Mr. Lotz also expects to share in the prize money that will 
be awarded to the Brooklyn. He is at present at Old Point Comfort in 
Virginia, and his wounded arm is almost healed. — American Druggist. 



Henry Ward Beecher once said that the sexton of Plymouth 
Church had a standing order that when he found anybody 
asleep in the church, he was to go right on to the platform and 
wake up the minister. 

The total number of lepers in the world is estimated at 
2,000,000, of whom 20,000 are in Japan, 130,000 m India, 300,- 
000 in South America, 500,000 in China, 20,000 in Europe, 
40,000 in Turkey and 5,000 in Hawaii and the United States. 



THE CALIFORNIA DRUGGIST. 



DR. PIERCE TAKES UP THE GAUNTLET. 

Replies to the Druggists of Indiana. 

Dr. R. V. Pierce's reply to the circular issued by the Indiana Phar- 
maceutical Association reflects so well the views of many manufacturers 
of proprietary medicines, himself being one of the largest, that we 
give it in full. It is dated Buffalo, August 20, 1898, and is addressed to 
A. Timberlake, secretary of the Association, at Indianapolis. It reads: 

We have your two circulars dated Aug 12, 1898, containing copies of 
the resolutions adopted by your Association at a special session held 
August 10. 

The first of these resolutions addressed to "Manufacturers of the 
Proprietary Remedies — furnishing their remedies — to so-called cut- 
rate druggists and department stores," is as follows : 

" Resolved, That we request such manufacturers of medicine to fut- 
nish their products to the trade only through recognized wholesale 
druggists." - 

To this we reply, that it has been the steadfast policy and practice of 
this house to protect the legitimate retailer in every way possible. We 
have never sold to cut-rate druggists or to department stores. That they 
obtain our medicines is due to practices and methods as entirely be- 
yond our cognizance as they are beyond our control. 

THE WAYS OF THE COTTER. 

We have spent many thousands of dollars and much painstaking 
labor in earnest endeavors to keep our preparations out of the hands of 
aggressive, advertising cutters, and we exceedingly regret to be obliged 
to acknowledge that while our efforts have sometimes met with some 
measure of success in certain localities, yet in others the proscribed 
cutters manage, by hook or by crook, in roundabout and devious ways, 
to obtain our remedies in spite of all our earnest efforts to have their 
sale confined to legitimate channels only. 

RETAILERS, TAKE HEED ! 

In view of the general tenor of your circular, we can only hope that 
the attitude of the retail trade may not compel us to depart from 
a policy to which we have so faithfully and steadfastly adhered in 
the interest of the retailers for so many years. 

The preamble to the second resolution charges the manufacturers with 
being "unjust aud unpatriotic ", in that they have increased the prices 
of their medicines to cover the war tax, and resolve 

"That we, the Indiana Pharmaceutical Association, in special session 
assembled, do urgently appeal to these manufacturers to reconsider their 
action in advancing prices, and ask them to cheerfully assume the pat- 
riotic duty of paying the stamp tax, as it was evidently intended by 
Cougress that they should do, and not place it upon the retailer, who 
is now carrying more than his share of the burden." 

THE CHARGE OF LACK OF PATRIOTISM. 

The assumption of this resolution, that Congress intended the tax on 
proprietary medicines to fall on the manufacturer, has arrayed against 
it the precedent and practice, not of our nation alone, but of the lead- 
ing nations of the world. The charge of lack of patriotism is as un- 
called for as it is unwarranted by the actual facts. Why should Con- 
gress single out one tax in especial and make its operation unique and 
distinct from that of every other similar tax ever leved or collected? 

It is the intent in the collection of the present war tax, as it is in all 
similar taxes, that the consumer should pay the tax, thus distributing a 
burden fairly and equitably among the public at large. That this is the 
intent of the law is obvious. 

(A) In the very principle which governs taxation, it is the intent that 
taxes shall not be levied on the actual necessities of daily life, but 
upon those articles which are extra to the common, every-day need. 
No tax on bread would be thought of for an instant, because the 
baker does not pay the tax, but the buyer, and the tax would be a 
hardship on millions. A tax on salt, too, would fall heaviest on the 
poor, to whom it is an essential commodity, and would not there- 
fore be considered by the modern political economist. In all taxa- 
tion it is kept in view as a fundamental principle that the consumer 
pays the tax, and the proof of this is that the articles selected for 
taxation are chosen in accordance with that principle. 

(B) That it is the intent that the consumer should pay the tax is mani- 
fest in the general operation of the revenue law. There is a tax on 



telegrams. Who pays it? The man who buys the right to use the 
wires of the telegraph company — the consumer. The same is true 
of the express companies. They charge the tax to the public at 
large. When the added tax was placed on tobacco, the price of 
cigars and cigarettes at once went up. The retailer paid mote, but 
he charged the extra cost at once to the consumer, who paid more 
for his cigar, and so paid the tax. 
(C) That we are acting within the intent and purpose of the law is evi- 
dent by the interpretation given to similar laws in this country, in 
England, and other countries. 

It has been well held that taxes should always fall on the con- 
sumer, on the broad principle that everyone is a consumer, and 
only a few are producers, and so the tax becomes a tax on the whole 
nation, and not upon any special class of persons. In all cases 
where the tax is one of long standing and permanence, it is neces- 
sarily reckoned as among the fixed charges of any firm doing busi- 
ness in the merchandise so taxed, and the amount of the tax is 
added to the price of the goods as a part of the original cost. 

RELATION OF COST TO PRICE. 

But were it otherwise, the adding of the amount of the tax on pro- 
prietary medicines to the selling price would be a necessity from a 
purely commercial viewpoint The selling price of our wares is based 
on the cost of the product, the expense of manufacture, the cost of the 
conduct of the business, the amount of risk, and the' large expense of 
publishing and popularizing these remedies in order to create a sale on 
which the retailer shares the profits without sharing the risk or cost of 
the advertising. Any firm going into any kind of business which in- 
volved the payment of the stamp tax, would figure that tax as part of 
the cost of its goods, and base its price to the trade accordingly. It 
would be a necessity to do this. The man who, in making his price, 
left out an element of cost would soon be out of business. 

But if this is a necessity to a man just starting in business, is it not 
equally necessary to a man established in business ? As a matter of fact, 
it is and must be so, and the advance of our prices was not an arbitrary 
transaction prompted by greed, but was, in fact, a real commercial 
necessity. 

EFFECT OF SUBSTITUTION, ETC. 

A tax amounting to very nearly 6 per cent of our gross sales could 
not be ignored. In fact it is more than our net profits have amounted 
to in some years, figured on the gross business transacted. We have 
stated in a recent circular to the retail trade that we had contemplated 
an advance in the price of our goods before the war tax was proposed 
or anticipated. The price of our one dollar preparations had for years 
been $7.75 per dozen. We had decided that it would be necessary to 
advance the price to $8 per dozen. The tax came, and we advanced our 
price to $8 25 per dozen. In years past, when competition was far less, 
when it cost much less than it does today to keep up an active demand 
for our medicines from the retail druggist through liberal expenditures 
in advertibing, when substitution, which is so extensively practiced to- 
day, was scarcely thought of — the former price of $7.75 paid us a far 
greater net profit than we are now able to realize out of our advanced 
price of $8.25. This is due to the unfavorable trade conditions prevail- 
ing, and for which we do not feel that we should be held responsible. 
The retail druggist is not the only one whose former profits have had 
to give wa3' to the new trade conditions. Manufacturers are sufferers 
as well, as we have already pointed out. 

If the new conditions have come to stay, as many believe, then it 
seems to us that both manufacturers and dealers must adapt themselves 
to the new order of things, submit gracefully to some reduction in 
their former profits, and try to bear their misfortune with becoming 
equanimity. 

THE PROFIT AT FULL RETAIL PRICES. 

Evan at our advauced price of $8.25 per dozen, supposing the freight 
should cost the retailer on an average 25 cents a dozen, making the 
total cost to him $8 50 per dozen, in sections where-our one-dollar prep- 
arations sell at the full price, the dealer still makes a net profit of a 
little better than 40 per cent. This, while not fully up to what we 
would be pleased to see druggists realizing on our products, will, never- 
theless, compare favorably with the profits enjoyed by merchants in 
other lines of trade. We must not lose sight of the fact that while there 
is a larger volume of business being transacted today in this country 



THE CALIFORNIA DRUGGIST. 



than ever before, yet it is being handled on much smaller margains of 
profit than in former years. Both manufacturers and dealers in every 
line of trade have to submit to reductions of profits formerly enjoyed. 
In sections where cutting prevails dealers generally have been able to 
advance the selling price on our goods by as much or more than the 
actual advance in cost to them ; and it is a curious fact that the dealers 
in those sections where cutting prevails are not the ones who complain 
of our moderate advance in the price of our goods. It comes chiefly 
from those who are and have been able to command the full retail prices 
established by the manufacturer. While we have always opposed cut- 
ting of prices by every means and feasible plan in our power to exercise 
or carry out, it would seem an anomalous condition if we should suffer 
in the esteem of those who have always been able to get full dollar 
prices for our dollar preparations, while our action is not condemned 
or criticised by those who have not for years been able to realize full 
prices on our and other preparations. 

It must be patent to all that every successful proprietary medicine 
manufacturer in fixing his prices is obliged to take into account the 
sharper competition of today as compared with the past, the greater 
cost per bottle of marketing his products owing to increased cost of 
advertising, and the disposition on the part of some dealers to substitute 
other articles for his, after he has induced the customer to call upon the 
druggist for his products. 

OBJECTS TO BEING SINGLED OUT FOR TAXATION. 

We have been charged with evading the war tax, but we pay that tax, 
as consumers, on every telegram we send, on every check we draw, on 
every express package we send out, on every taxable article we pur- 
chase. We pay this general tax in common with all. Why should we 
be singled out for a special tax disproportioned in every way to our 
profits and opposed to the very principle of taxation? 

When we say "disproportionate to our profits " we are aware that our 
statement is liable to be called in question. Exaggerated ideas seem to 
be quite generally entertained as to the profits enjoyed by the manufac- 
turers of proprietary medicines. 

There is no business which demands a greater risk of capital in such 
large sums than the manufacturing and marketing of proprietary medi- 
cines. Sums of hundreds of thousands of dollars have been put out to 
establish a medicine and make a market for it, and when a half million 
dollars had been spent the tide was only turning. In other and numer- 
ous cases it never did turn, and fortunes have been sunk in fruitless 
advertising. 

The great mistake lies in this : That the popular eye is focused on 
the few shining examples of success, where courage, thrift, forethought 
and good judgment, coupledlwith an article or articles of superior merit, 
have at last won a stable commercial footing. 

THE AVERAGE LIFE OF A PROPRIETARY MEDICINE. 

How many such firms are there ? You can count them easily. Count 
then the years that they have been engaged in business against the fact 
that the average life of a proprietary medicine is but two years, and you 
may begin to gain some idea of the wrecks that have gone down in that 
sea of risk, carrying with them more gold than Spain's galleons carried 
in the days when she freighted fleets with the precious metals. 

We believe our friends, the retailers, have been misled in large part, 
by the artful cries of designing persons, who swell up with patriotism 
because they think there is an extra dollar in it for them. 

THE PATRIOT FOR REVENUE ONLY 

is not a novelty. It is a fine thing to see a manufacturer whose price 
was always $8, against our price of $7.50, strike an attitude and say : 
" Behold a patriot ! I don't put my price up ! Buy my goods, which 
are just as good as any and are pure red, white and blue patriotic 
artieles ! " Patriotism of that kind has corrupted courts, sold out 
armies and ruined nations. It is a patriotism eternally associated with 
the names of Judas and Benedict Arnold. Having prostituted the 
national flag to his base purpose of forcing his nasty, sloppy, syphilitic 
syrup down the throats of the American people, the proprietor of that 
article would do well to seek the seclusion of the forest, and spend the 
remainder of his days with that other self-acclaimed patriot in digging 
his " swamp- root." 

THE FEW WHO HAVE NOT ADVANCED PRICES. 

It is an interesting fact that the few proprietors who have not found 



it necessary to advance prices, and who are so frantically waving the 
American flag to attract attention to their disinterested patriotism, are 
those the sale of whose preparations, as is well known to the trade, had 
either from lack of intrinsic merit in the articles themselves, or for the 
want of enterprise and push on the part of the proprietors, or possibly a 
little of both, are pretty well run down. The hope of reviving their 
last waning fortunes and prestige by a grand flourish of flags and 
posing as patriots will scarcely deceive anybody. Possibly a few im- 
pressionable dealers may be misled thereby and be induced to get down 
a few old dusty, fly-specked, shop-worn packages of their goods, a long 
time since charged up to profit and loss as dead stock, and endeavor to 
"push" them off to some unwary customer, and thus may self-ac- 
claimed patriotism have its reward. 

It mus t not be overlooked, either, that these anti-war prices of our 
little band of self-sacrificing patriots were higher than ours are after the 
advance. Had we been accustomed to receive $8 50, $8.75 or $9 per 
dozen for our dollar preparations, we, too, could well have afforded to 
let well enough alone, btit unfortunately, we were not in that position. 

REGRETS THE DISCORD. 

In conclusion' we desire to say, that while we are not able to grant 
the concession in the prices of our goods that is asked, for reasons 
already stated, we at the same time most sincerely regret the discord 
which has come to mar our many years of close and pleasant relations 
with retail druggists of this country. 

We have stood by them so long and so steadfastly, through fair and 
through foul, sparing neither time nor money in their behalf, that it 
touches us somewhat closely to be made a party to charges which seem 
to us both ungenerous and unjust. 

We can but hope that a calmer view of the question at issue, together 
with a recollection of some of our efforts in the past in the retailers' be- 
half, may restore the friendly feelings which we have always sought to 
deserve, and the loss of which we should so sincerely regret. 
Very respectfully yours, 
World's Dispensary Medical Association, 

R. V. Pierce, Pres, 

"Apenta" Water and Yellow Fever. 

We understand that the Surgeon-General of the United 
States Army has ordered considerable quantities of the well 
known aperient water, "Apenta," for use of the army in Cuba, 
in view of the threatened outbreak of yellow fever, the remedy 
having proved of value in the treatment of this disease in the 
fever wards of the Touro Infirmary, in New Orleans. — Medi- 
cal Press and Circular, July 27, 1898. 



Of exceptional interest in connection with the amount of at- 
tention now being paid by retail druggists throughout the coun- 
try to the subject of patent medicines and their sale in drug 
stores, is the report recently made by the Meyer Bros. Drug Co., 
of St. Louis, relative to the prevailing prices of this class of 
goods. The investigation was conducted by the traveling sales- 
men of the firm and extended over one thousand and fifty- 
nine cities and towns, the territory extending from Washing- 
ton and California to Ohio and Georgia, with the exception of 
the cities of San Francisco, St. Louis, New Orleans, St. Paul 
and Minneapolis. Full prices were found to prevail in eight 
hundred and fifty-nine of the cities and towns included in the 
territory named, while cut prices prevailed in one hundred and 
eight places ; prices have been recently lowered in seventy-two 
localities. — Am. Druggist. 



A man in the car was telling how good his doctor was. 
Clever? said he, Well, I should say he was. The other day I 
called him in when I had swallowed five cents. He said if the 
coin was not counterfeit it would pass, and made me cough up 
two dollars. 



THE CALIFORNIA DRUGGIST. 



Business Personals. 



Mr. R. W. Ellis has accepted a position with the Thomas 
Drug Co. 

Mr. Paul A. Derge, of Anaheim, is looking after his mining i 
interests in Kern county. 



Mr. H. G. Dean, Third and Main streets, is taking a two 
weeks' lay-off at Bear Valley for his vacation, which he cer- 
tainly needs. Harry is a hard worker. 



Mr. Neblette, head clerk for C. E. Week, took his fort- 
night's outing; at Catalina. 



Mr. H. A. S. Smith has accepted a position with F. L. Win- 
gard, Long Beach, succeding Mr. Fracis Percy, whose state of 
health makes it necessary for him to leave the coast. 



E. C. Thomas, late of Los Angeles, has bought C. W. Mil- 
ler's drug business in Phoenix, Ariz. 



Mr. Frank M. Towne was called to Petaluma in August, to 1 
attend the funeral of his father-in-law, Mr. Fox. 



Walter Hicks, head clerk at Boswell & Noyes' Drug Co., 
has been on a ten-day trip to Bear Valley for his vacation. 



Dr. Nichols of Exton & Nichols, Oceanside, spent four 
weeks at Smith mountain, San Diego county, last month. 



Dr. E. C. Parke has gone to Kansas on business connected 
with his father's estate. He expects to be absent two months. 



Ellis T. Yarnell has accepted a position with Sale & Son. 
He has for some time past been with G. C. Thaxter, Redlands. 



Mr. Earnest Tanner of Sale & Son Drug Co. enjoyed a 
yachting trip among the islands during his vacation, acquiring 
thereby much color and a good supply of whale stories. 

Mr. E. E. Armour, Pomona, accompanied by Mrs. Armour, 
spent a week at Catalina this month. Mr. Armour's good fish- 
ing luck stayed with him, and the trip was productive of much 
enjoyment. 

Dr. A. D. Bedford, San Bernardino, who has disposed of his 
drug business, intends to devote his attention to professional 
work. We wish him entire satisfaction and success in his 
chosen vocation. 

Frank Morrison of Heath & Morrison, Riverside, with Mrs. 
Morrison took their summer vacation at Catalina. On Mr. 
Morrison's return Mr. Heath started for a two months' visit to 
northern New York, his old home, and other eastern points. 



Mr. J. A. Lamb of Towne & Lamb, San Bernardino, ac- 
companied by his sister, is spending a few weeks in San Diego. 

D. C. Schlotte, late with the Owl drug store, San Bernardino, 
has accepted the position of head clerk at Towne & Lamb's. 

W. H. Baldridge, Escondido, made a three months' visit to 
Kansas City this summer, returning reeently to his California 
home. 

Dr. A. D. Bedford, San Bernardino, with a party of a dozen 
will start Sept. 12th for a visit to the Grand Canon of the Col- 
orado. 

E. Virden, Santa Paula, accompanied by Dr. D. W. Mott, 
spent several pleasant days at Catalina and Los Angeles the 
latter part of August. 

Mr. D. Sale spent some time at Terminal Island this summer 
at the pretty family cottage, " Idle-sales," which, b} r the way, 
is very happily named. 

The interest of Dr. Royer in the Orange Drug Co., Orange, 
Cal., has been purchased by his partner, Dr. W. B. Wood, 
who will continue the business. 

Frank M. Towne, of Towne & Lamb, San Bernardino, ac- 
companied by Mrs. Towne, has been spending some time at 
Redondo during the heated period. 

Mr. C. E. Week, of Riverside, is enjoying a vacation of two 
or three weeks in Sacramento, San Francisco and Oakland. 
He was accompanied as far as Sacramento by Mrs. Week, who 
went from that point to the East on an extended visit. 

The Bedford Pharmacy, San Bernardino, has been purchased 
by W. H. Bramhall, late of Denver, Colorado. This well-es- 
tablished business is a good purchase, and we congratulate the 
new proprietor, who has our best wishes for his success. 



J. D. SeBrell, with his trusty dog and never-failing gun, his 
long gum-boots on and his pockets full of ammunition, went 

out for the ducks of Elsinore last lets see ! when was it? 

It must have been about '88. Are there no more ducks, J. D. ? 



Frank Gardner and wife took an outing at Strawberry Val- 
ley, in San Jacinto mountain, while the other Frank — Gillilan 
— with Mrs. G. spent a fortnight at Laguna. This leaves Mr. 
Hardman yet to be accounted for, but he is so rarely away from 
business that we fear we shall fail to write an outing item on 
his behalf. 

Walter Kabisius, Sixth and Olive streets, had a loud call 
about 5:30 o'clock last Thursday morning. It was only a run- 
away Chinese laundry wagon smashing through the front 
window, but it woke Walter up allee samee door bell. It is 
remarked by disinterested observers that the worthy proprietor 
though " long" on scare was "short" on raiment. 



Bristol and Rowley, Santa Ana, are preparing to erect a two- 
story brick building, corner Main and Fourth streets, and will 
occupy the corner store for their business. No harder working 
or more popular gentlemen can be found in the range of the 
drug business of Southern California than Bristol and Rowley, 
and we heartily congratulate them upon the success of their 
years of labor in Santa Ana. Several months will probably 
elapse before their new store can be made ready for occupancy. 



Mr. E. S. Castle, with Godfrey & Moore, made one of a 
fishing party at Long Beach, September 18, Dr. Kirkpatrick and 
daughter, Dr. Frost and wife and Mrs. Dougherty, with Mr. 
Castle, comprising the party. The catch was a remarkable one, 
205 barracuda and yellowtail being taken in six hours' fish- 
ing, fifty-seven of which were captured by Miss Kirkpatrick. 
Mr. Castle shows his lacerated hands in confirmation of this 
story, which, we imagine, might be doubted were not the ac- 
curacy of a pharmacist behind it. A ton of fish ! 



THE CALIFORNIA DRUGGIST. 



Mr. Wm. A. Trueblood of Central City, Iowa, lately in 
charge of the manufacturing department at Van Antwerp's, 
Mobile, Ala., has taken charge of the prescription case at the 
National Pharmacy, corner Sixteenth street and Grand av- 
enue, this city. Mr. Trueblood is a "born" druggist besides 
being a College of Pharmacy graduate, and is a welcome ad- 
dition to the pharmacists of our city. 



We regret to learn of the death of Mr. J. V. Kannawm, which 
occurred on September 3d, at Azusa, where he was about to 
start a new drug business. Mr. K. came from Canada to this 
coast about three years ago, hoping to be cured of consump- 
tion, but quickly succumbed to the fatal disease just as he had 
concluded he was well enough to open a store. He leaves a 
wife and many friends to mourn his loss. 



Dr. C. Prentice, of Chicago, has put forth the claim that 
any phvsician can tell with absolute certainty when a person is 
dead by examining the retina. The characteristic difference 
between the veins and the arteries that ramify upon its surface 
disappears the moment life is extinct, and never does so until 
death has occurred. As soon as we are dead the color of both 
veins and arteries becomes the color common to veins. In all 
cases of suspended animation that simulates death he says the 
ophthalmoscope will show that the veins and arteries of the 
retina retain their characteristic difference of color. 



The New Mexico Pharmacy Board will meet October 4 and 
and 5 at Albuquerque. W. C. Porterfield, Silver City, is secre- 
tary. 

Drug Clerks will find a startling proposition made them 
by Theo. Noel (of Chicago) in our advertising pages this 
month. Look it up. There may be something in it for you. 



The opening of the schools this month creates a demand for 
stationery, which is likely to run you short. Remember that 
F. W. Braun & Co. are carrying a large stock of goods in this 
line, and that their prices are always right. 



We met her on Second street one evening, just a woman 
with a begging paper, headed, "Help a Poor Blind Man." 
She needed no argument to plead the cause of her absent 
friend, for, as an object of charity, he was simply out of sight. 



A note from the Arlington Chemical Company in response 
to an inquiry by F. W. Braun & Co. elicits the information that 
all of the manufactures of that company, as well as of the N. 
Y. Pharmacal Association require stamps, excepting only 
Liquid Peptonoids and Beef Peptonoids powder. 



The Era states that a druggist of West Chester, Pa., has 
discovered that a bunch of sweet pea blossoms on the soda 
counter will effectually abate the flies, and that the same result 
has followed hundreds of tests by other persons. If this 
doesn't start a boom in sweet pea cultivation it will be a 
wonder. 

Malt Nutrine is one of the items on which the internal reve- 
nue duties are twice laid, but notwithstanding this fact the 
Anheuser-Busch Brewing Association are paying the whole of 
the tax without increasing the price to the trade. Malt Nutrine 
is one of the leading articles in its line, and its style of packing 
makes it particularly convenient to handle. Order of F. W. 
Braun & Co. 

California Cream of Lemon is a toilet article to which much 
more than ordinary interest attaches. Mr. Cosgrove, one of 
the proprietors, assures us that it is made of entire lemons, 
which are ground into pulp form and the combination of juice, 
oil, and albuminous matter effected by a peculiar process, 
forming when completed a remarkably effective emollient 
preparation. See our advertising pages. 



Railway Accidents, 

The total number of casvLalties to persons on account of railway acci- 
dents for the year ending June 30, 1897, was 43,168. Of these casualties 
6,437 resulted in death, and 36,731 in injuries of varying character. Of 
railway employees 1,693 were killed and 27,667 were injured during the 
year. According to the three general classes these casualties were 
divided as follows: Train men 976 killed, 13,795 injured ; switch- 
men flagmen, and watchmen, 201 killed, 2,423 injured ; other em- 
ployees, 516 killed, 11,449 injured. The casualties to employees result- 
ing from coupling and uncoupling cars were, killed, 214 ; injured, 6,283. 
The corresponding figures for the year ending June 30, 1896, were 229 
killed and 8,457 injured. The casualties for coupling and uncoupling 
cars were assigned as follows : Train men, kiHed, 147; injured, 4,698; 
switchmen, flagmen and watchmen, killed, 58; injnred, 1,325; other 
other employees, killed, 9 ; injured, 260. The casualties resulting from 
trains and engines were as follows : Trainmen, killed, 325 ; injured, 
2,726 ; switchmen, flagmen, and watchmen, killed, 32 ; injured, 357 ; 
other employees,- killed, 51 ; injured, 544. 

The casualties to the three general classes of employees mentioned, 
caused by collisions and derailments, were as follows : Trainmen, 
killed, 250; injured, 1,327; switchmen, flagmen, and watchmen, 
killed, 11 ; injured, 74; other employees, killed, 42 ; injured, 251. The 
total number of passengers killed during the j'ear under review was 
222; injured, 2,795. Ninety-three passengers were killed and 1,011 in- 
jured in consequence of collisions and derailments. Other than em- 
ployees and passengers the total number of persons killed was 4,522 ; 
injured, 6,269. Included in these figures are casualties to persons 
classed as trespassers, of whom 3,919 were killed and 4,732 were in- 
jured. From summaries showing the ratio of casualties, it appears that 
1 out of every 486 employees was killed, and one out of every 30 em- 
ployees was injured during the year. With respect to trainmen, includ- 
ing enginemen, firemen, conductors, and other trainmen, it appears 
that one was killed for every 165 employed, and 1 injnred for every 12 
employed. One passenger was killed for every 2,204,708 carried, and 
1 injured for every 175,115 carried. Basing ratios upon the number of 
miles traveled, it appears that 55,211,440 passenger-miles were accom- 
plished for each passenger killed, and 4,385,309 passenger-miles for 
each passenger injured. 

Gold Extraction With Potassium Permanganate. 

A new process for the extraction of gold has been tried with 
success in the gold districts of New Zealand. The finely 
powdered auriferous ore is first mixed with common salt and 
sulphuric acid, and potassium permanganate is then added in 
solution. Hydrochloric acid is formed by the action of the 
sulphuric acid on the salt, and from this chlorine is liberated 
by the permanganate. The chlorine then combines in the 
nascent state with the gold, forming soluble gold chloride. The 
new method is said to have many advantages over the cyanide 
and amalgamation processes. The chemicals used are harm- 
less, non-poisonous and cheap, and the extraction of gold from 
the ore is nearly complete. A particular advantage lies in the 
fact that the process can be applied to ores containing copper, 
for which the cyanide process cannot be used. A gold mine at 
Mount Morgan, New Queensland, obtained by the perman- 
ganate process 95 per cent of the gold present from ore yielding 
only 20 per cent by the cyanide process. The ore contained 
also copper, iron, antimony and maganese. — Sudd. Ap. Ztg. 



IO 



THE CALIFORNIA DRUGGIST. 



OUR ADVERTISERS. 



It will be of interest and value to the trade to consult our 

advertising columns, in which will be found represented the 

following firms and goods : 

A. Gettleman Brewing Co. 
Allcock's Plasters. 
Ammonol Chemical Co. 
Antikarnnia Chemical Co. 
Apollinaris Co., Limited. 
Arlington Chemical Co. 
Beeman Chemical Co. 
Brauu, F. W. & Co.'s Laboratory 

Products. 
California Fig Sj-rup Co. 
Cal. Mission Eucalyptus Lozenges. 
Centaur Company. 
Crown Perfumery Co. 
Davol Rubber Co. 
Dean & Son. 
Etna Chemical Co. 
Florence Manufacturing Co. 
Goodrich, B. F. & Co. 
Coronado Corks. 
Hayden Manufacturing Co. 
Hubert, Prof. I. 



Jayne, Dr. D. & Son. 

Kondon Manufacturing Co. 

Kuhns, Arthur Company. 

Leiner, M. 

Levy, B. & Co. 

Ludwick, G. M. 

Mariani & Co. 

Mead, J. L., Cycle Co. 

Moore, H. H. & Sons. 

Munn & Co. 

N. Y. Pharmacal Association. 

Planten.H. & Son. 

Pond's Extract Co. 

Portuondo, Vicente. 

Taite, Jos. G. & Sons. 

T. B. Insect Powder. 

Thum, O. W. Co. 

Wells, A.J. Manufacturing Co. 

Whittemore Bros. & Co. 

Wyeth, John & Bro. 



\ Kurtz' Freckle Salve j* 

ft (ORIGINAL) *{ 

7L Manufactured only by C. F. HEINZEMAN ^ 

^ Los Angeles, Cal. J* 

71 Trade Mark Registered. K 

Floor Waxes. 

The following formulas for floor waxes are given in the Sei- 
fenfabrikant : 

I. 

Melt together 2 parts of yellow wax or ceresin and 5 parts 
of oil turpentine. With this solution paint the floor, and 
let remain untouched for an hour or two ; then rub bright with 
a rag. 

II. 

Dissolve 32 parts of potash in 314 parts of water by the aid 
of heat. Bring "to a boil and drop in 32 parts of yellow wax. 
As soon as the mixture is homogeneous add 8 parts of annatto 
or sufficient to color. 

III. 

Melt 1 part of yellow wax with 8 parts of kerosene. The 
hot solution is painted thinly over the floor. As soon as the 
oil evaporates, the floor should be polished with a dry cloth. — 
Drug Circular. 

Tight Corks. 

A German patent has recently been granted for making 
corks fit tighter. The surface of the cork — that is the broad, 
ring surface which comes in contact with the glass — is 
corroded in such a manner that instead of being smooth a 
rough surface is obtained, thus bringing out a more complete 
tightening by increasing the adhesion to the glass. 



Pacific Coast Drug Agency 



OFFERS FOR SALE 



First-Class Drug Stores 
and Medical Practices 

in all the Pacific States and Territories 

Clerks Registered, Prooided and Employed. Partnerships 
Negotiated. Lists Sent Free. Correspondence Solicited. 

G. M. LUDWICK, 

S. E. Cornar Second St. and Broadway, Room 201, Los Angeles, Gal. 

Three money-makers are offered to the trade this month by 
F. W. Braun & Co. in the Hayden Mfg. Co.'s Arnica Salve, 
Carbolic Salve and Witch Hazel Salve. They are very neatly 
put up in large-sized boxes, and retail at 25 cents. The un- 
iform price is $1 per dozen Add some to your next order. 



WANTS, Etc., Etc. 

[Under this heading we Tvill be pleased to publish FREE OF 
CHARGE, notices of clerks wanted, positions desired, stores for 
sale or exchange, propositions for purchasing, etc.~\ 



WANTED— Position by graduate in pharmacy. Best reference and 
long experience. Please state salary can give. J. R. HODGES, 
Coleman, Tex. 

WANTED — Partner to open new drug business. Am graduate with 
long experience. State amount of money can put in. Best 
references. Address " TEXAS," care of California Druggist. 

WANTED — To sell, the Figueroa Pharraaey, the best paying outside 
store in the city, at invoice. Want to devote all my time to prac- 
tice only reason for selling. Only those meaning business need apply. 
W. M. Johnston, M. D., owner. 



FOR SALE — A fine drug business in Norwalk ; splendid location ; no 
opposition, there being no other drug store within a radius of five 
miles. Norwalk has about 1000 inhabitants and lies in the center of a 
thickly settled and productive valley. Owner must sell on account of 
ill health. Address DR. W. T. MERCHANT, Norwalk, Cal. 



FOR SALE — Only drug store in Southern California town of 600 in- 
habitants, -with a large tributary population. Rich dairy country 
in artesian belt; 10 miles from ocean; no competition nearer than 8 
miles. Stock of about $ 2000. Rent only $8.00 per mouth. Will sell at 
invoice, with reasonable discount for cash. Inquire of F. BRAUN & 
CO., Los Angeles. 



A Parsons (Kan.) druggist is reported to have sold a colored 
man a mixture of ammonia and carbolic acid in mistake for 
gin. After the man had gone an hour, the druggist discovered 
his error and ran to the colored man's house to save his life 
As he turned the first corner he met the colored man coming 
back with an empty bottle to get some more of what he called 
the "ravenishing ol' gin I evah drank in mah life." — Era. 



FOR SALE — An established drug business a few miles from Los An- 
geles, in country town. Will sell at inventory, which will come 
near to $3000. Inquire of F. W. BRAUN & CO., Los Angeles 

FOR SALE — Small drug store, near the peat lands, Orange county. 
Drugs will invoice about $600. Lot and house $350. Good open- 
ingfor doctor. Address F. W BRAUN & CO., Los Angeles. 

FOR EXCHANGE— House and lot in Los Angeles, Cal., worth $1500 
for stock of drugs of like amount, in country town where cutting 
of prices is unknown. Address GEO. E. BLUE, 3129 S. MAIN, Los 
Angeles, Cal. 

FOR SALE — A well located drug store in Los Angeles, with an in- 
creasing trade, value $1200. Expenses small. Owner not pharma- 
cist is reason for selling. Inquire of F. W. Braun & Co , Los Angeles 

FOR SALE — In coast city of Southern California, a drug business 
established over eight years. Stock about $2500 ; location first-class. 
Address M. H., care CALIFORNIA DRUGGIST. 

FOR SALE — A city drug store. Fine location. Good business. Low 
rent. Good reasons for selling. Address L, care F. W. BRAUN & 
CO. 

FOR SALE — City drug business at a bargain. Stock about $1200, all 
clean and no dead stuff. Good location for a doctor. Inquire of F. 
W. BR A UN & CO., Los Angeles. 

FOR SALE— Elegant clean stock in the most progressive suburb of 
Los Angeles. Only drug store within twenty blocks. Best reasons 
for selling. Value about $2000. Inquire of F. W. BRAUN & CO. 
Los Angeles. 

FOR SALE — A good, long established drug business in this city. 
Price, $2500. Address " ADVANTAGEOUS," care CALIFORNIA 
DRUGGIST. 



THE CALIFORNIA DRUGGIST. 



ii 



PRICE LIST OF DRUGS, CHEMICALS, ETC. 

These prices are for quantities as ordinarily bought by average buyers, and include containers, unless 
otherwise indicated. Subject to market changes. 

For special quantities we will make special figures. 

F. W. BRA UN & CO., Los Angeles, Cal. 



ACBTANILID ft 

ACID, Acetic No. 8 ft) 

Acetic U. S. P ft) 

Benzoic, Eng oz 

Benzoc, German oz 

Boracic ft) 

Carbolic, crude gal 

Car lolic, cryst, blk label, l-tt> tin ft) 

Carbolic, cryst, blk label, 5-ft> tins ft) 

Carbolic, cryst, gold label, 1-lb bots ft) 

Carbolic, cryst, gold label, 5-tt> tin ft) 

Citric 9) 

Gallic oz 

Hydrocyanic, dil oz 

Hydrocyanic, cone, Scheele's oz 

Hydrofluoric, 1-oz bots ea 

Hydrofluoric, 4-oz bots. ea 

Muriatic, coml., 6-ft bots ea 

Muriatic, coml , carboy, $2 ft) 

Muriatic, C. P., 1-ft bots ft) 

Muriatic, C. P., 6-ft> bots ft) 

Nitric, coml., 7-ft> bots ea 

Nitric, coml., carboy, $2 ft) 

Nitric, C P., l-ft>bots ft) 

Nitric, C. P., 7-ft)bots ft) 

Oxalic ft) 

Pyrogallic, Merck's ft) 

Pyrogallic, Merck's oz 

Salicylic ft) 

Salicylic oz 

Salicylic, from oil wintergreeu oz 

Sulphuric, coml., 9-ft> bots ea 

Sulphuric, coml., carboy, $2 ft) 

Sulphuric, C. P., l-ft> bots ft) 

Sulphuric, C P., 9-ft) bots ft) 

Tannic ft) 

Tartaric .ft) 

ALCOHOL, absolute, 1-qt bots ea 

Grain 

Wood, 5 gal. lot to bbl.lot gal 

Wood, less quantity, can extra gal 

ALUM, chrome ft) 

Dried (burnt alum) ft) 

Lump lb 

Ground ft) 

Powdered ft) 

AMMONIA, cone, 26°, 5-pt bots.. ea 

Cone, bulk, can extra gal 

Bromide , ft> 

Carbonate ft) 

Muriate, lump ft) 

Muriate, gran, coml ft) 

Muriate, gran, pure ft) 

Muriate, powd ft) 

Valerianate oz 

AMMONAL (Po. or Tablets) oz 

ANT1KAMNIA OZ 

ANTIPYRIN oz 

ARISTOL (25 oz, $1.65) oz 

ARROWROOT, Bermuda ft) 

ARSENIC, powd, white ft) 

BALSAM Copaiba ft) 

Fir, Canada ft) 

Peru ft) 

Tolu ft) 

BARK, Cinchona, red, true .... ft) 

Cinchona, red, powd.... ft) 

Cinchona, yellow, Calisaya lb 

Cinchona, yellow, powd lb 

Elm, slab ft) 

Slrn, ground ft> 

Elm, powd ft> 

Sassafras ft> 

Soap, slab ft) 

Soap, ground ft) 

Soap pwd ft) 

Soap, cut, 5c boxes doz 

Soap,"eut, 10c bozes doz 

Wild Cherry ft 

BAT RUM gal 

F. W. B. & Co., K pts doz 

F.W. B. &Co., pts doz 

BEANS, Tonka, Angostura ft 

Vanilla, Mexican ft 

Vanilla, Tahiti ft 

BEEKIEs, Cubeb ft 

Cubeb, powd ft 

Juniper ft 

BISMUTH, sub-carbonate ft 

Sub-gallate oz 

Sub-nitrate ft 

BLUE MASS ft 

BLUE VITRIOL ft 

BORAX, refined ft 

Powd ft 

BUDS, Cassia ft 

CALOMEL, American ft 

English ft 

Stock ft 

CAMPHOR ft 

CANTHARIDES, Chinese, powd ft 

Russian, pjari ft 



42® 
10® 





16 




10 


14® 


20 


40® 


50 


30® 


32 


28® 


30 


36® 


38 


33® 


36 


38® 


46 


11® 


12 


11® 


12 


40® 


45 


45® 


50 




75 


65® 


75 


3® 


•iV, 


35® 


40 


25® 


30 




1 00 


8® 


9 


35® 


40 


25® 


30 


12® 


15 




3 00 




26 


60® 


70 


8® 


10 




54 


65® 


75 


2® 


2V 


35® 


40 


25@ 


30 


1 15® 


1 50 


38® 


42 




1 50 


market 


90® 1 05 




1 10 


13® 


15 


12® 


15 


sy 2 ® 


4 


5® 


6 


6® 


8 




85 




75 




75 


12® 


25 


13® 


15 


11® 


15 


16® 


20 


20® 


25 




27 




1 04 




1 00 




45 




1 80 




35 


10® 


12 


70® 


85 


45® 


50 


2 75® 3 00 


75© 


30 


50® 


55 


35® 


60 


50® 


00 


35® 


60 


12® 


15 


14® 


18 


10® 


20 


12® 


15 


7® 


10 


10® 


13 


18® 


20 




35 




60 


12® 


15 


2 50® 


3 00 




1 75 




3 50 


2 25® 


2 50 


14 50@15 50 


3 25® 3 50 


25® 


30 


30® 


35 


9® 


10 


1 70® 


1 80 




17 


1 35® 1 45 


70® 


75 


4%® 


7 


8^@ 


12 


S%@ 


12 


35® 


38 


80® 


8b 


1 10® 


1 lb 


55® 


65 


37® 


42 


60® 


65 


1 00® 


1 10 



CAPSICUM, African, pods ft 

African, powd ft 

CARAMEL (gal $1 50,can extra) ft 

CARBON, bisulphide, 1-ft bots doz 

Bisulphide, 2-fti bots doz 

Bisulphide, 1-gal cans ea 

Bisulphide, 5-gal cans ea 

CARMINE, No 40 oz 

CHALK, French, powd ft 

White, precip ft 

White, prepared, drops ft) 

CHARCOAL, animal, gran ft 

Animal, powd ft 

Willow, powd , bulk ft) 

Willow, powd., 1-ft cartons ft 

Willow, powd., J4-ft> cartons ft 

Willow, powd., %-ft cartons ft 

CHLORAL HYDRATE, 1 fts ft 

% fts ft 

Yt, fts ft 

CHLOROFORM, 1-ft tins ft 

7-ft tins ft 

Squibbs', 500-gm ea 

Squibbs', 250-gm ea 

Squibbs', 100-gm ea 

CLOVES ft 

Powd ft 

COBALT, powd ft 

COCAINE, hydrochlorate oz 

Hydrochlorate, y 2 oz oz 

Hydrochlorate, l /% oz ea 

COCOA BUTTER ft 

CODEINE, alk., J/ 8 oz oz 

Sulphate, y s oz oz 

COLOCYNTH APPLE ft 

Powd ft 

COMPOSITION POWDER, H-ftpkgsft 

COPPERAS, bbls, 1% ft 

CORROSIVE SUBLIMATE ft 

Powd ft 

CREAM TARTAR, pure ft 

CREOLIN, 1-ft and 5-ft bots ft 

CREOSOTE, beech-wood ft 

Coml ft 

CURCUMA, powd ft 

CUTTLE BONE ft 

DEXTRINE ft 

DOVER'S POWDER ft 

EIKONOGEN oz 

EMERY, flour ft 

ERGOT, powd ! ft 

ESSENCE PEPPERMINT, 2-oz bot..doz 

ETHER, Nitrous, couc, 1-ft bots ft 

Nitrous, cone , %-ib bots ft 

Nitrous, cone, % -ft bots ft 

Sulphuric, U. S P.. 1880 ft 

Snlphuric, cone, 1890 ft 

Sulphuric, Squibbs', 500-gm ea 

Sulphuric, Squibbs', 250-gm ea 

Sulphuric, Squibbs', 100-gm ea 

EUCALVPTOL, Merck's....: oz 

EXTRACT, Cascara. fluid, F. W. B. & Co..ft> 
Cascara, fluid, F. W. B. & Co.. 5-ft bots. ..ft 
Cascara, fl., arom , F.W B. & Co., 1-ft bot..ft 
Cascara, fl., arom., F.W.B. & Co., 5-ft bot..ft 

Logwood, 15 and 25-ft boxes ft 

Logwood, 1-ft, %-ft and %-ft boxes ft 

Witch Hazel, distilled gal 

Less than 5 gals, container extra. 
EXTRACTS, FLAVORING, 

Lemon, F. W. B. &Co., 2-oz doz 

Vanilla, F. W. B. & Co , 2-oz doz 

FLOWERS, Arnica ft 

Chamomile, Eng ft 

Chamomile, Ger ft 

Lavender ft 

Rosemary ; ft 

FOIL. Tin, Heavy ft 

Tin, Medium ft 

Tin, Light ft 

FORWALDEHYD ft 

FRUIT JUICES, F. W. B. & Co., qts., doz 
FRUITS, Crushed, F.W.B.&Co.,^gals ,doz 

FULLERS EARTH ft 

GELATINE,, Cox's, sml doz 

French, gold label •. ft 

French, silver label ft 

French, bronze label ft 

GLUE, Carpenter's ft 

White ft 

GLYCERINE, 50 ft cans ". ft 

10-ftcans ft 

2-oz bots doz 

Schering's 1-ft) bots ft 

Schering's 10-ft bots ft 

GLYCOLINE (gal., $1.50, can extra) ft 

GUM, Aloes, Barb ft 

Aloes, Barb , powd ft 

Aloes, Cape ft 

Aloes, Cape, powd ft 

Aloes, Socotrine, true ft 

Aloes Socotrine, powd ft 



22® 
20® 



12® 



25 
25 
25 

2 00 

4 00 
1 05 

3 75 
35 

8 

12 

10 

12 

10 

15 

18 

20 

25 

1 60® 1 70 

1 55® 1 80 

1 95® 2 00 

55® 57 

52® 54 

1 15 

66 

26 

20 

25 

30 

3 25 

3 35 
55 
55 

5 10 

4 75 
90 
85 
35 

3 

85 

95 

32 

60 

1 10 

50 

15 

35 

12 

1 25 

37 

10 

5a 

1 50 

1 25 

1 40 



50® 



27® 



12® 



50® 



1 
1 

1 55® 1 60 

75® 80 

80® 85 

1 25 

66 

30 

24 

70 

50 

80 

75 

12® 13 

15® 20 



18® 



25® 



1 50 

1 75 

20 

30 

35 

15 

W 

25 

30 

35 

60 

5 00 

10 80 

6® - 10 

1 50 

60® 65 

40® 45 

35® 40 

9® 12 

15® 18 

14K® 15 

17 

1 25® 1 50 

45 

40 

35 

30 

35 

25 

25 

50 

55 



25® 



45® 



Ammoniac ft 40® 45 

Arabic, No. 1 ft 70® 75 

Arabic, No. 2 ft 50® 55 

Arabic, powd., No. 1 ft 70® 75 

Arabic, powd., French ft 90® 1 00 

Arabic, sorts ft 40® 45 

Asafetida ft 32® 35 

Asafetida, powd ft 45® 50 

Benzoin ft 50® 55 

Benzoin, powd ft 60® 70 

Catechu ft 9® 12 

Catechu, powd ft 32® 35 

Guaiac ft 38® 40 

Guaiac, powd J ft 45® 50 

Myrrh ft 35® 38 

Myrrh powd ft 38® 40 

Olibanum ft 25® 30 

Opium ft 4 00® 4 25 

Opium, powd ft 5 00® 5 20 

Shellac, orange ft 32® 35 

Shellac, orange, ground ft 35® 38 

Shellac, white ft 35® 40 

Shellac, white, powd ft 40® 45 

Spruce, tears ft 1 25® 1 35 

Tragacanth, flake ft 90® 95 

Tragacanth, sorts ft 45® 50 

Tragacanth, powd ft 1 00® 1 10 

HOFFMAN'S ANODYNE ft 65 

HOPS, pressed, 3^ and K-lbs ft 16® 20 

Pressed, oz ft 25 

HYDROGEN PEROXIDE, Mar- 

chand's, lbs doz 7 80 

Marchand's, %-lbs doz 5 75 

Marchand's, J^-lbs doz 3 90 

Marchand's. y s -\bs doz 2 25 

M. C. W., or P. & W., 1 lbs doz 4 80 

M C. W., or P. & W.,}^-lbs doz 3 00 

M. C. W., or P. & W., %-lbs doz 1 80 

Oakland, 1 lb doz 8 00 

Oakland, K-lbs doz 3 75 

Oakland, 5^-lbs doz 2 50 

U.S.P.,llb ft 35 

U.S. P. ,11b full doz 3 25 

HYDROZONE, 1-lb bots doz 10 90 

}4-\b bots doz 7 50 

#-lb bols doz 4 90 

y a -\b bots doz 2 25 

ICHTHYOL oz 50 

Ichthyol ft 6 50 

INDIGO ft 70® 75 

INSECT POWDER, Buhach, 6-lb cans.ft 50® 60 

Dalmatian, bulk ft 28® 40 

Hill's California, bulk ft 35® 45 

"T. B." 61b cans ft . 40 

" T. B " 1-lb cans doz 5 50 

" T. B," J^-lb cans doz 3 25 

' T. B." small doz 1 25 

IODINE, re-subl oz 36 

Re-subl ft 3 60® 3 80 

IODOFORM oz 37 

Iodoform ft 3 60® 3 80 

IRON, carbonate precip ft 16® 18 

Chloride, solution ft 25® 35 

Iodide oz 35 

Sub-sulphate (Monseli oz 8 

Sub-sulphate (Monsel) ft 34® 40 

Sub-sulphate solution ft 25® 30 

Sulphate, dried ft 15® 20 

Sulphate, pure cryst., bulk ft 8® 10 

Sulphate, pure cryst., 1-lb bots ft 14® 18 

JUICE, Grape, Los Gatos, pts doz 4 00 

Grape, Welch's, % pts doz 1 90 

Grape. Welch's, pints doz 2 75 

Grape, Welch's, quarts doz 5 25 

LANOLIN, Leibreich's ft 1 00 

LEAD, acetate, coml ft 16® 20 

Acetate, powd ft) 20® 25 

Acetate, C. P ft 27® 30 

Sub-acet. solu., Goulard's ft 30® 35 

LEAVES, Bay ft 14® 15 

Buchu.long ft 30® 33 

Buchu, short ft 22® 25 

Rosemary, bulk ft 18® 20 

Sage, y 2 s and &s ft 18® 20 

Sage, ozs ft) 25 

Senna, Alex ft) 30® 35 

Senna, Alex., powd ft 35 

Senna, Tinnevelli ft 18® 20 

Senna, Tinnevelli, powd ft 20® 25 

UvaUrsi ft 12® 15 

LEECHES, (25 or more, 8c.) ea 10 

LIME. Chloride, 35-ft cans ft 4% 

Chloride, Acme, 1-lb cans doz 1 25 

Chloride, Acme, )4-\b cans doz 80 

Chloride, Acme, % -lb cans doz 45 

Chloride, Electron, 1-lb cans doz 1 20 

Chloride, Phoenix, 1-lb cartons doz 1 10 

LITHARGE ft 1)4® 10 

LONDON PURPLE ft 15® 20 



12 



THE CALIFORNIA DRUGGIST, 



LOZENGES, Licorice, 51b boxes ft 24 

Licorice, "Acme," 5-lb boxes ft) 35 

Peppermint. 5-lb boxes ft) 15 

lYCdPOUIUM ft) 50® 55 

EYE, concentrated i case, $3.50) doz 90 

LYSOL, 1-lb bots ft) 65 

MAGNESIA, Calcined, 1-lb tin ft) 6o 

Carbonate, Jenning's, 2 and J-oz ft) 5 

Carbonate, K. & M., 4-oz., 2 oz. and 1 oz..ft> IK® 25 

Carbonate, K. & M., powdered tb 35 

Carbonate, K. 6c M .. S. S ft) 60 

Eff. citrate, Herring's doz 2 00 

MANGANESE, black oxide ft) 6@ 8 

MANNA, large flake lb 90® 1 00 

Small flake ft> 60® 65 

MENTHOL, (oz. 30c ) ft) 2 S5@ 3 10 

MEBOUKY ft) 78® 85 

Bi-sulphate ft) 65® 70 

Iodide, green oz 25 

Iodide, red oz 26 

MORPHINE, sulph.. H oz oz 2 60® 2 90 

Sulph., 'A oz., 2^oz bxs oz 2 55® 2 85 

Sulph., 1 oz tins oz 2 35® 2 65 

Sulph., 5-oz tins oz 2 30® 2 60 

MOSs, Iceland ft) 15 

Irish ft 20 

MUSK. Canton, 1-oz bxs oz 35 

Tonquin, s /& ozbots ea 4 50 

MUSTARO Co!burn's,6 lb cans ft) 28 

Ground California ft) 14® 15 

NAPHTHALINE, balls, cakes or flakes..!*) 4® 8 

NUTMEGS ft) 00® 65 

Ground ft) 65® 70 

NUTS, Areca ft) 30® 35 

Areca.powd ft) 35® 40 

Kola ft) 25® 35 

NUX VOMICA ft) 15® 20 

Powdered ft 20® 25 

OIL, Almond, bitter oz 65 

Almond, sweet ft 25® 45 

Amber, rect ft 50® 55 

Anise ft 2 40® 2 60 

Bay oz 45® 50 

Benne lean extra) gai 1 15® 1 25 

Bergamot, Sanderson ft 3 40® 3 60 

Bergamot, Sicilian ft 3 00® 3 20 

Cassia ft 2 25® 2 50 

Castor "A A" gal 1 25® 1 35 

Castor, machine gal 45® 50 

Castor, special com'l gal 75® 80 

Less than 5 gals., can extra. 

Cedar, coml ft 40® 50 

Cedar, pure ft) 75® SO 

China nut (can extra) gal 65® 75 

Cloves ft 95® 1 15 

Cocoanut ft) 20® 30 

Cod liver, Norwegian (can extra) gal 1 10@ 1 25 

Cottonseed gal 55® 70 

Less than 5 gal., can extra. 

Croton ft 1 35® 1 50 

Cubebs ft 1 50® 1 75 

Eucalyptus ft 65® 75 

Geranium Rose oz 65® 75 

Hemlock, pure ft 75® 80 

Lard gal 75® 85 

Less than 5 gal can extra. 

Lavender flowers ft 2 25® 2 40 

Lavender, garden ft 75@ 80 

Lemon, Sanderson ft 2 00® 2 20 

Lemon. Sicilian ft 1 25® 1 50 

Mustard, Essential oz 65 

Neatsfoot (less than 5-gal. can extra) ...gal 75® 80 

Olive, California, qts doz 12 00 

Olive, Italia, 1 gal cans gal 2 10 

Olive, Malaga, can extra gal 1 00(o 1 25 

Orange, bitter ft 4 50® 4 75 

Orange, sweet ft 2 25® 2 50 

Origanum ft 50® 60 

Pennyroyal ft 1 50® 1 75 

Peppermint Hotchkiss ft 1 85® 2 10 

Peppermint, Western ft 1 30(u< 1 50 

Pinus Sylvestris ft 1 20® 1 40 

Rhodium oz 40® 75 

Rose oz 7 50@10 00 

Rosemary flowers... ft 1 50® 1 65 

Sandalwood, Eng oz 50 

Sandalwood, Ger ft 3 00® 3 25 

Sassafras ft 75® 85 

Sewing Machine, Nye's, small doz 45 

Sewing Machine. Nye's, large doz 75 

Sperm, Nye's crystal gal 75 

Sperm, pure, w. b gal 1 25 

Less than 5 gal can extra. 

Spike ft 25® 35 

Turpentine, rect., Merck ft 45 

I'nion salad gal 75® 80 

Less than 5 gal can extra. 

Wintergreen ft) 1 70® 1 90 

Wormwood ft 4 00® 5 00 

OIL CAKE, ground ft 02'X® 03 

OINTMENT, Citrine ft 65 

Mercurial, K m ft 50(7/' ",:. 

Mercurial \i m ft 60® 65 

Zinc, benz. oxide ft) 75 

ORANGE PEEL ft 15® 18 

PAPOID, y 2 or 1-oz bots oz 2 00 

PARAFFIN lb 10® 15 

PARIS GREEN ft) 20m 

l's, J4's, '^'s ft 25® 80 

PETROLATUM, ex. amber ft 614® 9 

Snow while ft) 25® 30 

PHENACETIN(25ozs. .95) oz 100 

PHOSPHORUS, 11-lb cans It. 76 

l*tb cans lb s."> 

% and !i-cans It. 'X,<„ 1 OS 

PLASTER PARIS lb 02® 05 

Dentist's lb 04® 08 

POISON, purple _ ft OS® 10 



POTASH. Babbiffs, (case $3.50) doz 

Caustic, crude ft 

Caustic, white, stick ft 

Bichromate ft 

Carbonate ft 

Chlorate ft 

Cyanide, mining ft 

Cyanide, pure granular lb 

Iodide ft) 

Nitrate ft 

Permanganate ft 

Prussiate, red ft 

Prussiate, yellow lb 

PUMICE STONE, lump ft 

Powd ft 

QUASSIA, Chips ft 

QUININE, 1-oz bottle oz 

1 oz tin oz 

5-oz tin oz 

25-oz tin oz 

50-oz tin oz 

100-oz tin oz 

RED PRECIPITATE ft 

RESIN ft 

ROOT, Aconite ft 

Althea, cut lb 

Blood lb 

Blood, powd ft 

Calamus, peeled ft 

Gentian ft 

Gentian, powd ft 

Ginger, Atrican _ ft) 

Ginger, Jamaica ft. 

Goldenseal ft) 

Goldenseal, powd ft) 

Ipecac, powd ■. ft 

Licorice, select ft). 

Licorice, cut ft 

Licorice, powd ft 

Orris, powd ft) 

Rhubarb ft 

Rhubarb cubes ft 

Rhubarb fingers ft 

Rhubarb, powd ft 

Rhubarb, powd., Allen's, Eng ft) 

Sarsaparilla, Hond .ft) 

Sarsaparilla, Hond, gro ft 

Sarsaparilla, Mex lb 

Sarsaparilla, Mex., gro .ft 

Valerian ft) 

Valerian, powd ft 

ROTTEN STONE, powd ft 

SACCHARIN, 25 gm. cartons ea 

SAFFRON, American ft 

Spanish oz 

SAL EPSOM ft 

Epsom 4-oz cartons doz 

Glauber ft 

Nitre, cryst ft) 

Nitre, powd lb 

Rochelle ft 

Soda ft> 

SALOL, (oz30) ft) 

SEED, Anise, Ital lb 

Anise, powd ft) 

Bird, mixed, 1-lbs., 60-lb case case 

Bird, mixed, 1 ft) doz 

Canary ft) 

Caraway ft) 

Cardamom .'. ft) 

Celery ft) 

Coriander ft) 

Flax, cleaned ft 

Flax, ground ft) 

Hemp lb 

Millet lb 

Mustard fb 

Poppy, blue ft) 

Rape ft) 

sabadilla, powd lb 

Worm, American ft) 

Worm, Levant ft) 

SEIDLITZ MIXTURE ft. 

Powders, single, 100s box 

Powders, 3's doz 

Powders, 6's doz 

Powders, 10s doz 

SHEEP DIP, Carbolic gal 

Little's 1 gal cans gal 

Little's 5 gal cans gal 

SNUFF, Garrett's Scotch, blads tb 

Garrett's Scotch, 1-oz tins doz 

Garrett's Scotch, 2-oz tins doz 

Garrett s Scotch, 4-oz tins doz 

Garrett's Scotch, 6 oz bots doz 

Lorillard's Maccaboy. 4-oz bots doz 

Lorillard's Rappee. 4-oz bots doz 

SOAP, Castile, Conti white ft 

Marseilles, white ft. 

Mottled, coml ft 

Mottled, pure ft 

Turkish, green or white ft 

Powdered ft 

German green, Stiefel's tb 

Whale Oil ft. 

SODA ASH lb 

Caustic, 98 per cent ft 

Causlic, 70 per cent (Drums) ft 

Caustic, white, sticks lb 

Bicarbonate : lb 

Bromide ft. 

Hyposulphite lb 

Hyposulphite, new process tb 

SOLUTION, Donavan's ft 

Fowler's : ft 

Goulard's ft 

SPERMACETI ft 

SPIRITS, Brooklyn and Columbian gal. 

Less than 5 gals, can extra. 

Nitre, U. S. P ft 

Nitre, 2-oz bots doz 



< l A@ 
45® 

l.H" 
15(5 



14® 17 
30® 35 
65 
2 50® 2 55 
08® 12 
40® 60 
60® 65 
32® 35 

(I9(y 111 

06® 08 
10 
29® 31 
27® 29 
24® 26 
23® 25 

22>*@ 24 % 

22® 24 

1 10 

Ol 1 ^ to 03 
■Mi, S5 
35® 40 
25® 30 
30® 35 
60 
13® 16 
14® 18 
20® 25 
25® 29 
60® 65 
65® 70 

2 50® 2 75 

13® 15 

30 

14® 18 

35® 40 

75 

1 25® 1 50 

1 50® 1 75 



40® 
40® 
25® 
25® 
30® 
35® 
07® 



40 
10 
1 00 
45 
90 
04 
35 
03 
12 
12 
30 

01%® 03 

3 50® 3 65 

16® 18 

20® 25 

3 50 



40® 

02K® 

01M® 
o«@ 



03%® 05 
10® 12 

1 35® 1 40 
18® 25 
10® 

03'/ 2 @ 

03H® 

03'/ 2 @ 



10® 
04® 
40® 



28® 



1 45® 
1 



12 
05 
05 
06 
06 
08 
12 
06 
50 
20 
25 
30 
2 50 
60 
1 50 
@ 2 00 
1 10 
1 35 
1 20 
50 
60 
1 00 

1 75 

2 75 
2 50 
2 75 

16 
13 
10 
12 
11 
35 
in 
06 
08 
08 
02%g 08 
42® 45 



13® 
10® 

07 ',(<?■ 
08® 
10® 



04® 
06® 

in ;® 



02%® 

03K® 
04® 

26® 

■Mr, 
G0@ 



i :.in,. i ;:, 

55® 60 

1 50^ 



STRONTIUM, nitrate ft 14® 17 

STRYCHINE,, cryst., J^-oz bots oz 1 25 

Cryst., 1-oz bots oz 1 00 

Powd., Vij-oz bots oz 1 20 

Powd., 1-oz bots oz 95 

SUGAR MILK, powd ft 20® 25 

SULFONAL oz 1 35 

SULPHUR, crude, ground, Cal ft 02^@ 03 

Flour ft. 03%® 04% 

Flowers ft 04 @ 05 

Roll ft 03%® 05 

SYRUP. Iodide Iron, F. W. B. & Co ft 57® 60 

Rock Candv. bbls and % bbls gal 70® 75 

TAR, Pine, % pints doz 75 

Pine, pints doz 90 

Pine, quarts .' doz 1 50 

WATER, distilled, containers extra gal 10 

Orange Flower, containers extra gal 2 00® 2 25 

Rose, containers extra gal 2 00® 2 50 

WAX, Floor, powd ft 40 

Yellow, pure tb 27® 30 

White, pure ft 50® 55 

White, No. 1 ft 35® 40 

WHITE PRECIPITATE ft 1 20 

ZINC, metallic, shavings ft 20® 35 

Oxide, com'l ft 14® 15 

Oxide, Hubbuck's ft 45® 5C 

Sulphate, com'l ft 06® 08 

Sulphate, chem. pure ft 17® 20 

PROPRIETARY ARTICLES 

Controlled by F. W. Braun & Co. 

Braun's Carbolic Salve doz $125 

" Carbolic Soap doz 75 

" Condition Powder „ doz 1 00 

" Essence Jamaica Ginger doz 150 

•' Florida Water, lge doz 3 50 

" Florida Warer, small doz 150 

" Sarsaparilla doz 4 00 

" Syrup Tar and Wild Cherry doz 150 

Cal. Mission Eucalyptus Lozenges doz 1 50 

Cal. Mission Eucalyptus Plasters doz 1 50 

Cal. Mission Poison Oak Remedy doz 1 50 

Cal. Root Beer doz 80 

Cal. Mocking Bird Food doz 3 00 

Corouado Sea Salt doz 80 

Hajden's Arnica Salve doz 1 00 

" Carbolic Salve doz 100 

" Witch Hazel doz 1 00 

" Sanitary Towels, small gro 3 50 

" " medium gro 3 75 

" " " large gro 4 00 

Hayden's Sachet Powder, % ft bots ft 3 00 

Hunter's Witch Hazel doz 1 75 

Matchless Sarsaparilla doz 5 00 

Matchless Wild Cherry Phosphates doz 1 75 

Swain's Carbolic Powder doz 1 50 

Tarine doz 1 75 

" T. B." Insect I ovvder, 6-ft can ft 40 

1-ft " doz 5 50 

" " " y 2 -Tb " doz 3 25 

" " " sml " doz 1 25 



BRAUN'S... 

California 
Condition Powder 



IS A 



Well Established Remedy 



Having a good sale throughout Southern 
California and the Territories 



It is used for 



Horses, Cattle, Sheep and Poultry 

IT IS GOOD 

It Retails for 25 cents 
It Costs $ 1 .OO Per Dozen 

You need it in your business ! 



MANUFACTURED 
AND SOLD BY 



F. W. BRAUN & CO. 



LOS ANGELES, CAL. 



VOLUME 7.] 



LOS ANGELES, OCTOBER, 1898. 

THE" 






[NUMBER HT 




^©I^THlVJieililKjftoL DEVOTEE TO TOE BInteII^§T§©F THE P^TABL B5I^llII©©IIS < f 







F. W. BRAUN & CO., WHOLESALE DRUGGISTS 



(OILMAN SPIRITS 



THE EQUAL of ALCOHOL for all 
PURPOSES EXCEPT INTERNAL use. 

MANHATTAN SPIRIT CO. 

Sole Manufacturers, BUFFALO, N. Y. 



TRADE MARK 



The Price to RETAILERS is 
$8 -Case of 50 glass bottles 




See that the 
Labels bear the well known 
RED DIAMOND MARK of the 
APOLLINARIS COMPANY, LIMITED. 

SOLE EXPORTERS: 
THe APOLLINflRIS 60MPANY, Ld., London 

J. S. ANDERSON, 21 Sutter St., San Francisco 
Representing United Agency Co., 503 Fifth Ave., New York 





LACTOPEPTINE Powder, in ounces, per dozen $8 20 

LACTOPEPTINE Powder, in half-pound bottles, per pound 9 80 

Lbs. per doz. 5-lt> Bot. Ea. 

LACTOPEPTINE Elixir $12 15 $4 60 

LACTOPEPTINE Elixir with Bismuth 12 15 4 60 

LACTOPEPTrNE Elixir with Strychnia and Bismuth 12 15 4 60 

LACTOPEPTINE Elixir with Calisaya 12 15 4 60 

LACTOPEPTINE Elixir with Calisaya, Iron and Bismuth 12 15 4 60 

LACTOPEPTINE Elixir with Gentian and Chloride of Iron 12 15 4 60 

LACTOPEPTINE Elixir with Phosphate of Iron, Quinia and Strychnia 12 15 4 60 

LACTOPEPTINE Liquid 12 15 4 60 

LACTOPEPTINE with Beef, Iron and Wine 12 15 4 60 

Per Doz. 6-lb Bot. 

LACTOPEPTINE Syrup with Phosphates $12 15 $5 60 



NEW YORK PHARMACAL ASSOCIATION, Yonkers, N. Y. 



What do you say to the offer of a Barrel 

HOSPITAL TONie 

FOR $12.00 NET 30 DAYS 

Yo can have the chance by sending to 

F. W. BRAUN & CO. 

LOS ANGELES, CAL. 



50 YEARS' 
EXPERIENCE 




Trade Marks 
Designs 
Copyrights &c 

Anyone sending n sketch and description may 
quickly ascertain our opinion free whether an 
invention is probahlv patentable. Communica- 
tions strictly contlrten'tial. Handbook on Patents 
sent free. Oldest ogency for securing patents. 

Patents taken through Munn & Co. receive 
special notice, without c harg e, in the 

Scientific American. 

A handsomely Illustrated weekly. Largest clr- 
culation of any scientific journal. Terms, $3 a 
year ; four months, JL Sold by all newsdealers. 

MUNN &Co. 36 ' Bfoad -> New York 

Branch Office, C25 F St., Washington, D. C. 



Jtye Qaliforpia Dru§§ist 

A MONTHLY JOURNAL 

DEVOTED TO THE INTERESTS OF THE RETAIL DRUGGIST. 



Volume VII.] 



LOS ANGELES, CAL., OCTOBER, 1898. 



[Number 



11. 



51?e ^alifon?ia Dm^ist 

PUBLISHED MONTHLY BY 

THE CALIFORNIA DRUGGIST PUB. CO. 

P. O. Drawer 406, Station C. - - LOS ANGELES, CAL. 

(To whom all Communications should be addressed.) 

F. S. LANGDON, ........ PRESIDENT 

J. Q. BRAUN, "... .... Treasurer 

R. A. ALLEN, ......... Editor 

TERMS OF SUBSCRIPTION. 

Per Year $1 00 

Single Copies 10 

ADVERTISING RATES. 

One Page $100 00 

Half Page '. 60 00 

Fourth Page 35 00 

Eighth Page 20 00 

Cards (per month) 1 50 

Jggg*' Advertisements for positions or assistants, or to buy or sell Drug 
Stores, are inserted free of charge. 

Items of interest to Pharmacists are solicited. 

The official organ of the San Diego Retail Druggists' Association. 

The official organ of the Los Angeles County Pharmaceutical Associa- 
tion. 

TUST now the retail druggists of the country — perhaps ex- 
^ cepting those of the Pacific Coast — are very much stirred 
up over the project of forming a National Association, having 
for its object the correction of abuses and the maintenance of 
the rights of the trade, through the power of organization. It 
is designed to hold meetings simultaneously with the National 
Wholesale Druggists' Association, and to use such occasions to 
promote the interests of the retailers in all possible ways. It 
has been the weak point of the trade that they have had no or- 
ganized body, other than local associations, through which 
their demands could be made effective, while the need of such 
organization has been evident to all who have seen the influ- 
ence exerted by the powerful Wholesale and Proprietary asso- 
ciations upon all questions affecting their interests, whether in 
legislation or otherwise. The war stamp question is the lead- 
ing thought at the present moment, and the effect of concerted 
effort upon proprietors at the coming meeting in St. Louis this 
month is expected to be a help toward relieving the burden of 
the druggist. It may be considered practicable too, to join 
the proprietors in an effort to effect the repeal, in toto, of the 
stamp tax on medicines, and thus remove the irritating cause 
of disagreement and ill-feeling now existing. 



'"FHE State Board of Pharmacy at its meeting, Oct. 6, in Los 
*■ Angeles, examined eight applicants for certificates. The 
result has not yet been made public. 



T"HE ambitious attempt to establish a third wholesale drug 
* house in Los Angeles came to a conclusion on the 7th 
inst. when the Pacific Drug Company made a transfer of their 
stock in trade, F. W. Braun & Co. being the purchasers. 
With sufficient capital behind it, and a strong effort to capture 
a share of the trade the " Pacific" found the attempt a losing 
one from the start, and now retires from the field. The 
history of business enterprises shows one unvarying fact, viz. , 
that success comes only through the application of sound bus- 
iness principles, not through lucky chance. It is self-evident 
that the first requisite in business is a population with 
whom one may have dealing. In a thickly populated country 
a new competitor may, by virtue of superior ability, overcome 
weaker, though long established rivals. We think, however, 
that the history of the enterprise in question demonstrates that 
its field of operations was fully occupied before its advent, and 
that a considerable increase in the population tributary to Los 
Angeles is required before the need of an additional wholesale 
drug house will be felt. 

\1 7HEN Joseph Jacobs of Atlanta, who was recognized as 
' ' one of the leading "cutters" in the drug trade, was 
chosen chairman of the Commercial Section of the A. Ph. A. 
last year, a wide-spread curiosity was manifested to see what 
position he would take on the cut-rate problem, and it was 
thought by many that when this year's meeting was held he 
would in some way antagonize the traditions of the trade-in 
his address. The result did not justify such apprehension, 
Mr. Jacobs entering upon no discussion outside his plain field 
of duty, but filling his position with high credit. Mr. Jacobs 
has a good business head. 



QOMEWHAT more than one hundred patent medicine pro- 
^ prietors are advertising thj&fact that they are paying the 
war tax themselves and making no advances in the price of 
their goods. Asa " reward of merit " they are soliciting in- 
creased patronage and the help of the druggist in pushing 
their products. About twenty-five per cent of the membership 
of the Proprietary Association are included in above number. 



'"THE annual meeting of the National Wholesale Druggists' 
*■ Association will be held in St. Louis during the week 
beginning Monday, Oct. 17th. The new retail association is 
planned to meet at the same time and place. There will be 
a lively week in the old town. 



A S will be noticed in our advertising columns, the Commis- 
■'*■ sioner of Internal Revenue has decided that 12^ cent 
stamp attached to each ounce of Antikamnia fulfills all re- 
quirements of the law. 



THE CALIFORNIA DRUGGIST. 



""THE American Druggist has issued an extra number devoted 
* to the Baltimore meeting of the American Pharmaceuti- 
cal Association, containing the proceedings and the various 
papers read before the Association, together with cuts of local 
objects and pictures of officers. The "extra" has been very 
generally mailed to the trade, and supplies very completely the 
demand for a report of the meeting of the A. Ph. A. The oc- 
casion seems to have been one of special social interest, as well 
as of value in its educational and scientific features. 

The entertainment program was one justifying the reputa- 
tion of Baltimoreans for splendid hospitality, and will be an 
example difficult to match in future meetings of the Associ- 
ation. In fact, the acceptance of the invitation from a popular 
summer watering place (Put-in-bay) for next year's meeting 
indicates a purpose to forego a feature in these annual gather- 
ings which has reached the top notch in the profuse liberality 
of the people of Baltimore. We fail to notice the names of 
any Pacific Coast members in the list of those present. Per- 
haps an anticipation of the oppressive summer heat on the At- 
lantic sea-board dissuaded them (next year's meeting place on 
Lake Erie will be free from that objection), or possibly the 
counter attraction of the Omaha exposition had its influence. 
There is little wonder, to our mind, that a business man on the 
Coast should hesitate to undertake a six-thousand mile trip for 
the purpose of attending any kind of a meeting, during the 
heated term especially. 

As to the proceedings of the meeting in question there is 

nuch of practical value in them, the address of President 

Whitney being a review of the condition of the drug trade es- 

iecially interesting. The address of Chairman Jacobs of the 

ommercial section received close attention, as it deserved. The 

eath of Prof. Henry Trimble, which occurred August 24, 

rought out tributes of loving appreciation of his character and 

services from J. U. Lloyd, Caswell A. Mayo and others. 

The newly elected officers of the Association are as follows: 

President — Charles E. Dohme, Baltimore. 

First Vice-President — George F. Payne, Georgia. 

Second Vice-President — James H. Beal, Ohio. 

Third Vice-President — Josie A. Wanous, Minnesota. 

Treasurer — S. A. D. Sheppard, Massachusetts. 

General Secretary — Charles Caspari, Jr. 

Reporter on the Progress of Pharmacy — C. Louis Diehl, 
Kentucky. 

Local Secretary — Not named. 

Members of the Council — Wm. S. Thompson, H. M. Whit- 
ney and Charles A. Rapelye. 



'"THE Wo "s Dispensary Medical Association has acceeded 
* to the quest of the retail druggists associations to re- 
duce the pric* )f their preparations, to the extent of allowing 
a three per cent discount on purchases amounting to $16.50, 
which makes an $8 rate on their dollar preparations, and a cor- 
responding reduction on other goods. This prompt and cheer- 
ful response by Dr. Pierce is worthy of commendation, and 
will be appreciated by the trade. 



Queer Orders. 

A Jersey City druggist a making a collection of the queer 
orders he receives from people who send children to the store 
for things they need. Here are a few of them : 

" This child is my little girl. I sent you five cents to buy 
two sitless powders for a groan up adult who is sike." 

Another reads : "Five sense worse of Aunty Toxyn for to 
gargle babi's throte and obleage. 

An anxious mother writes: "You will please give the 
lettle boi five cents worth of epaca for to throw up in a five- 
months'-old babe. N. B. — The babe has a core stummick." 

This one puzzled the druggist : " I have a cute pane in my 
child's diagram. Please give my son something to release 
it." 

Another anxious mother wrote : " My little babey has eat 
up its father's parish plaster. Send an antedote quick as pos- 
sible by the enclosed little girl." 

The writer of this one was evidently in pain : "I haf a 
hot time in my insides and wich I wood like to be extin- 
guished. What is good for to extinguish it ? The enclosed 
quarter is for the price of the extinguisher. Hurry, pleas. — 
Bulletin Phar. 

A countryman from Garvanza called recently at one of our 
largest down town drug stores and asked for a box of " twi- 
light " or " skylight" soap — was not positive which was the 
name. The proprietor suggested "twilight" (toilet) which 
the customer accepted and went away happy. 



Note F. W. Braun & Co.'s Sundries department's special 
offer for October. You may not soon have another opportu- 
nity of stocking up on musical instrument strings at their 
special prices. 



Patents Relating to Pharmacy, Etc., Sept. 6th, 13th, 20th 

and 27th. 

Fisher H. Lippincott, Philadelphia, Pa., Soda Water apparatus, 610188. 

Nels Person, Garner, Iowa, Truss, 610202. 

Henry Bausch, Rochester N. Y., Mouth and Throat Mirror, 610518. 

Joseph C. McBeth, Denver, Colo., Surgeon's Splint, 610866. 

James C. Munyon, Philadelphia, Pa., Inhaler, 610717. 
. Wilhelm Schmidt, Arlington, N. J., Refining Camphor, 610664. 

De Wane B. Smith, Deerfield, N. Y., Design, Body for Sprayers, 29327. 

Ludwig Limpach, Berlin, Germany, making Salicylo-acetic acid, 611- 
014. 

Benjamin H. Lohman, St. Louis, Mo., Surgical Injector Clamp, ell- 
OSS. 

Henry T. Mason, Philadelphia, Pa., Package for Medical Preparations, 
611136. 

Arthur R. Moody: Stoke-on-Trent, England, Respirator, 610914. 

Ferdinand A. Reichardt, New York, N. Y., Surgical Case, 611023. 

Max Zahn, Artern, Germany, Obtaining Lime Sucrate, 61 1 164. 

Arthur M. Chambers, Thorncliffe, England, Medicinal Vaporizer, 611. 
560. 

Samuel L. Hannon and M. A. Jordan, Washington, D. C, Respirator, 
611478. 

Charles E. Longdon, New Haven, Conn., Syringe Tube, 611454. 

Arthur B. Cruickshank, London, England, Design, Syringe Bulb, 29- 
424. 

Wm. C. Ha'.lock, New York, N. Y., Design, Pessary, 29408. 



The following has been recommended for rheumatism : 

Lithium benzoate 4 scruples 

Potassium iodide Yi dram 

Tincture serpentaria 2 drams 

Wine colchicum 1 dram 

Fluid extract manaca \% drams 

Chloroform water, enough to make 8 ounces 

Adult dose: Two tablespoonsful twice a day. 



THE CALIFORNIA DRUGGIST. 



The Druggist Who Hade a Million. 

BY M. QUAD. 

"No, I'm not worth $3,000,000 in cash, as is popularly re- 
ported ", said the retired druggist, as he stroked his chin- 
whiskers in a complacent way. " I expect I'd have hard work 
to scrape up over half that sum, but I shall manage to get 
along some way. Meanwhile, I'm rich in the thought that I 
got my start in life in Connecticut." 

" But why particularize Connecticut? " was asked. 

" Because of its laws, and because of its queer people. In 
my time the druggist who started in business in a Connecticut 
town found about forty old laws on the statute books to con- 
front him and render his life miserable, and the stranger who 
opened business in a small town found all other business men 
against him. I got a corner store in a big village and began 
to hustle. The first thing I did was to take a full page ad. in 
the local paper. Can you believe that I was arrested for it? " 

' ' On what grounds ? ' ' 

" For unduly exciting the public ! Yes, sir, the warrant 
read that I was seeking to stir up anger and excitement against 
public welfare, and I was fined $10 and cautioned to go slow. 
I paid the newspaper $30 for that ad. and yet the editor came 
out in the next issue and said it was evident that a dangerous 
agitator had settled in the community and ought to be care- 
fully looked after ! It was the proprietor of the other drug 
store who instituted the proceedings against me, and in revenge 
I marked all my patent dollar remedies down to eighty cents. 
That left a thumping big profit, as you know, but in less than 
thirty-six hours I was arrested again. The charge was that I 
was preparing to defraud my creditors. I proved that I hadn't 
any, but owned my stock and had $1500 in the bank, but the 
court held that there must be some sort of fraud in my knock- 
ing down prices, and I paid another fine. I realized by this 
time that they were after me, but I was born of fighting stock 
and I made up my mind to hang on." 

' ' And the next move ? ' ' 

"Well, I had a grocer next to me, and a shoe store on the 
opposite corner. The grocer got four dozen bottles ot cough 
medicine to peddle out, and the shoe man put a lot of sponges 
and tooth-brushes on sale. I at once bought two barrels of 
sugar and sold it at a cent a pound less than the grocer, and I 
got a case of boots worth $3 a pair, and gave every man his 
choice for $1.50. I made those fellows tired in about three 
days, and they had me arrested for false pretenses. I turned 
about and hauled 'em up for selling goods not covered by their 
licenses, and they let go of me as if they'd picked up a hot 
potato. Meanwhile, the other druggist was laying for me 
again. There was a law that every prescription should be filed 
with the town clerk, but not knowing of it I had taken no 
steps. I pleaded guilty when arrested and was fined $10 and 
costs. I wanted to get even, of course, and the chance soon 
occurred. He visited his store on Sunday to see if all was 
right, and I swore out a warrant and he had to fork over $5. 
The law at that time even kept a man out of his own store on 
Sunday, unless in case of fire or serious illness." 

"Then they must have decided to let you alone ? " observed 
an interested listener. 

" On the contrary, the row had just begun ", replied the re- 
tired druggist. "A dry goods man went into toilet soaps, and I 
bought and almost gave away calico enough to last that county 



ten years. When I had settled him, a book-store man took up 
Seidlitz powders and pills, and I supplied the town with free 
paper and envelopes. I had got the better of him when I was 
fined for using obnoxious language. It wasn't anything I 
said, but a sign in the window, reading : 'You've all got 'em, 
but I've got the cure.' It was a cold-feet remedy, but the 
judge decided that the sigti might refer to bugs and other 
things, and was at any rate calculated to shock sensitive 
people. I paid the usual fine and shouldered my gun to get 
back at the chap who swore out the warrant. He was a furni- 
ture man and a church deacon, and after a bit I had him fined 
$5 for obstructing the sidewalk with a bedstead. As to trade 
and profits, I hadn't any, of course, but as my expenses were 
light, and my stock all paid for I could afford to hang on. 
When they had made a general boycott on me I used to go off 
fishing or hunting, and queerly enough I was arrested for that. 
Under an old law, which read that a drugstore must be kept 
open during reasonable hours on week days, I was fined $10 
and costs. My rival was the man who caused it, and the very 
next day I got even with him. A chimney burned out and he 
rang the fire bell. The law read that any person ringing the 
bell unless there was a fire was guilty of a misdemeanor, and 
as there was no fire it cost him $8 to square matters." 

," But they let you alone at last? " asked the impatient drug 
clerk who wanted to lock up and go to bed. 

' ' Yes, after a year or two more of it " , replied the retired 
druggist with a grim smile, "but I'm thinking that most 
young men in my position would have got discouraged and 
thrown up the sponge. Perhaps you never heard that there 
used to be a law in Connecticut against the use of ambiguous 
language? Well, there was, and I was arrested and fined $3 
under it. A man came in with a sore finger and wanted to 
know if tar would heal it. I told him I doubted it, and that 
was defined as ' ambiguous.' It was the furniture man who 
put up this job, and next day I had him up for cruelty to ani- 
mals in keeping a dog in the store over night. In the last at- 
tempt to crush me the furniture man, the shoe-store man, the 
grocer, and the rival druggist were combined. A boy came 
into the store with a sore heel and I dressed it with a piece of 
court-plaster. They brought up an old law to prove that I 
had given ' medical aid and assistance ' without having filed 
my diploma as a physician, and I paid something like $25 for 
my charity. The laugh was on me, but not for long. I caught 
the old deacon out after ten o'clock without a lantern and had 
him hauled up. The shoe-store man got into a jaw with a 
drayman, and I had seven counts of ' harsh and undue lan- 
guage ' against him in the warrant. The grocer left a trap- 
door open ' against public safety ' and had to pay $4 and costs, 
and the druggist was soaked $25 under an ancient law which 
held that all salves sold for the curing of sores must be com- 
pounded by 'ye keeper of the drug store himself.' " 

" And then you shook hands over the chasm and began to 
make your million and a half?" was asked as the retired drug- 
gist got up to go. 

"Why, yes, that was the end of the attempted freeze-out, 
but I sold my store after a bit. There was no money to be 
made there." 

" But how— how— ? " 

" Oh, I got elected to the Legislature and stood in with the 
ring for two or three terms. It may not be quite a million and 



THE CALIFORNIA DRUGGIST. 



a half, but a few thousand dollars makes no difference one way 
or the other. I was telling you of my adventures as a drug- 
gist simply to point a moral.' ' 

" But what is the point? " 

" Go into some other business if you want to make a million 
and a half ! " — American Druggist. 



Comfrey (Symphytum) in a Case of Sarcoma. 

In an address to the Royal Academy of Medicine in Ireland 
(Atlantic Med. Jour.) Mr. William Thomson, president of 
that body, said, speaking of a case of sarcoma : "The growth 
returned; the patient then consulted Dr. Semon, of London, 
who advised immediate removal of the jaw. This was done 
after the usual methods, and the whole base of the skull was 
found infiltrated. All that possibly could be was removed. 
After a month the growth returned, bulging upon the face, 
almost closing the right eye. 

" This was in June last, and we all agreed upon a speedily 
fatal prognosis. Early in October he walked into my office 
looking better than I had ever seen him, and I was not able to 
identify a trace of the former trouble. He told me had ap- 
plied poultices of comfrey- root, and that the swelling had 
gradually disappeared. 

" Now, this was a case of undoubted diagnosis by all the best 
known methods, in which the disease recurred twice, and the 
second time in an extreme degree ; and yet this recurrent 
tumor has disappeared. I do not know the cause, but I do be- 
lieve that comfrey-root can remove a sarcomatous tumor. The 
fact that this recurrent tumor has not sloughed away, but sim- 
ply with unbroken covering disappeared, is to me one of the 
greatest surprises and puzzles I have ever met with." 



They Don't Mix. 

An Illinois druggist has gone insane over Christian Science. 
He has become very violent, tried to set the house on fire, at- 
tempted suicide, and has been locked up for safety His ardent 
advocacy of Christian Science principles did not go very well 
in the drug business. When customers would inquire which 
of several medicines he would recommend, his reply usually 
was that it made no difference which they bought, for neither 
would do them any good. The Christian Science Disciple 
cannot make any money in the drug business. The two are 
basally incompatible. — Era. 



Young Doctor — Did you diagnose his case as appendicitis, 
or merely the cramps? Old Doctor — Cramps. He didn't 
have money enough for appendicitis. — Life. 



Old Dr. Fiset Who Has Got Ninety Years or So. 

But Doctor Fiset, not moche fonnc he get, 

Drivin' all over de whole contree, 
If de road she's bad, if de road she's good, 

When ev'cyt'iug drown on de Spriug-tam flood, 
An' working for not'ing half time mebbe ! 
Let her rain or snow, all he want to know 

Is jus' if anywau's feelin' sick, 
For Docteur Fiset's de ole-fashion kin', 

Doiii' good was de only t'ing on hees min', 
So he got no use for de politique. 

— British Medical Journal. 



Some of the Drug Conditions During the War Between the 
States, 1861=1865. 

BY JOSEPH JACOBS, PH. G., ATLANTA, GA. 

After referring fully to the condition of the Southern people 
prior to the war, and contrasting the strength of the Confederate 
Government, in both men and supplies, with that of the 
Federal Government, Mr. Jacobs touched on the character of 
the drugs in common use. 

ARTICLES WHICH WERE SCARCE. 

Among the scarcest articles in a drug store in those days 
were paper, twine and corks. Some of the stores obtained old 
life preservers from abandoned river boats and got a supply, 
thus, of hand-cut stoppers. Various fabrics were pressed 
together for small stoppers, and for large bottles, demijohns 
and jugs, different sized corn-cobs commanded the same price 
as XXX corks do today. In the museums of New York, 
Washington and Chicago can be seen some of the specimens 
of attempts to manufacture glass bottles in Louisiana, Ala- 
bama and South Carolina. 

In the interior districts and small villages the country 
doctors returned to first principles and to the use of the plants 
of the fields and forests ; and these agencies were about all 
they had to rely on, outside of whisky and a little quinine, the 
latter frequently at $100 an ounce. * * * 

Various small attempts were made to manufacture chemicals 
at Knoxville, Tenn., Greenville, S. C, Columbia, S. C, and 
Milledgeville and Macon Ga., but outside of producing a few 
gun-caps and nitre for making gunpowder and a few carboys of 
sulphuric acid for charging the torpedoes in Charleston harbor, 
very little was accomplished. Later on some small manufac- 
turing was done at Richmond and Charlotte, but, owing to the 
want of machinery and proper apparatus, little was achieved. 
A blockade runner brought into Wilmington, N. C, a supply 
of apparatus for making sulphuric acid, which arrived only a 
few days before the city fell. Much might have been accom- 
plished with this but for the fall of Wilmington, as the plant was 
said to be first-class, and, it is said, was disposed of for a large 
sum to a Philadelphia manufacturer. 

THE EXCESSIVELY HIGH PRICE OF QUININE 

made its handling a profitable employment. Almost every 
means known to human ingenuity was employed to smuggle 
it through the lines. Small packages were placed in letters, 
which the Adams Express Company would guarantee for the 
sum of $2 to deliver to the postoffice at some point in the 
Confederacy. Officers speculated in it, buying and selling 
until this created a scandal almost equal to that of speculating 
in cotton and it was finally stopped by a strong proclamation. 

MISHAP OF A FEMALE SMUGGLER. 

One of my Alabama lawyer friends, an ex-Confederate, 
famous for learning, for valor as a soldier and for delightful 
humor as a raconteur, once related to me the following remin- 
iscences : 

To supply the trying necessities of the drug demand, he said 
he had heard of many amusing plans that were resorted to by 
the government itself, and by persons who were mainly 
prompted by neither impulses of humanity nor patriotism, but 
by the simple desire of gain. He said he heard of a woman 



THE CALIFORNIA DRUGGIST. 



who went into the Northern lines four times, returning always 
with a considerable quantity of the more costly drugs con- 
cealed beneath her skirts. On her return from the fifth trip, 
however, some portion of her paraphernalia, while on a ferry 
boat, was caught in a way to put too great a strain on some 
string or buckle, so that it gave way, and the walking drug 
store was brought down to " dire combustion." * * 

ECONOMY IN HOSPITAL SUPPLIES. 

The following will give an idea of the economy that was en- 
joined in the matter of supplying general and post hospitals, 
the amounts stated being quantities for one year for one thou- 
sand troops : Acetic acid, 5 lbs. ; arsenic, 5 ozs. ; muriatic 
acid, 8 lbs. ; sulphuric acid, 8 lbs. ; tartaric acid, 16 lbs.; sul- 
phuric ether, 16 lbs. ; alcohol, 192 pint bottles; ammonia, 5 
lbs. nitrate of silver, 8 ozs. ; asafoetida, 32 ozs. ; camphor, 16 
lbs. ; catechu, 5 lbs. ; cerae albae, 16 lbs. ; chloroform, 8 lbs. ; 
copaiba, 40 lbs. ; creosote, 16 ozs. ; adhesive plaster, 40 yds. ; 
extract belladona, 16 ozs. ; fluidi buchu, 8 lbs. ; columbae, 8 
bs. ; gentian, 8 lbs; ; glycyrrhiza, 48 lbs. ; hyoscyani, 16 ozs.; 
rhei, 8 lbs. ; sarsaparilla, 16 lbs. ; senna, 8 lbs. ; valerian, 64 
ozs.; mercuric chloride, 5 ozs. ; iodine, 16 ozs. ; ammonia, 32 
lbs. ; magnesia, 5 lbs. ; sulphate morphia, 16 drs. ; myrrh, 5 
lbs. ; opium, 5 lbs. ; ether, 5 lbs. ; jalap, 32 ozs. ; cantharides, 
16 ozs. ; aloes, 32 ozs.; sulphate quinine, 80 to 160 ozs. ; 
sugar 160 lbs. ; strychnia, 8 drs. ; digitalis, 32 ozs. ; unguenti 
hydrarg., 8 lbs. * * * 

WAR-TIME DRUGGISTS AND PRICES. 

From my friend, J. F. B. Ljllard, of New York, I learn the 
following names of some druggists who were in business at the 
South during those trying times : Benjamin Ward, of Mobile ; 
H. Metcalf, at Montgomery, Ala.; J. A. Lee, New Iberia, La.; 
N. O. Mior, Columbia, S. C; John Ingalls, Macon, Ga.; J. J. 
Shott, Galveston, Tex.; F. S. Duffy, Newbern, S. C; G. W. 
Aymer, Charleston, S. C; S. T. Dornoville and A. H. Ros- 
coe, Nashville, Tenn.; Robert Carter, Columbus, Ga. ; A. Sol- 
omons, Savannah, Ga.; Crawford W. Long, Athens, Ga. 

To afford an idea of the prices ruling in Richmond, June, 
1863, I append the articles in some original invoices purchased 
by R. W. Powers from Kent, Paine & Co. Some are as fol- 
lows : 3 boxes ext. logwood, 47 lbs. at $4 per lb.; 1 keg bi- 
carb soda, 112 lbs. at $2.75; 1 case brown Windsor soap, 
$12.75 doz. ; 1 bbl. camphor, 86 lbs., at $20 ; 112 lbs. of galls 
at $4 ; ico lbs. tartaric acid, $2.25 per lb.; salt, 44c lb.; hops, 
$2.50 lb.; i cask French brandy, $52 gal.; India ink, 75c. bot- 
tle ; 9 doz. assorted pencils, $4 doz.; phosphorus, $14 lb.; citric 
acid, $4.50; oil peppermint, $16.50 ; Kpsom salts, $3.87^ ; 6 
bottles capsules, $6.50; 12 pewter syringes, $1.25 each; 2 
boxes blue pills, $6 ; 1 bottle syr. ipecac, $10 ; 15 ozs. quinine, 
$22.25 oz.; 60 dr. morphine, $28 dr.; blacking, $1.40 per box ; 
tallow candles, $2.37 lb. '* * * 
housewives' remedies. 

It was quite an industry, I am told by an Atlanta lady, Mrs. 
Marcus A. Bell, for the country people to raise castor oil beans. 
The crushed beans were boiled and the oil skimmed off. She 
said that the grandmothers of those days revived the traditions 
of Colonial times. They made their own dyes and coloring 
matters from the roots and barks of native woods. Dogwood, su- 
mac and the roots of pine trees were largely used, and indigo 
was cultivated in the gardens. Instead of paregoric, fennel- 



seed tea was given to the babies. For rash they used red-oak 
bark and alum. Goose grease and sorghum, or honey, was a 
standard remedy for croup, backed up with turpentine and 
brown sugar. Sassafras tea was given in the spring and fall 
as a blood medicine. Adults' colds were doctored with horse- 
mint tea and tea from the roots of broom sedge. For eruptions 
and impure blood, spice-wood tea was given. Wine was made 
from the berries of the elder bush. For diarrhea, roots of 
blackberry and blackberry cordial ; and so, also, was a tea 
made from the leaves of the rose geranium. Mutton suet, sweet 
gum and the buds of the balm of Gilead was a standard salve 
for all cuts and sores. Balsam cucumber was widely used as a 
tonic, and was considered a specific remedy in burns. Catnip, 
elecampane, and comfrey root and pennyroyal were in every 
good housewife's pantry, in which, also, was the indispensable 
string of red peppers, a bag of sage leaves and of " balm." 
Calamus root for colic in babies was a common dose. The best 
known standard Georgia tonic was dogwood, poplar and wild- 
cherry barks, equal proportions, chipped fine and put in whisky 
and taken a wineglassful at meal times ; it is still used in large 
quantities from " Yamaeraw to Nickajack." In hemorrhages, 
black-haw root was commonly used. All the white mustard 
we had was raised in our gardens. 

She learned from these experiences that barks were best 
gathered while the sap was running, and when gathered the 
outer and rougher portion should be shaved off and the bark 
cut thinly and placee in a good position in the shade to dry ; 
that roots ought to be gathered after the leaves are dead in the 
fall, or better, before the sap rises ; that seeds and flowers must 
be gathered only when fully ripe, and put in a nice dry place, 
and that medicinal plants to be secured in the greatest perfec- 
tion, should be obtained when in bloom and carefully dried in 
the shade. 

WAR SUBSTITUTES. 

I here append a list of substitutes that were used by drug- 
gists and physicians during the war in large quantities, in most 
of the instances being the only medicines of the kind to be had: 

IMPORTED ARTICLES. SUBSTITUTES. 

Columbo, Quassia Yellow root. 

Spanish Flies Potato bugs. 

Powdered leaves of butternut. 
Jalap Wild jalap. 

Wild potato vine. 

Fever root. 
Aloes , Wild jalap. 

Mulberry bark. 

Butternut. 

Dock. 

Wild potato vine. 

Amer. Colombo. 
Quinine and Peruvian Bark.. .Tulip tree bark. 

Dogwood. 

Cotton-seed tea. 

Chestnut root and bark. 

Chinquepin root and bark. 

Thoroughwort. 

Spanish oak bark. 

Knob grass. 

Willow bark. 
Digitalis Blood-root. 

Wild cherry. 

Pipsissiwa. 

Bugle weed. 

Jasmine. 



THE CALIFORNIA DRUGGIST. 



Conium American hemlock. 

Opium American hemlock. 

Motherwort. 
Sarsaparilla Wild sarsaparilla. 

Soapwort. 

Yellow parilla. 

China briar. 

Queen's delight. 

Chamomile Dogwood. 

Flaxseed. Watermelon seed. 

Gum Arabic Low mallows. 

Apple, pear and quince gum. 

Balm. 

Watermelon seed. 

Ergot Cotton-root . 

Guaiacum Boxwood. 

Poke. 

Prickly ash. 
Ipecac Wild jalap. 

Carolina hipps. 

Mezereon Prickly ash. 

Kino and Catechu Cranesbill. 

Senna Wild senna. 

Colocynth Alum-root. 

Tannin Smooth sumac. 

Olive oil Peanut oil. 

Beech-nut oil. 

Cotton-seed oil. 
Laudanum Hops. 

Motherwort. 
Acacia Slippery-elm bark. 

Sassafras pith. 

Bougies Slippery-elm bark. 

Corks Black gum roots. 

Tupelo wood. 

Corn-cobs. 

Allspice Spice-bush. 

Pink root Cardinal flower. 

Asafoetida Wild chamomile. 

Calomel Dandelion. 

Pleurisy root. 

Butterfly weed. 
Belladonna and Hyoscya»ius... Jamestown weed. 

Valerian Lady's slipper. 

Colchicum Indian poke. 

PECULIAR AND UNUSUAL USES OF ARTICLES. 

From various physicians, intelligent ladies, and from old 
Confederate magazines and books and newspapers, I have 
gathered the following data in reference to peculiar and un- 
usual uses of articles that are incident to our trade, that 
seemed to be of more or less general employment in the South 
by physicians, druggists and in Confederate households. 

Wood anemone was employed as a vesicatory in removing 
corns from the feet. Powdered may-apple, mixed with resin, 
was used as a caustic in treating horses, the farriers using it 
for escharotic purposes. On the farm the juice of the pulp of 
the may-pop seeds was made into a summer drink in place of 
lemonade. Powdered blood-root, snuffed up the nose, made a 
powerful sternutatory and was applied as an escharotic to fun- 
gus flesh. Pond-lily poultice was extensively applied to ulcers. 
Button snakeroot, or globe flower, was used largely as an 
expectorant or diuretic. Tooth-ache bark (aralia spinosa) was 
used to allay pain caused by carious teeth, and in South Caro- 
lina the negroes relied on it almost exclusively for rattlesnake 
bite. Side-saddle or fly-catcher was used in the various forms 
of dyspepsia. Ink was made from the rind of the pomegran- 
ate fruit and from poke berries. Where during convalesence 



an astringent tonic was indicated, dogwood supplied the need. 
This, with the blackberry and gentians and pipsissiwa as 
tonic and diuretics, and sweet gum and sassafras for mucilagi- 
nous and aromatic properties, and wild jalap as a cathartic, 
supplied the surgeon in camp with easily procurable medicinal 
plants, which proved sufficient in many times of need. 

The bark of the dogwood and swamp willow was mixed 
with tobacco for smoking. Watermelon juice was made into 
a syrup, and the rind into preserves. The seeds of the water- 
melon and those of the gourd were used as a diuretic. Gourd 
rind was used as mould for buttons. The ladies of St. John's 
Parish, S. C, used prickly pear for hardening tallow in candle 
making, one pound to four pounds of tallow, taking the place 
of wax. The hand-leaved violet formed an emollient applica- 
tion. Red maple made an astringent wash. * * 

AN OLD FORMULA FOR SOAP. 

Among the recipes for making soap that were published in 
the Southern papers, I note the following : i. Yellow or 
resin soap : dissolve one pound of concentrated lye in half a 
gallon of water and three and a half pounds of fat or tallow, 
and boil ; put in three-fourths pound of powdered resin, and 
let it boil down by constantly stirring until the soap sticks on 
the kettle and gets very thick. Put in a mould. 2. Hard 
fancy soap : Dissolve half pound of concentrated lye in two 
and a half pounds of hot water, and let cool ; then melt by a 
low heat five pounds of clear fat or tallow ; pour in the lye in 
a very small stream, and stir rapidly. Keep stirring until all 
has assumed the appearance of thick honey. L,et it stand for 
24 hours, when it will have set into a fine hard soap, which 
may be perfumed or variegated with colors by stirring in the 
desired perfume or coloring matter, just before covering. 3. 
Soft soap : One pound concentrated lye and three gallons soft 
water and five pounds fat or tallow. Boil till the mass grows 
transparent and all the fat has disappeared. Add fifteen gal- 
lons of water and boil a few minutes, and the soap will be 
ready for use. * * * 

What I have here collected has been put together in a busy 
season and during the war excitements that have just been en- 
gaging the attention of all our people. The result is not in- 
tended as a complete history of the conditions named. It could, 
necessarily, only be a part of the history of those conditions. 

In designing this paper, I had hoped to make it more com- 
plete by using contributions from surgeons of the Confederate 
army and navy, and druggists engaged in business during the 
period, so far as they were living, and from papers to be loaned 
me by them. Out of scores of letters addressed to living men 
of this character, I received but few replies. In obtaining some 
of the matter, railway trips had to be taken, and much of it was 
collected at considerable expense and labor. When it is remem- 
bered that the conditions that are suggested here lasted for a 
period of nearly four years, then the sufferings and the achieve- 
ments and the heroism of seven millions of people are in a 
measure made manifest. 

If I have succeeded in recalling by way of suggestion some 
facts that in the present may be of use, or in the future may 
be evolved into utility, I will have been rewarded for my out- 
lay and my efforts. 

The war of 1861-1865 is now but a memory. The heroes of 
both sides — those "tented" on "fame's eternal camping 
ground ' ' and the survivors — are now dear to a re-united 



THE CALIFORNIA DRUGGIST. 



people, who, proud of the common victories of their fellow- 
countrymen at Manila and Santiago, and rejoicing in the 
vigor of American arms and the glory of American ideals, 
stand expectantly awaiting and hopefully facing the great 
future in store. 

The Flora and Fauna of the Philippine Islands. 

BY CLEMENT B. LOWE. 

An article on the Philippines by the writer, read before the 
New Jersey Pharmaceutical Association, having attracted con- 
siderable attention, on account of the interest which all Amer- 
icans now have in these islands, I have been requested to pre- 
pare a paper on the above title for the Alumni Report. 

In doing so, it will be necessary to look into the situation of 
these islands, and to consider the relation which they bear to 
adjacent land. It is supposed that they originally belonged to 
the Asiatic mainland, having become detached from it probably 
by subsidence, as they seem to lie upon a shallow submarine 
plateau reaching from the Malay peninsula eastward for some 
1 200 or 1500 miles. They also show the same volcanic forma- 
tion which curves southeastward through Sumatra and Java, 
and thence northward through the Celebes into the Philip- 
pines ; therefore earthquakes are not infrequent, these seismo- 
logical disturbances being carefully watched, and recorded in 
the excellent observatory of the Jesuits at Manila. 

It is therefore reasonable to suppose that there should be 
some similarity between the flora and fauna of these islands 
and that of the mainland. This we find to be the case, modi- 
fied, of course, by somewhat different climatic conditions and 
surroundings. In the case of the Philippines modified also by 
their longer isolation, which has greatly lessened similarities 
and increased divergencies. 

The climatic conditions in the neighborhood of Manila show 
an equable temperature varying between 72 and 95 F., the 
greatest heat occurring in April, May and June, the annual 
rainfall averaging between 98 and 100 inches. The northern 
part of these islands, Luzon, etc., are exposed to the violent 
northeast monsoons, and in October there may be expected 
the terrific typhoons like that which wrecked the United States 
warships Trenton and Vandalia in the harbor of Samoa. 

The Philippines are exceedingly well watered, containing a 
number of perennial rivers and upland and lowland lakes. In 
consequence of the equable climate, large rainfal and fertility 
of the soil, the vegetation is of a tropical character and won- 
derfully luxuriant, the mountains being clothed with magnifi- 
cent forests to their very tops. 

The nomenclature of the woods of the country forms an im- 
mense list, the most of which are little known. Among the 
trees yielding valuable woods we find magnificent forests of 
ebony (Diospyros ebenum, or D. ebenaster); the ironwood 
(Diospyros species), which is so heavy and exceedingly close- 
grained ; the sapan (Caesalpina sapan), which is exported as a 
dyewood ; a cedar (Cedrus ceodar) ; the highly prized teak 
(Tectona grandis), which grows to a height of 120 to 150 feet, 
with a girth of 10 to 25 feet. The wood is of a yellowish- 
brown color, straight-grained, easily worked, hard, strong, and 
once seasoned does not readily warp or crack. On account 
of the presence of a resinous oil it is not attacked by insects, 
and is wonderfully durable. It is especially preferred for ship- 
building, particularly for the woodwork of armored vessels, as 



not containing tannin, it does not corrode the metal like iron. 
The oil which is extracted is used medicinally and as a substi- 
tute for linseed oil. " Narra wood" has the appearance of 
mahogany, but is lighter in color, and not so close-grained ; it 
it is excellently suited for furniture. 

" The floors of the houses are made out of hand-sawed hard- 
wood planks, which are most highly polished by banana leaves 
and greasy rags." One of the sidewalk trees af Manila is the 
showy fir tree (Arbol de fuego), which in general resembles an 
oak. The thick, flaming red blossoms appear mostly before 
the leaves, and hence the trees when in bloom seem like a 
mass of fire. 

The natural order Palmse is well represented by several va- 
riety of palms, which form striking features of the landscape. 
Among them is the cocoanut palm (Cocos nucifera), which 
grows all over the islands, presenting a beautiful appearance ; 
from the husk of its fruit is produced the fiber (coir) which has 
such extensive economic uses ; from the fruit the well known 
cocoanut oil. The betelnut palm (Areca catechu), the fruit of 
which is extensively masticated in the East, is the most grace- 
ful of the eastern palms. From the gomuti palm ( Arenga sac- 
charifera) is made the native sugar (jaggery), and by the fer- 
mentation of its juice an intoxicating liquor or toddy (from the 
Sanscrit tade), which is largely consumed. 

The sago palm (Sagus Rumphii), whose pith yields the sago 
of commerce, largely consumed as a food, grows principally on 
the large island of Mindanao. The dragon's blood palm 
(Calamus Draco) climbs by means of strong spines on the leafy 
petioles ; it sometimes reaches a length of 300 feet. From its 
fruit is obtained the resin constituting the dragon's blood of 
commerce. 

The natural order Graminese is represented by the bamboo 
(Bambusa vulgaris and Dendrocalamus giganteus). This most 
valuable plant forms one of the principal objects of the tropical 
scenery, shading the streets outside of Manila proper. From 
it is made innumerable objects, viz., house furniture, bridges, 
rafts carts, boxes, baskets, bottles, fishing-rods, pipe-stems, 
etc. The sugar cane (Saccharum officinarum), of which there 
are some twenty varieties, is cultivated to a large extent, 160,- 
000 tons being exported in a single year, but it is not as profit- 
able as it could be made under better management, owing to 
the low grade of sugar. Rice (Oryza sativa) is the staple food 
of the inhabitants, being preferred to sago. It grows luxuri- 
antly, and it would be easily possible to raise all consumed, 
but large amounts are imported. Indian corn (Zea mays) is 
cultivated to some extent as in other parts of the East Indies, 
and millet is also said to be raised. 

The natural order Musacese is represented by the well known 
banana (Musa sapientum), whose fruit is eaten raw. By the 
plantain (Musa paradisiaca), the oriental staff of life, whose 
fruit is much larger— in the mountains one or two are said to 
be a load for a man ; they are generally eaten cooked (fried, 
roasted or baked) . The stem of the plantain (Musa textilis) 
yields the valuable fiber known as abaca or Manila hemp, con- 
stituting, next to sugar, the most valuable export from the 
islands, amounting to some 200,000,000 pounds per year. 

The Bromeliacese are represented by the pineapple (Aua- 
nassa sativa), which grows as common as weeds. If the fruit 
is not allowed to mature, there can be prepared from the leaves 
exceedingly long, fine fibers, from which the most delicate 



THE CALIFORNIA DRUGGIST. 



fabrics known in the world can be woven, some of the necker- 
chiefs worn by the native women costing $100. 

The Solanaceae are represented by the tobacco plant (Nico- 
tiana rustica), cultivated to a large extent, the quality rivaling 
that of Cuba. "The very finest cigars in Manila (the ' In- 
comparables ' ) , made of a special selected tobacco, wrapped in 
silver foil, packed in rosewood boxes and tied with Spanish 
ribbon, cost only 5 cents apiece." 

The Rubiacese are represented by the coffee plant (Coffea 
species) which thrives wonderfully well, producing a berry 
which is so strongly flavored that the worst Manila coffee is 
said to command as high a price as the best Java, and to be 
highly esteemed by connoiseurs on the Continent. 

The Aurantiacese are represented by the orange (Citrus au- 
rantium), and the citron (C. medica). 

The Myrtaceae, by the well known guava fruit (Psidium 
guaiva), and by the rose-apple (Eugenia jamboo), which has a 
dry but edible and strongly rose-flavored fruit. 

The Leguminosse by the tamarind (Tamarindus indica), the 
fruit of which is largely used in cookery in the East, or is eaten 
raw, or as a condiment with rice, vegetables, etc. Also by the 
indigo plant (Indigofera tinctoria), which is cultivated to some 
extent. 

The Anacardiacese by the mango (Mangifera indica), " the 
apple of the tropics." Good mangoes are said to hsve a deli- 
cately flavored pulp, and a consistence somewhat like butter ; 
the poorer ones a taste like tar and turpentine. 

The vegetables of the temperate zone, such as beans, peas, 
etc. , are grown by covering them up and protecting them from 
the sun by trellis works covered by banana leaves, although 
they are mainly brought from Hong Kong. 

Flowering plants are not as numerous as one would suppose, 
and those which are represented have mostly small inodorous 
flowers. The orchids, however, are of rare beauty, and quite 
abundant in the forests. Fragrant pink pond lilies are found 
in some of the lakes. 

The fauna of these islands is remarkable for the entire ab- 
sence of the larger forms of animal life, e.g., the elephant, 
rhinoceros, tapir, tiger, etc., such as are common to the main- 
land and larger adjacent islands ; the smaller forms are quite 
similar. 

The wild animals comprise the antelope, fox, wildcat and 
monkey. Flying mammals are numerous ; they include a 
squirrel, a lemur and some twenty species of bats. 

Singing birds are not numerous, but are replaced by a large 
variety of pigeons, parrots, cockatoos, a pheasant and water- 
fowl. 

The reptiles are represented by crocodiles, lizards (one of 
them, an iguana, being four feet in length), a large python 
some 40 feet long, and numerous other snakes, some harmless 
species of the latter being used for hunting the voracious 
house rats, both snakes and rats generally taking up their 
abode between the ceiling and roof of the house. 

The domestic animals are the pony, strong, tough and quick 
stepping ( there are no horses); the Indian buffalo (carabao), 
used for ploughing, pulling the fire engines, etc.; various 
breeds of mongrel dogs, and forlorn cats, and numerous fowl, 
the gamecock being everywhere in evidence, occupying, as it 
does, the_first place in the affection of the natives, and in case 
of fire removed from danger before the babies. 



A few words about the ethnology of the islands may not be 
amiss, although somewhat outside the scope of the article. 
The bulk of the nearly 8,000,000 population belongs funda- 
mentally to the Malay stock, presenting a great variety of type 
and speech, some forty different languages being spoken. In 
and adjacent to the large cities are numerous Chinese, 100,000 
or more. In the mountains of the five larger islands are found 
the Negritoes ("Little Negroes"), who are said to number 
some 20,000. They are about 4 feet 6 inches high, with round 
skulls, and very short frizzly or woolly hair, and are supposed 
to be related to the pigmy tribes of Africa. They are of a very 
low order of intelligence, have no fixed abodes, and get their 
living by hunting game with poisoned arrows. 

In conclusion, the general situation in the Philippine Islands 
can probably be summed up best in the lines of the familiar 

hymn : 

" Where every prospect pleases, 
And only man is vile.'" 

— Alumni Report. 



Chemical Lecture Experiment. 

The following pretty and interesting experiment with ma- 
terials available to any pharmacist, is taken from a German 
journal : 

Pour into a test tube 3 ccm. concentrated sulphuric acid, 
and let a similar amount of alcohol trickle down the glass and 
form a layer over it. Now, without shaking the glass, drop 
in a few little crystals of potassium permanganate. There is 
at once a development of small bubbles of gas, and in the 
course of two or three minutes in the zone of activity or per- 
turbation, flashes of light, resembling lightning and which re- 
produce in miniature the phenomena of electrical discharges. 
This contines a while, the flashes gradually growing stronger, 
when suddenly the liquids mix. By letting the tube stand 
perfectly quiet the phenomena will last an hour or more with 
short pauses. If a longer pause than usual, and the phenomena 
appears to have ceased altogether, give the tube a slight shake 
and they reappear and continue da capo. The temperature of 
the liquids rises, but so little and so slowly that the increment 
is scarcely perceptible. The phenomena are not satisfactorily 
explained. The nascent oxygen of K M n 4 is a factor with- 
out doubt. — Mont. Phar. Jour. 



M. Louis Roure, the perfume manufacturer of Grasse, 
France, who was represented in New York by W. P. Ungerer, 
died a few weeks ago. He was an active, clever and ingenious 
Frenchman. All his perfumes were extracted from flowers. 
He combined the scents of six or seven in endless varieties. 
They were to him, as a perfumer, what the keyboard of a 
piano is to a Rubenstein. — American Druggist. 



It is stated that Alberto Ricci, of Turin, has discovered that 
solution of hydrogen dioxide rapidly disintegrates hardened 
masses of cerumen in the ear. A small quantity of the liquid 
is poured in, allowed to remain a few moments and the pas- 
sage is then syringed with water. — Drug. Circular. 



Dollie — " He promised to send back my lock of hair, but 
he hasn't done it yet." Mollie — "That's the way with these 
hair restorers — all promise and no performance." 



THE CALIFORNIA DRUGGIST. 



Business Personals. 



John R. Cauch succeeds E. R. Cauch & Son, Santa Paula. 
Congratulations to the new firm. 



A new drug store is being opened in the Adams Hotel 
building, Phoenix, by Collins & Co. 



The Phoenix (Arizona) Drug Co. are now located in hand- 
some quarters in the Ford Hotel Block. 



T. B. Robinson, Compton, has sold to Mrs. Helen Ward. 
Mr. L. A. Rockwell continues as manager. 



Mr. Frank Jones, of Jones & Son, Ventura, spent a few 
pleasant days in this city this month. It was his first outing 
in six months. 

Mr. Ed. Kelly, recently with H. Brisley, Prescott, is now 
occupying the position of dispensary clerk at the Territorial 
Hospital for Insane, Phoenix. 



Mr. Harry Brisley, of Prescott, Arizona, who with his 
family has been absent several months on a visit to his old 
home in England, returned last month, having greatly enjoyed 
the trip. 

Mr. Ed. C. Robinson, the good looking and affable head 
clerk with J. H. Trout, with the efficient help of J. W. Mon- 
tague, will manage the pharmacy during Dr. Trout's absence 
at the East. 

Mr. Clarence Condon has accepted a position with Jones & 
Son, Ventura. Mr. Condon is a well known and popular 
young pharmacist of this city, and will make a desirable addi- 
tion to the drug circle of Ventura. 



Otto G. Freyermuth, lately with Pierce & Robbins, Pomona, 
has gone to San Francisco to enter the California College of 
Pharmacy. In due time we hope to see Otto emerge, bearing 
the coveted Ph. G. on his banner. 



Mr. Matias P. Hernandez, buyer for L. E. Samaniego & Co., 
Cindad Juarez, Mexico, and Miss Flora Martinez, were mar- 
ried at Sacred Heart Church, El Paso, Texas, Sept. 15th. 
May their pathway be strewn with roses. 



Elwin F. Tarr succeeds Brisley & Tarr at Jerome, Arizona. 
The conflagration that wiped out the town last month took 
Brisley & Tarr's building with the rest, and dissolved the 
partnership as well. We wish Mr. Tarr a successful career 
and no more fires. 



The A. W. Ellington Drug Co.'s store, Spring and Fourth 
streets, is undergoing a transformation. The adjoining room 
has been added, the partition removed, and an entire new 
front put in. As completed, the room will have a frontage of 
40 feet, permitting the fitting up of an establishment second to 
none in this city. When the work of refitting the store is 
complete we hope to make further allusion to the changes 
that have taken changes therein. 



Dr. J. H. Trout, the popular druggist of Broadway and 
Sixth street, accompanied by Mrs. Trout, left on the 5th inst. 
for Pittsburg, to attend the Triennial Conclave of Knights 
Templar. After participating in the festivities of that occa- 
sion, they will visit relatives at the doctor's old Pennsylvania 
home, besides making side trips to New York and other 
eastern cities. They expect to return by December 1st. 



Minier & Co. succeed Minier, Kennedy & Co. (Arcadian 
Pharmacy), Tucson, Arizona. 



Tests for Lard. 

The pharmacopoeia gives a full description of lard with di- 
rections for detecting most adulterations. 

A. P. Smith has devoted considerable time to the means of 
identifying pork drippings when sold for pure lard or the in- 
ternal fat of the abdomen of the hog. He announces through 
an English journal that this distinction can be determined by 
means of the melting point. We copy the following from his 
article : 

Deg. F. 

Pure home-rendered lard melts at 112 

Chemists' prepared lard melts at 113 

Grocers' I lard melts at 106 

Grocers' II American lard melts at 96 

Grocers' III lard melts at 95 

Grocers' IV lard melts at 103 

Grocers' V lard melts at 102 

Bacon fat melts at 90 

It is an acknowledged fact that the manufacturer melts down 
the whole available fat of the pig ; but, should the product be 
called lard? Certainly not, any more than beef dripping is 
entitled to the name of suet. Lard is the fat from the omen- 
tum, or " leaf" of the pig, and from no other part. The melt- 
ing point of lard is of the highest importance when it is used 
for making pastry. The quality of the crust materially de- 
pends upon it. In the hand of a good cook pure lard fur- 
nishes a puff paste an inch or more in thicknes, while lard of 
95 melting point yields a tough, hard crust, unbreakable by a 
spoon. I have purposely had experiments made under my 
supervision with lards of various melting points, and the rise 
in the crust was exactly proportional with the rise of the 
melting point of the lard employed. 

It is a noticeable fact that pure lard always solidifies with a 
crinkled surface, while shop lard is perfectly smooth. — M. B. 
Druggist. 

Incorporated. 

The Ellington Drug Company, Los Angeles, Cal.; capital 
stock, $30,000, divided into 3,000 shares, of which amount 
$12,000 has been subscribed. The purposes of the company 
are to do a general business in buying and selling drugs and 
physicians' supplies. The directors named are A. W. Elling- 
ton, C. W. von Spiegel, O. P. Widaman, Burton E. Green, 
and Delia M. Ellington. 



" I suppose," said the quack while feeling the pulse of his 
patient, "that you think me a fool." "Sir," replied the 
sick man, "-I perceive you can discover a man's thoughts by 
his pulse." 



IO 



THE CALIFORNIA DRUGGIST. 



OUR ADVERTISERS. 



It will be of interest and value to the trade to consult our 



advertising columns, in which 

following firms and goods : 

A.. Gettleman Brewing Co. 
Allcock's Plasters. 
Ammonol Chemical Co. 
Antikamnia Chemical Co. 
Apollinaris Co., Limited. 
Arlington Chemical Co. 
Beeman Chemical Co. 
Braun, F. W. & Co.'s Laboratory 

Products. 
California Fig Syrup Co. 
Cal. Mission Eucalyptus Lozenges. 
Centaur Company. 
Crown Perfumery Co. 
Davol Rubber Co. 
Dean & Son. 
Etna Chemical Co. 
Florence Manufacturing Co. 
Goodrich, B. F. & Co. 
Coronado Corks. 



will be found represented the 



Hayden Manufacturing Co. 

Hubert, Prof. I. 

Jayne, Dr. D. & Son. 

Kondon Manufacturing Co. 

Kuhns, Arthur Company. 

Leiner, M. 

Levy, B. & Co. 

Ludwick, G. M. 

Mariani & Co. 

Mead, J. L., Cycle Co. 

Moore, H. H. & Sons. 

Munn & Co. 

N. Y. Pharmacal Association. 

Planten,H. & Son. 

Taite, Jos. G. & Sons. 

T. B. Insect Powder. 

Thum, O. W. Co. 

Wyeth, John & Bro. 



Pacific Coast Drug Agency 



Kurtz' Freckle Salve \ 

(ORIGINAL) *» 

Manufactured only by C. F. HEINZEMAN )* 

Los Angeles, Cal. ^ 

Trade Mark Registered. R 




New Goods Received by F. W. Braun & Co. 

Salvacea, extra strong, 50c doz. 

Grove's Tasteless Quinine oz. 

Armour's Beef Capsules doz. 

Armour's Vigoral, 2 oz doz. 

Thialion doz. 

Eucaine Hydrochor, l /g oz oz. 

Ferro Somatose, yi oz doz. 

Lacto Somatose, l /% oz doz. 

Walnut Hair Restorer doz. 

Coe's Eczema Cure doz. 

Wampole's Pepsin Cachous doz. 

Wampole's Li thia Tablets, 3 gr doz. 

Wampole's Lithia Tablets, 5 gr doz. 

Elba's Ant Exterminator doz. 



$4.00 

.85 

2.25 

2.50 

10.00 
3.60 

10.50 

10.50 
7.75 
8.50 
.75 
1.70 
2.10 
1.75 



The preliminary plans of the New York Zoological Park, 
to be located in south Bronx Park, one of the new acquisi- 
tions of Greater New York, have been completed, and work 
upon them will soon be commenced. These plans include 
those for the lion house, the monkey house, the elephant 
house, bird house, winter house for birds, reptile house, trop- 
ical ruminants house, main restaurant and administration 
buildings. Of secondary structures there will be : a flying 
cage, eagles and vultures aviary, buffalo house, deer barns, 
wolf and fox dens, bear dens, sea-lion pond, pheasant aviary, 
mountain sheep shelter and duck aviaries. Particular atten- 
tion has been given in connection with this park to as com- 
plete a system of sewerage and water supply as science and 
money can create. The different houses and the outer 
grounds will be kept in almost as an aseptic condition as 
the wards of a well regulated hospital. — Medical Times. 

Laundry Polish: White Wax 2 ounces 

Spermaceti 4 ounces 

Stearin y z ounce 

Ultramarine blue 3 grains 

Melt together and let cool. For a dozen shirts, put a piece the size of 
a hazlcnut in the hot starch, and mix. Finish with a hot iron. 



OFFERS FOR SALE 



First-Class Drug Stores 
and Medical Practices 

in all the Pacific States and Territories 

Clerks Registered, Prooided and Employed. Partnerships 
Negotiated. Lists Sent Free. Correspondence Solicited. 

G. M. LUDWICK, 

S. E. Corner Second St. and Broadway, Room 201, Los Angeles, Cal. 



Three money-makers are offered to the trade this month by 
F. W. Braun & Co. in the Hayden Mfg. Co.'s Arnica Salve, 
Carbolic Salve and Witch Hazel Salve. They are very neatly 
put up in large-sized boxes, and retail at 25 cents. The un- 
iform price is $1 per dozen Add some to your next order. 



WANTS, Etc., Etc. 

[ Under this heading we will be pleased to publish FREE OF 
CHARGE, notices of clerks wanted, positions desired, stores for 
sale or exchange, propositions for purchasing , etc."] 

WANTED — To purchase a drug store in good business center in Los 
Angeles. Address with full particulars, Arthur Wright, care of 
Mr. Maconkey, 887 Bedford Ave., Brooklyn, N. Y. 



WANTED — Position by graduate in pharmacy. Best reference and 
long experience. Please state salary can give. J. R. HODGES, 
Coleman, Tex. 

WANTED — Partner to open new drug business. Am graduate with 
long experience. State amount of money can put in. Best 
references. Address " TEXAS," care of California Druggist. 

WANTED — To sell, the Figueroa Pharmaey, the best paying outside 
store in the city, at invoice. Want to devote all my time to prac- 
tice only reason for selling. Only those meaning business need apply. 
W. M. Johnston, M. D., owner. 

FOR SALE — A fine drug business in Norwalk ; splendid location ; no 
opposition, there being no other drug store within a radius of five 
miles. Norwalk has about 1000 inhabitants and lies in the center of a 
thickly settled and productive valley. Owner must sell on account of 
ill health. Address DR. W. T. MERCHANT, Norwalk, Cal. 



FOR SALE — Only drug store in Southern California town of 600 in- 
habitants, with a large tributary population. Rich dairy country 
in artesian belt; 10 miles from ocean; no competition nearer than 8 
miles. Stock of about $2000. Rent only $8.00 per month. Will sell at 
invoice, with reasonable discount for cash. Inquire of F. BRAUN & 
CO., Los Angeles. 

FOR SALE — An established drug business a few miles from Los An- 
geles, in country town. Will sell at inventors 7 , which will come 
near to $3000. Inquire of F. W. BRAUN & CO., Los Angeles 

FOR SALE — Small drug store, near the peat lands, Orange county. 
Drugs will invoice about $600. Lot and house $350. Good open- 
ing for doctor. Address F. W BRAUN & CO., Los Angeles. 

FOR EXCHANGE— House and lot in Los Angeles, Cal., worth $1500 
for stock of drugs of like amount, in country town where cutting 
of prices is unknown. Address GEO. E. BLUE, 3129 S. MAIN, Los 
Angeles, Cal. 

FOR SALE — A well located drug store in Los Angeles, with an in- 
creasing trade, value $1200. Expenses small. Owner not pharma- 
cist is reason for selling. Inquire of F. W. Braun & Co , Los Angeles 

FOR SALE — In coast city of Southern California, a drug business 
established over eight years. Stock about $2500 ; location first-class. 
A ddress M. H., care CALIFORN IA DRUGGIST. 

FOR SALE — A city drug store. Fine location. Good business. Low 
rent. Good reasons for selling. Address L, care F. W. BRAUN & 
CO. 



FOR SALE — City drug business at a bargain. Stock about $1200, all 
clean and no dead stuff. Good location for a doctor. Inquire of F. 
W. BRAUN & CO., Los Angeles. 

FOR SALE — Elegant clean stock in the most progressive suburb of 
Los Angeles. Only drug store within twenty blocks. Best reasons 
for selling. Value about $2000. Inquire of F. W. BRAUN & CO. 
Los Angeles. 

FOR SALE — A good, long established drug business in this city. 
Price, $2500. Address "ADVANTAGEOUS," care CALIFORNIA 
DRUGGIST. 



THE CALIFORNIA DRUGGIST. 



1 1 



PRICE LIST OF DRUGS, CHEMICALS, ETC. 

These prices are for quantities as ordinarily bought by average buyers, and include containers, unless 
otherwise indicated. Subject to market changes. 

For special quantities we will make special figures. 

F. W. BRAUN & CO., Los Angeles, Cal. 



ACBTANILID ft 42® 45 

ACID. Acetic No. 8 ft 10® 25 

Acetic U. S. P ft 30 

Benzoic, Eng oz 16 

Benzoic, German oz 10 

Boracic ft 14® 20 

Carbolic, crude gal 40® 50 

Carbolic, cryst, blk label, 1-ft tin ft 30® 32 

Carbolic, cryst, blk label, 5-ft tins ft 28® 30 

Carbolic, cryst, gold label, 1-ft bots ft 36® 38 

Carbolic, cryst, gold label, 5-ft tin ft 33® 36 

Citric ft 38® 46 

Gallic oz 11® 12 

Hydrocyanic, dil oz 11® 12 

Hydrocyanic, cone, Scheele's oz 40® 45 

Hydrofluoric, 1-oz bots ea 45® 50 

Hydrofluoric, 4-oz bots ea 75 

Muriatic, cotnl., 6-ft bots ea 65® 75 

Muriatic, coml, carboy, $2 ft 3® 3% 

Muriatic, C. P., 1-ft bots ft 35® 40 

Muriatic, C. P., 6-ft bots ft 25® 30 

Nitric, coml., 7-ft bots ea 1 00 

Nitric, coml. , carboy , $2 ft 8® 9 

Nitric, C. P., 1-ftbots ft 35® 40 

Nitric, C. P., 7-ft bots ft 25® 30 

Oxalic ft 12® 15 

Pyrogallic, Merck's ft 3 00 

Pyrogallic, Merck's oz 25 

Salicylic ft 60® 70 

Salicylic oz 8® 10 

Salicylic, from oil wintergreen oz 54 

Sulphuric, coml., 9-ft bots ea 65® 75 

Sulphuric, coml., carboy, $2 ft 2® 2% 

Sulphuric, C. P., 1-ft bots ft 30® 40 

Sulphuric, C. P., 9-ft bots ft 20® 30 

Tannic ft 1 15® 1 50 

Tartaric ft 38® 42 

ALCOUOL, absolute, 1-qt bots ea 1 50 

Grain market 

Wood, 5 gal. lot to bbl. lot gal 90® 1 05 

Wood, less quantity, can extra gal 1 10 

ALUM, chrome ft 13® 15 

Dried (burnt alum) ft 12® 15 

Lump ft 3'/£@ 4 

Ground ft 5® 6 

Powdered ft 6@ 8 

AMMONIA, cone, 26°, 5-pt bots ea 85 

Cone, bulk, can extra gal 75 

Bromide ft 75 

Carbonate ft 12® 25 

Muriate, lump ft 13® 15 

Muriate, gran, coml ft 11® 15 

Muriate, gran, pure ft 16® 20 

Muriate, powd ft 20® 25 

Valerianate... oz 27 

AMMONAL (Po. or Tablets) oz 1 04 

ANT1KAMNIA oz 1 00 

ANTIPYRIN oz 45 

AKISTOL (25 oz, $1.65) oz 180 

ARROWROOT, Bermuda ft 35 

ARSENIC, powd, white ft 10® 12 

BALSAM Copaiba ft 70® 85 

Fir, Canada ft 45® 50 

Peru ft 2 50® 2 75 

Tolu ft 75© 30 

BARK, Cinchona, red, true ... ft 50® 55 

Cinchona, red, powd.... ft 35® 60 

Cinchona, yellow, Calisaya ft 50® 55 

Cinchona, yellow, powd ft 35(® 60 

Sim, slab ft 12® 15 

Sim, ground ft 14® 18 

Elm, powd ;..ft 10® 20 

Sassafras ft 12® 15 

Soap, slab ft 7® 10 

Soap, ground ft 10@ 13 

Soap pwd ft 18® 20 

Soap, cut, 5c boxes doz 35 

Soap, cut, 10c bozes .; doz 60 

Wild Cherry ft 12® 15 

BAY RUM gal 2 50® 3 00 

F. W. B & Co., V 2 pts doz 1 75 

F. W. B. & Co., pts doz 3 50 

BEANS, Tonka, Angostura ft 2 25® 2 50 

Vanilla, Mexican ft 14 50@15 50 

Vanilla, Tahiti ft 3 25® 3 50 

BERRIES, Cubeb ft 25® 30 

Cubeb, powd ft 30® 35 

Juniper „ ft 9® 10 

BISMUTH, sub-carbonate...! ft 1 70® 1 80 

Sub-gallate oz 19 

Sub-nitrate ft 1 35® 1 45 

BLUE MASS ft 70® 75 

BLUE VITRIOL .....ft 4^@ 7 

BORAX, refined ft 8%® 12 

Powd ft 8%® 12 

BUDS, Cassia ft 35® 38 

CALOMEL, American ft 80® 85 

English ft 1 10® 1 15 

Stock ft 55® 65 

CAMPHOR ft 37® 42 

CANTHARIDES, Chinese, powd ft 60® 65 

Russian, powd ft 1 00® 1 10 



CAPSICUM, African, pods ft 22® 25 

African, powd ft 20® 25 

CARAMEL (gal $1 50, can extra) ft 25 

CARBON, bisulphide, 1-ftbots doz 2 00 

Bisulphide, 2-ft bots doz 4 00 

Bisulphide, 1-gal cans ea 1 00® 1 05 

Bisulphide, 5-gal cans ea 3 75 

CARMINE, No 40 oz 35 

CHALK, French, powd ft 6^@ 8 

White, precip ft 10® 12 

White, prepared, drops ft 8® 10 

CHARCOAL, animal, gran ft 8® 12 

Animal, powd ft 8® 10 

Willow, powd , bulk ft 12® 15 

Willow, powd., 1-ft cartons ft 18 

Willow, powd., %-ft cartons ft 20 

Willow, powd., H -ft cartons ft 25 

CHLORAL HYDRATE, 1 fts ft 1 60® 1 70 

Vi fts ft 1 55® 1 80 

U fts ft 1 95® 2 00 

CHLOROFORM, 1-ft tins ft 55® 57 

7-ft tins ft 52® 54 

Squibbs'.500-gm ea 1 10 

Squibbs', 250-gm ea 58 

Squibbs', 100-gm ea 26 

CLOVES ft 20 

Powd ft 25 

COBALT, powd ft 30 

COCAINE, hydrochlorate oz 3 25 

Hydrochlorate, % oz oz 3 35 

Hydrochlorate, Y% oz ea 50® 55 

COCOA BUTTER ft 45® 55 

CODEINE, alk., i/ 8 oz oz 4 35 

Sulphate, l / a oz oz 5 00 

COLOCYNTH APPLE ft 90 

Powd ft 85 

COMPOSITION POWDER, i/ 8 ftpkgsft 35 

COPPERAS, bbls, \% ft 2@ 3 

CORROSIVE SUBLIMATE ft 80® 85 

Powd ft 90® 95 

CREAM TARTAR, pure ft 27® 32 

CREOLIN, 1-ft and 5-ft bots ft 55® 60 

CREOSOTE, beech-wood ft 1 04® 1 18 

Coml ft 45® 50 

CURCUMA, powd , ft 12® 15 

CUTTLE BONE ft 30® 35 

DEXTRINE ft 8® 12 

DOVER'S POWDER ft 1 25 

EIKONOGEN oz 37 

EMERY, flour ft 8® 10 

ERGOT, powd ft 50® 55 

ESSENCE PEPPERMINT,2-ozbot..doz 1 50 

ETHER, Nitrous, cone, 1-ft bots ft 1 20® 1 25 

Nitrous, cone, %-ft bots ft 1 35® 1 40 

Nitrous, cone, %-9> bots ft 1 55® 1 60 

Sulphuric, U. S. P., 1880 ft 75® 80 

Sulphuric, cone, 1890 ft 80® 85 

Sulphuric, Squibbs', 500-gm ea 125 

Sulphuric, Squibbs', 250-gm ea 66 

Sulphuric, Squibbs', 100-gm ea 30 

EUCALYPTOL, Merck's oz 24 

EXTRACT. Cascara, fluid, F. W. B. & Co..ft 70 

Cascara, fluid, F. W. B. & Co.. 5-ft bots. ..ft 50 

Cascara, fl., arom., F.W.B. & Co., 1-ft bot.ft 80 

Cascara, fl., arom., F.W.B. & Co , 5-ft bot..fc 75 

Logwood, 15 and 25-ft boxes ft 12® 13 

Logwood, 1-ft, %-ft and %-ft boxes ft 15® 20 

Witch Hazel, distilled gal 65® 90 

Less than 5 gals, container extra. 
EXTRACTS, FLAVORING, 

Lemon, F. W. B. & Co., 2-oz doz 1 50 

Vanilla, F. W. B. & Co., 2-oz doz 1 75 

FLOWERS, Arnica ft 18® 20 

Chamomile, Eng _ ft 28® 30 

Chamomile, Ger ft 30® 35 

Lavender ft 12® 15 

Rosemary ft 40 

FOIL. Tin, Heavy ft 20® 25 

Tin, Medium : ft 25® 30 

Tin, Light ft 30® 35 

FORVIALDEHYD ft 55® 60 

FRUIT JUICES, F. W. B. & Co., qts., doz 5 00 

FRUITS, Crushed. F.W.B.&Co.,^gals ,doz 10 80 

FULLERS EARTH ft 6® 10 

GELATINE,, Cox's, sml doz 1 50 

French, gold label ft 60® 65 

French, silver label ft 40® 45 

French, bronze label ft 35® 40 

GLUE, Carpenter's ft 9® 12 

White ' ft 15® 18 

GLYCERINE, 50-ft cans ft 14^® 15 

10-ftcans ft 17 

2-oz bots doz 1 25@ 1 50 

Schering's 1-ft bots ft 45 

Schering's 10-ft bots ft 40 

GLYCOLINE (gal., $1.50, can extra) ft 35 

GUM, Aloes, Barb .ft 25® 30 

Aloes, Barb , powd ft 30® 35 

Aloes, Cape.. ft 20® 25 

Aloes, Cape, powd ft 20® 25 

Aloes, Socotrine. true ft 45® 50 

Aloes Socotrine, powd ft 50® 55 



Ammoniac 

Arabic, No. 1 

Arabic, No. 2 

Arabic, powd., No. 1 

Arabic, powd., French 

Arabic, sorts ft 

Asafetida ft 

Asafetida, powd ft 

Benzoin ft 

Benzoin, powd ft 

Catechu ft 

Catechu, powd ft 

Guaiac ft 

Guaiac, powd ft 

Myrrh ft 

Myrrh powd ft 

Olibanum " ft 

Opium ft 

Opium, powd ft 

Shellac, orange ft 

Shellac, orange, ground ft 

Shellac, white ft 

Shellac, white, powd ft 

Spruce, tears ft 

Tragacanth, flake ft 

Tragacanth, sorts ft 

Tragacanth, powd ft 

HOFFMAN'S ANODYNE ft 

HOPS, pressed, y 2 and #-lbs._ ft 

Pressed, oz ft 

HYDROGEN PEROXIDE. Mar- 

chand's, lbs doz 

Marchand's, %-lbs doz 

Marchand's, 5^-lbs doz 

Marchand's, J^-lbs doz 

M. C. W., or P. & W., 1 lbs doz 

M. C. W., or P. & W., %-lbs doz 

M. C. W., or P. & W., %-lbs doz 

Oakland, 1 lb doz 

Oakland, %-lbs doz 

Oakland, 5^-lbs doz 

U. S. P., 1 lb ft 

U. S. P. , 1 lb full doz 

HYDROZONE, 1-lb bots doz 

%-lb bots doz 

J^-lb bots doz 

J^-lb bots doz 

ICHTHYOL oz 

Ichthyol ft 

INDIGO ft 

INSECT POWDER, Buhach, 6-lb cans.ft 

Dalmatian, bulk ft 

Hill's California, bulk ft 

"T. B." 6-lb cans ft 

"T. B." 1-lb cans doz 

"T. B," %-lb cans doz 

' T. B." small doz 

IODINE, re-subl oz 

Re-subl ft 

IODOFORM oz 

Iodoform ft 

IRON, carbonate precip ft 

Chloride, solution ft 

Iodide oz 

Sub-sulphate (Monseli oz 

Sub-sulphate (Monsel) ft 

Sub-sulphate solution ft 

Sulphate, dried ft 

Sulphate, pure cryst., bulk ft 

Sulphate, pure cryst., 1-lb bots ft 

JUICE, Grape, Los Gatos, pts doz 

Grape, Welch's, % pts doz 

Grape, Welch's, pints doz 

Grape, Welch's, quarts doz 

LANOLIN, Leibreich's ft 

LEAD, acetate, coml ft 

Acetate, powd ft 

Acetate, C. P ft 

Sub-acet. solu., Goulard's ft 

LEAVES, Bay ft 

Buchu, long ft 

Buchu, short ft 

Rosemary, bulk ft 

Sage, %s and ^s ft 

Sage, ozs ft 

Senna, Alex ft 

Senna, Alex., powd , ft 

Senna, Tinnevelli ft 

Senna, Tinnevelli, powd ft 

Uva Ursi ft 

LEECHES, (25 or more, 8c.) ea 

LIME. Chloride, 35-ft cans ft 

Chloride, Acme, 1-lb cans doz 

Chloride, Acme, J^-lb cans doz 

Chloride, Acme, %-lb cans doz 

Chloride, Electron, 1-lb cans doz 

Chloride, Phoenix, 1-lb cartons doz 

LITHARGE ft 

LONDON PURPLE ft 



45 

75 
55 
75 
ft 90® 1 00 
45 
35 
50 
55 
70 
12 
35 
40 
50 
38 
40 
30 

4 25 

5 20 
30 
35 
40 
45 

1 25® 1 35 

95 

45® 

1 "" 



50® 



32® 
45® 
50® 



32® 

38® 
45® 
35® 
38® 
25® 



27® 
32® 
35® 



50 
1 10 
65 
20 
25 



70® 



35® 



7 80 

5 75 

3 90 

2 25 

4 80 

3 00 

1 80 

6 00 
3 75 

2 50 
35 

3 25 
10 90 

7 50 

4 90 

2 25 
52 

6 75 
75 
60 
40 
45 
40 

5 50 

3 25 
1 25 



3 45® 3 65 

37 

3 60® 3 80 

16® 18 

25® 35 

35 

8 

34® 40 

25® 30 

15® 20 

8® 10 

14® 18 

i 00 

1 90 

2 75 
5 25 

80 
16® 20 
20® 25 
27® 30 
30® 35 
14® 15 
30® 33 
22® 25 
18® 20 
18® 20 

25 
30® 35 

35 
18® 20 
20® 25 
12® 15 

10 

4J-2 

1 25 

80 

45 

1 20 

1 10 

7^@ 10 

15® 20 



12 



THE CALIFORNIA DRUGGIST 



LOZENGES, Licorice, 5-lb boxes ft 24 

Licorice, "Acme," 5-lb boxes ft 35 

Peppermint, 5-lb boxes ft 15 

ITCOPODICM ft 50® 55 

LYE. concentrated (case, $3.50) doz 90 

1TSOL, 1-lb bots ft 65 

MAGNESIA, Calcined 1-lb tin ft 65 

Carbonate, Jenning's, 2 and 4-oz ft 5 

Carbonate, K. & M., 4-oz., 2 oz. and l-oz..ft 18@ 25 

Carbonate, K. & M., powdered ft 35 

Carbonate, K. & M., S. S ft 60 

Eff. citrate, Herring's doz 2 00 

MANGANESE, black oxide ft 6@ 8 

MANNA, large flake ft 90® 1 00 

Small flake ft 50® 60 

MENTHOL, (oz. 30c.) ft 2 65® 3 10 

MERCURY ft 78® 85 

Bi-sulphate ft 65® 70 

Iodide, green oz 25 

Iodide, red oz 26 

MORPHINE, sulph., % oz oz 2 60® 2 75 

Sulpta., J^oz., 2%oz. bxs oz 2 55® 2 70 

Sulph., 1-oz tins oz 2 35® 2 50 

Sulph., 5-oztins oz 2 30® 2 45 

MOSS, Iceland ft 15 

Irish ft 20 

MUSK, Canton, 1-oz bxs oz 35 

Tonquin, yi oz bots ea 4 50 

MUSTARU Colburn's,6 lb cans ft 28 

Ground California ft 14® 15 

NAPHTHALINE, balls, cakes or flakes..ft 4® 8 

NUTMEGS ft 60® 65 

Ground ft 65® 70 

NUTS, Areca ft 30® 35 

Areca.powd ft 35® 40 

Kola '. ft 25® &5 

NUX VOMICA ft 15® 20 

Powdered ft 20® 25 

OIL,, Almond, bitter oz 65 

Almond, sweet ft 25@ 45 

Amber, rect ft 50® 55 

Anise ft 2 40® 2 60 

Bay oz 45® 50 

Benne (can extra) gal 1 15@ 1 25 

Bergamot, Sanderson ft 3 40® 3 60 

Bergamot, Sicilian ft 3 00® 3 20 

Cassia ft 2 00® 2 25 

Castor "A A" :. gal 1 25® 1 35 

Castor, machine gal 45® 50 

Castor, special com'l .gal 75® 80 

Less than 5 gals., can extra. 

Cedar, coml ft 40® 50 

Cedar, pure ft 75® 80 

China nut (can extra) gal 65@ 75 

Cloves ft 95® 1 15 

Cocoanut ft 20® 30 

Cod liver, Norwegian (can extra) gal 1 10® 1 25 

Cottonseed gal 55® 70 

Less than 5 gal., can extra. 

Croton ft 1 50® 1 65 

Cubebs ft 1 50® 1 75 

Eucalyptus ft 65® 75 

Geranium Rose oz 65® 75 

Hemlock, pure ft 75® 80 

Lard gal 75® 85 

Less than 5 gal can extra. 

Lavender flowers ft 2 25® 2 40 

Lavender, garden ft 75® 80 

Lemon, Sanderson ft 2 00® 2 20 

Lemon. Sicilian ft 1 25® 1 50 

Mustard, Essential oz 65 

Neatsfoot (less than 5-gal. can extra) ...gal 75® 80 

Olive. California, qts doz 12 00 

Olive, Italia, 1 gal cans gal 2 10 

Olive, Malaga, can extra gal 1 00® 1 25 

Orange, bitier ft 4 50® 4 75 

Orange, sweet ft 2 25® 2 50 

Origanum ft 50® 60 

Pennyroyal ft 1 50® 1 75 

Peppermint Hotchkiss ft 1 85® 2 10 

Peppermint, Western ft 1 30® 1 50 

Pinus Sylvestris ft 1 20® 1 40 

Rhodium oz 40® 75 

Rose oz 7 50@10 00 

Rosemary flowers... ft 1 50® 1 65 

Sandalwood, Eng oz 50 

Sandalwood, Ger „ ft 3 00® 3 25 

Sassatras ft 75® 85 

Sewing Machine, Nye's, small doz 45 

Sewing Machine, Nye's, large doz 75 

Sperm, Nye's crystal gal 75 

Sperm, pure, w. l> gal 1 25 

Less than 5 gal can extra. 

Spike ft 25® 35 

Turpentine, rect., Merck ft 45 

Union salad gal 75® 80 

Less than 5 gal can extra. 

Winter>.'iecn ft 1 70® 1 90 

Wormwood ft 4 00® 5 00 

OIL CAKK. ground ft 02'/® 03 

OINTMENT, Citrine ft - 65 

Mercurial '/, in ft 50® 55 

Mercurial \b m ft 60® 65 

Zinc, lienz. oxide ft 75 

ORANGE PEEL. ft 15® 18 

PAPOin, Korl-ozbota oz 200 

PARAFFIN ft 10® 15 

PAHIS OKKKN ft 20® 25 

I'S, li's, 'A's ft) 25® 30 

PETROLATUM, ex. amber ft 6V® 9 

Snow while ft 25® 30 

I'HKNACKTIN (25ozs. .95) oz 1 00 

PBOSPHOBU8, 11-ftcans ft 75 

1-lh cans ....ft 85 

\< t and "i-cans ft 95(« 1 05 

PLA8TBB PAHIS It 

Dentist's ft ulr.i us 



POISON, purple ft 

POTASH. Babbitt's, (case $3.50) doz 

Caustic, crude ft 

Caustic, white, stick ft 

Bichromate ft 

Carbonate ft 

Chlorate ft 

Cyanide, mining ft 

Cyanide, pure granular ft 

Iodide ft 

Nitrate ft 

Permanganate ft 

Prussiate, red ft 

Prussiate, yellow ft 

PUMICE STONE, lump ft 

Powd ft 

QUASSIA, Chips ft 

QUININE, 1-oz bottle oz 

1-oz tin oz 

5-oz tin oz 

25-oz tin oz 

50-oz tin oz 

100-oz tin oz 

RED PRECIPITATE ft 

RESIN , ft 

ROOT, Aconite ft 

Althea, cut ft 

Blood ft 

Blood, powd ft 

Calamus, peeled ft 

Gentian ft 

Gentian, powd ft 

Ginger, African _ ft 

Ginger, Jamaica ft 

Goldenseal ft 

Goldenseal, powd ft 

Ipecac, powd ft 

Licorice, select ft 

Licorice, cut ft 

Licorice, powd ft 

Orris, powd ft 

Rhubarb ft 

Rhubarb cubes ft 

Rhubarb fingers ft 

Rhubarb, powd ft 

Rhubarb, powd., Allen's, Eng ft 

Sarsaparilla, Hond ft 

Sarsaparilla, Hond, gro ft 

Sarsaparilla, Mex .ft 

Sarsaparilla, Mex., gro ft 

Valerian ft 

Valerian, powd ft 

ROTTEN STONE, powd ft 

SACCHARIN, 25 gm. cartons ea 

SAFFRON, American ft 

Spanish oz 

SAL EPSOM ft 

Epsom 4-oz cartons doz 

Glauber ft 

Nitre, cryst ft 

Nitre, powd ft 

Rochelle ft 

Soda ft 

SALOL, (oz30) ft 

SEE D, Anise, Ital ft 

Anise, powd ft 

Bird, mixed, 1-lbs., 60-lb case case 

Bird, mixed, 1ft doz 

Canary ft 

Caraway ft 

Cardamom ft 

Celery ft 

Coriander ft 

Flax, cleaned ft 

Flax, ground ft 

Hemp ft 

Millet ft 

Mustard ft 

Poppy, blue ft 

Rape ft 

Sabadilla, powd ft 

Worm, American ft 

Worm, Levant ft 

SEIDI.ITZ MIXTURE ....ft 

Powders, single, 100s box 

Powders, :l's doz 

Powders. 6's doz 

Powders, 10s doz 

SHEEP DIP, Carbolic gal 

Little's 1 gal cans gal 

Little's 5 gal cans gal 

SNUFF, Garrett's Scotch, blads ft 

Garrett's Scotch, 1 oz tins doz 

Garrett's Scotch, 2-oz tins doz 

Garrett's Scotch, 4-oz tins doz 

Garrett's Scotch, 6 oz bots doz 

Lorillard's Maccaboy. 4-oz bots doz 

Lorillard's Rappee. 4-oz bots doz 

SOAP, Castile, Couti white ft 

Marseilles, white ft 

Mottled, coml ft 

Mottled, pure ft 

Turkish, green or white lb 

Powdered lb 

German green, Stiefel's ft 

Whale Oil ft 

SODA A*H ft 

Caustic, 98 per cent ft 

Caustic, 70 per cent (Drums) ft 

Caustic, white, sticks ft 

Bicai bonate ft 

Bromide ft 

Hyposulphite ft 

Hyposulphite, new process ft 

SOLUTION, Donavan's ft 

Fowler's ft 

Goulard's ft 

SPKKM ACETI ft 

SPIK1TS, Brooklyn and Columbian gal. 

Less than 5 gals, can extra. 



08® 

1 l A® 
45® 
15® 
15® 
14® 
30® 



10 
90 
13 

Til 
'JO 
25 
17 
35 
65 

50® 2 55 
08® 12 
60 
05 



10 



tKlfti 

32<u' 

u9« 

06® 

10 
31 
29 
26 
25 
22}$ @ 24}4 

22® 24 
1 10 
01% to 03 
35 
40 
30 
35 
60 
16 
IS 
25 
29 
65 

65® 70 
2 75® 8 00 

13® 15 
30 
18 
40 



29® 
27® 
24® 



35® 
25® 
30® 

13® 
14® 

20® 
25® 



14® 
35® 



1 25® 1 50 
1 50® 1 75 
75 
1 75 
45 
45 
30 
30 
35 
40 
10 
1 00 
45 
90 
04 
35 
03 
12 
12 
30 
03 



40® 

40® 
25® 
25® 
30® 
35® 
07® 

40® 

02i/i@ 

01}4® 

08® 

09® 

26® 
01%® 
3 50® 3 65 

16® 18 

20® 25 

3 50 

75 

03^® 05 

10® 12 
1 35® 1 40 

18® 25 

10® 
03%® 
03^@ 
03%® 

04® 

06® 

10® 



40® 



12 

05 

05 

06 

06 

08 

12 

06 

50 

20 

25 

28® 30 

2 50 

60 

1 45® 1 50 

1 @ 2 00 

1 10 

1 35 

1 20 

55 

65 

1 10 

1 90 
8 00 

2 50 
2 75 

16 
18 
10 
12 
11 
35 
Id 

06 
08 

My,® 08 

02%O OS 

42® 45 

02%® 



\:\t„ 

low 

07K@ 

0B(g 



ti la 



08K@ 

ll|„r 

25® 

:u,, 
50® 



1 B0@ 1 76 



Nitre, U.S. P ft 55® 60 

Nitre, 2-oz bots doz 1 50 

STRONTIUM, nitrate ft 14® 17 

STRTCHINE,, cryst., i/ 8 -oz bots oz 1 25 

Cryst., 1-oz bots oz 1 00 

Powd., Ys-oz bots oz 1 20 

Powd., i-oz bots oz 95 

SUGAR MILK, powd ft 20® 25 

SULFONAL oz 1 35 

SULPHUR, crude, ground, Cal ft 02%® 03 

Flour ft 03%® 04% 

Flowers ft 04 @ 05 

Roll ft 0?.%© 05 

STRUP, Iodide Iron, F. W. B. & Co ft 57® 60 

Rock Candy, bbls and % bbls gal 70® 75 

TAR, Pine, % pints doz 75 

Pine, pints doz 90 

Pine, quarts doz 1 50 

"WATER, distilled, containers extra gal 10 

Orange Flower, containers extra gal 2 00® 2 25 

Rose, containers extra gal 2 00® 2 59 

"WAX, Floor, powd ft 40 

Yellow, pure ft 27® 30 

White, pure ft 50® 55 

White, No. 1 ft 35® 40 

WHITE PRECIPITATE ft 1 20 

ZINC, metallic, shavings ft 20® 35 

Oxide, com'l ft 14® 15 

Oxide, Hubbuck's ft 45® 5C 

Sulphate, com'l ft 06@ 08 

Sulphate, chem. pure .ft 17® 20 

PROPRIETARY ARTICLES 

Controlled by F. W. Braun & Co. 

Braun's Carbolic Salve ... doz $1 25 

" Carbolic Soap doz 75 

" Condition Powder doz 1 00 

" Essence Jamaica Ginger doz 150 

■' Florida Water, lge doz 3 50 

" Florida Warer, small doz 150 

" Sarsaparilla doz 4 00 

" Syrup Tar and Wild Cherry doz 150 

Cal. Mission Eucalyptus Lozenges doz 150 

Cal. Mission Eucalyptus Plasters doz 1 50 

Cal. Mission Poison Oak Remedy doz 1 50 

Cal. Root Beer doz 80 

Cal. Mocking Bird Food doz 3 00 

Corouado Sea Salt doz 80 

Hayden's Arnica Salve doz 1 00 

" Carbolic Salve doz 100 

" Witch Hazel doz 1 00 

" Sanitary Towels, small gro 3 50 

" medium gro 3 75 

" " " large gro 4 00 

Hayden's Sachet Powder, % ft bots ft 3 00 

Hunter's Witch Hazel doz 1 75 

Matchless Sarsaparilla doz 5 00 

Matchless Wild Cherry Phosphates doz 1 75 

Swain's Carbolic Powder doz 1 50 

Tarine doz 1 75 

" T. B." Insect Powder, 6-ft can ft 40 

" " " 1-ft " doz 5 50 

%-ft" doz 3 25 

" " " sml " doz 1 25 



BRAUN'S... 

California 
Condition Powder 



IS A 



Well Established Remedy 



Having a good sale throughout Southern 
California and the Territories 



It is used for 



Horses, Cattle, Sheep and Poultry 

IT IS GOOD 

It Retails for 2/5 cents 
It Costs $1,00 Per Dozen 

You need it in your business ! 



MANUFACTURED 
AND SOLD BY 



F. W. BRAUN & CO. 



LOS ANGELES, CAL. 



VOLUME 7.] 



LOS ANGELES, NOVEMBER, 1898 

THE* 



[NUMBER 11. 




^©itolY J®li)KHAL DEVOTEE TO THE fflffe^ESTSOFTHE ^ETABL R^dlieQDg'f • 




F. W. BRAUN & CO., WHOLESALE DRUGGISTS 



COLUMBIAN SPIRITS 



TRADE MARK 



THE EQUAL of ALCOHOL for all 
PURPOSES EXCEPT INTERNAL use. 

MANHATTAN SPIRIT CO. 

Sole Manufacturers, BUFFALO, N. Y. 



The Price to RETAILERS is 
S8.-Case of 50 glass bottles 





See that the 

Labels bear the well known 

RED DIAMOND MARK of the 

APOLXINARIS COMPANY, LIMITED. 

SOLE EXPORTERS: 
The APObyNARIS 60MPANY, Ld., London 

J. S. ANDERSON, 21 Sutter St., San Francisco 
Representing United Agency Co., 503 Fifth Ave., New York 



PRICE LIST *~~ 

FEB. 1, 1890, AND FEB. 1, 1891. 

Beef Peptonoids 6 ozs., per dozen $ 9 00 

Beef Peptonoids .16 " " 19 00 

Liquid Peptonoids 16 " " 9 12 

Liquid Peptonoids with Coca ....16 " " 9 lis 

Peptonoids, Iron and Wine 16 " " 9 12 

Phospho-Caffein Compound 2 " " 2 25 

Phospho-Caffein Compound 4 " " 4 fiO 

Phospho-Caffein Compound 8 " " 9 00 

Phospho-Caffein Compound 32 " " 24 OO 

WE GUARANTEE THE SALE OF ALL OUR GOODS. 



THE fl^LtlNGTOH CHEMICflLi CO. 

YONKERS, N. Y. 



What do you say to the offer of a Barrel 

HOSPITAL T©Nie 

FOR $12.00 NET 30 DAYS 

Yo can have the chance by sending to 

F. W. BRAUN & CO. 

LOS ANGELES, CAL. 



50 YEARS' 
EXPERIENCE 




Trade Marks 
Designs 
Copyrights &c 

Anyone sending a sketch and description may 
quickly ascertain our opinion free whether an 
invention is probably patentable. Communica- 
tions strictly confidential. Handbook on Patents 
sent free. Oldest agency for securing patents. 

Patents taken through Munn & Co. receive 
special not irr, without c harg e, in the 

Scientific American. 

A handsomely illustrated weekly. Largest cir- 
culation of any scientific Journal. Terms, $3 a 
year; four months, fL Sold by all newsdealers. 

MUNN &Co. 36,B - d ^ New York 

Branch Office, 625 F St., Washington, D. C 



Jr/e Qaliforpia Dru^ist 

A MONTHLY JOURNAL 

DEVOTED TO THE INTERESTS OF THE RETAIL DRUGGIST. 



Volume VII.] 



LOS ANGELES, CAL., NOVEMBER, 1898. 



[Number 



11. 



Gtye ^aliforpia Dru^ist 



PUBLISHED MONTHLY BY 



THE CALIFORNIA DRUGGIST PUB. CO. 

P. O. Drawer 406, Station C. - - LOS ANGELES, CAL. 

(To whom all Communications should be addressed.) 



F. S. LANGDON, ........ President 

J. Q. BRAUN, .... .... Treason er 

R. A. ALLEN, ......... Editor 

TERMS OF SUBSCRIPTION. 

Per Year $1 00 

Single Copies 10 

ADVERTISING RATES. 

One Page fioo 00 

Half Page 60 00 

Fourth Page 35 00 

Eighth Page. - 20 00 

Cards (per month) 1 50 

B^F" Advertisements for positions or assistants, or to buy or sell Drug 
Stores, are inserted free of charge. 

Items of interest to Pharmacists are solicited. 

The official organ of the San Diego Retail Druggists' Association. 

The official organ of the Los Angeles County Pharmaceutical Associa- 
tion. 

T T is probable that a concerted movement of the drug trade 
* will be made upon Congress at its next session for a repeal 
ot the stamp tax upon medicines. The many defects in the 
law have made its application a source of constant irritation, 
while its effect, in singling out a class for special taxation is an 
apparent injustice. We do not anticipate that any serious ob- 
jection will arise to the stamp tax upon checks, notes, legal 
documents, etc., for these are, in our view, legitimate sources 
of government revenue, either in war time or otherwise, and 
nearly every citizen, we think, will concede their propriety and 
justice ; but the country is weary of the rulings and counter 
rulings through which the department has done its best to 
steer clear of the rocks and snags that have obstructed the 
channels of interpretation of the law, and made Commissioner 
Scott's life a burden. 



'"THE American oil peppermint crop of 1898 is reported as 
*■ short of last year's production to the extent of one-fifth 
to one-fourth and not of so uniformly good quality. Peppermint 
farming has yielded so poor returns of late that producers in some 
cases have allowed the grounds to become weedy, which con- 
dition is detrimental to the flavor and value of the oil. The 
low prices of last season still continue, though large holders 
are showing no anxiety to sell, apparently looking for an ad- 
vanced market. 



T will now be in order for the California retail druggists to 
renew their Association, and get into line with the National. 



COME of our contemporaries are suggesting our new posses- 
^ tions as good openings for American druggists. We are 



willing to relinquish our chance, 
for us. 



California is good enough 



\ \ 7~E notice in the New Zealand Prices Current and journal 
VV of Commerce that Teacher's Highland Cream Whiskey 
is quoted in its "spirit" column. It is well known in all parts 
of the ciyilized world. F. W. Braun & Co. supply it to the 
trade ; are California agents. See advertisement. 



A N Oregon Agricultural College has recently added a course 
^*- in pharmacy to its curriculum. Now if the Colleges of 
Pharmacy would add a course in agriculture to theirs, the boys 
would have something substantial to fall back upon in cut-rate 
times. The farmer-pharmacist or pharma-farmercist should 
never be out of a job. 

'"THE Paris School of Pharmacy has taken action relative to 
* the International Pharmaceutical Congress of 1900 by ap- 
pointing a committee of organization. The committee includes 
the entire faculty of the Paris School, together with a large 
number of leading men from other French educational in- 
stitutions. M. Planchon is president and M. Bourquelot secre- 
tary-general of the committee. 

A MULTITUDE of proprietors of little known patent medi- 
**■ cines still keep the Eastern drug journals filled with their 
dulcet songs of self-praise for not advancing their prices, and 
pleading for consideration at the hands of the druggists. If a 
druggist is looking for cheap goods to push, he might better 
work up something with his own name upon it. But the real 
game he is after is the man who advertises, and whose goods 
are indispensable to him. 

THE wholesale drug firm of Evans & Sons (Limited), Mon- 
*■ treal, announced, Oct. 3, to manufacturers of proprietary 
goods that they would sign no more "rebate" agreements. 
Their action has aroused much discussion on this side the line, 
and various opinions are expressed as to its ultimate effect 
upon the rebate plan. It looks as though some of the manu- 
facturers and jobbers really think it forecasts the going to 
pieces of the entire system. 

We judge that it must be a feeble system indeed, if a single 
house can by its withdrawal endanger the entire structure, 
built up through fifteen years or more of combined effort. 

But we have a better opinion than that of the membership 
of the "P. A." 



THE CALIFORNIA DRUGGIST. 



Retailers' Good Work. 

"THE organization of the National Association of Retail 
*■ Druggists, which was accomplished at St. Louis Oct. 17, 
by delegates representing some fifteen thousand of the fratern- 
ity in this country, was an event of uncommon interest to the 
trade. A well defined purpose to secure their rights by mov- 
ing directly upon the enemy's works animated their efforts and 
brought prompt consideration of their demands from the other 
National Associations in session at the same time in St. Louis. 
The Wholesale Druggists' and the Proprietary Associations 
both used their efforts to effect a restoration of harmony by 
taking steps to meet the just demands of the retailers, and to 
cooperate with them in efforts to promote their mutual inter- 
ests. The Proprietary Association conceded the justice of each 
manufacturer paying his own stamp tax and charging no more 
than $2.00, $4.00 and $8.00 for 25c, 50c and $1.00 goods, and 
agreed to recommend such maximum prices to proprietors. 
The personnel of the Retailers' Association impressed strongly 
upon the old organizations the fact that a power had arisen 
at last from out the hitherto scattered elements of the retail 
trade ; and that in future a very palpable force would claim 
consideration at their hands, able to prefer and enforce their 
legitimate demands. There should, in fact, be no necessity 
for antagonism between the three great divisions of the drug 
trade, their interests being so interlaced and interdependent, 
but, on the contrary, a mutual regard for each others' rights, 
while an occasional consultation together would certainly pro- 
mote good feeling and mutual respect. 

The question of stamp taxes and advances in price of pat- 
ents form but a small part of the matters claiming serious at- 
tention on the part of the retail trade, though these were the 
final straws that overcame their inertia and precipitated their 
late action. The many spasmodic attempts of the drug- 
gists to "get together" on cut-rate questions had taught 
them some lessons, and when the time came to act upon these 
later matters, the N. A. R. D. sprang full armored into the 
arena. 

The movement seems to have had its most effective start 
from the action of the Chicago and of the St. Louis retail drug- 
gists' assoriations, although it is probable that these were only 
the larger among many factors. At all events the N. A. R. D. 
has already become a decided power in the land, and we regret 
that the Pacific Coast was not represented at its organization. 
The president of the Chicago Retail Druggists' Association, 
Mr. T. V. Wooten, opened the proceedings of the meeting, 
reading an address, in which the plan of action proposed was 
outlined, together with the reasons for the movement. 

An address of welcome by John Allen, president cf the St. 
Louis Apothecaries' Society then followed, in which these 
words occur, showing the animating purpose in the minds of 
his society at least : " We want you to build this house upon 
a rock. We want you to throw about it all the strength that 
a great organization will give to it." 

The response to this address was made by Wm. Muir, of 
Brooklyn, after whom J. M. Good, of St. Louis, as the dele- 
gate of the A. Ph. A., addressed the convention. 

A temporary organization was effected by the election of 
Thomas V. Wooten as chairman, and John W. Lowe, of Conn., 
as secretary. After the appointment by the chair of a com- 
mittee on credentials, and following a recess, Mr. R. M. Dadd, 



chairman of the committee, reported the following list of ac- 
credited representatives and their proxies : 

DELEGATES TO THE CONVENTION AND STATES REPRESENTED. 

American Pharmaceutical Association— J. M. Good, F. W. Sen- 
newald, Thomas Lay ton, A. E. Ebert, Julius Jungman. 

Alabama Pharmaceutical Association — E. P. Gait, Selma ; 
George W. Bains, Birmingham ; W. F. Dent, Montgomery ; P. C. Can- 
didus, Mobile. 

Connecticut Pharmaceutical Association— Charles A. Rapelye, 
Hartford ; John W. Lowe, New Haven. Credentials were submitted 
from the Hartford and New Haven Druggists' Association. 

Iowa Pharmaceutical Association — W. J. Bently, Oskaloosa ; F. 
B. Wiley, Marshalltown ; J. H. Mitchell, Ottumwa ; Frank Madler. 

Illinois Pharmaceutical Association— J. H. Keeling, Rock ford ; 
H. Swannell, Champaign ; L. C. Deck, Girard ; Frank Fleury, Spring- 
field ; F. P. Milnor, Litchfield ; H. Stringoetter, Belleville; W. C. Simp- 
son, Vienna; D. V. Mount, Joliet ; R. C. Frerksen, Chicago; H. C. 
Bauman, Dundee; Theodore C. Loehr, PaulJ.Shuh, Cairo. 

ILLINOIS. 

Chicago Retail Druggists' Association — T. V. Wooten, L. K. Waldron, 
Leonard Tillotson, I. W. Blood, H. W. Snow. 
Chicago Apothecaries' Society — W. Bodemann, F. M. Schmidt. 
Vermillion County Association — W. F. Bond, Danville. 
Tri-City Druggists' Association — G. H. Sohrbeck, Moline. 
Freeport Retail Druggists' Association — W. F. Gungkunz, Freeport. 
Rockford Retail Druggists' Association — J. H. Keuling, Rockford. 
Decatur Druggists' Association — E. A. West, Decatur. 
Ouincy Retail Druggists' Association — Ben Miller, Quincy. 
Will County Pharmaceutical Association — John B. Mount, Joliet. 



Indiana State Association — F. H. Burton, Evansville ; A. Timberlake, 
Indianapolis ; F. W. Woodson, La Porte. 

St. Joseph County Druggists' Association — F. D. Warner, New Car- 
lisle. 

La Porte County Association — F. W. Meis?ner, Alternate. 

Lafayette Pharmaceutical Association — H. E. Glick, Lafayette. 

KANSAS. 

Kansas Pharmaceutical Association — F. E. Holliday, Topeka ; W. J. 
Evans, Iola. 

Topeka Retail Drug Association — F. E. Holliday, Topeka. 

KENTUCKY. 

Kentucky Pharmaceutical Association — Simon M. Jones, Louisville ; 
R. M. McFarland, Henderson ; Vernon Driskell, Ghent. 

Louisville Botanical Club — Theodore Rectauous, William Voettler, S. 
N. Jones, Louisville. 

MISSOURI. 

Missouri Pharmaceutical Association — A. T. Fleischmann, Sedalia ; 
W. B. Powell, Excello ; H. F. A. Spilker, St. Louis ; J. E. Hilby, St. 
Louis; S. Boehm, St. Louis. 

Pettis County Retail Drug Association — Aug. T. Fleischmann. 

Kansas City Pharmaceutical Association — Jas. M. Love, Wm. M. 
Federmann. 

MARYLAND. 

Maryland Pharmaceutical Association — Dr. A. J. Corning, A. R. L. 
Dohme, Baltimore. 

Baltimore Retail Druggists' Association — Henry P. Hynson, Louis 
Schulze, Baltimore. 

MINNESOTA. 

Minnesota State Pharmaceutical Association— Dr. J. W. Harrah, Min- 
neapolis ; Andrew J. Eckstein, New Ulm ; H. W. Rietzke, St. Paul ; 
Chas. E. Heller. 

Minneapolis Druggists' Association — Dr. J. W. Harrah, Minneapolis. 

MONTANA. 

Montana State Pharmaceutical Association — A. Timberlake, proxy. 



THE CALIFORNIA DRUGGIST. 



MICHIGAN. 

Michigan State Pharmaceutical Association — John J. Sourwine, Esca- 
bana ; C. N. Anderson, Detroit. 

Detroit Pharmaceutical Society — Chas. F. Mann, Detroit. 
Saginaw Pharmaceutical Society — D. E. Prall. 

NEW YORK. 

New York Pharmaceutical Association, Wm. Muir, Brooklyn ; Thomas 
Stoddart, Buffalo. 

New York Deutscher Apotheker Verein — Geo. Gregorius, Felix Hirse- 
man, New York city. 

Kings County Pharmaceutical Association — Wm. Muir, Wm. C. An- 
derson, Brooklyn. 

Erie County Pharmaceutical Association — Geo. Reimann, Buffalo. 

Syracuse Druggists' Association— William Muench, Syracuse. 

Courtland County Druggists' Association — Wm. Muir, Brooklyn, 
proxy. 

NORTH DAKOTA. 

H. L. Haussamen, Grafton. 

OHIO. 

Ohio Pharmaceutical Association — W. R. Ozier, J. E. Blackburn, Col- 
umbus ; George L. Hechler, Louis C. Hopp, Cleveland ; Alfred De 
Lang, F. H. Freericks, A. Wetterstrom, Cincinnati ; John Mayer, M. A. 
Burckardt, Dayton ; J. C. Firmin, Findlay ; C. F. Inman, Akron. 

Cincinnati Academy — John Wein, W. S. Wagner. 

Toledo Pharmaceutical Association — J. T. Bower, F. D. Stevens, J. M. 
McCann, Toledo. 

Columbus Druggists' Association — F. W. Herbst, John Byrne, George 
W. Matson. 

PENNSYLVANIA. 

Pennsylvania Pharmaceutical Association — C. L. Hay, Du Bois ; A. J. 
Kearcher, Allegheny. 

Western Pennsylvania Druggists' Association — J. W. Cheswright, 
Pittsburg. 

Scranton Druggists' Association — John J. Davies, Scranton. 

SOUTH DAKOTA. 

South Dakota State Pharmaceutical Association — F. H. Burton, 
Evansville ; A. Timberlake, Indianapolis. 

TEXAS. 

Tarrant County Retail Drug Association — Ed. S. Richardson, Mar- 
shall. 

Texas Pharmaceutical Association — A. Timberlake, proxy. 

WISCONSIN. 

Wisconsin Pharmaceutical Association — E. B. Heimstreet, Janesville. 
Milwaukee Pharmaceutical Association — R. N. Dadd, Milwaukee. 

On motion of Mr. Muir of New York, the report of the 
committee was ordered accepted. 

A committee on Constitution and By-laws having been ap- 
pointed, adjournment was had to 3 p. m., at which time the 
several articles of the proposed Constitution were read and sub- 
sequently adopted, together with By-laws. 

Permanent officers of the association were nominated by a 
committee and unanimously elected as follows : 

OFFICERS. 

President — H. P. Hynson of Maryland. 

First Vice-president — G. L. Hechler of Ohio. 

Second Vice-president — Simon N. Jones of Kentucky. 

Third Vice-president — N. A. Kuhn of Nebraska. 

Secretary — T. N. Wooten of Chicago (360 Dearborn St). 

Treasurer — John W. Lowe of Connecticut. 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE. 

A. Timberlake, Indiana. 



T. E. Holliday, Kansas. 
John Allen, Missouri. 
W. R. Dyche, Illinois. 



Articles I, II, and III of the Constitution, relating to name, 
object and membership are as follows : 

ARTICLE 1. 
The name of this organization shall be "The National As- 
sociation of Retail Druggists." 

ARTICLE 11. 

OBJECT. 

The object of the association shall be to unite the represen- 
tatives of associations of retail druggists in the United States 
in a central body for the improvement of the business condi- 
tions of the retail drug trade. 

ARTICLE in. 

MEMBERSHIP. 

Section 1. The association shall be a delegate body. 
Membership is vested exclusively in regularly organized asso- 
ciations of retail druggists. 

Sec 2. Each State and local association shall be entitled 
to one delegate for each 100 active members, or a fraction of 
100 members. Such delegates shall be actively engaged in 
the retail drug business. 

Sec 3. The American Pharmaceutical Association shall 
be entitled to five delegates to all meetings of the association. 



It is the purpose of the Executive Committee to work for 
the extension of the influence and membership of the associa- 
tion, and they will invite the cooperation of all associations of 
retail druggists not at present represented. 

The movement is one of great promise, and we trust that 
next year's meeting at Old Point Comfort, Va., will bring out 
delegations from all sections of the country not represented at 
St. Louis to join with their fellow druggists in the effort to 
promote their mutual interests. 

Petroleum Emulsions. 

This formula is from " Martindale's Extra Pharmacopseia." 
The dose of the white, odorless petroleum oil is 1 to 2 
drachms. It is called liquid petrolatum in the U. S. P. 

1. 
Take of 

Liquid Petrolatum 4 ozs. 

Oil of sweet almonds 2 ozs. 

Powdered acacia \% ozs. 

Glycerin ... \ l A ozs. 

Sodium bypophosphite 128 grs. 

Calcium hypophosphite 128 grs. 

Lime water, enough to make 1 pt. 

II. 
EMULSIO PETROLEI ET HYPOPHOSPHITUM. 

Dose, 1 to 4 drachms. 

Soft paraffin 5 ozs- 

Acacia powder 2% ozs. 

Mix and add water 4 ounces. Dissolve hypophosphite of 
sodium and hypophosphite of calcium, of each, 2 drachms, in 
water 6 ounces. Add to the above with constant trituration 
and water, q. s. to 15 ounces. — B. & C. Drug. 



THE CALIFORNIA DRUGGIST. 



State Board of Pharmacy. 

The quarterly meeting of the California State Board of Phar- 
macy was held at Los Angeles on the 6th and at San Francisco 
on the 1 2th of October, 1898, for the registration of graduates 
and for the examination of candidates for certificates to prac- 
tice pharmacy as licentiates and assistants. 

The following were registered as graduates in pharmacy : 

H. S. Cottle, Lida L. Talcott, C. A. Mueller, E. E. Baumeis- 
ter, W. E. Cates, G. L. Edelman, H. P. Elder, V. W. Hop- 
kins, E. O. Pendleton, A. E. Briggs, F. Blankinship, F. Zerr 
and W. H. Collins. 

The following passed a satisfactory examination and were 
registered as licentiates : 

C. F. Large, E. A. Cockburn, I. M. Parry, F. I. Kelly, 
Kate R. Chaigneau, W. A. Trueblood, P. W. Barritt, D. E. 
Hull, and C. S. McKenney. 

Registered as assistants on diplomas from the California 
College of Pharmacy : 

E. N. Greenwood and E. O. Webb. Assistants by exami- 
nation, H. Lapidaire and H. G. A. Ryckman. 

The next meeting of the board will be held at Sacramento 

on the 10th of January, 1899. 

John Calvert, Secretary. 
400 Sutter St., San Francisco. 



Patents of October 4th, 11th, 18th and 25th, and November 
1st, of Interest to Pharmacists. 

Patents of Oct. 4th, 11th, 18th, and 25th, and Nov. 1st, of interest to 
Pharmacists : 

Arvilla S. Markle, Oskaloosa, Iowa, Abdominal bandage, 611920. 

William D. Allison, Indianapolis, Ind., Physician's table, 612375. 

Martin L. Cooper, Modesto, Cal., Continuous hot-air syringe and 
vaporizer, 612158. 

Robert M. Green, Philadelphia, Pa., Soda fountain, 612033. 

Adelbert D. Hill, Stanton, Minn., Pasteurizing apparatus, 612106. 

John E. Lee, Coushokocken, Pa., Container for ligatures, etc., 612355. 

Mattie A. Watson, Chicago, 111., Abdominal supporter, 612072. 

Mattie A. Watson, Chicago, 111., Abdominal bandage, 612073. 

Russell B. Williamson, Clifton Springs, N. Y., Spraying device, 612081. 

Marvin E. Woodling, Minneapolis, Minn., Inhaler, 612295. 

Ollie Bedell, Elmore, Minn., Breast pump, design, 29475. 

Abraham Abelson, New York, N. Y., Coin-controlled apparatus for 
dispensing liquids in sprays, 612654. 

Affonso de Figaniere, Nonistown, Pa., Brominating apparatus, 712716. 

Affonso de Figaniere, Norristown, Pa., Desulfurizing apparatus, 
612717. 

Herbert S. Lloyd, Philadelphia, Pa , Battery-electrode, 612649. 

James G. Moscrop, San Bernardino, Cal., Ecraseur, 612569. 

Edward J. Wells, Morristowu, Tenn., Surgical chair, 612760. 

Charles M. Blackman, New York, N. Y., Atomizer, 613222. 

Frank Cossor, London, England, Clinical thermometer, 613190 

Steven G. Smith, Hannibal, Mo., Bandage for umbilical cords, 612997. 

Argo M. Foster, Cleveland, Ohio, Atomizer, 613413. 

John A. Hart, Blackburn, England, Ventilating and air-moistening 
apparatus, 613510. 

Pierre P. Monnet, Lyons, France, Making aromatic aldehydes, 613460. 

Russell Parker, New York, N. Y., Vaginal tube for syringes, 613391. 



Peroxide of hydrogen is a powerful antidote for cyanide 
poisoning. It has been applied successfully in 3 per cent, 
solution as subcutaneous injections, every four minutes. At 
the same time the stomach was washed out with a 2 per cent, 
solution. Peroxide of hydrogen forms with hydrocyanic acid 
oxamide, a harmless compound. 



Myths and Folk Lore of Belladonna. 

(The following were furnished to the Red Cross Notes by 
Dr. Adolph W. Miller of Philadelphia, Pa.) 

The berry of the Deadly Nightshade is known as the Devil's 
Berry, which reminds us that the whole plant has something 
uncanny attached to it. It is sometimes called Death's Herb, 
and was formerly known under the name of Dwale, the fruit 
being called Dwaleberry. i. e., torpor or trance berry, from the 
Danish word (dvale) meaning a trance or dead-sleep. This is 
the explanation given by some writers, though it is only fair 
to say that others connect it with the French word denil, mean- 
ing grief or mourning, because it made those people mourn 
whose friends ate the berries and died. But the testimony of 
the Danish dvale-baer or trance berry is in favor of the former 
suggestion. In Chaucer's time it was employed for sleeping 
draughts, hence his remark, that "there needeth him no 
dwale." 

In Bohemia the Belladonna is esteemed as the favorite plant 
of the devil, who is supposed to watch over it. He may, how- 
ever be drawn from it on a certain night of the year by letting 
loose a black hen, after which it is supposed he will immedi- 
ately run. The name Belladonna refers to an ancient belief 
that the Nightshade is the form of a fatal enchantress. The 
Greek goddess Hecate was supposed to preside over the lower 
world ; she was said to know the names of all the herbs, and 
to teach her daughters their special qualities. In consequence 
of this, such poisonous plants as Belladonna, Aconite and a 
variety of others, were sacred to Hecate. 

" I ha' been plucking (plants among) 
Hemlock, Henbane, Adder's Tongue, 
Nightshade, Moonwort, Leopard's bane ;" 

— Beti Johnson, page 531, 

All of which are magic plants. 

The Nightshade is said to be a favorite of the devil. Its 
name Belladonna, meaning the Fair Lady, refers to an ancient 
belief that the Nightshade is the form of a fatal enchantress or 
witch, called Atropa ; while the common name Belladonna 
also refers to the custom of continental ladies employing it as 
a cosmetic, or for the purpose of making their eyes sparkle. — 
Notes on Belladonna, from Flowers and Flower Lore, by Rev. 
Hilderic Friend, F. L. S. 

Belladonna means literally Fair Lady, and was most likely 
given to this plant on account of the tempting appearance of 
these berries. Atropa refers to its deadly properties, coming 
from Atropos, the ancient name of one of the fates, or evil 
destinies. The Saxons called the plant Ranewort, or Murder- 
ing Weed. Raging and Furious Nightshade are also old 
names, significant of its evil character. It was likewise called 
Dwale. 

The poisonous nature of this plant has been long known ; 
thus, we read that the Scotch, under Macbeth, having de- 
feated the army of the Danes, under Sweyn, destroyed many 
of them by mixing its juice with ale, wine and bread. Earlier 
yet it is recorded by Plutarch that the soldiers of Marc An- 
tony were drawn by hunger to eat unknown herbs, and the 
camp became filled with unhappy, restless men, who, one by one, 
died of the poison of the Belladonna. In more modern times 
it is recorded that 150 soldiers were poisoned by this plant near 
Dresden. — Wild Flowers, and Where to Gather Them. 



THE CALIFORNIA DRUGGIST. 



Internal Revenue Service, First District of Cal- 
ifornia, Collector's Office. 

San Francisco, Cal. , Oct. 25, 1898. 
To Manufacturers under Schedule ll B" : 

There seems to be a misunderstanding as to the use of Form 
428. This form is to be returned monthly by all manufac- 
turers of articles under Schedule "B" including all druggists 
who manufacture any taxable articles. It need not be sworn 
to. The purpose of this form is simply to certify that each 
article manufactured has been properly stamped before sale. 

The sworn statements of articles sold unstamped, are totally 
different, but were taken on Form 428 since no form was pro- 
vided. Tbe law provides that the tax under Schedule "B" 
shall be paid by stamping the articles themselves before sale. 
The privilege of selling without stamps and making sworn re- 
turns for assessment was granted only because stamps could 
not be procured. 

This office has had for some time a full supply of all stamps 
needed and no excuse will be allowed for not stamping articles 
before sale. In every case the tax must be paid by stamps be- 
ing affixed to the article itself. 

In future Forms 428 must certify that all manufactured arti- 
cles have been stamped. In case of failure to make return or 
affix stamps the penalties provided for by law for such failure 
will be enforced. Respectfully, 

John C. Lynch, Collector. 



Note the ad. of Egg White Soap, this issue. It has proved 
a big success — highly perfumed and elegant style. You must 
have it to make your soap display complete. F. W. Braun & 
Co. sell it. 

The Syrup White Pine Compound, large 25 cent bottles, put 
up for the trade by F. W. Braun & Co., is a cough remedy of 
great value. Nothing sells better. They also supply the ar- 
ticle in 5-pint bottles and in gallon jugs, at low prices. See 
ad. for prices. 

There is an excellent opportunity just now to select from a 
very large stock of sponges which F. W. Braun & Co. have 
gathered together in their druggists' sundries department. It 
will pay you to order now. See pink pages, this issue, for a 
partial description. 

Whiskies bottled in Government warehouses under Inspec- 
tor's stamp are goods most particularly to be desired in a first- 
class drug store. The most positive evidence of quality goes 
with every bottle. Look in our advertising pages for price 
list of a variety of some of the finest of these goods. 

It is said that a French chemist has invented a new kind of 
candle made by dissolving five parts of colorless gelatin in 
twenty parts of water, adding twenty-five parts of glycerin and 
heating until a perfectly clear solution has been formed. To 
this is added two parts of tannin dissolved by heating in 
ten parts of glycerin. A turbidity is produced that vanishes 
upon further boiling. The boiling is continued until the 
water has been driven off, and the mass is then cast into ordi- 
dary candle molds. The candles obtained in this way are as 
clear as water, and burn quietly without spreading any odor. 
— British and Colonial Druggist. 



Among the recent decisions secured by The Centaur Com- 
pany we are able to quote verbatim the following, which ought 
to be sufficient warning to the unscrupulous that Chas. H. 
FJetcher proposes to maintain the rights of his company. 

United States Circuit Court, District of Montana : The Centaur 
Company vs. W. C. Crum, Edward Lambert and W. H. A. T. Wallace, 
co-partners under the firm name of the Queen City and Manufactur- 
ing Company. 

The President of the United States of America, to W. C. Crum, Ed- 
ward Lambert and W. H. A. T. Wallace, and their clerks, attorneys, 
agents, servants and workingmen, greeting : 

Whereas, it has been represented to us, in our Circuit Court of the 
United States, for the District of Montana, that the complainant, the 
Centaur Company, a corporation of the State of New York, has a valid 
trade-mark and rights in the use of the word " Castoria " as applied by 
it to a certain preparation for relieving the stomach and bowel troubles 
of infants and children, and in certain labels, wrappers and packages 
used by it in its method of dressing up and preparing for sale said pre- 
paration, including the size, shape and lettering of the bottles contain- 
ing the same, and that you, the said W. C. Crum, Edward Lambert, and 
W. H. A. T. Wallace, have imitated said name and said labels, wrappers 
and bottles and said method of dressing up said goods for sale, thereby 
deceiving the public into buying your goods in the place of those of 
the complainant, and thereby defrauding the complainant contrary to 
good morals and equity : 

Now, therefore, we do strictly command you, the said W. C. Crum, 
Edward Lambert, and W. H. A. T. Wallace, your agents, attorneys, 
clerks, servants, and workmen, and each and everyone of them, under 
the pains and penalties which may fall upon you, and each of you, in 
case of disobedience, that you forthwith and forever desist and refrain 
from directly or indirectly putting up, selling, advertising, or offering 
for sale any preparation under the name "Castoria" or under any label, 
wrapper, package, or bottle so dressed up, as, by size, lettering, or ar- 
rangement will be liable to create confusion in the minds of the public 
with the labels, wrappers, packages, and bot'les and mode of dressing 
up said preparation used by complainant, or so to mislead the public 
into buying your goods when intending to purchase those of complain- 
ant. 

Witness The Honorable Melville W. Fuller, Chief Justice of the 
United States, at the City of Helena, District of Montana, this 8th day 
of August, 1898. 

(Signed) Hiram KnowlES. 

Mr. Chas. H. Fletcher, President of the Centaur Company, 
informs us that their attorney, Edward C. Russell, proceeded 
at once, after receiving the injunction, to the factory of the de- 
fendants, accompanied by a U. S. Marshal, where they siezed 
and destroyed all bottles, wrappers and labels, and all plates, 
etc., used in the manufacture of the spurious stuff. The plant 
destroyed, Mr. Fletcher is now arranging to proceed against 
those dealers who have handled the goods, to recover damages 
sustained. 

Internal Revenue Service, First District of Califor- 
nia, Collector's Office. 

San Francisco, Cal., Nov. 5, 1898, 
Wm. H. Harrison, Esq., Deputy Collector, Los Angeles, Cal.: 

Sir: In reply to yours of the 3d instant, I beg to inform 
you that where a drug store is sold out in its entirety in one 
transaction, that portion of the stock liable to International 
Revenue Tax which was on hand on the 1st day of July does 
not require to be stamped because of such sale, it being rather 
a wholesale transaction instead of a sale at retail, as construed 
by the law. Respectfully, 

Signed : John C. Lynch, Collector. 



THE CALIFORNIA DRUGGIST. 



Petition of the Proprietors of and Dealers in Proprietary 

riedicines, Including the Wholesale and Retail 

Dealers in Drugs, of the United States.* 

The undersigned, representing the industries mentioned, 
hereby earnestly petition your Honorable House of Repre- 
sentatives and Senate of the United States, that the War Tax 
upon Proprietary Medicines may be promptly or speedily 
revoked, for the following potent or valid reasons : 

I. Because it is founded upon entirely erroneous ideas as 
to the origin and value of these medicines, the general or prev- 
alent idea being that these medicines are mere nostrums, the 
outcome of ignorance and greed, for gain ; and that they are 
of no value as curatives for disease and are deserving of no 
legal recognition. 

Whereas the real fact is that they, to a very large and 
almost universal extent, are the best and most successful pre- 
scriptions of our most advanced and successful physicians. 
The story is simple. The physician, and the more eminent he 
may be the most likely this result is to happen, sends his pre- 
scription to his druggist, who carefully prepares and sends it 
to the patient ; this is iollowed by others, and others, all made 
of the same ingredients and the same proportions, and they 
are largely and even eminently successful The druggist is 
alive to this — he knows from his own observation that he has 
in his hand a cure for a certain definite form of disease, and 
gives it a name and launches it upon the public as a remedy 
for a certain form of disease. 

There is nothing of ignorance or mendacity or illiberality 
in the transaction ; the druggist has really rendered the public 
a service, and has only taken advantage of the opportunity 
which his trade offered him, and has given wings to a blessing 
for the people ; nineteen-twentieths of the popular medicines 
of the day have this origin and deserve respect rather than 
opprobrium. 

II. These preparations or medicines become very largely 
the refuge of the working-class and of the self-respecting 
poor, not the degraded poor who crowd the dispen- 
saries or form the inmates of hospitals, but of the labor- 
ing, careful, saving class, who are illy able or cannot 
afford the pay of the regular physician, who from his 
high fees is regarded rather as the luxury of the rich than 
as the refuge of the poor ; and hence this self-respecting, labor- 
ing class form a very large percentage of the patrons of pro 
prietary medicines, which they regard as their most ready, 
safe and prompt rescue in case of disease or illness. 

III. This War Tax is also founded upon very extravagant 
and popular ideas of the profits of the business. This may be 
illustrated by a short anecdote : a conversation was in 
progress between a venerable Congressman and a proprietor. 
The latter was laboring to show that the Stamp Tax was 
oppressive, when the Congressman said, " Why, here is your 
25-cent box of pills, and it has not cost you over four cents to 
make it, and on every box you thus make 21 cents." " Oh," 
said the maker, "I sell them for $16 a gross, which is 11 cents 
each"; and it is quite probable that the Congressman only 
echoed the popular opinion. 

It occurs to the writer to say that the ideas which now pre- 
vail among legislators respecting the origin, value, business 

* Read at the annual meeting of the Proprietary Association of America, St. Louis, 
Oct. 17-20, 189 



and profits of the proprietary medicine trade are widely preva- 
lent and have met with little change during the last thirty or 
more years. 

It fell to the lot of the writer to be one, and I think the 
only survivor, of the five who were sent as deputies to meet 
and confer with the Committee of Ways and Means of the 
House of Representatives of 1861, of which the Honorable 
Thaddeus Stephens was chairman. 

They had arranged a tax of two, four and eight cents upon 
the 25c, 50c. and $1 vials or packages of medicine. 

When this announcement was made, our answer was, " But, 
gentlemen, you must remember that we, the makers and tax- 
payers, only get one-half of the sum which the consumer 
pays." This was received with some degree of incredulity, 
but when the proofs were shown the tax-rate was reduced just 
one-half, with this remark of Chairman Stephens: "Gentle- 
men, the country is in peril — you and every industry must 
respond. When the war is over your claims will be 
respected." Yet, in view of all this the tax was continued 
for twenty years. 

But let us return to the stubborn fact ; which is, that in the 
medicine business, as in almost every form of industry, the 
maker gets usually only one-half of what the consumer pays. 
The middle-men, the dealers, get the entire first half. Then the 
maker pays, first his advertising, and I think it may be safely 
stated that the 20,000 publications of the United States make 
more money from advertising the proprietary medicines than 
do the proprietors themselves, and this has been, and prob- 
ably will always be, the case. It is the common experience of 
proprietors to pay for advertising each year, from one-half to 
two-thirds more than they can save from the results or profits 
of their business. The usual or common result is that of their 
receipts one-third to one-half goes for advertising, for new 
business often more, and for the old and established probably 
less. Another third of all receipts must go for material and 
taxes and business expenses. So that, as a general rule, the 
maker will rarely get more than one-tenth or one-eighth ol 
what the consumer pays, if he gets anything. 

As to the results of the tax of 1861 and 1865, only the old 
and long established proprietors saved any money, while hun- 
dreds of younger and weaker, but yet deserving and worthy, 
proprietors were crushed out of existence. 

IV. We beg you to consider that this is a special and par- 
ticular tax, and is over and beyond all other taxes and 
demands for money which every citizen must pay. It is levied 
upon a beneficial and widely employed and useful industry. 
It was levied for the support and maintenance of a war which 
was patriotic and successful, and has come to a speedy and 
righteous conclusion, and we trust that the wisdom and fore- 
sight of the makers of it will promptly remove it. And the 
more so as, when the tax is not laid upon the consumer, to 
whom the tax of one cent upon the vial or box may be as 
nothing, the two and one-half cent tax upon each dollar which 
is laid upon the retail prices really becomes five per cent tax 
upon the maker, as he gets only half of what the consumer 
pays. 

That every citizen has the inalienable right to elect, choose 
or employ what mode or form of treatment or medication he or 
his dependants or family shall take or employ, is so palpable 
as not to require discussion. 



THE CALIFORNIA DRUGGIST. 



If we have been correct in our delineation and exposure of 
the reasons for this tax, and also in making it clear that it is a 
tax upon the medicines of the self-respecting poor, we want to 
suggest the necessity of this War Tax being terminated at the 
earliest practicable date. Frederick Humphreys, M. D. 



The International Bureau of Metric Weights and fleasures. 

From an article on the metric system — historical and 
descriptive — recently appearing in the Chemist and Druggist, 
we take the following account of the establishment where the 
standards are verified : (Drug Circular.) 

About a hundred yards from the well known Sevres por- 
celain manufactory near St. Cloud stands a small building 
where the administration of the metric system for France, and 
indeed for the whole civilized world, is conducted. 

At the end of a leafy avenue, itself surrounded by a chestnut 
grove, stands the Pavilion de Breteuil, a little white villa, 
formerly belonging to one of the Bonaparte family. Above 
the entrance gate of the garden is the inscription, "Bureau 
International des Poids et Mesures," and for the benefit of the 
inquisitive stranger the notice is appended, " Entree Interdite." 
I obtained admission through the kind intervention of Dr. J. 
A. Harker, a young savant from Kew Observatory. * * * 
The pavilion itself is occupied by M. Benoit, the French 
director. In the laboratory j ust opposite work his two Swiss 
assistants, M. Guyon and M. P. Chappuis. * * * 

The metric system is controlled by an international bureau, 
including a representative from each country interested. Mr. 
Chanery, of the standards department of the Board of Trade, 
is the English representative ; M. J. Bertrand represents 
France ; and M. Foerster, Germany. These gentlemen meet 
once every two years in the library of the pavilion. The 
budget of the establishment is 78,ooof. yearly, contributed in 
various proportions by the nations adhering, and assessed 
according to population, legal enforcement of the metric sys- 
tem, etc. In round figures Germany pays io.ooof. ; France, 
8,ooof. ; the United States a trifle more; England, 5,ooof. 
Small countries pay much less — Denmark only about 30of. — 
but all have equal rights. Denmark took about i,ooof. worth 
of standards from the laboratory last year. 

"As to progressive Japan, one might almost say she has 
been spending a big portion of her war indemnity on scientific 
instruments," said Dr. Harker. "No; the metric system is 
not compulsory there, but the standards are checked by the 
metric standard ; and she likes the best of everything. All 
the meters she bought were of platinum-iridium. They cost 
about ^400 apiece. You know this metal costs half again as 
much as gold. Yes ; one can have the standards in cheaper 
metals, and many countries do." * * * 

The laboratory itself is double- walled, so to speak. A pas- 
sage funning betweeen the outside walls and the laboratory 
walls reduces to a minimum the influences of heat and cold. 
The official standards of the French metric system are locked 
in the cellar. 

Measures of length do not interest chemists, or it would be 
curious to describe the way the official standard meters are 
prepared— the metal kept in water at a certain invariable tem- 
perature, the division into 1-1000 parts of a millimeter (called 
microns), etc. Of course, this is done by automatic machin- 



ery, and with the aid of microscopes. The meter was once 
made in H form, but an X section has now been adopted to 
economize the expensive metal. 

The kilogram room was next visited. Here I found M. 
Guyon in charge, and on Dr. Harker explaining the purpose 
of my visit, he courteously placed himself at our disposal. 
Here were four sets of scales, glass cased, of course ; but what 
I did not understand were the brass rods, 4 yards long, in 
front ol each. 

1 ' You are aware that temperature exercises a great influence 
on weight," was the explanation. " If any one goes near the 
balances, the animal heat would seriously affect the calcula- 
tions. These brass levers serve as arms, and enable us to 
weigh four meters from our scales." 

" But it is impossible to see at such a distance." 

" Quite so ; and here you see is a kind of telescope for use 
by the operator. Of course you know also that when one side 
of a scale beam is longer than the other it always goes down. 
You have noticed that in shop scales. Well, it is practically 
impossible to have a beam which is exactly equal." 

"But you have only to change your weights on to the 
other scale to find the error." 

" Exactly ; and here is an apparatus for doing so every 
time we weigh." And, going to the end of the brass levers, 
M. Guyon put his eye to the telescope, the weights were lifted 
from one side to the other, the scale pans being cut to allow 
of this. " A most ingenious arrangement," Dr. Harker coin- 
cided, " which only exists in very few other establishments." 
Then there were the standard weights, some sets in platinum- 
iridium and some in quartz. I noticed that for the milligram 
weights the same arrangement was adopted as is used for 
small apothecaries' weights (" angle weights " is, I think, the 
technical term) in England. 

Quartz and platinum are the hardest substances obtainable, 
but sets of velvet-lined pincers (or ivory for the tiny weights) 
are alone used to lift them from the velvet boxes in which 
they luxuriously nestle. They are, needless to say, always 
slowly and softly deposited, and never dropped or pushed on 
the scale pan. Each time the glass case, of the scales has been 
opened, the instrument is not used again for several hours. 
All is done that is possible to maintain the room at an 
even temperature. For the kilogram the standard of precision 
is a fraction of the 1-100 of a milligram, or about one hundred 
millionth of the total weight. The standard kilogram had 
a box to itself, a conical piece of metal. A vacuum weighing 
apparatus, barometer, iron cupboard for weights, etc., com- 
pleted the furniture of the laboratory. 

"And the liter?" I asked. That, I was told, is now 
calculated from the kilo. But the staff are at present making 
a standard liter. In a third room I was shown a block 
of metal, which was being trimmed into the proper size by 
Bischoffheim's 1892 apparatus, a large and elaborate machine 
as big as a grand piano. All covered in varnished wood, 
a glass front enabled the block, which was to be exactly 
the inside capacity of the liter, to be seen. Behind, one could 
mount on a raised platform, and by the aid of the microscope 
see the work of paring the block down to the correct size when 
the electric light was switched on. 



The California Druggist $1.00 a year. 



8 



THE CALIFORNIA DRUGC ST. 



Matches Without Phosphorus. 

Some time ago the Belgian government offered a substantial 
prize to the inventor who should produce matches which while 
free from phosphorus would yet strike anywhere. In view of 
the suffering which the use of phosphorus entails on the work- 
people making the matches, it is a relief to hear that three 
inventors have "faced the music." Mr. S. A. Rosenthal and 
Dr. S. J. von Komoeki, each working separately, have per- 
fected a match -paste which seems to be the very thing we 
have all been wanting. Their process is being patented, and 
when completed will be made public. In the meantime an 
independent analysis by Johnson, Matthey & Co., Hatton 
Garden, assures us that the composition is perfectly free from 
yellow phosphorus. As generally happens in the case of 
inventions, several persons succeed in solving the same prob- 
lem simultaneously. Mr. Herbert Burrows writes to the 
Daily Chronicle to claim credit for a London County Council 
employe, Mr. Cordes, whose matches may shortly be expected 
on the market. Mr. Cordes has been hampered by want of 
appliances (he has had to grind up his composition with a 
fiat-iron), but by perseverance is said to have turned out 
matches perfectly non-poisonous, and quite successful in other 
ways. If these inventions fulfill all the expectations their 
announcement has raised, they bid fair to be the greatest 
advance in match-making since the days when Walker, in his 
chemist's shop at Stockton-on-Tees, first hit upon the idea of 
the present match. — C, & D. 



Poultry Tonic. 

There is a great similarity between the various poultry pow- 
ders and "foods." The powders are popularly supposed to 
increase the egg-laying power of hens. We quote a few typ- 
ical formulas : 

Powdered egg-shell or phosphate of lime 4 ozs. 

Iron sulphate 4 ozs. 

Powdered capsicum 4 ozs. 

Po wdered fen ugreek 2 ozs. 

Powdered black pepper 1 oz. 

Silver Sand 2 ozs. 

Powdered lentils 6 ozs. 

A tablespoonful to be mixed with sufficient food for twenty 
hens. 

< ivster shell, ground 5 ozs. 

Magnesia 1 oz. 

Calcium carbonate 5 ozs. 

Bone, ground \}4 ozs. 

Mustard bran \]/ z ozs. 

Capsicum 1 oz. 

Sodium chloride 1 oz. 

Iron sulphate l / 2 oz. 

Sodium carbonate % oz. 

Sulphur ]4 oz. 

Heef, lean, dried and powdered 10 ozs. 

Fine sand 10 ozs. 

Corn meal 20 ozs. 

Li nseed meal 20 ozs. 

Reduce all to moderately coarse powder and mix well. 

The above are formulas that are recommended by poultry- 
men, and pharmacists should not condemn them, even if they 
do seem polypharmic. Poultrymen have their own ideas 
about the value of complicated formula. — lira. 



Old Negro Woman (pouring coal-oil among a nest of cock- 
roaches): " I jis' reckon I's gwine to fix you dis time. I'se 
tried lime, inseck poddah an' hot wattah, an' dey hain't done 
no good ; but now you'd jis' as well gib up, fer you can't buck 
de Stan'ard Oil Company." 



Anglican Hair Lotion. 

Take of 

Tincture of cantharides 1 oz. 

Oil bay leaf 5 m. 

Oil bergamot 5 m. '■- 

Rectified spirit , 3 ozs. 

Rose water to 8 or 

Mix and filter through kaolin, and color with burnt sugar, 
or if you require a less expensive one, try this : 
Take of 

Aq flor aurant 14 ozs. 

Glycerin 1 oz. 

Tinct. cantharides 4 drs. 

Liq. ammonia; 4 drs. 

New Liquid Blacking. 

The following is given, in the Neu Erfindungen und 
Erfahrungen, as the formula for an instantaneous blacking. 
It seems to be rather a varnish than a "blacking" : 

Shellac 400 parts. 

Venice turpentine 150 parts. 

Nigrosin (alcohol soluble) 6 parts. 

Alcohol 95 percent ■. 2,000 parts. 

Water 200 parts. 

Dissolve the shellac and nigrosin in the alcohol. Warm tL^ 
turpentine until very liquid, and add to the solution. Stir 
until dissolved, then add the water. Apply with a soft pencil 
or sponge. Keep well stoppered. — National Druggist. 



How It Happened. 

"You know how absent-minded old Squills is," said the 
senior clerk. 

"Yes," said the junior. 

"Well, he went and got one of those bells for his wheel 
that rang a long, continuous ring, you know." 

" I know," said the junior. 

"And he went to ring it when he turned a corner." 

"Of course." 

"And it rang, and then he yelled 'Hello! ' and tried to put 
the handle-bar up to his ear ; and when he got home he was 
mud from head to foot, and the maddest man I ever saw, and 
he didn't tell me how it happened till the next morning." — 
Drug Topics. 

It is claimed that the use of tobacco is an effective preven- 
tive of cholera. It has been learned from the report of investi- 
gations of the effects of tobacco during epidemics of cholera 
that cholera microbes could not exist in the mouths of smokers. 
There were no living bacteria after twenty-four hours in cigars 
made up with water containing 1,500,000 cholera germs to the 
cubic inch. There were no traces of microbes to be found in 
any cigars manufactured in Hamburg at the time of the epi- 
demic there. The microbes die in a half or two hours' ex- 
posure to smoke in Brazil, Sumatra or Havana tobacco. The 
smoke of any cigar kills the microbes. 



THE CALIFORNIA DRUGGIST. 



Business Personals. 



L. P. Collette, the Eastside Druggist, is a candidate for the 
City Council, for the First Ward. 



J. H. Trout has returned from his visit to the East, look- 
ing in the best of health and condition. 



W. W. Boswell has purchased of Dr. G. A. Cutler the lat- 
ter's drug business, corner Hill and Fourth streets. 



Freeman & Hanchett have opened a very neat pharmacy at 
Tenth street and Grand avenue, and we hope will meet with 
success in their venture. 



The J. M. Harris drug store, Boyle Heights, has been pur- 
chased by F. A. Utiger, late of Dennison, Texas. We wish 
Mr. Utiger success in his new field. 



Arthur Nelson, lately chief clerk for John Devine, Santa 
Monica, has entered the employ of the Sale & Son Drug Co., 
id will prove an acquisition to their force. 



" Dr. W. H. Davis, Pacific Coast representative of Parke, 
Davis & Co., is in town for a few days, in the interest of his 
firm, and apparently in his usual vigorous health. 



C. F. Heinzeman was laid up for a few days last week 
with a sprained ankle, which gave him the unusual experience 
of a vacation. The doctor is very seldom found away from 
his post. 

Warren Quinn has returned to his position in the Thomas 
Drug Company after an absence of some months and a short 
period of service with the First Texas Regiment in the army 
of Uncle Sam. 

Ellis T. Yarnell has returned, after a long absence, to enter 
again the employ of the Sale & Son Drug Co. Mr. Yarnell is 
a competent and reliable drug man, and in his present position 
has an excellent opportunity to show his qualities. 



A. A. W. Bley has again entered the circle of pharmacy in 
Pasadena, having bought his old business again from R. H. 
Gaylord. "No place like home." We welcome the doctor 
to his old field, where his friends are a legion. 



Walter Turner, head clerk for the Pasadena Drug Co., has 
been confined to his room for some weeks by a severe attack of 
sciatica. We are glad to know that he is now convalescent, 
and trust he will soon be found at his post again. 



Mr. Ben L- Bear, of Phoenix, Arizona, and Miss Lula A. 
Hargis, of Los Angeles, were married at the home of the 
bride, on Wednesday, the 9th inst., the Rev. Dr. Cantine per- 
forming the ceremony. 

Ben L., who is always happy, has increased his joys a 
hundred fold, and the fair bride, may she be no less happy 
than her husband ! The Druggist extends its congratula- 
tions, and wishes all the best things of life for the bride and 
groom. 



Wm. E. Cates, Ph. G., late of Boston, has accepted a posi- 
tion with C. Laux Co. as head prescription clerk. Mr. Cates 
was for several years a member of the Connecticut Pharmacy 
Board, is an accomplished pharmacist and an acquisition to 
the profession in this city. 



Plummer & Prittie have taken the old stand of A. Lauben- 
sheimer, Wilmington, and will henceforth supply the people 
of that seaport with everything in the drug line. Mr. Plum- 
mer, who will have charge, is a careful and competent gentle- 
man, and will have the confidence of the entire community. 



The rustling medicine-man is in evidence with us at present. 
Mr. Sam Pearce is working in the interest of H. K. Wampole 
&.Co., C. S. Ruggles is stirring up the trade for Hance Bros. 
& White, H. Settle for the Maltine Manufacturing Co., E. R. 
Leibert pushing Sharp & Dohme's manufactures, and George 
Little representing Frederick Stearns & Co. 



The marriage of Robert Horace Gaylord and Elizabeth 
Emery, at Pasadena, November 2d, was an event of much 
interest in society circles of that city. Mr. Gaylord is one of 
Pasadena's leading druggists, and Mrs. Gaylord one of her 
fairest daughters. " Blest be the tie that binds ! " Congratu- 
lations and best wishes are hereby extended. 



Fenn Hildreth has again accepted a position with the 
Thomas Drug Co. after an absence of some months, the past 
summer having been spent in honorable service as one of 
Roosevelt's Rough Riders, and going through all the fights of 
that lively command with but a slight scratch. Fenn is 
young for a veteran, but the Cuban campaign certainly en- 
titles him to that distinction. 



R. J. Newman, formerly clerk for F. N. Van Horn, the East 
First-street Druggist, sailed for Manila, October 13th, on the 
steamer Senator, He was accompanied by W.J. Hill, another 
Los Angeles drug clerk, both being attached to the Hospital 
Corps of the United States Army, and among the very few of 
the Seventh California Regiment who succeeded in getting 
away to the Philippines. Good luck go with you, boys ! 



J. E. Sullivan, of F. W. Braun's druggists' sundries depart- 
ment, put in an appearance at his old desk November 1st 
looking bronzed and hearty after his five months' service with 
the Seventh Regiment. His many friends are glad to greet 
him again, and express their satisfaction at his return. Fred 
Schueddig, of the laboratory department, also returned with the 
regiment, looking remarkably well and vigorous. The air up 
by the Golden Gate has been bracing up the Southern Califor- 
nia boys in great shape, adding much to their strength and 
avoirdupois. 

A Friendly Suggestion. 

"Sir," said the long-haired individual as he entered the 
editorial sanctum, "I have here a little poem on 'A Roof 
Garden,' that I tossed off this morning." 

" Well," replied the knight of the blue pencil, after a hasty 
glance at the manuscript, "I'd advise you to take it back to 
the roof garden and toss it off again." 



IO 



THE CALIFORNIA DRUGGIST. 



OUR ADVERTISERS. 



It will be of interest and value to the trade to consult our 
advertising columns, in which will be found represented the 
following firms and goods : 



A. Gettleman Brewing Co. 
Allcock's Plasters. 
Ammonol Chemical Co. 
Antikamnia Chemical Co. 
Apollinaris Co., Limited. 
Arlington Chemical Co. 
Beeman Chemical Co. 
Braun, F. W. & Co.'s Laboratory 

Products. 
California Fig Syrup Co. 
Cal. Mission Eucalyptus Lozenges. 
Centaur Company. 
Crown Perfumery Co. 
Davol Rubber Co. 
Dean & Son. 
Etna Chemical Co. 
Florence Manufacturing Co. 
Goodrich, B. F. & Co. 
Coronado Corks. 



Hayden Manufacturing Co. 

Hubert, Prof. I. 

Jayne, Dr. D. & Son. 

Kondon Manufacturing Co. 

Kuhns, Arthur Company. 

Leiner, M. 

Levy, B. & Co. 

Ludwick, G. M. 

Mariani & Co. 

Mead, J. L., Cycle Co. 

Moore, H. H. & Sons. 

Munn & Co. 

N. Y. Pharmacal Association. 

Planten.H. & Son. 

Taite, Jos. G. & Sons. 

T. B. Insect Powder. 

Thum, O. W. Co. 

Wyeth, John & Bro. 



\ Kurtz' Freckle Salve j* 

jrf (ORIGINAL) Vj 

7L Manufactured only by C. F. HEINZEMAN f, 

<\ Los Angeles, Cal. J^ 

71 Trade Mark Registered. K 



New Goods Received by F. W. Braun & Co. 

Hudyan doz. $ 4.20 

Kodal Dyspepsia Cure doz. 4.00 

Orthoform oz. 1.65 

Drefs' Hair Restorer doz. 8.50 

Coke Dandruff Cure doz. 8.00 

Norwich Vag. Pessaries doz. 6.00 

Norwich Haemorroidal Cones doz. 4.00 

Norwich Gonorrhoea Crayons doz. 4.50 

S. & D. Sodic Phosphate Compound doz. 6 00 

S. & D. Elixir Panpeptic doz. 8.50 

S. & D. Sol. Hydriodic Acid, '/lbs lb. 4 00 

Clarke's Pure Rye, bottled in bond see adv. 

Teacher's Highland Cream Whiskey case 12.00 

Runnymede Club Whiskey see adv. 



Preparation of Taka-Diastase. 

In the manufacture of Taka-Diastase the spore of a pecu- 
liar fungus, known commercially as Taka-Moyashi, is 
planted on moistened and sterilized wheat bran. After 
planting, the mixture of bran and Taka-Moyashi is spread 
in thin trays and kept for forty to forty-eight hours in a 
warm, damp cellar. During this time the fungus grows 
luxuriantly, producing the diastase. When it has reached 
its maximum, the growth is stopped and the impregnated 
bran, known as Taka-Koji, is thoroughly exhausted with 
water. This solution is concentrated by re-percolation and is 
thrown into a large volume of alcohol, which precipitates the 
diastase. The precipitated Taka-Diastase is then separated 
and dried. — Bulletin Pharmacy. 



Pacific Coast Drug Actencij 



OFFERS FOR SALE 



First-Class Drug Stores 
and Medical Practices 

in all the Pacific States and Territories 

Clerks Registered, Prodded and Employed. Partnerships 
Negotiated. Lists Sent Free. Correspondence Solicited. 

G. M. LUDWICK, 

S. E. Corner Second St. and Broadway, Room 201, Los 



WANTS, Etc., Etc. 

[Under this heading we will be pleased to publish FREE OF 
CHARGE, notices of clerks wanted, positions desired, stores for 
sale or exchange, propositions for purchasing, etc.'] 

WANTED — To purchase a drug store in good business center in Los 
Angeles. Address with full particulars, Arthur Wright, care of 
Mr. Maconkey, 887 Bedford Ave., Brooklyn, N. Y. 



WANTED — Position by graduate in pharmacy. Best reference and 
long experience. Please state salary can give. J. R. HODGES, 
Coleman, Tex. 

WANTED — Partner to open new drug business. Am graduate with 
long experience. State amount of money can put in. Best 
references. Address " TEXAS," care of California Druggist. 

WANTED — To sell, the Figueroa Pharmaey, the best paying outside 
store in the city, at invoice. Want to devote all my time to prac- 
tice only reason for selling. Only those meaning business need apply. 
W. M. Johnston, M. D., owner. 



FOR SALE — A fine drug business in Norwalk ; splendid location ; no 
opposition, there being no other drug store within a radius of five 
miles. Norwalk has about 1000 inhabitants and lies in the center of a 
thickly settled and productive valley. Owner must sell on account of 
ill health. Address DR. W. T. MERCHANT, Norwalk, Cal. 



Three money-makers are offered to the trade this month by 
F. W. Braun & Co. in the Hayden Mfg. Co.'s Arnica Salve, 
Carbolic Salve and Witch Hazel Salve. They are very neatly 
put up in large-sized boxes, and retail at 25 cents. The un- 
iform price is $1 per dozen Add some to your next order. 



FOR SALE — Only drug store in Southern California town of 600 in- 
habitants, with a large tributary population. Rich dairy country 
in artesian belt; 10 miles from ocean; no competition nearer than 8 
miles. Stock of about $2000. Rent only $8.00 per month. Will sell at 
invoice, with reasonable discount for cash. Inquire of F. BRAUN & 
CO., Los Angeles- 

FOR SALE — An established drug business a few miles from Los An- 
geles, in country town. Will sell at inventory, which will come 
near to $3000. Inquire of F. W. BRAUN & CO., Los Angeles 

FOR SALE — Small drug store, near the peat lands, Orange county. 
Drugs will invoice about $600. Lot and house $350. Good open- 
ingfor doctor. Address F. W BRAUN & CO., Los Angeles. 

FOR EXCHANGE— House and lot in Los Angeles, Cal., worth $1500 
for stock of drugs of like amount, in country town where cutting 
of prices is unknown. Address GEO. E. BLUE, 3129 S. MAIN, Los 
Angeles, Cal. 

FOR SALE — A well located drug store in Los Angeles, with an in- 
creasing trade, value $1200. Expenses small. Owner not pharma- 
cist is reason for selling. Inquire of F. W. Braun & Co., Los Angeles 

FOR SALE — In coast city of Southern California, a drug business 
established over eight years. Stock about $2500; location first-class. 
A ddress M. H., care CALIFORNIA DRUGGIST. 

FOR SALE — A city drug store. Fine location. Good business. Low 
rent. Good reasons for selling. Address L, care F. W. BRAUN & 
CO. 

FOR SALE — City drug business at a bargain. Stock about $1200, all 
clean and no dead stuff. Good location for a doctor. Inquire of F. 
W. BRAUN & CO., Los Angeles. 

FOR SALE— Elegant clean stock in the most progressive suburb of 
Los Angeles. Only drug store within twenty blocks. Best reasons 
for selling. Value about $2000. Inquire of F. W. BRAUN & CO. 
L os Angeles. 

FOR SALE — A good, long established drug business in this city. 
Price, $2500. Address "ADVANTAGEOUS," care CALIFORNIA 
DRUGGIST. 

FOR SALE. — Drug business and dwelling ; five-room house with out- 
buildings ; bath ; hot water fixtures, etc. Price $2,750. Address 
M. A., care California Druggist. 

FOR SALE. — Drug stock and fixtures in one of the best towns in South- 
ern California. No cutting. Will sell at invoice. Owner has other 
business. Address S. S. Rogers, Escondido, Cal. 



THE CALIFORNIA DRUGGIST. 



1 1 



PRICE LIST OF DRUGS, CHEMICALS, ETC. 

These prices are for quantities as ordinarily bought by averag-e buyers, and include containers, unless 
otherwise indicated. Subject to market changes. 

For special quantities we will make special figures. 

F. W. BRAUN & CO., Los Angeles, Cal. 



ACETANILfD ft 42® 45 

ACID, Acetic No. 8 ft 10® 25 

Acetic U. S. P ft 30 

Benzoic, Eng oz 16 

Benzoic, German oz 10 

Boracic ft 14® 20 

Carbolic, crude gal 40® 50 

Carbolic, cryst, blk label, 1-ft tin ft 30® 32 

Carbolic, cryst, blk label, 5-ft tins ft 28® 30 

Carbolic, cryst, gold label, 1-ft bots ft 36® 38 

Carbolic, cryst, gold label, 5-ft tin ft 33® 36 

Citric ft 38® 46 

Gallic oz 11® 12 

Hydrocyanic, dil oz 11® 12 

Hydrocyanic, cone, Scheele's oz 40® 45 

Hydrofluoric, 1-oz bots ea 45® 50 

Hydrofluoric, 4-oz bots ea 75 

Muriatic, com]., 6-ft bots ea 65® 75 

Muriatic, coml , carboy, $2 ft 'AH® 3% 

Muriatic, C P., 1-ft bots ft 35® 40 

Muriatic, C P., 6-ft bots ft 25® 30 

Nitric, coml., 7-ft bots ea 1 00 

Nitric, coml., carboy, $2 ft 8® 9 

Nitric, C. P., 1-ft bots ft 35® 40 

Nitric, C P., 7-ft bots ft 25® 30 

Oxalic ft 12® 15 

Pyrogallic, Merck's ft 3 00 

Pyrogallic, Merck's oz 25 

Salicylic ft 60® 70 

Salicylic oz 8@ 10 

Salicylic, from oil wintergreen oz 54 

Sulphuric, coml. , 9-ft bots ea 65® 75 

Sulphuric, coml., carboy, $2 ft 2® 2% 

Sulphuric, C. P., 1-ft bots ft 30® 40 

Sulphuric, C P., 9-ft bots ft 20® 30 

Tannic ft 1 15® 1 50 

Tartaric .ft 38® 42 

AlCOHOL, absolute, 1-qt bots ea 1 50 

Grain market 

Wood, 5 gal. lot to bbl.lot gal 90® 1 05 

Wood, less quantity, can extra gal 1 10 

ALUM, chrome ft 13® 15 

Dried (burnt alum) ft 12® 15 

Lump ft 3%@ 4 

Ground ft 5® 6 

Powdered ft 6® 8 

AMMONIA, cone, 26°, 5-pt bots ea 85 

Cone, bulk, can extra gal 75 

Bromide ■ , ft 75 

Carbonate ft 12® 25 

Muriate, lump ft 13® 15 

Muriate, gran, coml ft 11® 15 

Muriate, gran, pure ft 16® 20 

Muriate, powd ft 20® 25 

Valerianate oz 27 

AMMONAL, (Po. or Tablets) oz 1 04 

ANT1KAMNIA Oz 1 00 

ANTIPYRIN oz 35 

AKISTOL (25 oz, $1.65) oz 180 

ARROWROOT, Bermuda ft 35 

ARSENIC, powd, white ft 10® 12 

BALSAM Copaiba ft 65® 75 

Fir, Canada .. ft 45® 50 

Peru ft 2 50® 2 75 

Tolu ft 75© 30 

BARK, Cinchona, red, true ft 50® 55 

Cinchona, red-, powd ft 35® 60 

Cinchona, yeliow, Calisaya ft 50@ 55 

Cinchona, yellow, powd ft 35® 60 

Elm, slab ft 12® 15 

Elm, ground ft 14® 18 

Elm, powd ft la® 20 

Sassafras ft 12® 15 

Soap, slab ft 7® 10 

Soap, ground ft 10® 13 

Soap pwd ft 18® 20 

Soap, cut, 5c boxes doz 35 

Soap, cut, 10c bozes doz 60 

Wild Cherry ft 12®' 15 

BAY RUM gal 2 50® 3 00 

F. W. B. & Co., % pts doz 1 75 

F. W. B. & Co., pts doz 3 50 

BEANS, Tonka, Angostura ft 2 25® 2 50 

Vanilla, Mexican ft 14 50@15 50 

Vanilla, Tahiti ft 3 25® 3 50 

BERRIES, Cubeb ft 25® 30 

Cubeb, powd ft 30® 35 

Juniper ft 9® 10 

BISMUTH, sub-carbonate ft 1 70® 1 80 

Sub-gallate oz 19 

Sub-nitrate ft 1 35® 1 45 

BLUE MASS ft 70® 75 

BLUE VITRIOL ft 4%® 7 

BORAX, refined ft 8^@ 12 

Powd ft 8H@ 12 

BUDS, Cassia ft 35® 38 

CALOMEL, American ft 80® 85 

English ft 1 10® 1 15 

Stock ft 55® 65 

CAMPHOR ft 37® 42 

CANTHARIDES, Chinese, powd ft 60® 65 

Russian, powd ft 90@ 1 00 



6K@ 
10® 



8® 
12® 



25 
25 
25 

2 00 
4 00 
1 05 

3 75 
35 

8 
12 
10 
12 
10 
15 
18 
20 
25 

1 70 

1 



50® 



CAPSICUM, African, pods ft 22® 

African, powd ft 20® 

CARAMEL, (gal $1 50, can extra) ft 

CARBON, bisulphide, 1-ft bots doz 

Bisulphide, 2-ft bots doz 

Bisulphide, 1-gal cans ea 1 00@ 

Bisulphide, 5-gal cans ea 

CARMINE, No 40 oz 

CHALK, French, powd ft 

White, precip ft 

White, prepared, drops ft 

CHARCOAL, animal, gran ft 

Animal, powd ft 

Willow, powd , bulk ft 

Willow, powd., 1-ft cartons ft 

Willow, powd., %-ft cartons ft 

Willow, powd., J{-ft cartons ft 

CHLORAL HYDRATE, libs ft 1 

Hfbs ft 1 

K fts lb 1 95® 2 00 

CHLOROFORM, 1-ft tins ft 

7-ft tins ft 

. Squibbs', 500-gm ea 

Squibbs', 250-gm ea 

Squibbs', 100-gm ea 

CLOVES ft 

Powd , ft 

COBALT, powd ft 

COCAINE, hydrochlorate oz 

Hydrochlorate, % oz oz 

Hydrochlorate, Ya oz ea 

COCOA BUTTER ft 

CODEINE, alk., y a oz oz 

Sulphate, Ya oz oz 

COLOCYNTH APPLE ft 

Powd ft 

COMPOSITION POWDER, i/g-ftpkgsft 

COPPERAS, bbls, 1% ft 

CORROSIVE SUBLIMATE ft 

Powd ft 

CREAM TARTAR, pure ft 

CREOLIN, 1-ft and 5-ft bots ft 

CREOSOTE, beech-wood ft 

Coml ft 

CURCUMA, powd ft 

CUTTLE BONE ft 

DEXTRINE ft 

DOVER'S POWDER ft 

EIKONOGEN oz 

EMERY, flour ft 

ERGOT, powd ft 

ESSENCE PEPPERMINT,2-ozbot..doz 

ETHER, Nitrous, cone, 1-ft bots ft 

Nitrous, cone , %-ft bots ft 

Nitrous, cone, J^-ft bots ft 

Sulphuric, U. S. P.. 1880 ft 

Sulphuric, cone, 1890 ft 

Sulphuric, Squibbs', 500-gm ea 

Sulphuric, Squibbs', 250-gm ea 

Sulphuric, Squibbs', 100-gm ea 

EUCALYPTOL, Merck's oz 

EXTRACT, Cascara, fluid, F. W. B. & Co..ft 
Cascara, fluid, F. W. B. & Co.. 5-ft bots.. .ft 
Cascara, fl., arom., F.W.B. & Co., 1-ft bot..ft 
Cascara, fl., arom., F.W.B. & Co , 5-ft bot..ft 

Logwood, 15 and 25-ft boxes ft 

Logwood, 1-ft, 54-ft and ~% -ft boxes ft 

Witch Hazel, distilled gal 

Less than 5 gals, container extra. 
EXTRACTS, FLAVORING, 

Lemon, F.W.B. & Co., 2-oz doz 

Vanilla. F. W. B. & Co., 2-oz doz 

FLOWERS. Arnica ft 

Chamomile, Eng.... lb 

Chamomile, Ger ft 

Lavender ft 

Rosemary ft 

FOIL. Tin, Heavy ft 

Tin, Medium ft 

Tin, Light ft 

FORMALDEHYD ft 

FRUIT JUICES, F. W. B. & Co., qts., doz 
FRUITS, Crushed, F.W.B.&Co.,^gals ,doz 

FULLERS EARTH ft 

GELATINE,, Cox's, sml doz 

French, gold label ft 

French, silver label ft 

French, bronze label ft 

GLUE, Carpenter's ft 

White ft 

GLYCERINE, 50-ft cans ft 

10-Ib cans ft 

2-oz bots doz 

Schering's 1-ft bots ft 

Schering's 10-ft bots ft 

GLYCOLINE (gal., $1.50, can extra) ft 

GUM, Aloes, Barb .ft 25® 

Aloes, Barb , powd ft 30® 

Aloes, Cape ..ft 20® 

Aloes, Cape, powd ft 20® 

Aloes, Socotrine, true ft 45® 

Aloes Socotrine, powd ft 50® 



57 

54 

1 10 

58 

26 

20 

25 

30 

3 25 

3 35 

55 

55 

5 35 

5 10 

90 

85 

35 

2® 3 

JO® 85 

95 

32 

60 

18 

50 

15 

35 

12 

1 25 

37 

10 

50 

1 50 

1 20® 1 25 

1 35® 1 40 

1 55® 1 60 

75® 80 

80® 85 

1 25 

66 

30 

24 

70 

50 

80 

75 

12® 13 

15® 20 

65® 90 



27® 
55® 



12® 



50® 



1 50 

1 75 
20 
30 
35 
15 
40 
25 
38 
35 
60 

5 00 

10 80 

10 

1 50 
65 
45 
40 
12 

15® 18 
14^® 15 
17 
1 25® 1 50 
45 
40 
35 
30 
35 
25 
25 
50 
55 



18® 



12® 



25® 
30® 



35® 



Ammoniac ft 40® 45 

Arabic, No. 1 ft 70® 75 

Arabic, No. 2 ft 50® 55 

Arabic, powd., No. 1 ft 70® 75 

Arabic, powd., French ft 90® 1 00 

Arabic, sorts ft 40® 45 

Asafetida ft 32® 35 

Asafetida, powd ft 45® 50 

Benzoin ft 50® 55 

BeDzoin, powd ft 60® 70 

Catechu ft 9® 12 

Catechu, powd ft 32® 35 

Guaiac ft 38® 40 

Guaiac, powd ft 45® 50 

Myrrh ft 35® 38 

Myrrh powd ft 38® 40 

Olibanum ft 25® 30 

Opium ft 3 85® 3 90 

Opium, powd ft 5 00® 5 20 

Shellac, orange ft 27® 30 

Shellac, orange, ground ft 32® 35 

Shellac, white ft 35® 40 

Shellac, white, powd ft 40® 45 

Spruce, tears ft 1 25® 1 35 

Tragacanth, flake ft 90® 95 

Tragacanth, sorts ft 45® 50 

Tragacanth, powd ft 1 00® 1 10 

HOFFMAN'S ANODYNE ft 65 

HOPS, pressed, % and %-lbs ft 16® 20 

Pressed, oz ft 25 

HYDROGEN PEROXIDE, Mar- 

chand's, lbs doz 7 80 

Marchand's, H-lbs doz 5 75 

Marchand's, J^-lbs doz 3 90 

Marchand's, j|-lbs doz 2 25 

M. C. W., or P. & W., 1 lbs doz 4 80 

M C. W., or P. & W.,%-lbs doz 3 00 

M. C. W., or P. & W., %-lbs doz 1 80 

Oakland, lib doz 6 40 

Oakland, J^-lbs doz 3 95 

Oakland, ^-lbs doz 2 70 

U.S. P., lib ft 35 

U. S. P. ,11b full doz 3 25 

HYDROZONE, 1-lb bots doz 10 90 

i^-lb bots doz 7 50 

i^-lb bots doz 4 90 

Ys-Vo bots doz 2 25 

ICHTHYOL oz 52 

Ichthyol ft 6 75 

INDIGO ft- 70® 75 

INSECT POWDER, Buhach, 6-lb cans.ft 50® 60 

Dalmatian, bulk ft 28® 40 

Hill's California, bulk ft 35® 45 

"T. B." 6-lb cans ft 40 

"T. B." 1-lb cans doz 5 50 

"T. B," %-lb cans doz 3 25 

' T. B." small doz 1 25 

IODINE, re-subl oz 36 

Re-subl ft 3 45® 3 65 

IODOFORM oz 37 

Iodoform ft 3 SO® 4 00 

IRON, carbonate precip ft 16® 18 

Chloride, solution ft 25® 35 

Iodide oz 35 

Sub-sulphate (Monsell oz 8 

Sub-sulphate (Monsel) ft 31® 40 

Sub-sulphate solution ft 25® 30 

Sulphate, dried ft 15® 20 

Sulphate, pure cryst., bulk ft 8® 10 

Sulphate, pure cryst., 1-lb bots ft 14® 18 

JUICE, Grape, Los Gatos, pts doz 4 00 

Grape, Welch's, % pts doz 1 90 

Grape. Welch's, pints doz 2 75 

Grape, Welch's, quarts doz 5 25 

LANOLIN, Leibreich's ft 80 

LEAD, acetate, coml ft 16® 20 

Acetate, powd ft 20® 25 

Acetate, C. P ft 27® 30 

Sub-acet. solu., Goulard's ft 30® 35 

LEAVES, Bay ft 14® 15 

Buchu.long ft 30® 33 

Buchu, short ft 22® 25 

Rosemary, bulk ft 18® 20 

Sage, %s and #s ft 18® 20 

Sage, ozs lb 25 

Senna, Alex ft 30® 35 

Senna, Alex., powd , ft 35 

Senna, Tinnevelli ft 18® 20 

Senna, Tinnevelh, powd ft 20® 25 

UvaUrsi ft 12® 15 

LEECHES, (25 or more, 8c.) ea 10 

LIME. Chloride, 35-ft cans ft 4% 

Chloride, Acme, 1-lb cans doz 1 25 

Chloride, Acme, J^-lb cans doz 80 

Chloride, Acme, %-lb cans doz 45 

Chloride, Electron, 1-lb cans doz 1 00 

Chloride, Phoenix, 1-lb cartons doz 90 

LITHARGE ft 7^@ 10 

LONDON PURPLE ft 15® 20 



12 



THE CALIFORNIA DRUGGIST, 



LOZENGES, Licorice, 5-lb boxes lb 

Licorice, "Acme," 5-lb boxes It) 

Peppermint, 5-lb boxes ft 

LTCOPODIUM lb 

LYE, concentrated (case, $3.50) doz 

LTSOL, 1-lb bots lb 

MAGNESIA, Calcined 1-lb tin ft 

Carbonate, Jenning's, 2 and 4-oz tb 

Carbonate, K. & M., 4-oz., 2 oz. and loz.lb 

Carbonate, K. & M., powdered tb 

Carbonate, K. & M., S. S lb 

Eff. citrate, Herring's doz 

MANGANESE, black oxide lb 

MANNA, large flake ft 

Small flake ft 

MENTHOL, (oz. 30c.) ft 

MERCURY ft 

Bi-sulphate ft 

Iodide, green oz 

Iodide, red oz 

MORPHINE, sulph.. l / s oz oz 

Sulph., '/& oz., 2 l /2 oz bxs oz 

Sulph., 1 oz tins oz 

Sulph., 5-oz tins oz 

MOSS, Iceland ft 

Irish ft 

MUSK, Canton, 1-oz bxs oz 

Tonquin, yi oz bots ea 

MUSTARD Colburn's,6 lb cans ft 

Ground California ft 

NAP HTH ALINE, balls, cakes or flakes..ft 

NUTMEGS ft 

Ground ft 

NUTS, Areca ft 

Areca.powd ft 

Kola ft 



50@ 



IS® 



25 

35 
60 

2 00 

6@ 8 

90@ 1 00 

50® 60 

2 85® 3 10 

78® 85 

65® 70 

25 

26 

•J W<r, -2 75 

2 55® 2 70 

2 35® 2 50 

2 30© 2 45 

15 

20 

35 

4 50 



4® 
60(5' 
65® 



15 



NUX VOMICA ft 

Powdered ft 

OIL, Almond, bitter oz 

Almond, sweet ft 

Amber, rect ft 

Anise ft 

Bay oz 

Benne (can extra) gai 

Bergamot, Sanderson ft 

Bergamot, Sicilian ft 

Cassia ft 

Castor "A A" gal 

Castor, machine gal 

castor, special com'l gal 

Less than 5 gals., can extra. 

Cedar, coml ft 

Cedar, pure ft 

China nut (can extra) gal 

Cloves ft 

Cocoanut ft 

Cod liver, Norwegian (can extra) gal 

Cottonseed gal 

Less than 5 gal., can extra. 

Croton ft 

Cubebs ft 

Eucalyptus ft 

Geranium Rose oz 

Hemlock, pure ft 

Lard gal 

Less than 5 gal can extra. 

Lavender flowers ft 

Lavender, garden ft 

Lemon, Sanderson ft 

Lemon, Sicilian ft 

Mustard, Essential oz 

Neatsfoot (less than 5-gal. can extra) ...gal 

Olive, California, qts doz 

Olive, Italia, 1 gal cans gal 

Olive, Malaga, can extra gal 

Orange, bitter ft 

Orange, sweet tb 

Origanum ft 

Pennyroyal ft 

Peppermint Hotchkiss ft 

Peppermint, Western ft 

Pinus Sylvestris ft 

Rhodium oz 

Rose oz 

Rosemary flowers tb 

Sandalwood, Eng oz 

Sandalwood, Ger ft 

Sassafras ft 

Sewing Machine, Nye's, small doz 

Sewing Machine, Nye s, large doz 

Sperm, Nye'scrystal gal 

Sperm, pure, w. b gal 

Less than 5 gal can extra. 

Spike ft 

Turpentine, rect., Merck ft 

( nion salad gal 

Less than 5 gal can extra. 

Wintergreen lb 

Wormwood ft 

OIL CAKE, ground lb 

OINTMENT, Citrine !l> 

Mercurial, '.'< m lb 

Mercurial '/ 2 m ft 

Zinc, benz. oxide lb 

ORANGE PEEL II, 

PAPOID, 'A or 1-oz bots oz 

PARAFFIN Ih 

PARIS GREEN ft 

l's, H's, \i's tb 

PETROLATUM, ex. amber ft 

Snow while lb 

PHENACETIN (25 ozs. .95) oz 

PHOSPHORUS, U-Ib cans ft 

1-lb cans lb 

% and }{-cans lb 

PLASTER PARIS tb 

Dentist's tb 



35® 
25® 
15® 
20® 

25® 



75® 



65 
70 
35 
40 
35 

20 
25 
65 
45 
55 

2 40® 2 60 
45® 50 

1 15® 1 25 

3 40® 3 60 

3 00® 3 20 

2 00® 2 25 
1 25® 1 35 

45® 50 
75® 80 

50 
80 
75 

95® 1 15 

20® 30 

1 10® 1 25 

55® 70 

1 50® 1 65 

1 50® 1 75 
65® 75 
65® 75 
75® 80 
75® 85 

2 25® 2 40 
75® 80 

2 00® 2 20 

1 25® 1 50 

65 

75® 80 

12 00 

2 10 

1 00@ 1 25 

4 50® 4 75 

2 25® 2 50 
50® 60 

1 50® 1 75 
1 85® 2 10 
1 30® 1 50 
1 20® 1 40 

40@ 75 

7 50@10 00 

1 50® 1 65 

50 

:; 00® :: 25 

75® 85 

% 

!■> 

75 
1 25 

25® 35 

■15 

75® 80 

l 70® i 90 

l D0@ 5 ih' 
02'^® 03 



50® 

6or«' 



15® 18 
2 00 
10® 15 
20® 25 
25® 30 

mm 9 

25® 30 
1 00 

75 
86 

•>,,,„ 1 115 
02® 05 
04® 08 



POISON, purple ft 

POTASH, Babbitt's, (case $3.50) doz 

Caustic, crude ft 

Caustic, white, stick ft 

Bichromate ft 

Carbonate ft 

Chlorate ft 

Cyanide, mining ft 

Cyanide, pure granular ft 

Iodide ft 

Nitrate ft 

Permanganate tb 

Prussiate, red ft 

Prussiate, yellow ft 

PUMICE STONE, lump ft 

Powd ft 

QUASSIA, Chips lb 

QUININE. 1-oz bottle oz 

1-oz tin oz 

5-oz tin oz 

25-oz tin oz 

00-oz tin oz 

100-oz tin oz 

RED PRECIPITATE ft 

RESIN, ft 

ROOT, Aconite ft 

Althea, cut ft 

Blood lb 

Blood, powd ft 

Calamus, peeled ft 

Gentian ft 

Gentian, powd ft 

Ginger, African ft 

Ginger, Jamaica ft 

Goldenseal ft 

Goldenseal, powd ft 

Ipecac, powd ft 

Licorice, select ft 

Licorice, cut ft 

Licorice, powd ft 

Orris, powd ft 

Rhubarb ft 

Rhubarb cubes 

Rhubarb fingers 

Rhubarb, powd ft 

Rhubarb, powd., Allen's, Eng ft 

Sarsaparilla, Hond ft 

Sarsaparilla, Hond, gro ft 

Sarsaparilla, Mex ft 

Sarsaparilla, Mex., gro ft 

Valerian ft 

"Valerian, powd ft 

ROTTEN STONE, powd ft 

SACCHARIN, 25 gm. cartons ea 

SAFFRON, American , 

Spanish oz 

SAL EPSOM 

Epsom 4-oz cartons doz 

Glauber ft 

Nitre, cryst ft 

Nitre, powd ft 

Rochelle ....ft 

Soda jb 

SALOL, (oz32) ft 

SEED, Anise, Ital ft 

Anise, powd ft 

Bird, mixed, 1-lbs., 60-lbcase case 

Bird, mixed, 1 ft doz 

Canary ft 

Caraway ft 

Cardamom ft 

Celery ft 

Coriander ft 

Flax, cleaned ft 

Flax, ground ft 

Hemp ft 

Millet ft 

Mustard ft 

Poppy, blue ft 

Rape ft 

Sabadilla, powd ft 

Worm, American ft 

Worm, Levant ft 

SEIDLITZ MIXTURE lb 

Powders, single, 100s box 

Powders, 3's doz 

Powders. 6's doz 

Powders, 10s doz 

SHEEP DIP, Carbolic gal 

Little's 1 gal cans gal 

Little's 5 gal cans gal 

SNUFF, Garrett's Scotch, blads ft 

Garrett's Scotch, 1-oz tins doz 

Garrett's Scotch, 2-oz tins doz 

Garrett's Scotch, 4-oz tins doz 

Garrett's Scotch, 6 oz bots doz 

Lorillard's Maccaboy, 4-oz bots doz 

Lorillard's Rappee. 4-OZ bots doz 



08® 


10 




SMI 


7'A@ 


13 


45® 


70 


15® 


20 


15® 


25 


14® 


17 


30® 


35 




65 


2 50® 2 55 


08® 


12 


111(0 


60 


60® 


65 


32® 


3o 


IIU(» 


10 


06® 


08 




10 


31® 


33 


29® 


31 


26® 


28 


25® 


27 


24 H@ 26^ 


24® 


26, 


. : 


10 


OV/i to 


03 


30® 


35 



25® 



13® 
14® 
20® 
25® 
60® 
65® 



75® 3 00 

13® 15 

80 

14® 18 

35® 40 

75 

ft 1 25® 1 50 

" 1 50® 1 75 

75 

75 

45 

45 

30 

30 

35 



40®, 
■10® 
25® 
25® 
::o® 
35® 
07® 

ft 40® 

)z 

ft 02&@ 

01^@ 
08® 



40 
10 
1 00 
45 
90 
04 
35 
03 
12 
12 
30 
03 



03 K 2 ® 
10® 

1 35® 
18® 
10® 

03-, (« 

0:;' 2 (5 

o: :',„; 

M<„ 
06® 
10® 
04® 
40® 



SOAP, Castile, Couti white. 

Marseilles, white 

Mottled, coml 

Mottled, pure 

Turkish, green or white 

Powdered 

German green, Stiefel'9 

Whale Oil 

SODA ASH 

Caustic, 98 per cent 

Caustic, 70 per cent (Drums) 

Caustic, white, sticks 

Bicarbonate 

Bromide. 



26® 

0154® 

8 60® 3 75 

16® 18 

20® 25 

3 50 

75 

05 

12 

1 40 
25 
12 
05 
05 
06 
06 
OS 
12 

06 

50 
20 
25 
28® 30 

2 50 
60 

1 I.V. 1 5o 

1 @ 2 00 

1 10 

1 35 

1 20 

55 

65 

1 10 

1 90 

3 00 

2 50 
75 
16 
18 
10 
12 
11 
86 

HI 
06 

OS 



13® 

10® 

07$4@ 

08® 
10® 



02-/ 2 @ 



lyposulphite lb 

Hyposulphite, new process ft 

SOLUTION, Donavan's ft 

Fowler's ft 

Goulard's tb 

SPERMACETI ft 

SPIRITS, Brook lyu and Columbian gal. 1 50® 1 75 

Less than 5 gals, can extra. 



04® 
06® 
0i?i@ 08 
02%® 03 
42® 15 

01 

65 

05 
06 

40 

35 

■ 

56 



08#@ 

04® 

25® 

:;om 
50® 



Mitre, U.S. P ft 55® 60 

Nitre. 2-oz bots doz 150 

STRONTIUM, nitrate ft 14® 17 

STRY CHINE., cryst., y a oz bots oz 1 25 

Ciyst., 1-oz bots oz 1 00 

Powd., / 8 -oz bots oz 1 20 

Powd., 1-oz bots oz 95 

Si: GAR MILK, powd fc 2 0® 25 

SULFONAL oz 1 35 

SULPHUR, crude, ground, Cal ft 02&@ 03 

Flour ft 03»<® 0454 

Flowers ft 04 @ 05 

Roll ft 03%® 05 

SYRUP. Iodide Iron, F. W. B. & Co ft 57® 60 

Rock Candy, bbls and % bbls gal 70® 75 

TAR, Pine, y 2 pints ' doz 75 

Pine, pints doz 90 

Pine, quarts doz 1 50 

WATER, distilled, containers extra gal 10 

Orange Flower, containers extra gal 2 00® 2 25 

Rose, containers extra gal 2 00® 2 50 

WAX, Floor, powd ft 40 

Yellow, pure ft 27® 30 

White, pure ft 50® 55 

White, No. 1 ft 35® 40 

WHITE PRECIPITATE ft 120 

ZINC, metallic, shavings lb 20® 35 

Oxide, com'l ft 14® 15 

Oxide, Hubbuck's ft 45® 5C 

Sulphate, com'l ft 06fn 08 

Sulphate, chem. pure ft 17® 20 

PROPRIETARY ARTICLES 

Controlled by F. W. Braun & Co. 

Braun's Carbolic Salve doz $1 25 

" Carbolic Soap doz 75 

" Condition Powder doz 1 00 

'• Essence Jamaica Ginger doz 150 

•' Florida Water, Ige doz 3 50 

" Florida Warer, small doz 150 

" Sarsaparilla doz 4 00 

" Syrup Tar and Wild Cherry doz 1 50 

Cal. Mission Eucalyptus Lozenges doz 150 

Cal. Mission Eucalyptus Plasters doz 1 50 

Cal. Mission Poison Oak Remedy doz 1 50 

Cal. Root Beer doz 80 

Cal. Mocking Bird Food doz 3 00 

Coronado Sea Salt doz 80 

Haydeu's Arnica Salve doz 1 00 

Carbolic Salve doz 100 

" Witch Hazel doz 1 00 

" Sanitary Towels, small gro 3 50 

" medium gro 3 75 

" " large gro 4 00 

Hayden's Sachet Powder, '/ ft bots ft 3 00 

Hunter's Witch Hazel. doz 175 

Matchless Sarsaparilla doz 5 00 

Matchless Wild Cherry Phosphates doz 1 75 

Swain's Carbolic Powder doz 1 50 

Tarine doz 1 75 

" T. B." Insect Powder, 6-ft can ft 40 

" " 1-ft " doz 5 50 

Y 2 -fb" doz 3 25 

" sml " doz 1 25 



BRAUN'S... 

California 
Condition Powder 



IS A 



Well Established Remedy 



Having a good sale throughout Southern 
California and the Territories 



It is used for 



Horses, Cattle, Sheep and Poultry 

IT IS GOOD 

It Retails for 25 cents 
It Costs $ I .OO Per Dozen 

You need it in your business ! 



MANUFACTURED 
AND SOLO BY 



F. W. BRAUN & CO. 



LOS ANGELES, CAL. 



VOLUME 7.] LOS ANGELES, DECEMBER, 1898. [NUMBER 12. 

TH ih 




W^^LV^&U^MaL ^EVOTEJi T© TlnllE fliffe^gT^OFTHi G^TAflL P^HH(Q<S 



V*^ 




V* 



'*'* 



7 



F. W. BRAUN & CO., WHOLESALE DRUGGISTS 



(0LUHBIAN SPIRITS 



TRA.DE mark 



THE EQUAL of ALCOHOL for all 
PURPOSES EXCEPT INTERNAL use. 

MANHATTAN SPIRIT CO. 

Sole Manufacturers, BUFFALO, N. Y. 



The Price to RETAILERS is 
$8. Case of 50 glass bottles 




See that the 
Labels bear the well known 
RED DIAMOND MARK of the 
APOLLINARIS COMPANY, LIMITED. 

SOLE EXPORTERS: 
Ttie flPOLLINflRIS 60MPANY, Ld., London 

J. S. ANDERSON, 21 Sutter St., San Francisco 
Representing United Agency Co., 503 Fifth Ave., New York 



LHCTOPePTI N6 



LACTOPEPTINE Powder, in ounces, per dozen $8 20 

LACTOPEPTINE Powder, in half-pound bottles, per pound 9 80 

Lbs. per doz. 5-ft> Bot. Ea. 

LACTOPEPTINE Elixir $12 15 $4 60 

LACTOPEPTINE Elixir with Bismuth 12 15 4 60 

LACTOPEPTINE Elixir with Strychnia and Bismuth 12 15 4 60 

LACTOPEPTINE Elixir with Calisaya 12 15 4 60 

LACTOPEPTINE Elixir with Calisaya, Iron and Bismuth 12 15 4 60 

LACTOPEPTINE Elixir with Gentian and Chloride of Iron 12 15 4 60 

LACTOPEPTINE Elixir with Phosphate of Iron, Quinia and Strychnia 12 15 4 60 

LACTOPEPTINE Liquid 12 15 4 60 

LACTOPEPTINE with Beef, Iron and Wine 12 15 4 60 

Per Doz. 6-lb Bot. 

LACTOPEPTINE Syrup with Phosphates $12 15 $5 60 



NEW YORK PHARMACAL ASSOCIATION, Yonkers, N. Y. 



What do you say to the offer of a Barrel 

HOSPITAL TONie 

FOR $12.00 NET 30 DAYS 

You can have the chance by sending to 

F. W. BRAUN & CO. 

LOS ANGELES, CAL. 



50 YEARS' 
EXPERIENCE 




Trade Marks 
Designs 
Copyrights &c. 

Anvone sending a sketch and description may 
quickly ascertain our opinion free whether an 
invention is probably patentable, f'ommunica- 
tionsstrictly confidential. Handbook on Patents 
sent free. Oldest agency for securing patents. 

Patents taken through Munn a CO. receive 
special notice, without, c harg e. In .the 

Scientific American. 

A handsomely illustrated weekly. Largest cir- 
culation of any scientific Journal. Terms. *d a 
year : four months, $1. Sold by all newsdealers. 

MUNIUCo. 36lBroadwa > New York 

Branch Office, 626 V St., Washington, D. C 



Jtye Qaliforpia Dru^ist. 

A MONTHLY JOURNAL 

DEVOTED TO THE INTERESTS OF THE RETAIL DRUGGIST. 



Volume VII.] 



LOS ANGELES, CAL., DECEMBER, 1898. 



[Number 12. 



51?e ^aliforpia Dm^ist 



PUBLISHED MONTHLY BY 



THE CALIFORNIA DRUGGIST PUB. CO, 

P. O. Drawer 406, Station C. - - LOS ANGELES, CAL. 
(To whom all Communications should be addressed.) 



F. S. LANGDON, 
J. Q. BRAUN, 
R. A. ALLEN, 



President 

Treasurer 

Editor 



TERMS OF SUBSCRIPTION. 

Per Year $1 00 

Single Copies 10 

ADVERTISING RATES. 

One Page $100 00 

Half Page 60 00 

Fourth Page 35 00 

Eighth Page 20 00 

Cards (per month) 1 50 

86^ Advertisements for positions or assistants, or to buy or sell Drug 
Stores, are inserted free of charge. 

Items of interest to Pharmacists are solicited. 

The official organ of the San Diego Retail Druggists' Association. 

The official organ of the Los Angeles County Pharmaceutical Associa- 
tion. 



It remains to be seen how promptly the people of this coast 
will adjust themselves to the new conditions under which we 
are placed by our geographical position. We may assume, at 
least, that we are soon to enter upon a period of commercial 
activity hitherto unknown on these shores, and that a consid- 
erable influx of population and capital will ensue, bringing to 
this large section of the United States those elements of strength 
and influence so important to our prosperity. 



"THE Nicaragua Canal question has for some years been a 
*■ source of much trouble and perturbation of mind to the 
people of this coast, it having been assumed by us to be of the 
first importance to our commercial interests that this waterway 
should be constructed. It has tried us sorely that all efforts 
we and our Eastern advocates have made to interest the gen- 
eral government or individual capitalists in the question have 
up to the present time only resulted in the obtaining of con- 
cessions by syndicates whose object seems to have been to 
enrich themselves by selling their concessions. So little gen- 
eral interest was aroused in the canal proposition that it seemed 
likely to take another generation before the work would be 
accomplished. 

Now, however, the question has leaped to the foremost 
position among the subjects of legislation. The recent acqui- 
sition of the Hawaiian and Philippine islands by the United 
States has brought the whole people to a realizing sense of the 
absolute necessity of this waterway, both for the purposes of 
commerce, and still more urgently for the needs of our navy in 
the protection of our new possessions. Thus, with the wealth 
and influence of the great manufacturers added to the powerful 
arm of our general government, the building of the Nicaragua 
Canal is assured, and that with no unnecessary delay, and we 
feeble ones of the Pacific Coast may well thank the happy 
providence that has so thoroughly nationalized what has 
seemed largely a question of local interest. 



\ A/E now expect to see the exploiting of the Philippines by 
*" the omnipresent "lost manhood" people, who have 
worked nearly every out-of-the-way field (in their minds), 
bringing woeful tales of wasted lives and broken constitutions 
which were restored, at nearly the last gasp, by some educated 
gorilla, who was touched with sympathy, having "been 
there ' ' himself, and who communicated the secret remedy 
(probably P. D. & Co.'s pills No. 477) which made him as 
good as new. Said secret remedy brought from the impene- 
trable forests and inaccessible mountains of Africa at great 
risk and expense now being offered (for a suitable considera- 
tion) to suffering humanity who are past all help from edu- 
cated physicians, and who mope about among their fellows 
with trembling steps and vacant eyes. The Malays, or better 
still, those little black dwarfs of the far interior of Mindanao 
ought to furnish something novel for these medical romancers. 
Who will strike the first pick into this undeveloped field ? 



A PAIR of druggists' scales, recovered from the wreck of 
the Spanish ship Infanta Maria Teresa— Admiral Cer- 
vera's flagship — was presented to the Philadelphia College of 
Pharmacy by Chas. E. Alexander, Class of '96, who was 
present, upon the U. S. Steamship Indiana, on the occasion of 
the great naval battle outside of Santiago, July 3d. It is an 
interesting relic, and gives evidence of the intense heat to 
which it was subjected in the burning ship, the brass portions 
having been entirely melted away — as we learn from the 
Alumni Report. 

WHEN American civilization gets to work among the Fili- 
pinos we may expect that the modern pharmacy will 
occupy its usual important position. The California College 
of Pharmacy offers all necessary facilities for putting our 
Asiatic wards on the top shelf among pill-rollers, though we 
suspect that the American schoolmaster will have a large 
amount of preliminary work to do before dean Searby will be 
rushed with applications from our newly acquired archipelago. 



T 



HE next meeting of the California State Board of Phar- 
macy will be held at Sacramento, Jan. 10th, 1899. 



THE CALIFORNIA DRUGGIST. 



A MOVEMENT has been started among druggists to adopt 
a universal price-mark to define the price charged for 
prescriptions, so that " refills " shall be charged for at the 
original figure, thus avoiding the suspicion that arises in the 
mind of the customer when a new price is made. The State 
Associations of Minnesota, Wisconsin, Missouri and Nebraska 
have assented to the plan, and recommended its adoption. We 
see no possible objection to the idea, and much of usefulness. 
Moreover, it will promote a desirable uniformity in the valuing 
of the pharmacist's services. The proposition of the originator 
of the plan is to use the word pharmacist, spelling it 
p-h-a-r-m-o-c-i-s-t, as the price-mark, and to write upon the 
prescription, if returned to the customer, or upon the label, the 
characters defining the charge that was made for filling the 
the same. 

A RECENT decision of the United States Court is to the 
effect that Aristol, Europhen, Losophan, Lycetol, 
Phenacetin, Piperazine, Protargol, Salophen, Sulpho- 
nal, Tannigen, Tannopine, Trional, being uncompounded 
chemicals, are not subject to the stamp act. 



THE official report of the proceedings of the National Asso- 
ciation of Retail Druggists is being mailed by the Sec- 
retary of the association to every retail druggist in the 
country. We advise our readers to give it careful considera- 
tion, for the work of the association involves the interests of 
all. 

The Prospect. 

The present chance for adjusting trade differences and 
ameliorating the condition of the retailer is the best that has 
ever arisen . It is altogether likely that the proprietors will do 
the fair thing. But if they hold back, it is certain that the re- 
tail druggists will not long remain the distributors of proprie- 
tary articles ; that they will bar their doors to all unprofitable 
merchandise; that the sale of private and cooperative specialties 
will receive an enormous impetus ; and that a bitter fight will 
be waged by the retail trade against every hostile proprietor. 
Having held out the olive branch, the N. A. of R. D. will not 
be at a loss for a policy, if the response from the proprietors 
prove cold, evasive or menacing. " We prefer to sell your 
goods, if you will assure us a decent profit ; but if you refuse 
we will work out our own salvation — and those of you who 
are not with us are against us ! " 

The Call of Duty to Every Druggist : ' ' Affiliate with your 
fellow druggists ! Join your local or county society. If you 
have none, confer with your druggist-neighbors, form an asso- 
ciation, choose a delegate or two, correspond with the Secretary 
of the N. A. of R. D. (T. V. Wooten, 943 West Madison 
street, Chicago, 111.), and ascertain how you can bring the in- 
fluence of your little society to bear. Above all, remember that 
it is not sentiment, but common business sense, trade salvation, 
which lends emphasis to this advice. A great movement has 
begun : your own welfare, your income, your livelihood, your 
bread and butter, depend, in no small measure, upon its suc- 
cess. You cannot afford to withhold your cooperation from 
the unselfish and able men who went to St. Louis for your 
sake as much as for their own. Your interest, your profit, 
your duty, all bid you try to do something for yourself. The 



time is ripe, the occasion auspicious, the prospect encouraging. 
Whilst others are battling for the retail trade, you ought at 
least to lift your little finger in their support. To do your 
duty can cost you nothing ; to fail to do it may mean a partial 
responsibility for the ill-success of a wise and generous plan ; 
it will mean the contempt of the business community ; it will 
invite the chances of the only disaster which excludes consola- 
tion and sympathy — that due to one's own folly and inertia — 
that which a little energy might have averted." — Bulletin 
Pharmacy. 

The Longest Pole Knocks the Persimmon. 

The National Retail Druggists' Association pole has knocked 
down another persimmon, and this time one of the largest on 
the proprietary tree. Dr. R. V. Pierce's World Dispensary is 
"it," and Hood and the rest might just as well line up with 
the St. Louis $2.00-4.00-8.00 resolution first as last. After 
stating that he had determined to comply with the request of 
the retailers, Dr. Pierce, in his circular to the trade, proceeds 
to throw bouquets at himself in the following choice bit 
of rhetoric: "In thus taking the initiative in the matter of 
the request of the Retailers' Association, it adds to our pleas- 
ure to believe that we were in some measure instrumental in 
furthering the interests and desires of that association in 
its recent gathering at St. Louis." With all due deference to 
the learned doctor's deductions, we desire to say that it adds 
greatly to our pleasure to witness the vigor and vim with 
which the aforesaid association handles the pole that will 
eventually bring every one of these proprietary persimmons to 
the earth. — Paint, Oil and Drug Review. 



Sassafras. 



The wooded mountains and the waste lands and unculti- 
vated fields of North Carolina supply practically the world 
with sassafras bark. The total output from all sources in 
North America is in round numbers 200 tons, and North Caro- 
lina supplies four-fifths of this quantity. Virginia comes next 
with about 25 tons, and the balance from neighboring seaboard 
States, north and south. 

While it grows in moderate abundance in nearly all the 
States, North Carolina is able to supply it most cheaply on ac- 
count of the cheap labor generally at hand. The collectors, 
men and women, go forth in the morning, the men doing the 
digging and the women the lighter work of rossing, peeling 
and drying. 

A family of five persons, experienced collectors, will get 
during a day, forty pounds of dry bark, and they are paid for 
this about four to five cents per pound in family groceries at 
the country stores. When the cupboard is empty, they start 
off again to collect enough bark to replenish it. 

One would suppose that the supply from this State would 
have been exhausted long ago, considering also the amount of 
roots used in distilling the oil (our European friends preferring 
to distill their own oil), but nothwithstanding the terrible 
drain, nature seems to keep up her good work, for we have no 
evidence that there any fewer sassafras trees now than there 
ever were. — Jos. A. Velsor. 



The number of pharmacists in Wisconsin holding first grade 
certificates is 1349, and of assistants 337. 



THE CALIFORNIA DRUGGIST. 



Pharmaceutical Association of Quebec. 



EXAMINATION QUESTIONS. 

At the major Pharmaceutical examinations, held in Quebec, 
on October 18, the following questions were submitted for the 
candidates to answer : 

MATERIA MEDICA. 

i. Give the source, habitat, nat. order, parts used, physical 
characteristics and the B. P. preparations, with their strength 
and doses of the following substances : Anethi Fructus, 
Carophyllum, Galbanum, Quassio Lignum, Sabadilla and 
Senna Alexandria. 

2. Salicini, Pylocarpini, from what and how obtained. 
What are the physical characteristics and their doses ? 

3. Define (a) Antilethic, (b) Diuretic, (c) Styptic, (d) 
Ecbolic, (e) Antipyretic, (f ) Antiseptic, and give an example 
of each. 

4. What would be the treatment in a case of poisoning by 
(a) Hydrochloric acid, (b) belladonna, (c) chloride of zinc, 
(d) camphor, (e) tobacco ? 

5. Give a description of the following roots : Aconiti, 
pareira senyce and taraxacum, enumerate their preparations, 
giving the formula of each and their dose. 

6. 01. santal, Ol. turpentine, coco butter, what are they and 
from what obtained ? Give physical characteristics and doses. 

CHEMISTRY. 

i . What is the principal source of tannic acid ? Give the 
principal actions. What are the products of its ebullition with 
diluted sulphuric acid ? How would you distinguish tannic 
acid from gallic acid ? By what action would you distinguish 
from one another tannic, gallic and pyrogallic acid ? Give a 
short explanation of the chemical action involved in tanning. 
Give the chemical formulae, methylic, ethylic, propylic, butyric 
and amylic alcohol. Describe in equation the action of a mix- 
ture of amylic alcohols, bichromate of potash and sulphuric 
acid in the mannfacture of valerianate of sodium B. P. What 
are the reactions between the valerianic acid and valerianate of 
annyl obtained in the preceding action upon the hydrate of 
sodium ? Write the equations. 

3. What is the # action of diluted sulphuric acid upon 
starch ? How would you recognize the presence of starch in 
a solution ? Under what essential condition does disatase act 
upon starch ? What are the products of its action ? How is 
the glucose obtained from starch ? 

4. How many c. c. of nitric acid 22 p. c. will 100 c. c. 
normal vol. sol. of soda neutralize ? Give the equation and 
figures establishing the quantity of acid neutralized. 

5. What means are employed to indicate the end of a re- 
action in volumetric analysis, which will be used in the pre- 
ceding analysis in question No. 2, and how. would you utilize 
it ? What volumetric solution and indicator would you use in 
the estimation of bromide of sodium and of acetum ? 

6. From what source other than egg may albumen be ob- 
tained ? Give some reaction of albumen. Explain the action 
of white of egg, when administered as an antidote in case 
of poisoning by several mineral substances. What is the ac- 
tion of pepsin upon albumen ? What is the product obtained ? 

PHARMACY. 

1. Give and explain the general theory for the titration or 
extraction of alkaloids. 



2. Name three general re-agents or incompatibilities pre- 
cipitating alkaloids from their aqueous solutions. 

3. Fermentation, what is it? By what is it caused ? Give 
an example of a fermentation, and explain the changes that 
take place by a chemical equation. 

4. Give for each of the following : Two principal tests by 
which to determine their quality and purity : Scammony 
(powder), pepsin, rectified spirits, salicylic acid. 

5. Citrate of iron and quinine. Explain briefly its prepa- 
tion. Give its principal test for indentity, and quality, and its 
strength in quinine. 

6. Ether. Give and explain by equations its preparation. 
Give its principal physicial and chemical characteristics, and 
its uses in Pharmacy and Medicine. 

BOTANY. 

1. What is the shape of a normal vegetable cell ? What 
other forms do cells assume ? Give causes. Are all cell-walls 
of equal thickness ? If not, state why. Are all the cells of a 
live exogenous tree, 60 years old, alive and active? Give 
reasons. 

2. Describe the differences existing between: (1) a com- 
plete flower, (2) a perfect flower, (3) an irregular flower. Give 
an example and description of each. 

3. Give the distinguishing diagnostic differences between 
the sol-anaciae and the labiatrae. 

4. What do you understand by stamens ? Name and ex- 
plain their several parts and functions. Name the various 
unions and describe the different situations or dispositions of 
stamens on plants. 

5. Write a short description of Dehiscence. Is this plant 
function necessary to vegetation ? Give reasons and example 
of same. 

6. What is bark ? What purpose does it serve ? How 
many layers has normal bark, naming them ? What chemical 
substances used in the industrial arts do we obtain from bark ? 
— Canadian Druggist. 

The Punishment Fits the Crime. 

The Paris Figaro tells a story of a dentist in a fashionable 
quarter who has an attractive wife given to cycling. One day, 
while she was out riding, a well-known young Vicomte passed 
her in his auto-car, made slight advances, and thought they 
were not resented. Later, he found an opportunity of speaking 
to her, and asked permission to call, which was accorded. But 
the lady, taken perhaps with a slight remorse, told her husband 
of the adventure, and when the Vicomte appeared he was 
shown to the consulting-room and had to plead toothache. The 
dentist put the young gallant in an operating-chair, on the 
plea of examining his teeth, and before the unwilling patient 
knew what was happening one of his best molars was ex- 
tracted. " My fee is 2of." added the dentist, which the 
Vicomte paid and was ceremoniously bowed out. — Chemist and 
Druggist. 

Mucilage from Beets. 

Under a German patent mucilage fully equal to that from 
acacia is prepared from sugar-beets. After removal of the sac- 
charose the residue is treated with hot solution of sulphuric 
acid, whereby the metapectinic acid is converted into arabin- 
ose. — Western Druggist. 



THE CALIFORNIA DRUGGIST. 



Physcis, the Foundation of Pharmaceutical Pedagogics.* 

BY JOSEPH FEIL, PH. G. 

We are confronted in pharmaceutical teaching with precisely 
the same complaint that is heard from every technical and lit- 
erary college in this country, namely, that students are not 
prepared for the work they wish to undertake. Enthusiasm, 
earnestness and determination are not lacking, but a miscon- 1 
ception of the requirements necessary to master the sciences 
which constitute the foundations of the art of pharmacy are 
woefully conspicuous in a large majority of instances. 

Attempts to eradicate this fundamentally serious condition 
have been made over and over again, the sole remedy sug- 
gested being that druggists should exercise greater care in the 
selection of apprentices, and not employ boys whose education 
does not give hope of future mastery of the pharmaceutical arts 
and sciences. 

But the very idea of being compelled to employ, of course at 
some pecuniary compensation, reacts against the possibility of 
quality of mind, and is apt to bring into consideration quality 
of muscle as the preponderating qualification ; the long hours 
of the drug store compared with other stores act as a restraint 
against obtaining the best help ; and lastly, the druggist's loud 
cry about the deterioration of his calling has acted very strongly 
in the same direction. 

We must work on the material presented to us, and while 
we should do everything to secure the best, yet ill the present 
nature of the conditions we must concentrate our efforts in the 
direction of making the fairly passable into the highest obtain- 
able. A mind capable of careful and intelligent observation is 
the quality most desirable in our pupils, and this condition is 
rarely a natural one, but results from correct education. 

An educational instrument of unusually peculiar value for 
this purpose lies in a well graded series of physical experi- 
ments, supplemented by a good scientific text-book, and above 
all by rigid, thoroughly studied recitations. 

These experiments should be well graded and selected with 
a view to both pharmaceutical and chemical future uses, and 
could with enormous profit supplement much so-called phar- 
maceutical laboratory work, which, at its best, is only a repeti- 
tion of what the student knows, or what he ought to know if 
he has had any practical experience, and while of great tech- 
nical use its educational force and develpment value is almost 
nothing. 

I append an outline of some experiments of this nature, 
which can be readily performed in any ordinary pharmaceutical 
or chemical laboratory, or even on common kitchen tables, and 
from experience know they tend to bring out, expand and de- 
velop those perceptive powers required to understand the prin- 
ciples and theories of modern sciences and the processes of 
everyday pharmacy. 

The following is not intended as a complete set of experi- 
ments, but simply to indicate the direction in which the work 
has proved valuable : 

EXPERIMENTS. 

i. Apparatus. — Accurate foot ruler. Make a metric 
ruler graduated to m. m. 

2. App. — Metric ruler and hollow metallic cube open on 
one side. Determine contents of cube, and calculate the quan- 
tity of water it should contain ; counterpoise it on a Harvard 

*Read at the Baltimore meeting of the American Pharmaceutical Association. 



balance, fill it with water and accurately weigh the water. 
Compare results. 

3. Repeat 2 with a glass cylinder such as a mixing jar. 

4. Repeat 2 with a burette, measuring it from the o to 50 
marks. 

5. App. — Glass tube, cork, graduates. Determine cross- 
section and internal diameter by measuring length and vol- 
ume. Cork tube, pour in 1 c. c. water and note height by 
rubber band. Add 10 c. c. water and note if its length is 10 
times that of first c. c. 

6. App. — Irregular piece of metal, graduated cylinder. 
Determine volume of metal by the water it displaces. 

7. App. — Same piece metal, balance, cylinder. Weigh 
metal in air, then in water, compare, note loss, compare loss 
with volume found in 6 ; calculate specific gravity of metal. 

8. App. — 2-oz bottle or specific gravity bottle and deter- 
mine by weight its contents of water, alcohol, benzine, syrup, 
etc. Compare. 

9. Ruler, lead or shot, cylinder. Put shot or lead toward 
one end of ruler so that it floats vertically in water to about 
half its length ; note where it marks water level and mark 
1000, then float in other liquids, such as alcohol, benzine, etc. ; 
mark levels and compare with 8. 

10. App. — Wax, lead, balance, cylinder. Determine spe- 
cific gravity of wax. 

11. Metallic rods, wax distributed at intervals, burner. 
To show how heat travels and the variability of its effect on 
different substances. 

12. Fill a test-tube two-thirds full of water, heat at bottom 
to boiling, allow to cool and heat near surface. 

13. App. — Theremometer, ice, boiling water, boiling alco- 
hol. Test correctness of thermometer by comparing the tem- 
peratures the articles show and the ones they should show as 
stated in the United States Pharmacopoeia. 

14. App. — Tested thermometer, various substances, proper 
flasks. Determine a number of boiling points. 

15. App. — As in 14. Determine various melting points. 

16. Ice water, boiling water. Mix equal quantities and 
note temperature. 

17. A few experiments in magnetism^ electricity and light 
would be a valuable addition ; such may be found in any of 
the many excellent manuals for the physical laboratory. 



New Liquid Glue. 



The following is the subject of an English patent, and is 
said to yield a glue liquid at all ordinary temperatures, of great 
adhesive properties, and which does not mold : 

Let any desired amount of gelatin or glue swell in cold water 
until it has taken up the maximum of that substance. Pour 
off and work out ail excess of moisture, then liquefy by the 
application of heat (in a water bath). To the solution add 10 
per cent of the original weight of the gelatin or glue, of sodium 
salicylate, and dissolve. A small addition of oil of clove is 
recommended. This, as we understand the description, consti- 
tutes a stock, which is to be diluted for use, as desired. 



The rapid increase in the demand for Whittemore's fine shoe 
polishes and dressings indicates the preference of the public for 
these goods. Order from F. W. Braun & Co. See adver- 
tisement. 



THE CALIFORNIA DRUGGIST. 



To Preserve Lemon Juice. 

Santiago, Kansas City, Mo. — The writer claims that he has "tried 
all the receipts that he has seen in the pharmaceutical journals, includ- 
ing the National Druggist, and none of them were very good." To our 
certain knowledge some processes that we have given were, and are, ex- 
cellent, for we have tried them and have found them reliable. The pres- 
ervation of lemon juice (and other juices as well) requires attention to 
detail in manipulation, the omission of an apparently trivial or unim- 
portant detail frequently spoiling results. The following we know to 
be a reliable process : Express the juice and filter at once through two 
thicknesses of best Swedish paper into a container that has been steril- 
ized by boiling in water immediately before using. The better plan is 
to take it directly from the boiling water. Have ready some long-necked 
8-ounce vials, also sterilized in boiling water, and fill the juice into them, 
leaving sufficient space in the body of the vial for the reception of about 
a teaspoonful of best olive oil. Pour in the oil so that it will trickle down 
the neck of the vial and form a layer on top of the juice. Thrust s little 
wad of antiseptic cotton into the neck, so that it does not touch the oil, 
then put in the cork and seal. Put in a cool place and keep standing up- 
right. If carried out faithfully, this process will preserve the juice in a 
perfectly fresh and natural condition for years. The two prime essen- 
tials are careful and rapid filtration of the juice and the complete asepti- 
cization of the containers. Another process which we have found, by 
actual experiments, to preserve the juice for at least a year, is as follows : 
Filter the juice through paper (simple straining it through horsehair 
cloth, or even canton flannel, is said to be sufficient), add 8% to 10% of 
alcohol and cork tightly. This is the method followed by the purveyors 
to the French navy, and it is claimed that the juice keeps, in any climate, 
indefinitely, — National Druggist. 

The subject of the preservation of lemon juice for commer- 
cial purposes is one frequently brought before us, and many 
experiments have been made in Southern California with that 
object in view. Hitherto, however, no one seems to have dis- 
covered a satisfactory process. In the methods above sug- 
gested the National Druggist is doubtless justified in recom- 
mending them, for there is no reason to doubt their efficiency. 
It is apparent that the first process is adapted to the wants of 
the druggist who would take advantage of the lowest market 
to lay in his supply for the year. It is equally plain that it is 
not available for shippers of juice. The addition of alcohol, 
as in the French process, means an increase on the cost of the 
raw material of about 25 cents per gallon, which constitutes a 
heavy tax upon the business. We trust that a more economi- 
cal process may be found, as it is a matter of considerable im- 
portance to lemon growers, who have a large per cent of their 
fruit discarded by the packers, and hitherto have obtained little 
or nothing for the culls. — [Ed. Cal. Drug.] 



Adventure of a Fighting Pharmacist at Siboney. 

Louis Lotz, son of Mr. Christian Lotz, of Morris avenue and 
One hundred and fifty-second street, New York city, and a 
graduate of the New York College of Pharmacy, was appointed 
pharmacist in the U. S. Navy a few months ago, and was as- 
signed to the collier and supply ship Csesar (formerly the King- 
toir). Mr. Lotz recently sent home a choice lot of relics and 
souvenirs of the engagement off Santiago, Cuba, July 3, in 
which Cervera's fleet was destroyed, and they are now dis- 
played in the show window of Mr. Lotz, Sr., attracting much 
attention from the passers-by. Young Lotz was a member of 
the detachment of thirty apothecaries and surgeons detailed 
for service at the hospital camp of the 71st N. Y. Volunteers 
on Siboney Hill (near Santiago), and with the relic sent a let- 
ter descriptive of his adventures on this memorable expedition. 
On the march to the assigned position the party came suddenly 



on the sentinel of a Spanish detachment who were lying in 
ambush to waylay the non-combatants. The sentinel made a 
dash at Mr. Lotz and inflicted a saber cut on the left arm, 
making a flesh wound only. The wounded man instantly 
pistoled his assailant, but the crack of his "gun" woke up the 
Spaniards, and in a trice the engagement became general. 
After a short but lively combat, the non-combatants captured 
the entire Spanish squad of twenty men, of whom six were 
badly wounded. None of the Americans, except Mr. Lotz, 
were hurt. The party arrived safely with their prisoners, and 
after a few days were returned to their respective ships. On 
arriving at his vessel Mr. Lotz was transferred to the cruiser 
Brooklyn, and it was upon her that he was enabled to be a 
spectator of one of the greatest naval dramas ever played on 
the waters of the deep — the destruction of an entire squadron 
of modern first-class fighting vessels. Mr. Lotz, Jr., is at 
present stationed at Old Point Comfort, Va. 



Patents granted November 8th, 15th, 22d and 29th, of in- 
terest to pharmacists : 

Ernest C. Clark, Detroit, Mich., pill-making machine, 613758. 

Jerome B. Dillon, assignor to G. Dillon and J. H. Black, Wickliffe, 
Ky., umbilical bandage, 613761. 

White W. M. Hickey, San Francisco, Cal., massage machine, 613859. 

James B. Herron, Chicago, 111., soda fountain, 613678. 

Leonard Knetzger, Du Quoin, 111., sprayer, 613905. 

Hannah Allen, Wakefield, R. I., bed-pan, 614526. 

Eugene L. Doyen, Paris, France, forceps, 614708. 

James M. Flower, assignor of one-half to R G. Ferguson, Pottsville, 
Ark., truss, 614612. 

Wm. H.Johnson, New Brunswick, N. J., bandage, 614477. 

Wm. R. Park, Taunton, and B. T. Williston, Somerville, assignors to 
Hancock Inspirator Company, Boston, Mass., injector, 614752. 

Alexander S. Ramage, assignor to J. Black, Cleveland, Ohio, ozoniz- 
ing apparatus, 614500. 

Gustav F. Richter, New York, N. Y. , tonsilotome, 614760. 

Edmund E. Safford, Boston, Mass., invalid rest, 614766. 

Albert Kaeding, Halberstadt, Germany, apparatus for changing bed- 
sheets for sick-beds, 614870. 

Herman Roeber, Kiel, Wis., pessary, 614895. 

Philip Schidrowitz and O. Rosenheim London, assignors to Joseph 
Turner & Company, limited, Oueensberry, England, Piperidyl carba- 
mate of piperidin and making same, 614991. 

Philip Schidrowitz and O. Rosenheim, London, assignors to Joseph 
Turner & Company, limited, Queensberry, England, Piperidin's salts 
and making same, 615051. 

Morgan T. Morgan, Anaconda, Mont., distributor for applying lini- 
ment, design, 29731. 

"Syrup of the Infant Jesus." 

In Belgium there is a syrup sold under the popular name of 
" Strop de V Enfant Jesus" and used in the disorders of denti- 
tion, convulsions, sleeplessness, etc. It has the following 

formula : 

Potassium bromide 5 parts 

Sodium bromide 5 parts 

Calcium bromide 5 parts 

Ammonium bromide 5 parts 

Syrup of belladonna 100 parts 

Syrup of orange flower 500 parts 

Mix. One to four teaspoonsful, according to the age of the 
infant. — National Druggist. 



See"D. & S." Licorice advertisement in this number of 
the Druggist. The season is here for the large use of sooth- 
ing substances for irritated throats, and among these Dean's 
licorice stands high. F. W. Braun & Co. will fill your orders. 



THE CALIFORNIA DRUGGIST. 



New Elements. 

Announcements of discoveries of new elements come thick 
and fast. It has been but a short time since we were told of 
krypton, neon and metargon. Subsequently news came that 
Prof. Ramsey and Mr. Travers had discovered another 
elemental gas, the spectrum of which was analagous to that of 
argon. To this gas they had given the name xenon. 

Some years ago Becquerel reported that salts of uranium 
gave off certain invisible rays, something like those discovered 
by Rontgen. Following this idea, M. and Mme. Curie found 
in a variety of pitch blende this character in a higher degree ; 
and this led them to the conclusion that a new element 
was present. So far they have not been able to separate 
it, but in a report to the French Academy, state that they 
have obtained a sulphide of it. They propose to call the 
metal polonium. 

In a recent number we made mention of another supposed 
new element, coronium. 

Coming to our own country, we find an announcement 
by Charles F. Brush, at the late meeting of the American 
Association for the Advancement of Science, that he also had 
discovered a new constituent of the atmosphere. For several 
years he had been engaged in investigating the subject, 
and believed that he had separated a gas lighter than hydro- 
gen, to which he proposed to give the name etherion. Accord- 
ing to the observations of Mr. Brush, this gas will probably 
prove less dense than even coronium, which is assumed to be 
far lighter than hydrogen. Mr. Brush believes that from the 
peculiarities exhibited by the gas, it must reach out indefinitely 
into space. 

To conclude the list, Sir William Crookes, the veteran 
investigator, announced at the last meeting of the British 
Association for the Advancement of Science, that, while his 
researches were still incomplete, he was able to speak definitely 
of a hitherto unknown element. By long-continued photo- 
graphic investigation of the ultra-violet rays of the spectrum, 
he discovered lines pointing to the existence of this element, 
and chemical investigation had convinced him of the reality 
of this prognosis. As the group of lines by which the pres- 
ence of the latest element was first made known appear almost 
at the extreme end of the ultra-violet spectrum, he proposes 
to call the substance monium, from the Greek monus, alone. 
— Drug. Circular . 

Coronium, a Hypothetical Solar Element, Discovered in 

Italy. 

According to the London Times, Professor Nasini, of Padua, 
has communicated to the French Academy the result of his 
investigations with Signor Anderlini and Salvadori into the 
gasses issuing from the earth in volcanic districts, among 
which they find coronium, hitherto known, hypothetically only, 
as a constituent of the sun. The announcement is, in the 
opinion of the discoverers, of the highest interest from a scien- 
tific point of view, as at once confirming the results of spectro- 
scopic examinations of the sun, and adding another proof of 
the substantial identity of materials in the sun and the earth. 
Coronium would seem (says the Times) to be a substance with 
a vapor density far smaller than that of hydrogen, which is by 
far the lightest body with which we are familiar. Some have 
suggested that it is only one of the elements known to us, mod- 



ified in some unknown way by conditions differing enormously 
from those that obtain on this planet. But against this hy- 
pothesis has to be set not only its occurrence at a distance from 
the sun's body, estimated at 300,000 miles, where it is difficult 
to believe that the vapors of the suggested elements can pre- 
dominate, but also the fact that in the midst of solar disturb- 
ances in prominences or near sun spots, when the lines of 
hydrogen, and other known elements are contorted, this coro- 
neal line remains sharp, fine and straight. — Magazine of 
Pharmacy . 

How to Make Emulsions. 

Mr. M. C. Metzger (Proceedings Illinois Pharmaceutical 
Association) recommends the following general process as 
being beyond criticism : " Take one-half as much water as 
you have oil and acacia — no matter how much oil and acacia 
are employed. Thus, put the acacia, say one ounce, in a mor- 
tar, put three ounces oil in a graduate and two ounces water in 
another graduate (half as much water as oil and acacia). Now 
take the graduate with oil in one hand and the graduate with 
water in the other hand, pour the oil and water on the pow- 
dered acacia at the same time (not separately), stir thoroughly 
a few minutes, then add the balance of the water and the 
syrup, or whatever it may require, to complete the emulsion." 

Taking up various emulsions in detail he gives some formu- 
ulas, which we herewith reproduce : 

CASTOR OIL EMULSION. 

Castor oil 5 ounces 

Powdered acacia 2 ounces 

Syrup vanilla 3 ounces 

Water q. s. ad 16 ounces 

Put the powdered acacia (2 ounces) in a mortar ; put the castor oil 
(5 ounces) in a graduate, and 3J4 ounces of water in another graduate ; 
pour the castor oil and water on the acacia, mix thoroughly! then add 
the remainder of the water and strain. 

TURLENTINE EMULSION. 

Oil turpentine ]/i ounce 

Powdered acacia 2 drachms 

Cinnamon water q. s. ad 4 ounces 

Place the powdered acacia (2 drachms) in a mortar ; put the oil of tur- 
pentine (yi ounce) in a graduate, and three drachms of water in another 
graduate ; pour the oil and water on the powdered acacia, rub thoroughly, 
add the remainder of the water and strain. 

PETROLEUM EMULSION. 

Liquid petrolatum 4 fluidounces 

Powdered gum arable 2 fluidounces 

Glycerin 1 fluidounce 

Water .....q. s. ad 16 fluidounces 

Mix the petrolatum and acacia intimately in a mortar ; then add, all 
at once, 4 fluidounces of water. Triturate this mixture until a good 
primary emulsion shall be formed. Finally, gradually add the glycerin 
and the remainder of the water. The glycerin is not essential, but it 
improves the taste of the mixture. It is much less repulsive than cod- 
liver oil, but its use as a substitute for it is as yet very limited. 

COD-LIVER OIL EMULSION. 

Cod-liver oil 8 ounces 

Syrup tolu 2 ounces 

Powdered acacia 2 ounces 

Water q. s. ad 16 ounces 

Flavor to suit. Place the powdered acacia in a mortar ; take the cod- 
liver oil in one graduate and five ounces of water in another graduate ; 
pour the oil and water on the powdered acacia, mix thoroughly, add the 
remainder of the water and syrup, flavor and strain. — Bulletin Phar- 
macy. 



THE CALIFORNIA DRUGGIST. 



Fact of Death Determined by X=Rays. 

The problem of death — that is, in respect to the tests which 
may be applied to assure scientists that death has really taken 
place, is by no means an easy one, says a prominent English 
physician. When the tissues begin to decay, when the action 
of external influences, once without effect on the living frame, 
begins to take the body to pieces, we are certain that vitality 
has vanished, and that the forces resisted in life are paramount 
in their power over the dead frame. This question has arisen 
in connection with the so-called risks of premature burial — 
risks which, I venture to think, have been grossly exag- 
gerated. The idea that people supposed to be dead have really 
been buried alive, is itsel a slur, and an undeserved one, on 
medical men. There may have been exceptional cases in 
which a person in a trance has been buried, but the fact of a 
body supposed to be dead and exhibiting, nevertheless, symp- 
toms of appearances inconsisient with the demise of the sub- 
ject, would surely of itself act as incentive to the accurate and 
minute axamination of the case. The tests which have been 
used to assure observers of the actual occurrence of death 
have been many and various, but, as I have indicated, with 
the exception of decomposition, they all have failed as certain 
indications of the departure of vitality. Recently the Roent 
gen rays have been applied for the determination of death, 
and apparently with success. If this be so, then medicine 
may congratulate itself on having utilized these useful rays 
for one more purpose in connection with the practice of 
the healing art. At the Biological Society of Paris, M. 
Bougarde gave a demonstration of the use of the rays when 
applied to living and dead persons respectively. It seems that 
when a living body has its organs photograped by the method 
in question, there is exhibited a distinct haziness or irregu- 
larity of outline in respect to the viscera. The reason for this 
haziness, of course, depends on the fact that there are move- 
ments taking place in the living frame, these movements inter- 
fering with the exactitude of the photograph. The subjects 
photographed were made to hold their breath, and still the 
outlines showed the irregularity in respect of the chest organs. 
When, on the other hand, the dead body was photographed, 
the outlines of the internal parts came out clear and sharp, and 
it is, therefore, assumed that where radiographs are taken of 
the dead subject, the sharpness of outline will afford a conclu- 
sive proof of death. — Western Druggist. 



Gardner Quincy Colton, T\. D. . 

Dr. Colton, to whom belongs in part the credit of anaesthesia 
by laughing gas, is dead in Rotterdam at the age of 84 years. 
Besides being a dentist, Dr. Colton was a physician, a lecturer, 
a critic, and electrician. There is good ground for the belief 
that he invented in 1848 the first electric motor ever run, but 
it never got beyond the model state, though the little machine 
which he built worked perfectly. 

Born in Vermont, of poor parents, he was able to get only a 
common school education. All his spare moments were given 
to reading and study, and with such good results that when he 
came to New York at the age of 21, in 1835, he added consid- 
erably to his means by writing for the newspapers. After 
graduation in medicine, he set out upon a lecture tour, speak- 
ing on philosophical and chemical subjects. His favorite 
lecture was one dealing with electrical phenomena and the 



peculiar effects upon the brain of nitrous oxide, which he called 
laughing gas because of the ridiculous performances of per- 
sons under its influence. In 1844 he lectured in Hartford, and 
among those on the stage was Dr. Horace Wells. A young 
man having inhaled the nitrous oxide gas barked his shins 
upon a chair, but felt no pain until the effects of the gas wore 
off. This struck Dr. Wells so forcibly that he determined to 
have a tooth out while under the influence of the gas, and the 
experiment was so successful that he published the result of it. 
For a long time other dentists scoffed at it, but when its effi- 
cacy was proved beyond doubt two other physicians, Morton 
and Jackson, put forth claims to the discovery which was to 
render painless the most distressing form of dentistry. The 
controversy which followed was bitter in its progress and tragic 
in its end, for it drove Drs. Wells and Morton to suicide and 
Dr. Jackson to an insane asylum. Thereafter the use of nitrous 
oxide fell away, but Dr. Colton revived it some years later, 
giving full credit for the discovery to Dr. Wells. — Clinic. 



The following letter, from Mavrogeny Pacha, Physician-in 
Chief to His Majesty the Sultan, is but one of many to show 
the esteem in which distinguished physicians hold the well 
known tonic wine " Vin Mariani." 

"Yildiz Palace, 
"Constantinople, July 2d, 1895. 

' ' Sworn enemy of the proprietary medicines which have of 
late years inundated all countries, and whose only object is the 
acquisition of gain for the proprietors, without the least bene- 
fit to science nor to humanity, I make a single exception in fa- 
vor of one preparation as meritorious, and which is thoroughly 
praiseworthy. -I refer to 'Vin Mariani,' which, without guise 
of deceit and mysticism, is valuable in its fortifying qualities, 
and has conferred high benefits upon weak and suffering hu- 
manity. (Signed) Mavrogeny Pacha, 

" Physician-in- Chief to His Majesty the Sultan." 

During the past thirty -five years "Vin Mariani " has gained 
more ardent admirers among the medical profession through- 
out the world than any other preparation, and justly so, as 
there has never been a disappointment from its use. This is 
specially noteworthy on account of the attacks made from 
time to time against Coca (generally from interested parties), 
and on investigation it is shown that the many so-called Coca 
wines are nothing more than shameful mixtures of the cheap- 
est, inferior wines, and variable solution of Cocaine unscrupu- 
lously sold as Coca wine, simply for mercenary purposes. 

It is in this manner that really useful drugs are brought into 
discredit. 

M. Mariani has gathered the written opinion, clinical notes, 
etc., of many thousand physicians from all parts of the world, 
showing the universal high opinion of practitioners who have 
subjected "Vin Mariani" to thorough test. 

" My father-in-law is really a simpleton ! The other day I 
wrote him that my pecuniary embarrassments were turning my 
hair gray, and what do you suppose his answer was? He 
sent me a bottle of hair-dye." — Fliegende Blatter. 

" What may we look forward to," asked the skeptical states- 
man, " if we allow the flag to remain wherever it is planted ? " 
' ' Flag-root ! ' ' promptly replied his solitary hearer, who is a 
druggist as well as a robust patriot. — Boston Journal. 



8 



THE CALIFORNIA DRUGGIST. 



Drummers for Doctors. 

The special Government agent at Hot Springs, Ark., says: 
The most harmful thing, for the reason that it is the most 
dangerous, is the present system of doctor-drumming. There 
are a great many doctors in Hot Springs who are notorious in 
the matter in having drummers for their business. The cus- 
tom about this is that when a stranger or strangers arrive in 
the city they are met on the trains and in towns more than 
ioo miles away from Hot Springs by drummers for these doc- 
tors. The drummers make the point, before taking the victim 
to the doctor, to ascertain, relatively, his financial standing, 
then to advise the doctor as to this matter, and the man is 
duly fleeced. 

One instance was cited to me of a man who came here to be 
treated, was captured by a drummer, carried to a doctor, and 
the drummer advised the doctor that he thought it would be 
well to charge the man about $25. The doctor had made his 
examination and advised the man that there was very little 
the matter with him and charged him $25. The patient pulled 
out an enormous roll of bills to pay him, and as soon as the 
patient went away, or out of hearing, the doctor called the 
drummer and told him he was a fool, that the man was a regu- 
lar walking national bank, and by some means he must get 
him back there so that they could get the money. 

When they got down stairs the drummer told the patient that 
the doctor was not satisfied quite about one feature of the ex- 
amination and advised him to return. Then the doctor made 
a more rigid examination of the man's abdomen, and when he 
was through advised the man that he had a tumor, and that it 
must be immediately removed by a surgical operation. 

The man became very much frightened and'of course yielded 
to the operation. He was chloroformed and an incision made 
across the entire width of his abdomen, just through the skin, 
not penetrating the cavity at all, and the wound sewed up. 
When the patient regained consciousness he was advised that 
the operation had been entirely successful, and a tumor in a 
bottle of alcohol was exhibited to him as the one which had 
been removed, and he was charged $500 for the operation, 
which he paid. 

Unguentum Durum and Molle. 

These two ointment vehicles some time ago were proposed 
by Miehle, the first, " hard ointment," to be composed of 40 
parts paraffin, 50 parts of paraffin oil, and 10 parts of wool-fat, 
the second, or "soft ointment," consisting of 22 parts of par- 
affin, 60 parts of paraffin oil, and 10 parts of wool-fat. These 
are to be made into ointments lege artis, employing the lowest 
possible temperature. In the absence of an ointment mill the 
mixture must be stirred without interruption until cold to secure 
smoothness. These vehicles having proven quite satisfactory 
Miehle now suggests (Pharm. Zeit.) the following combina- 
tions : 

Unguentum Durum Argenti Nitrici — Silver nitrate, 1.0; dis- 
tilled water, enough ; peru balsam, 10. o ; unguentum durum, 
89.0. 

Unguentum Durum Plumbi — Solution of lead subacetate, 
10. o ; unguentum durum, 90.0. 

Unguentum Durum Rosatum — Rose water, 10.0 ; unguen- 
tum durum, 90.0. 

Unguentum Molle Iodi — Iodin, 10. o; potassium iodid, 5.0: 
water, 5.0; unguentum molle, 80.0. 



Unguentum Molle Leniens — Unguentum molle, 50.0 ; rose 
water, 50.0 ; rose oil, 2 drops. This paraffin cream forms an 
excellent substitute for cold cream. 

Unguentum Molle cum Aqua — Unguentum molle, 70.0 ; 
water, 30.0. A smooth, permanent, snow-white ointment which 
is capable of taking up, in addition to the foregoing, 40 per 
cent of its own weight of water, hence excellently adapted for 
combination with aqueous solution of salts, extracts, ichthyol, 
etc., such ointment not turning rancid. — Western Druggist. 



Antisepsis in the Barber Shop. 

According to a Chicago paper some barbers, aided by medi- 
cal friends, will present a bill to the next legislature requiring 
the disinfection of all towels, sponges, brushes, etc., which 
may be required in the business of the barber. Under the pro- 
posed law nothing but strictly antiseptic barber shops will be 
allowed in Illinois. The bill will provide that all barber shops 
shall be under the control of the State Board of Health, and 
each pay a license of $10 a year. The license shall only be 
granted after a thorough examination of the applicant's shop 
has been made and its sanitary conditions approved. Each 
individual barber shall also pass an examination as to his 
knowledge of the trade and of the use of disinfectants. The 
barber shall also have worked at his trade a certain number of 
years. The tools, brushes, towels and other articles in use in 
the shop must be thoroughly sterilized after being used, accord- 
ing to regulations the board of health may make. — Drug. 
Circular. 

Persimmon Beer. 

The National Druggist thus discourses of one of our national 
beverages : 

For persimmon beer the following process is in vogue 
in the portion of the South long the home of the writer : To 
one bushel of sweet, ripe persimmons, mashed and strained, 
add 6 pecks of wheat bran, and mash with a pestle, or tamp 
until thoroughly mixed. Cut the stiff mixture into loaves 
about the size of a pressed brick (8 inches long, 3^ inches 
wide, and 2 inches thick). Let stand a day or two, or longer 
if necessary, then break up into small pieces in a barrel, pour 
over them 12 gallons of soft water, and add a quarter of 
a pound of hops. Keep in a warm place until fermentation is 
nearly finished, then use. It is usually drank while fermenta- 
tion is still active, but if one wants a delightful champagne-like 
drink, and one that may be kept over until the next year's hot 
weather (the beer is made in the fall, usually after the 
first frost has ripened the "simmons"), proceed as follows: 
When fermentation is nearly or quite ceased, have ready some 
good strong bottles (champagne, ginger-ale or soda-water bot- 
tles are the best), and long, good corks. Drop a lump of 
sugar in each bottle, fill nearly to the top of the bottle 
with the beer, cork, and tie down the cork. Put the bottles 
in a cool place with a nearly equable temperature, and the 
liquor will keep easily for a year — and it is good. 



Have you a supply of the 25-cent size Syrup White Pine 
Compound ? F. W Braun & Co. furnish full 4-ounce bottles 
of the article, from their own laboratory, at $1.50 per dozen. 
As a general cough medicine for counter sales it has no equal. 
See advertising columns for further particulars. 



THE CALIFORNIA DRUGGIST. 



Business Personals. 



C. H. Wolf, lately with the Pasadena Drug Co., has ac- 
cepted a position with F. L. Wingard, Long Beach. 



C. W. Baldridge, Fallbrook, has completed and now occu- 
pies, the building he erected for his business purposes. 



Geo. W. Peterson has opened a new drug business at Globe, 
Arizona, making the third druggist in that enterprising camp. 



Will Secomb, late Lieutenant Co. K, Seventh Regiment, 
has returned to his old position with Towne & Lamb, San 
Bernardino. 

W. T. Gillis, Redlands, has recently finished an elegant resi- 
dence, at a cost of $6,000, which will make him a beautiful 
and attractive home. 

C. C. Abbey, Redlands, has just put in an acetylene gas 
plant for lighting his store. These carbide machines are get- 
ting to be quite popular among the drug trade. 



Hanson Webb, recently with M. P. Green, Pasadena, has 
accepted a position with the Ellington Drug Co., this city, and 
Walter Turner succeeds Mr. Webb in Pasadena. 



Frank Gilliland, with J. C. Hardman, gently broke the news 
to his friends, November 2d, that he was the father of twins, 
and he didn't seem really discouraged about it, either. It isn't 
so bad, Frank, for a dry year. 



The Orange Drug Co. have been adding considerably to their 
stock in trade, recently, besides putting in two fine business 
desks for their own convenience. They find that their in- 
creased facilities help materially in keeping trade at home. 



C. E. Week, Riverside, is never satisfied without he is add- 
ing some improvement to his place of business. This time it 
is a new outfit of plate-glass counter show-cases — six of them — 
making a handsome as well as useful addition to his business 
facilities. 

J. C. Hardman, Riverside, has been arranging a convenient 
business office in the back part of his store, on a raised plat- 
form, from which the entire room may be viewed, which fur- 
nishes a pleasant "headquarters" for the conduct of his large 
business. 

The Santa Ana Drug Co. 's new building is getting its roof 
on, and will shortly be ready to receive the attention of the 
plasterers and woodworkers. The old corner has undergone a 
great transformation, but will soon again show the colored 
lights that for so many years attracted purchasers of drugs to 
this k :ation. 



Mr. Q. R. Smith, Santa Ana, succeeds the well known firm 
of Mit Phillips & Smith, of which he has been the popular 
junior, though managing, partner for a number of years. Mr. 
Smith has shown his excellent bnsiness qualities by his thor- 
ough attention to details and his persistent work in building 
up the trade of the house. He has our best wishes for his con- 
tinued success. 

The Ellington Drug Co.'s remodeled store, Fourth and 
Spring streets, is one of the most attractive of our city. Its 
fifty feet frontage gives an unusual opportunity for display of 
goods, while its fine plate-glass cases and brilliant ceiling- 
lights, together with its beautiful show of cut-flowers, are 
happily calculated to delight the eye and interest the visitor. 
The enterprise of the proprietors is rewarded by a largely in- 
creased business. 

W. M. Bramhall, San Bernardino, has made some marked 
improvements in his store, recently. He has changed the lo- 
cation of his prescription case to its appropriate position at the 
rear, and has otherwise re-arranged his fixtures, besides re- 
papering, painting and decorating in white and gold, and 
brilliantly lighting his store with electricity, using forty in- 
candescent lamps for the latter purpose. Mr. Bramhall now 
has an extremely attractive place of business. 



Heath & Morrison, Riverside, have gone into the holiday 
trade this season on an unusually large scale. Their line in- 
cludes quantities of Mexican leather goods, Navajo rugs, 
blankets, and Indian baskets and curios, besides a rich display 
of costly cut-glass goods. The annex furnishes just the needed 
place for their exhibit. 



Towne & Lamb, San Bernardino, recently made an odd 
window display. It was made up of the long series of pre- 
scription books which had been filled during the fifteen 
years or more of the business life of the establishment, piled up 
in a way to show the serial numbers on the backs of the vol- 
umes, and flanked by ancient mortars, spatulas and other ap- 
pliances which long service had made into venerable relics. It 
was an interesting and instructive display, well worth repeat- 
ing in a much larger city than San Bernardino. 



Will Leithead, whose business trips around the " Kite 
shaped " are considerably more regular than the average clock, 
having a few leisure hours recently in Corona, accepted an in- 
vitation to go out quail shooting with R. F. Billings. You 
just ought to see the game that the " bag man " didn't bag ! 
Not a quail would stay in one place long enough to accommo- 
date his "range finder," though Billings was firing front, rear, 
and sidewise, and dropping his birds everywhere. One of the 
crack shots of Southern California was a hard man to shoot 
against, and carrying the game was about all the fun our friend 
Leithead got out of it. 

A Serious Detention. 

Speaker Reed wished to see a political friend on some 
important business, and telegraphed to him to come at once to 
Washington. The friend took the first train, but a " wash- 
out " on the railroad soon stopped him. Going to a telegraph 
office, he sent the following message : "Wash-out on the line, 
can't come." To which in due time he received the following 
reply from the Maine statesman : " Buy a new shirt and come 
anyway." — Public Health Journal. 



We would again call attention to the sponge display shown 
on our pink pages, and suggest a visit to F. W. Braun & Co.'s 
sponge and chamois department to examine their fine lines. 



IO 



THE CALIFORNIA DRUGGIST. 



OUR ADVERTISERS. 



It will be of interest and value to the trade to consult our 

advertising columns, in which will be found represented the 

following firms and goods : 

A.. Gettleman Brewing Co. 
Allcock's Plasters. 
Ammonol Chemical Co. 
Antikamnia Chemical Co. 
Apollinaris Co., Limited. 
Arlington Chemical Co. 
Beeman Chemical Co. 
Braun, F. W. & Co.'s Laboratory 

Products. 
California Fig Syrup Co. 
Cal. Mission Eucalyptus Lozenges. 
Centaur Company. 
Crown Perfumery Co. 
Davol Rubber Co. 
Dean & Son. 
Etna Chemical Co. 
Florence Manufacturing Co. 
Goodrich, B. F. & Co. 
Coronado Corks. 



Hayden Manufacturing Co. 

Hubert, Prof. I. 

Jayne, Dr. D. & Son. 

Kondon Manufacturing Co. 

Kuhns, Arthur Company. 

Leiner, M. 

Levy, B. & Co. 

Ludwick, G. M. 

Mariani & Co. 

Mead, J. L., Cycle Co. 

Moore, H. H. & Sons. 

Munn & Co. 

N. Y. Pharmacal Association. 

Planten, H. & Son. 

Taite, Jos. G. & Sons. 

T. B. Insect Powder. 

Thum, O. W. Co. 

Wyeth, John & Bro. 



^i^i^i^j^i^j^i^j^i^i^i^i^j^i^i^j^j^j^i^i^f^i^M: 



Kurtz' Freckle Salve 



(ORIGINAL) 



Manufactured only by C. F. HEINZEMAN 
Los Angeles, Cal. 



7L Trade Mark Registered. IV 

A Thirsty Child. 

An illegitimate child, named John Waite, who died at Sunder- 
land at the age of two years, was, said the mother at the inquest, 
a fearful drinker. He would drink anything, no matter what, 
and would play for hours pulling out and pushing in corks 
into bottles. She had to be always watching him. Last 
Saturday afternoon the oil man came, and after filling the 
lamp-bowl she went to the door for more oil. Returning, she 
found deceased on the table with the lamp at his mouth, drink- 
ing the paraffin oil. He became sick, but soon recovered. 
Syphons seemed to bother him, but he was getting to under- 
stand them. A neighbor said the child seemed always thirsty, 
and would "rummage" round the bottom of her cupboards. 
Twice or thrice she had caught him drinking from the paraffin- 
oil bottle. A month ago he fell into the rain-water tub whilst 
trying to get a drink from it. The child's last drink was from 
a mixture of oil of cloves and laudanum which the mother 
had got for her toothache. — Chemist and Druggist. 

To the Trade : 

We have yet in stock a number of desirable lines of fancy 
bottled perfumes for the holiday trade, a fine variety of fancy 
atomizers, and a few Celluloid, Pyralin and Florence sets, mir- 
rors, etc., besides a few Cosmeon (metal) toilet sets slightly 
rubbed, having been used for samples. We desire to dispose 
of all these goods before Christmas and will give special in- 
ducements to close them out. Call early and make first selec- 
tions. F. W. Braun & Co. 

Three money-makers are offered to the trade this month by 
F. W. Braun & Co. in the Hayden Mfg. Co.'s Arnica Salve, 
Carbolic Salve and Witch Hazel Salve. They are very neatly 
put up in large-sized boxes, and retail at 25 cents. The un- 
iform price is $1 per dozen Add some to your next order. 



P acific Coast Drufl Ag ency 

OFFERS FOR SALE 

First-Class Drug Stores 
and Medical Practices 

in all the Pacific States and Territories 

Clerks Registered, Prooided and Employed. Partnerships 
Negotiated. Lists Sent Free. Correspondence Solicited. 

G. M. LUDWICK, 

S, E. Corner Second St. and Broadway, Room 201, Los Angeles, Cal. 



WANTS, Etc., Etc. 

\Under this heading we will be pleased to publish FREE Ob 
CHARGE, notices of clerks wanted, positions desired, stores for 
sale or exchange, propositions for purchasing, etc.~\ 



FOR SALE. — A library of chemical and pharmaceutical books and 
periodicals, cheap. Also Geissler Tubes, Induction Coil, small 
balance, etc. Address E. Borgmann, 3951 N. Twentieth St., St. Louis, Mo. 



STOCK of Drugs, etc. — A $1,600 stock of drugs, books and notions, in- 
cluding furniture and fixtures, in a small town eight miles from San 
Diego, Cal., in the midst of 3,000 acres of orange and lemon orchards ; 
owner is old and in poor health, and will sell at a bargain for cash. 
Address Box 174, Chula Vista, Cal. 



WANTED — Position by graduate in pharmacy. Best reference and 
long experience. Please state salary can give. J. R. HODGES, 
Coleman, Tex. 



WANTED — Partner to open new drug business. Am graduate with 
long experience. State amount of money can put in. Best 
references. Address " TEXAS," care of California Druggist. 



WANTED — To sell, the Figueroa Pharmaey, the best paying outside 
store in the city, at invoice. Want to devote all my time to prac- 
tice only reason for selling. Only those meaning business need apply. 
W. M. Johnston, M. D., owner. 



FOR SALE — A fine drug business in Norwalk ; splendid location ; no 
opposition, there being no other drug store within a radius of five 
miles. Norwalk has about 1000 inhabitants and lies in the center of a 
thickly settled and productive valley. Owner must sell on account of 
ill health. Address DR. W. T. MERCHANT, Norwalk, Cal. 



FOR SALE— Only drug store in Southern California town of 600 in- 
habitants, with a large tributary population. Rich dairy country 
in artesian belt; 10 miles from ocean; no competition nearer than 8 
miles. Stock of about $2000. Rent only $8.00 per month. Will sell at 
invoice, with reasonable discount for cash. Inquire of F. BRAUN & 
CO., Los Angeles. 

FOR SALE — An established drug business a few miles frornLos An- 
geles, in country town. Will sell at inventory, which will come 
near to $3000. Inquire of F. W. BRAUN & CO., Los Angeles 



FOR EXCHANGE— House and lot in Los Angeles, Cal., worth $1500 
for stock of drugs of lit 



drug! 

of prices is unknown. 
Angeles, Cal. 



like amount, in country town where cutting 
Address GEO. E. BLUE, 3129 S. MAIN, Los 



FOR SALE — A well located drug store in Los Angeles, with an in- 
creasing trade, value $1200. Expenses small. Owner not pharma- 
cist is reason for selling. Inquire of F. W. Braun & Co , Los Angeles 

FOR SALE — In coast city of Southern California, a drug business 
established over eight years. Stock about $2500 ; location first-class. 
Address M. H., care CALIFORNIA DRUGGIST. 



FOR SALE — City drug business at a bargain. Stock about $1200, all 
clean and no dead stuff. Good location for a doctor. Inquire of F. 
W. BRAUN & CO., Los Angeles. 

FOR SALE— Elegant clean stock in the most progressive suburb of 
Los Angeles. Only drug store within twenty blocks. Best reasons 
for selling. Value about $2000. Inquire of F. W. BRAUN & CO. 
Los Angeles. 

FOR SALE — A good, long established drug business in this city. 
Price, $2500. Address "ADVANTAGEOUS," care CALIFORNIA 
DRUGGIST. 

FOR SALE. — Drug business and dwelling ; five-room house with out- 
buildings ; bath ; hot water fixtures, etc. Price $2,750. Address 
M. A., care California Druggist. 

FOR SALE. — Drug stock and fixtures in one of the best towns in South- 
ern California. No cutting. Will sell at invoice. Owner has other 
business. Address S. S. Rogers, Escondido, Cal. 



THE CALIFORNIA DRUGGIST. 



ii 



PRICE LIST OF DRUGS, CHEMICALS, ETC. 

These prices are for quantities as ordinarily bought by average buyers, and include containers, unless 
otherwise indicated. Subject to market changes. 

For special quantities we will make special figures. 

F. W. BRA UN & CO., Los Angeles, Cal. 



ACETANILID ft 42® 45 

ACID, Acetic No. 8 ft 10® 25 

Acetic U. S. P ft 30 

Benzoic, Eng oz 16 

Benzoic, German oz 10 

Boracic ft 14® 20 

Carbolic, crude gal 40® 50 

Carbolic, cryst, blk label, 1-ft tin ...ft 30® 32 

Carbolic, cryst, blk label, 5-ft tins ft 28® 30 

Carbolic, cryst, gold label, 1-ft bots ft 36® 38 

Carbolic, cryst, gold label, 5-ft tin ft 33® 36 

Citric ft 36® 44 

Gallic oz 11® 12 

Hydrocyanic, dil„ oz 11® 12 

Hydrocyanic, cone, Scheele's oz 40® 45 

Hydrofluoric, 1-oz bots ea 45® 50 

Hydrofluoric, 4-oz bots ea 75 

Muriatic, coml. , 6-ft bots ea 65® 75 

Muriatic, coml., carboy, $2 ft 3^@ 3% 

Muriatic, C. P., 1-ft bots ft 35® 40 

Muriatic, C. P., 6-ft bots ft 25® 30 

Nitric, coml., 7-ft bots ea 1 00 

Nitric, coml. , carboy , $2 ft 8® 9 

Nitric, C. P., 1-ftbots ft 35® 40 

Nitric, C. P., 7-ft bots ft 25® 30 

Oxalic ft 12® 15 

Pyrogallic, Merck's ft 3 00 

Pyrogallic, Merck's oz 25 

Salicylic ft 60® 70 

Salicylic oz 8® 10 

Salicylic, from oil wintergreen oz 54 

Sulphuric, coml., 9-ft bots ea 65® 75 

Sulphuric, coml., carboy, $2 .ft 2@ 2^ 

Sulphuric, C. P., 1-ft bots ft 30® 40 

Sulphuric, C. P., 9-ft bots ft 20® 30 

Tannic. ft 1 15@ 1 50 

Tartaric .ft 38® 42 

ALCOHOL, absolute, 1-qt bots ea 1 50 

Grain market 

Wood, 5 gal. lot to bbl. lot gal 90® 1 05 

Wood, less quantity, can extra gal 1 10 

ALUM, chrome ft 13® 15 

Dried (burnt alum) ft 12® 15 

Lump ft 3^@ 4 

Ground ft 5® 6 

Powdered .'.' ft 6® 8 

AMMONIA, cone, 26°, 5-pt bots ea 85 

Cone, bulk, can extra gal 75 

Bromide ft 75 

Carbonate ft 12® 25 

Muriate, lump ft 13® 15 

Muriate, gran, coml ft 11® 15 

Muriate, gran, pure ft 16@ 20 

Muriate, powd ft 20® 25 

Valerianate oz 27 

AMMONOL (Po. or Tablets) oz 1 04 

ANT1KAMNIA oz 1 00 

ANTIPYRIN oz 35 

AKISTOL (25 oz, $1.65) oz 180 

AKKOWKOOT, Bermuda ft 35 

ARSENIC, powd, white ft 10® 12 

BALSAM Copaiba ft 55® 65 

Fir, Canada ft 45® 50 

Peru ft 2 50® 2 75 

Tolu ft 75© 30 

BAKE, Cinchona, red, true ... ft 50® 55 

Cinchona, red; powd ft 35® 60 

Cinchona, yellow, Calisaya ft 50® 55 

Cinchona, yellow, powd ft 35® 60 

Elm, slab ; ft 12® 15 

Elm, ground ft 14® 18 

Elm, powd ft 10® 20 

Sassafras ft 12® 15 

Soap, slab ft 9® 12 

Soap, ground ft 12® 15 

Soap pwd ft 18® 20 

Soap, cut, 5c boxes doz 35 

Soap, cut, 10c bozes doz 60 

Wild Cherry ft 12® 15 

BAT BUM gal 2 50® 3 00 

F. W. B. & Co., % pts doz 1 75 

F. W. B. & Co., pts... doz 3 50 

BEANS, Tonka, Angostura ft 2 25® 2 50 

Vanilla, Mexican ft 14 50@15 50 

Vanilla, Tahiti ft 3 25® 3 50 

BEBBIES, Cubeb ft 25® 30 

Cubeb, powd ft 30® 35 

Juniper ft 9® 10 

BISMUTH, sub-carbonate ft 1 70® 1 80 

Sub-gallate oz 19 

Sub-nitrate ft 1 35® 1 45 

BLUE MASS ft 70® 75 

BLUE VITRIOL ft 4«^@ 7 

BORAX, refined ft 8K@ 12 

Powd ft &Vz@ 12 

BUDS, Cassia ft 35® 40 

CALOMEL, American ft 80® 85 

English ft 1 10® 1 15 

Stock ft 55® 65 

CAMPHOR ft 40® 44 

CANTHARIDES, Chinese, powd ft 60® 65 

Russian, powd ft 90® 1 00 



CAPSICUM, African, pods ft 

African, powd ft 

CARAMEL (gal $150, can extra) ft 

CARBON, bisulphide, 1-ft bots doz 

Bisulphide, 2-ft bots doz 

Bisulphide, 1-gal cans ea 

Bisulphide, 5-gal cans ea 

CARMINE, No 40 oz 

CHALK, French, powd ft 

White, precip ft 

White, prepared, drops ft 

CHARCOAL, animal, gran ft 

Animal, powd ft 

Willow, powd , bulk ft 

Willow, powd., 1-B> cartons ft 

Willow, powd., %-ft cartons ft 

Willow, powd., ~% -ft cartons ft 

CHLORAL HYDRATE, 1 fts ft 

y 2 fts ft 

H fts ft 

CHLOROFORM, 1-ft tins ft 

7-ft tins ft 

Squibbs', 500-gm ea 

Squibbs', 250-gm ea 

Squibbs', 100-gm ea 

CLOVES ft 

Powd ft 

COBALT, powd ft 

COCAINE, hydrochlorate oz 

Hydrochlorate, % oz oz 

Hydrochlorate, y$ oz ea 

COCOA BUTTER ft 

CODEINE, alk., Mi oz oz 

Sulphate, l /s oz oz 

COLOCYNTH APPLE ft 

Powd ft 

COMPOSITION POWDEB, i/ 8 ftpkgsft 

COPPERAS, bbls, 1% ft 

CORROSIVE SUBLIMATE ft 

Powd ft 

CREAM TARTAR, pure ft 

CREOLIN, 1-ft and 5-ft bots ft 

CREOSOTE, beech-wood ft 

Coml ft 

CURCUMA, powd ft 

CUTTLE BONE ft 

DEXTRINE ft 

DOVER'S POWDER ft 

EIKONOGEN oz 

EMERY, flour ft 

ERGOT, powd ft 

ESSENCE PEPPERMINT, 2-oz bot..doz 

ETHER, Nitrous, couc, 1-ftbots ft 

Nitrous, cone , %-9> bots ft 

Nitrous, cone, J^-ft bots ft 

Sulphuric, U. S. P.. 1880 ft 

Sulphuric, cone, 1890 ft 

Sulphuric, Squibbs', 500-gm ea 

Sulphuric, Squibbs', 250-gm ea 

Sulphuric, Squibbs', 100-gm ea 

EUCALYPTOL, Merck's oz 

EXTRACT, Cascara, fluid, F. W. B. & Co..ft 
Cascara, fluid, F. W. B. & Co.. 5-ft bots.. .ft 
Cascara, fl., arom., F.W B. & Co., 1-ft bot..ft 
Cascara, fl., arom., F.W.B. & Co., 5-ft bot..ft 

Logwood, 15 and 25-ft boxes ft 

Logwood, 1-ft, l /2-9> and i^-ft boxes ft 

Witch Hazel, distilled gal 

Less than 5 gals, container extra. 
EXTRACTS, FLAVORING, 

Lemon, F.W.B. &Co., 2-oz doz 

Vanilla, F. W. B. & Co , 2-oz doz 

FLOWERS, Arnica ft 

Chamomile, Eng ft 

Chamomile, Ger ft 

Lavender ft 

Rosemary ft 

FOIL. Tin, Heavy ft 

Tin, Medium ft 

Tin, Light ft 

FORMALDEHYD ft 

FRUIT JUICES, F. W. B. & Co., qts., doz 
FRUITS, Crushed, F.W.B.& Co., J^gals ,doz 

FULLERS EARTH ft 

GELATINE,, Cox's, sml doz 

French, gold label ft 

French, silver label ft 

French, bronze label ft 

GLUE, Carpenter's ft 

White ft 

GLYCERINE, 50-ft cans ft 

10-ft cans ft 

2-oz bots doz 

Schering's 1-ft bots ft 

Schering's 10-ft bots ft 

GLYCOLINE (gal., $1.50, can extra) ft 

GUM, Aloes, Barb ft 

Aloes, Barb , powd ft 

Aloes, Cape .. ft 

Aloes, Cape, powd ft 

Aloes, Socotrine, true ft 

Aloes Socotrine, powd ft 



22® 



6%® 
10® 



12® 



25 
25 
25 

2 00 

4 00 
1 05 

3 75 
35 

8 

12 

10 

12 

10 

15 

18 

20 

25 

1 60® 1 70 

1 55® 1 80 

1 95® 2 00 

55® 57 

52® 54 

1 10 

58 

26 

20 

25 

30 

3 25 

3 35 

50® 55 

45® 55 

5 35 
5 10 

90 

85 

35 

2® 3 

85 

95 

32 

60 

1 18 

50 

15 

35 

12 

1 25 

37 

10 

5o 

1 50 

1 20® 1 25 

1 35® 1 40 

1 55® 1 60 

75® 80 

80® 85 

1 25 

66 

30 

24 

70 

50 

80 

75 

12® 13 

15® 20 

65® 90 



1 50 

1 75 

20 

30 

35 

15 

40 

25 

30 

35 

60 

5 00 

10 80 

6® 10 

1 50 

60® 65 

40® 45 

35® 40 

9® 12 

15® 18 

143^® 15 

17 

50 

45 

40 

35 

30 

35 

25 

25 

50 

55 



90® 
27® 



12® 



50® 



12® 

20® 
25® 
30® 
55® 



1 25 



50® 



Ammoniac ft 

Arabic, No. 1 ft 

Arabic, No. 2 ft 

Arabic, powd., No. 1 ft 

Arabic, powd., French ft 

Arabic, sorts ft 

Asafetida ft 

Asafetida, powd .ft 

Benzoin ft 

Benzoin, powd ft 

Catechu ft 

Catechu, powd ft 

Guaiac ft 

Guaiac, powd ft 

Myrrh ft 

Myrrh powd ft 

Olibanum ft 

Opium ft 

Opium, powd ft 

Shellac, orange ft 

Shellac, orange, ground ft 

Shellac, white ft 

Shellac, white, powd ft 

Spruce, tears ft 

Tragacanth, flake ft 

Tragacanth, sorts ft 

Tragacanth, powd ft 

HOFFMAN'S ANODYNE ft 

HOPS, pressed, % and j£-lbs 

Pressed, oz ft 

HYDROGEN PEROXIDE, Mar- 

chand's, lbs doz 

Marchand's, %-lbs doz 

Marchand's, 5^-lbs doz 

Marchand's. Ys-Vos doz 

M. C. W., or P. & W., 1 lbs doz 

M C. W., or P. & W., %-lbs doz 

M. C. W., or P. & W., %-lbs doz 

Oakland, 1 lb doz 

Oakland, Yn-lbs doz 

Oakland, ^-lbs doz 

U.S. P., lib ft 

U. S. P., lib full doz 

HYDROZONE, 1-lb bots doz 

%-lb bots doz 

~%-Vo bots doz 

Yz-\h bots doz 

ICHTHYOL oz 

Ichthyol ft 

INDIGO ft 

INSECT POWDER, Buhach, 6-lb cans. ft 

Dalmatian, bulk ft 

Hill's California, bulk ft 

"T. B." 6-lb cans ft 

"T. B." 1-lb cans doz 

"T. B," %-lb cans doz 

' T. B." small doz 

IODINE, re-subl oz 

Re-subl ft 

IODOFORM oz 

Iodoform ft 

IRON, carbonate precip ft 

Chloride, solution ft 

Iodide oz 

Sub-sulphate (Monseli oz 

Sub-sulphate (Monsel) ft 

Sub-sulphate solution ft 

Sulphate, dried ft 

Sulphate, pure cryst., bulk ft 

Sulphate, pure cryst., 1-lb bots ft 

JUICE, Grape, Los Gatos, pts doz 

Grape, Welch's, )4 pts doz 

Grape, Welch's, pints doz 

Grape, Welch's, quarts doz 

LANOLIN, Leibreich's ft 

LEAD, acetate, coml ft 

Acetate, powd ft 

Acetate, C. P ft 

Sub-acet. solu., Goulard's • ft 

LEAVES, Bay ft 

Buchu, long ft 

Buchu, short ft 

Rosemary, bulk ft 

Sage, %sand %s ft 

Sage, ozs ft 

Senna, Alex ft 

Senna, Alex., powd , ft 

Senna, Tinnevelli ft 

Senna, Tinnevelli, powd ft 

Uva Ursi ft 

LEECHES, (25 or more, 8c.) ea 

r,TME. Chloride, 35-ft cans ft 

Chloride, Acme, 1-lb cans doz 

Chloride, Acme, J^-lb cans doz 

Chloride, Acme, 5^-lb cans doz 

Chloride, Electron, 1-lb cans doz 

Chloride, Phoenix, 1-lb cartons doz 

LITHARGE ft 

LONDON PURPLE ft 



40® 45 
70® 75 
50® 55 
70® 75 
90® 1 00 
40® 45 



32® 
45® 
50® 
60® 
9® 
32® 



45® 

35® 

38® 

25® 
3 85® 3 90 
5 00® 5 20 

27® 30 

32® 

35® 



1 00® 
ft 16® 



50® 
28® 
35® 



35 
40 
45 
1 35 
95 
50 

1 10 
65 
20 
25 

7 80 

5 75 

3 90 

2 25 

4 80 

3 00 

1 80 

6 40 
3 95 

2 70 
35 

3 25 
10 90 

7 50 

4 90 

2 25 
52 

6 75 
75 
60 
40 
45 
40 

5 50 

3 25 
1 25 

36 

3 45® 3 65 

37 

3 80® 4 00 

16® 18 

25® 35 

35 

8 

34® 40 

25® 30 

15® 20 

8® 10 

14® 18 

4 00 

1 90 

2 75 

5 25 
80 

16® 20 

20® 25 

27® 30 

30® 35 

14® 15 

30® 33 

22® 25 

18® 20 

18® 20 

25 

30® 35 

35 

18® 20 

20® 25 

12® 15 

10 

1 25 
80 
45 

1 00 
90 

iy 2 ® 10 

15® 20 



12 



THE CALIFORNIA DRUGGIST. 



65® 



90® 1 00 

50® 60 

2 85® 3 10 

85 

70 

25 

26 

2 60© 2 75 

2 55® 2 70 

2 35® 2 50 

2 30® 2 45 

15 

20 

35 

4 50 

28 

14® 15 

4® 8 

60® 65 

65® 70 

30® 35 

35® 40 

25® 35 



LOZENGES, Licorice, 5-lb boxes ft 24 

Licorice, "Acme," 5-lb boxes ft 35 

Peppermint, 5-lb boxes ft 15 

LYCOPODIUM ft 50® 55 

LYE. concentrated (case, $3.50) doz 90 

LTSOL, 1-lb bots ft 65 

MAGNESIA, Calcined, 1-lb tin ft 65 

Carbonate, Jenning's, 2 and 4-oz ft 5 

Carbonate, K. & M., 4-oz., 2 oz. and l-oz..ft 18® 25 

Carbonate, K. & M., powdered ft 35 

Carbonate, K. & M., S. S ft 60 

Eff. citrate, Herring's *. doz 2 00 

MANGANESE, black oxide ft 

MANNA, large flake ft 

Small flake ft 

MENTHOL, (oz. 30c.) ft 

MERCURY ft 

Bi-sulphate ft 

Iodide, green , — oz 

Iodide, red oz 

MORPHINE, sulph., ^ oz oz 

Sulph., Yz oz., 2%oz. bxs oz 

Sulph., 1-oz tins oz 

Sulph., 5-oz tins oz 

MOSS, Iceland ft 

Irish ft 

MUSK, Canton, 1-oz bxs oz 

Tonquin, % oz bots ea 

MUSTARD. Colburn's,6 lb cans ft 

Ground California ft 

NAPHTHALINE, balls, cakes or flakes..ft 

NUTMEGS ft 

Ground ft 

NUTS, Areca ft 

Areca, powd ft 

Kola ft 

NUX VOMICA ft 15® 20 

Powdered ft 20® 25 

OIL, Almond, bitter oz 65 

Almond, sweet ft 25® 45 

Amber, rect ft 50® 55 

Anise ft 2 40® 2 60 

Bay oz 45® 50 

Benne (can extra) gal 1 15® 1 25 

Bergamot, Sanderson ft 3 40® 3 60 

Bergamot, Sicilian ft 3 00® 3 20 

Cassia ft 2 00® 2 25 

Castor "A A" gal 1 15® 1 25 

Castor, machine gal 45® 50 

Castor, special com'l gal 75® 80 

Less than 5 gals., can extra. 

Cedar, coml ft 40® 50 

Cedar, pure ft 75® 80 

China nut (can extra) gal 65® 75 

Cloves ft 95® 1 15 

Cocoanut ft 20® 30 

Cod liver, Norwegian (can extra) gal 1 10® 1 25 

Cottonseed gal 55® 70 

Less than 5 gal., can extra. 

Croton ft 1 50® 1 

Cubebs ft 1 50® 1 

Eucalyptus ft 65® 

Geranium Rose oz 65® 

Hemlock, pure ft 75® 

Lard gal 75® 

Less than 5 gal can extra. 

Lavender flowers ft 2 25® 2 40 

Lavender, garden ft 75® 80 

Lemon, Sanderson ft 2 00® 2 20 

Lemon, Sicilian ft 1 25® 1 50 

Mustard, Essential oz 65 

Neatsfoot (less than 5-gal. can extra) ...gal 75® 80 

Olive, California, qts doz 12 00 

Olive, Italia, 1 gal cans gal 2 10 

Olive, Malaga, can extra gal 1 00® 1 25 

Orange, bitter ft 4 50® 4 75 

Orange, sweet ft 2 25® 2 50 

Origanum ft 50® 60 

Pennyroyal ft 1 50® 1 75 

Peppermint Hotchkiss ft 1 85® 2 10 

Peppermint, Western ft 1 30® 1 50 

Pinus Sylvestris ft 1 20® 1 40 

Rhodium oz 40® 75 

Rose oz 7 50@10 00 

Rosemary flowers ft 1 50® 1 65 

Sandalwood, Eng oz 50 

Sandalwood, Ger ft 3 00® 3 25 

Sassafras ft 75® 85 

Sewing Machine, Nye's, small doz 45 

Sewing Machine, Nye's, large doz 75 

Sperm, Nye's crystal gal 75 

Sperm, pure, w. b gal 125 

Less than 5 gal can extra. 

Spike ft 

Turpentine, rect., Merck ft 

Union salad gal 

Less than 5 gal can extra. 

Wintergreen v „ ft 

Wormwood ft 



OIL CAKE, ground .. 
OINTMENT, Citrine., 

Mercurial, ^ m 

Mercurial J4 m 

Zinc, benz. oxide 

ORANGE PEEL 



ft 

ft 

ft 

ft 

ft 

ft 

PAPOID, \i or 1-oz bots oz 

PARAFFIN ft 

PARIS GREEN ft 

l's, 'A's, M's ft 

PKTROLATCM, ex. amber lb 

Snow while ft 

PHENACETIN (25 ozs. .95) oz 

PHOSPHORUS, 11-ft cans ft 

1-lb cans lb 

\^ and J^-cans ft 

PLASTER PARIS lb 

Dentist's ft 



25® 35 

45 

75® 80 

1 70® 1 90 

4 00® 5 00 

02'/® 03 

65 

55 

65 

75 

18 

2 00 

15 

25 

30 

9 

30 

1 00 

75 

85 

95® 1 05 

02® 05 

04® 08 



50® 
60@ 

15® 

10® 
20® 
25® 
6^@ 
25® 



POISON, purple „ ft 

POTASH, Babbift's, (case $3.50) doz 

Cauitic, crude ft 

Caustic, white, stick ft 

Bichromate ft 

Carbonate ft 

Chlorate ft 

Cyanide, mining ft 

Cyanide, pure granular ft 

Iodide ft 

Nitrate ft 

Permanganate ft 

Prussiate, red ft 

Prussiate, yellow ft 

PUMICE STONE, lump ft 

Powd lb 

QUASSIA, Chips ft 

QUININE, 1-oz bottle oz 

1-oz tin oz 

5-oz tin oz 

25-oz tin oz 

50-oz tin oz 

100-oztin oz 

RED PRECIPITATE ft 

RESIN,... ft 

ROOT, Aconite ft 

Althea, cut ft 

Blood ft 

Blood, powd ft 

Calamus, peeled ft 

Gentian ft 

Gentian, powd ft 

Ginger, African _ ft 

Ginger, Jamaica ft 

Goldenseal ft 

Goldenseal, powd _ ft 

Ipecac, powd ft 

Licorice, select ft 

Licorice, cut ft 

Licorice, powd ft 

Orris, powd ft 

Rhubarb ft 

Rhubarb cubes ft 

Rhubarb fingers ft 

Rhubarb, powd ft 

Rhubarb, powd., Allen's, Eng ft 

Sarsaparilla, Hond ft 

Sarsaparilla, Hond, gro ft 

Sarsaparilla, Mex ft 

Sarsaparilla, Mex., gro ft 

Valerian ft 

Valerian, powd ft 

ROTTEN STONE, powd ft 

SACCHARIN, 25 gm. cartons ea 

SAFFRON, American.. ft 

Spanish oz 

SAL EPSOM ft 

Epsom 4-oz cartons doz 

Glauber 

Nitre, cryst ft 

Nitre, powd ft 

Rochelle ft 

Soda ft 

SALOL, (oz32) ft 

SEED, Anise, Ital ft 

Anise, powd ft 

Bird, mixed, 1-lbs., 60-lbcase case 

Bird, mixed, 1ft doz 

Canary ft 

Caraway ft 

Cardamom ft 

Celery ft 

Coriander ft 

Wax, cleaned ft 

Flax, ground ft 

Hemp ft 

Millet ft 

Mustard ft 

Poppy, blue ft 

Rape ft 

Sabadilla, powd ft 

Worm, American ft 

Worm, Levant ft 

SEIDLITZ MIXTURE ft 

Powders, single, 100s box 

Powders, 3's doz 

Powders, 6's doz 

Powders, 10s doz 

SHEKP DIP, Carbolic gal 

Little's 1 gal cans gal 

Little's 5 gal cans gal 

SNUFF, Garrett's Scotch, blads ft 

Garrett's Scotch, 1-oz tins doz 

Garrett's Scotch, 2-oz tins doz 

Garrett's Scotch, 4-oz tins doz 

Garrett's Scotch, 6-oz bots doz 

Lorillard's Maccaboy, 4-oz bots _ doz 

Lorillard's Rappee. 4-oz bots doz 

SOAP, Castile, Conti white ft 

Marseilles, white ft 

Mottled, coml ft 

Mottled, pure ft 

Turkish, green or white ft 

Powdered ft 

German green, Stiefel's ft 

Whale Oil ft 

SODA ASH ft 

Caustic, 98 per cent ft 

Caustic, 70 per cent (Drums) ft 

Caustic, white, sticks ft 

Bicarbonate ft 

Bromide ft 

Hyposulphite ft 

Hyposulphite, new process ft 

SOLUTION, Donavan's ft 

Fowler's ft 

Goulard's ft 

SPKKMACBTI ft 

SPIRITS, Brooklyn and Columbian gal. 

Less than 5 gals, can extra. 



08® 

TA® 
45® 
15® 
15® 
14® 
30® 



10 
90 
13 

70 
20 
25 
17 
35 
65 

35® 2 45 
12 



40® 
60® 
32® 



06® 08 



31® 33 

29® 31 

26® 28 

25® 27 

24J4@ 26J4 

24® 26 

1 10 

01J4 to 03 
30® 
35® 
25® 



14® 
20® 
25® 



14® 
35® 



40® 
40® 
25® 
25® 
30® 
35® 



40® 

02«@ 

ft 01!^@ 
08® 
09® 



35 

40 
30 
35 
60 
16 
18 
25 
29 
65 
65® 70 

2 75® 3 00 
13® 15 

30 
18 
40 
75 

1 25® 1 50 
1 50® 1 75 
75 
75 
45 
45 
30 
30 
35 
40 
10 
1 00 
45 
90 
04 
35 
03 
12 
12 
30 
01^@ 03 

3 60® 3 75 
16® 18 
20® 25 

3 50 

75 

03^® 05 

10® 12 

1 35® 1 40 

18® 25 

10® 12 

03',® 05 

03^@ 05 

0354® 06 

04® 06 

06® 08 

12 

06 

50 

20 

25 

30 

2 50 
60 

1 45® 1 50 

1 ® 2 00 

1 10 

1 35 

1 20 

55 

65 

1 10 

1 90 

3 00 

2 75 

3 00 
16 
13 
10 
12 
11 
35 
40 
06 
08 



10® 
04® 
40® 



Nitre, U.S. P ft 55® 60 

Nitre, 2-oz bots doz 1 50 

STRONTIUM, nitrate ft 14® 17 

STRYCHINE,, cryst., i/ 8 -oz bots oz 1 25 

Cryst., 1-oz bots oz 1 00 

Powd., 54-oz bots oz 1 20 

Powd., 1-oz bots oz 95 

SUGAR MILK, powd ft 20® 25 

SULFONAL oz 1 35 

SULPHUR, crude, ground, Cal ft 02#@ 03 

Flour ft 03%® 04J4 

Flowers ft 04 @ 05 

Roll ft 03%® 05 

SYRUP. Iodide Iron, F. W. B. & Co ft 57® 60 

Rock Candy, bbls and y 2 bbls gal 70® 75 

TAR, Pine, % pints doz 75 

Pine, pints doz 90 

Pine, quarts doz 1 50 

WATER, distilled, containers extra gal 10 

Orange Flower, containers extra gal 2 00® 2 25 

Rose, containers extra gal 2 00® 2 50 

WAX, Floor, powd ft 40 

Yellow, pure ft 27® 30 

White, pure ft 50® 55 

White, No. 1 ft 35® 40 

WHITE PRECIPITATE ft 120 

ZINC, metallic, shavings ft 20® 35 

Oxide, com'l ft 14@ 15 

Oxide, Hubbuck's ft 45® 5C 

Sulphate, com'l ft 06® 08 

Sulpha'te, chem. pure ft 17® 20 

PROPRIETARY ARTICLES 

Controlled by F. W. Braun & Co. 

Braun's Carbolic Salve doz $1 25 

" Carbolic Soap doz 75 

" Condition Powder doz 1 00 

" Essence Jamaica Ginger doz 150 

Florida Water, lge doz 3 50 

" Florida Warer, small doz 150 

" Sarsaparilla doz 4 00 

" Syrup Tar and Wild Cherry doz 150 

Cal., Mission Eucalyptus Lozenges doz 150 

Cal. Mission Eucalyptus Plasters doz 1 50 

Cal. Mission Poison Oak Remedy doz 1 50 

Cal. Root Beer doz 80 

Cal. Mocking Bird Food doz 3 00 

Coronado Sea Salt doz 80 

Hayden's Arnica Salve doz 1 00 

" Carbolic Salve doz 100 

Witch Hazel doz 1 00 

" Sanitary Towels, small gro 3 50 

" medium gro 3 75 

" large gro 4 00 

Hayden's Sachet Powder, U ft bots ft 3 00 

Hunter's Witch Hazel „ doz 175 

Matchless Sarsaparilla doz 5 00 

Matchless Wild Cherry Phosphates doz 1 75 

Swain's Carbolic Powder doz 1 50 

Tarine „doz 1 75 

" T. B." Insect Powder, 6-ft can „ ft 40 

1-ft " doz 5 50 

" " " %-ft" doz 3 25 

" " sml " doz 1 25 



BRAUN'S... 



Condition Powder 



IS A 



13® 
10® 

07 ',@ 
08® 
10® 



06® 

04^® 08 
02%® 03 
42® 45 

02 >4@ 



04 
65 
OS 
06 
40 
85 
35 
50® 55 
1 50® 1 7* 



03W® 
04® 

25® 



Well Established Remedy 



Having a good sale throughout Southern 
California and the Territories 



It is used for 



Horses, Cattle, Sheep and Poultry 

IT IS GOOD 

It Retails for 25 cents 
It Costs $ 1 .00 Per Dozen 

You need it in your business ! 



MANUFACTURED 
AND SOLD BY 



F. W. BRAUN & CO. 

LOS ANGELES, CAL. 



THE CALIFORNIA DRUGGIST. 




There's 
Difference 

IN 




* 



Tooth Brushes 



As well as in Mouths* 

The day of the old-fashioned, 4 rowed, clumsy tooth brush has gone 
forever, and now all the best trade demand the best — that is the 

1 "PROPHYLACTIC"! 

Tooth Brushes. 



jj Beery Druggist Can Make Money £ 

and build up his reputation by making a specialty of selling 
Prophylactic Brushes. 

Write us for information how we will secure customers for you. It costs 
you nothing. We do all the work and pay every expense. 



FLORENCE 7VYFG. CO. 

FLORENCE, MASS. 



11 



THE CALIFORNIA DRUGGIST. 



PHENALGIN 



( PHOSPHO-AMMONIO-PHENYLACETAMIDE ) 

f Antipyreti 
< Analgesic, 
(^ Stimulant. 



| Antipyretic, 
Medical Properties : -< Analgesic, 



The only synthetic coal-tar product which has stimulating quali- 
ties. PHENALGIN is made from chemically pure materials and 
may be distinguished from inferior products by being pure and 
having a strong ammoniacal taste and odor. 

Phenalgin is sold only in bottles containing two ounces of 
powder or one ounce of tablets. 

Price $1.00 per Battle 

This is one-half the price of impure and unskilfully com- 
pounded articles claiming similar properties to Phenalgin. 

MAY BE OBTAINED FROM 

F. W. BRAUN & CO. 

LOS ANGELES, CAL. 

OR ANY WHOLESALE DRUGGIST IN THE WORLD 



Ktna Chemical Company 

NEW YORK, U. S. A. 

Chicago, London, Paris, Berlin, Vienna, Genoa, Montreal. 



The Standard 
Remedy 

FOR OVER 60 YEARS 



RELIABLE 
and SALABLE . . 



i^3j GELATINE 

CAPSULES 

PL* AND ^ £* 

E F? L.OI OS 



'<£ Pearl Shaped Capsules. 




of PURE 



Sandal Wood 
..Oil.. 



AND ITS 

Various Combinations 



List No. 53 A. io Min. Capsules, Pure E. I. Sandal Oil, 12 in box, per doz. - $2.25 

" " 53- 10 " " " " " 24 " " - - 4-25 

" " 54- 10 " " " " " 36 •• " - 6.25 

" " 54 C. 10 " " " " " 100 " " - 1500 



421 A. PEKLOIDS 
5 minims 42I B 
capacity 42lC 



I Pure E.I. J 
j Sandal Oil J 



Vials of 40, per doz. - $ .70 
" 80, " - 9.00 

" 100, " - 10.20 



Tria bottle or dozen sent prepaid on receipt of price. Send for Samples and 
Detailed Formula List. 

fl. PLflNTEN & SON 

Established 1836 

Manuracturers ot Over 400 varieties oi Filled and Empty Gelatine Capsules 

NEW YORK 




(MARIAN! WINE) 

THE IDEAL FRENCH TONIC 

EXTENSIVELY ADVERTISED! 

SELLS CONTINUOUSLY 

ALL DRUGGISTS SHOULD 
HAVE A SUPPLY OF 

The Ideal French Tonic 

SUPPLIED BY ALL JOBBERS. 



For Show Cards, Signs, Etc., Address 

MKRIKNI St CO. 
52 West Fifteenth Street NEW YORK 



G^dneu's Sandal Pearls... 

NOT A PEARL-SHAPED CAPSULE 
BUT A 

Genuine Pearl 

IN THE HIGHEST STATE 
OF PERFECTION 

These Pearls contain 5 minims of strictly pure Oil 
of Sandal, distilled especially for use in our laboratory 
from fresh selected Mysore Sandalwood. Our Oil of 
Sandal has stood the highest test for purity and medic- 
inal qualities. In view of the attractive way in which 
these goods are put up and the low prices, they pay a 
larger profit to the retail druggist than any other 
Sandal preparation. 

REFUSE SUBSTITUTES 

Or so-called pearl-shaped capsules. Always soluble, 
thoroughly reliable. Largely advertised. Sample 
order solicited. Over 300 formulas. 




FOR SALE BY 

F. W. BRAUN & CO. 
Los Angeles and San Diego, Cal. 



jljjyjjypS 

$7.50 Per Dozen 



Price List and Samples Free. 

J. W. GEDNEY 

203 East 88th Street 
New York, U. S. A. 



THE CALIFORNIA DRUGGIST. 



iii 



The Knap Improved Vaginal Syringe 

MADE OF HA-RD -RUBBER 




The Advantages : 

ist. No wetting of bedding or clothing. 2nd. Will thoroughly wash the vagina. 

3rd. The air space prevents the cone from getting hot, and injections may be taken 30 
degrees hotter with this syringe than with others. 

4th. No inconvenience ; no dread of the douche and consequent failure to take it. 
Mfgd. by C. E. BLAKE CO., fo r 

F. W. BRAUN & CO., Los Angeles, Cal. 

PRICES : 

No. 1, Nozzle and escape tubing $15.00 per doz. 

No. 2, Bulb syringe and escape tubing 18.00 per doz. 

No. 3, Fountain syringe and escape tubing 21.00 per doz. 



Matchless Sarsaparilla 



With Iodide Potassium 



Druggists 



This is Different ^ <& 



have good reason to complain of unprofitable "patents." 



Give a Trial Order for the 



OOO 





&\ 



r^ 




H 



L^7 





and note the returns. 



The formula ( which we furnish ) is positively unexcelled by any similar preparation, and the product is a most 
elegant one. Directions in English and Spanish on each bottle. 



PRICE:- 



Per dozen, in full 14 oz. bottles $5 00 

3 " lots 4 75 



6 dozen lots $ 4 5o 

1 gross 48 00 



Matchless Pharmacal Co* 



30 Piatt Street, New York 



Trade Supplied by F. W. BRAUN & CO., Los Angeles and San Diego. 



IV 



THE CALIFORNIA DRUGGIST. 




CRANDALL'S 

OBSTETRICAL 
BED PAN 



Inflated Kim. Packet at Lower 
End. Adjustable Rubber Hose 
to carry off Liquid. Quickly 
Cleaned. When deflated can be 
rolled into a small package. 

In shape, construction and ma- 
terial, The Crandall Pan can not 
help but please. The Rubber is 
soft, and the inflated rim forms an 
easy cushion. It is too broad to up- 
set ; too deep to spill the contents. 
It can be used on the bed, opera- 
ting chair or table. It is particu- 
larly useful in floodings of mis- 
carriages; also douchings follow- 
ing where it is so necessary for the 
patient to remain in the recumbent 
posture. 



Made by 



B.F. 



akron, ohio. 

Branches : 

New York, 66 Reade St. 

Chicago, 141 Lake St. 

San Francisco^ 35 New Montgomery St. 



We are Anxious . ♦ ♦ 



TO INCREASE 
YOUR DEMAND FOR 



DR. KLINE'S 



Great Nerve Restorer 



By sending FREE SAMPLE BOTTLES 
of it; also HANDSOME DISPLAY card 
and advertising matter with your 
card printed thereon 



SEND TO 



931 Arch Street, Philadelphia, Penn. 



FOR SAMPLE 



p e! T Na§t s 



Honesty 

i$ tbc 

Best 

Policy 




50 years 

tbc 
Standard 

of 
Excellence 



Fac-simile of Bottle with Buff Wrapper. 

nn MfiT When people shorn the good sense to demand POND'S EXTRACT, 
U\J i\\J I attempt to sell them something else. 

CAUTION 

Common law perfectly protects Trade Marks. Persons selling any other prepara- 
tion representing that it is Pond's Extract, or the same as Pond's Extract, 
render themselves liable to a fine and imprisonment. 



Ole will be pleased to furnish any dealer, on request, printed matter 
with bis name and address tbereon. 



« « « « « 



POND'S EXTRACT CO., 



76 FIFTH AVENUE 



NEW YORK 



YICENTE P0RTU0ND0 




Cuban Hand Made Cigars 



Absolutely pure, and made from the finest tobaccos 
grown in the "Vuelto Abajo" districts. 

Without question the finest brand of Domestic Cigars 
Hade. 

Equal to Imported at much less figures. 

Sample orders solicited. See descriptive list with prices. 

Uniformity in quality and workmanship guaranteed. 



F. W. BRAUN & CO., 

Distributing Agents, Los Angeles and San Diego. 



THE CALIFORNIA DRUGGIST. 



PRICES OF 



ii 



CLEANFONT" NIPPLES 

Reduced to $3.00 per Gross, Net. 

These pay as big a profit to the retailer now as the ordinary nipples 
and give better satisfaction to the purchaser — besides, we help to create 
the demand. 

But a thing may be very good and yet not sell because no one 
knows it's good. The " Cleanfont " does not belong to this list. It has 
been widely advertised in women's publications of the largest circula- 
tion, and women know all about it. 

"CLEANFONT" NIPPLES 

Far outrank any pull-over nipple ever produced. The special advant- 
ages we claim for the nipple are : 

ist. Ribbed inside and 
therefore it cannot collapse. 
2d. It is seamless. 
3d. It is made of pure 
rubber. 

4th. It is durable. 
5th. It is low priced. 

Seamless Ribbed Inside 

(Registered Trade Mark.) 

PRICE, PER GROSS, NET, $3.00. 

FOX, FULTZ St CO. 

Manufacturers and Importers ot 

Druggists' Glassware and Sundries 

52 Park Place, New York, and 18 Blackstone St., Boston 
For Sale by F. W. BRAUN & CO., Los Angeles, Cal. 

ffitnoiiol 

( Ammoniated Phenylacetamide.) 

Stimulant, Antipyretic and Analgesic. 




Ammonol, like the majority of the more recently 
discovered Antipyretics, is a product of the Amido. 
benzine series (C e H 6 NH 2 ). It differs essentially, how- 
ever, in several particulars from the other medicinal coal-tar products, but especially 
in that it contains Ammonia in an active form and has a stimulating action on all the 
vital functions. 

It occurs in amorphous crystals having a pale yellowish color, is strongly alkaline 
in reaction, and has a pungent ammoniacal taste and odor. 

Ammonol and Combinations. 



A-mmonol ISg&te Powdered j In °« <»** bottles only. 

Ammonol Tablets " 

Ammonol Lithiated " 

Ammonol Peptonate " 

Ammonol Bromide 

Ammonol Camphorated " 

Ammonol with Camphor and Codeine " 

Ammonol with Ipecac and Opium " 



In 5 grain 
flat oval tab- 
lets, put up 
in one ounce 
bottles. 



To avoid substitution see that the letters " Ammonol Chemical Co." are blown in 
every bottle and that every tablet is flat oval in form. 

Neither Ammonol nor any of the Combinations are ever sold in bulk. 



The Ammonol Chemical Co. 



36 E. 14th St. (Union Square), West. New York, U. S. A. 

Trade supplied by F. W. BRAUN & CO., Los Angeles, Cal. 



Krause's Headache Capsules 



Will net you 



100 



PER CENT 
PROFIT ■«• 



and the greatest advertising novelty ever 
offered to the retail drug trade 



. . . Fill ©if EXPEtfS© 



8 



Subjects to Choose From. 

8 

Write to us for 

Illustrated Catalogue 

giving full particulars. 



Don't forget to send 
us your order for^— 



Krause's Headache 
Capsules 



While we are in a position to 
make you this offer. 



F. W. BRAUN & CO. 

Los Angeles, Cal. 



Menthol a quick Relief I 

How is Menthol Best Applied? 

For Influenza, Catarrh, Cold in the Head, Sore Throat, 
Coughs, Acute Rhinitis, Headache, etc., 

USE, 

Bradford's Compound Menthol inhaler 

It is a Wonderful Healer and so PROMPT 

For Tic doloreaux or Neuralgia, Headache and Pains in 
general, apply externally 

Bradford's Menthol Vinaigrettes 

OR PURE MENTHOL CONES 

Elegant in Form and Most Convenient for Use. 



Retail Price for either of above, 25 Cts. 

They are among the best sellers ot this season. 



MANUFACTURED BY 



ft. J. BRADFORD & 60., Boston, Mass. 

Sold by F. W. Braun & Co., Los Angeles, Cal. 



VI 



THE CALIFORNIA DRUGGIST. 



Wyeth's Granular Effervescing Salts. 

The following list of Granular Effervescing Salts embraces those in popular and general 
demand. We ask the trade to compare their general physical appearance with those usually 
found in the market. 

For uniformity and fineness of granule, ready and complete solubility, sparkling effervescence 
and general freshness, delicacy of flavor and character, they are unsurpassed. They are prepared 
with scrupulous exactness as to the strength and contents of each drachm or sixty grains. 



WYETH'S EFFERVESCING HEADACHE SALTS 

Caf = Acetan. 

[TRADE MARK.] 

Four-ounce size, per dozen $5 co 

Ten-cent size, per dozen 90 

One-pound bottles, per pound 1 25 

Five-pound bottles, per pound 1 20 

Aperient. 

Per dozen, four-ounce bottles $4 00 

Per pound bottle 1 00 

Bromides Modified. 

Per dozen, four-ounce bottles $5 co 

Per pound bottle 1 25 

Caffeine Hydrobromate. 

Per dozen, four-ounce bottles $5 00 

Per pound bottle 1 25 



LIST PRICES, SUBJECT TO USUAL DISCOUNTS. 

Sodium Bicarbonate. 



Magnesium Citrate. 

Per dozen, four-ounce bottles $4 00 

Per pound bottle 1 00 

Magnesian Aperient. 

Per dozen, four-ounce bottles $4 00 

Per pound bottle 1 00 

Potassium Bicarbonate. 

Per dozen, four-ounce bottles $4 00 

Per pound bottle 1 00 

Potassium Citrate. 

Per dozen, our-ounce bottles . . . . . . $4 00 

Per pound bottle 1 00 



Per dozen, four-ounce bottles $4 

Per pound bottle 1 

Sodium Phosphate. 

Per dozen, four-ounce bottles $4 

Per pound bottle 1 

Seidlitz Mixture. 

Per dozen, four-ounce bottles $4 

Per pound bottle 1 

Vichy. 

Per dozen, four-ounce bottles $4 

Per pound bottle 1 



00 
00 



00 
00 






00 
00 



THESE SALTS ARE PUT UP IN ATTRACTIVE BOTTLES, DOUBLY SEALED, EACH BOTTLE ACCOM PANIED WITH A DOSE GLASS. 



JOHN WYETH & BROTHER, Philadelphia, Penna. 



Turn Over a 
New Leafe* 



Every day in 
the year and 
enjoy the hap- 
py thought that heads every page of the 



^Columbia-® 
Desk Pad Calendar 



Keep track of engagements and matters of 
daily importance in your life, on the ample 
memoranda space — and at the end of the 
year you have a journal or diary that will 
be a pleasure to refer to for years to come. 

By mail to any address lor Ave two-cent stamps. 



POPE MFG. CO. 
Hartford, 
Conn. 





~«- SOMEIM f OR 
HOTHIWa. 

Druggist5 Wrappihcj Paper. 

Free. 

WE WILL FURNISH ANY DRUGGIST AFiriE 
IQUAUTYQF WRAPPING PAPER, FOUR-OUNCE 
SIZE, NEATLY BLOCKED TO PREVENT WASTE, 
WITH THEIRHAMEa BUSINESS PRINTED ON 
ONE SIDE OF EACH SHEET. ON THE OTHER 
SIDE WE PRINT A NEAT ADVERTISEMEMTIN 
SIX DIFFERENT fomsjdf OUR OLD REMEDY 



JOHNSON SANODYHE LINIMENT. F 



The sheets are collected, so as to appear m regular sucession. 
Send wur hame aud address if you want some or this paper. 

IT WILL SAVE YOU; EXPENSE. 




a*' 



Ronton Mi«;«; '°. 



Boston, Mass. 



)» 



OUR MEDIOrtES ARE FOR SALE BY ALL WHOLESALE. DRUGGISTS. 



THE CALIFORNIA DRUGGIST. 



vu 



LEINER'S 






The reputation of LEINER'S BRUSHES is not confined to 
this country alone. They sell in the British Dominions not 
less than at home, the same in South America, etc. 

They having the proud distinction of being the only Ameri- 
can made Brushes that have a demand in Old England. 

TRADE SUPPLIED BY 

F. W. BRAUN & CO., Los Angeles 




!VlHITTEM0R E O 



"FINE SHOES r 



I c(IIxT EDqJj 
bUckest color 



Whittemore Bros. 

& CO., Boston, Mass. 



Oldest 

and 

Largest 

Manufacturers 

of 



Shoe Polishes 



IN THE WOULD 



Make Dressings for Footwear of all Colors and Tints. 

"Gilt Edge" Oil Shoe Dressing 

For Ladies' and Children's Shoes. It Blacks, Polishes, 
Softens and Preserves— FINEST and BEST. 



"Dandy" Combination 

The package contains a bottle of " Dandy " Dressing, for removing 
stains from all russet and tan shoes, also a box of Yellow Polishing 
Paste (large) for giving them a brilliant, durable and water-proof 
polish. 

"Peerless" Ox Blood Combination 
" Nobby " Brown Combination 

and twenty-four other shoe polishes, a descriptive list of which will 

be mailed upon application. 
The Whittemore Polishes are sold at Manufacturers' Prices by 

F. W. BRAUN & CO., Los Angeles, Cal. 



Decorated ^™ B »r» B n E a«>&& 

t $£ir PLAIN AND LACQUERED ^^% 

Tin Boxes 



DEEP 

PANELED 

LJDS 

EXACT 

FLUID OUNCE 
CAPACITY 




ARE MADE BY 






Joseph G. Taite's Sonsy^ 

PHILADELPHIA, PA. .ir VvV* 




*r 



tig FapsLaDlactie Face Powder 




THE ONLY PERFECT TOILET POWDER 
IN THE MARKET. 

Over One Million Boxes Sold Annually. Four Shades: 
Flesh, White, Pink and Cream. Price, per box, 50 c. 
Per gross, $43.20. 

BEN. LEVY & CO., French Perfumers, 
Sole Proprietors, Boston, Mass. 

Trade Supplied by F. W. BRAUN & CO., 

Los Angeles, Cal. 



Trade Supplied by F. W. BRAUN & CO. 



TWENTY YEARS A FAVORITE ! 

H. H H. LINIMENT 

FOR MAN OR BEAST 



w* w» if oobb & m@m\ 

Sole Proprietors 



Trade Supplied by F. W. BRAUN & CO., 
Los Angeles, Cal. 



VU1 



THE CALIFORNIA DRUGGIST. 



SVU^i?? ^T5^ ^!5' WT5 8 ^Ti?- WT5 5 ^Ti) 5 ^ J9 5 ®T9 I -^T5'-^*5 5 ^'i?-^'!)' ^i? M*if M 1 *I? SVStM»i? ^3^*5' ^t? ^ W ®it? ^Ti^^ii? ®i^ ® U? ^ rij M*i? Ms^ ®W ^*3 



MS 



miHH: 



fig 



R PRIME OLD 

WHISKEY For Medicinal Use 



WMj DISTILLED FROM SELECT GRAIN MMM 

>|^j< IN BOTTLES ONLY Jt jt jt^jijtji^ ^f 



ELEGANT STYLE OF PACKAGE. 



SEAL OF MARYLAND 



PURE RYE 



NOTICE QUOTATIONS^ 

SINGLE CASE $8.00 5 CASE LOTS $7.75 



THE PACIFIC COAST 
DISTRIBUTERS ARE.... 

F. W. BRAUN & CO. 

LOS ANGELES, CAL. 



m 

m 
sSKS 

I 

m 

m 
m 

M 



w 
i 

M 



Ms? 



«1 



mi 



% 



*sts. 



m 



I 

I 

1 
I 

1 






THE CALIFORNIA DRUGGIST. 



IX 




PECULIAR excellence and 
FAIR PRICE have 
placed the Waverley 
AHEAD of all 
bicycles in points of 
sales and the 
possession of 
FRIENDS 

Write for Agents' TERMS 



The success of the Waverley Bicycle in '96 places 
it at the head of the leaders for '97. This year we 
produce a new and expensively made wheel, equipped 
with the only perfect bearings yet made — $100. 

Last year's famous model, greatly improved, has been 
reduced to $60. The saving is in the cost of machinery. 



INDIANA BICYCLE 
COMPANY... 

Pacific Coast Branch, 55 to 61 First St., 
San Francisco. 



HARRY BROWN, Agent 

639 South Broadway, 

Los Angeles, Cal. 



J^rKSrW 



V<cV&:V<cV<cV<i 



+^ 



Wright's 



( Antiseptic) 



SYRUP E FIGS 



Sells rapidly and gives 
General Satisfaction ... 

Price per doz. to trade, $4.00 

Price to Consumers, per bottle 50 

A discount of 5 per cent, is allowed on all single orders amount- 
ing to $24.00 and over. 

Advertising matter furnished free of charge on application to 
the manufacturers. 



California Fio Syrup Go. 

SflN FRAN6IS60, 6flL 

Louisville, Ku. New York, N. Y. 




Myrrh Tooth soap 

SOLD IN EVERY COUNTRY IN THE WORLD 



V^T^rl^ 



V^V*cV*cV*cV<cV<*V*i 



Universally Endorsed by Druggists 
and Dentists. 
ELEGANTLY For show case display. Put up in 
MnnwTcn elegant china boxes and in tin 
IVlOUINTtU boxes for travelers. Attractive 
advertising matter packed with each dozen. We 
always send something new. Retails for 25c. 

Wright's Myrrh Tooth Powder. 

Also tastefully arranged for show case display. Re- 
tails for 25c. 

If you have not got these two articles, send for sample dozen. We invite every 
druggist who handles our Tooth Soap or Powder to inform us of that fact and we will 
send him through his wholesale house a beautiful show card framed in glass, and 
other advertising matter. 

"-s A GOOD THING TO PUSH 

WRIGHT'S PARAGON 

Headache and Neuralgia Remedy 

With each dozen is included, free of charge. 18 
10 cent packages, the receipts from which more than 
dear the cost of one dozen of the 25c size. Positively 
the best Headache Remedy ever made. Endorsed by 
Physicians, Press and Public Sells at sight. Makes 
its own friends. Builds its own trade. A trial is all 
that is asked. Druggists permitted to guarantee 
satisfaction. It is perfectly harmless. Leaves no bad 
effect. Can be used in powder or wafer form. Re- 
tails for 25c and pays a nice profit. A good supply of 
attractive advertising matter packed with each dozen. Send for sample dozen. 

E nglish Glycerine and Cucumber. H-eyou got in^tock^ The be* face 
Wright's Red Cross Cough Syrup. Three sizes 25C 5oc aud |r oo 
Wright's Syrup of Tar and Wild Cherry. Three sizeSj 25C> ^ and $i 




Wright's Belladonna Porous Plasters. ( 2 dozen ta box) per dozen ?oc 



Hibbard's Rheumatic Porous Plasters. Extra strength ; per dozen, 



All of the above preparations can be procured of any wholesale druggist, or by 
writing to 

CHAS. WRIGHT & CO., Druggists, Detroit, Mich., U. S. A. 



THE CALIFORNIA DRUGGIST. 




fe'ft\VA«l-^H , KS. TO. 



^IGHMOJVD'S 

^X^NG OF THE J\(ERV£5 

KVI'ltiri,. $1.00 
OR. S. A. RICHMOND, Proprietor, Tuscola, Illinois. 



STANDARD 

HOUSEHOLD 

REME DIES. 

Dr. §. A. Richmond's Family Medicines 

Are prepared with great care, expressly for family use, under 
the immediate supervision of Dr. S. A. Kichmond himself, who 
is thoroughly acquainted with each drug and its effects on the 
human system 

Wholesale Price List. 

King of Hi e Nerves. 

1 Dozen $ 800 

Fpileptine. 

1 Dozen 8 8 00 

Celebrated Nervine. 

1 Dozen 8 800 

Hair Renewer. 

IDozen 8 800 

White Rose Cream. 

IDozen 8 4 00 

Liver Pills. 

IDozen $ 150 

Pile Ointment. 

1 Dozen $ 4 00 

Rheumatic Lightning. (Large.) 

IDozen 8 8 00 

Rheumatic Lightning. (Small.) 

IDozen 8 400 

Sexual Pills. 

1 Dozen $ 12 00 

Radical Regenerator. 

1 Dozen 8 12 00 

Female Regulating Pills. 

1 Dozen 8 12 00 

Bjs Salve. 

1 Dozen $ 1 50 

Lung Ralsant. (Large.) 

IDozen 8 8 00 

Lung Ralsam. (Small. ( 

1 Dozen 8 400 

Curling Fluid. 
IDozen 8 4 00 

^~The Medicines quoted herein are now being extensive- 
ly and systematically advertised all over the United States. 
No pains or money will be spared to promote fast and increas- 
ing sales, thus making them profitable to both Jobber and Re- 
taller. 

DK. S. A. RICHMOND, 

Sole Proprietor, Tuscola, 111 



THE CALIFORNIA DRUGGIST. 



XI 



k.1^: 



•. i .- >. ' \- 



AN OPEN LETTER 

To DRUGGISTS. 



We are asserting- in the courts our right to the 
exclusive use of the word " CASTOKIA " and 
" PITCHER'S CASTOKIA " as our trade mark. 



I, Dr. Samuel Pitcher, cf Hyannis, Massachusetts, was 
the originator of "PITCHER'S CASTORIA," the same that 
has borne and does now bear the fac-simile signature of 
&%fej£M on every wrapper. This- is the original 
"PITCHER'S CASTORIA" which has been used in the 
homes of the mothers of America for over thirty years. 
LOOK CAREFULLY at the wrapper and see that it is the 
kind you h'aoe always bought, and has the signature of 

\sc/&J%[£gy on tne wrapper. No one has authority from 
me to use my name except the Centaur Company of 
which Chas. H. Fletcher is President. 

March 8, 1897. QdL^~x2%y*^-**.T>. 



' K- ' 

1 — r -_ j 






$33.60 Per Gross, $2.80 Per Dozen. 

Jobbers sell in Gross Lots 5% and VA% off. 

THE KIND YOU HAVE ALWAYS BOUGHT. 









Xll 



THE CALIFORNIA DRUGGIST. 



I ■ V F W~2 you ever seen or tasted a sample of this wonderful Molasses 
Wi l\ \I I"* Candy ? There is nothing like it on the market ; you can sell 
■ M / » 1 ^-^ it on account of its superior quality and neatness of package ; 
"™ ■™ 1 " """'^■^^ it gives you a good profit and goes quick. 



Nothing Like It On Earth 
Delicious, Satisfying 



HILDRETHS ORIGINAL AND ONLY 




MOLASSES CANDY— Sold Everywhere 

PRICE. IN ASSORTED CASES, PER CASE, $6.00 

No First-Class Retail Store Should be Without VELVET, it is a Seller 



Factory, 38 to 48 Batterymarch Street, Boston, Mass. 



Capacity over 10 Tons Per Day 



The Retail Trade Supplied by F. W. BRAUN & CO., Los Angeles, Cal. 



GUILD'S 

Green Mountain Asthma Cure 

CURES HHY FEVER 




M 



AS WELL AS ASTHMA 

ANY are the people who save the expense of going away during the hay fever season by using this 
celebrated remedy prepared by Dr. J. H. Guild, graduate of New York Medical College and New York 
Chemical Laboratory, a practitioner in Bellevue and New Charity Hospitals, and a physician of recognized ability 
and distinguished eminence. This article has been the standard remedy for Asthma for a quarter of a century. 
It has found its way on its own merits to every civilized country on the globe. The growing demand, its great 
popularity and general use, stamp it as absolutely the most successful and satisfactory remedy that has ever been 
placed on the market. No other preparation has met with such great and uniform success. Being absolutely 
harmless, it can be used by the most delicate with perfect safety, whether young or old, and never fails to give 
immediate relief and perfect satisfaction. 

Thousands of testimonials from all over the world recite the history of most marvelous cures. 
Ask your druggist for it, or it will be sent by mail on receipt of price. Large size, $1.00 ; small size, 25c. 
Mail orders receive prompt attention. Please send your address on a postal card for a new book, " Practical Treatise on Asthma." Its 
causes, symptoms, treatment, etc. Mention this advertisement and it will be mailed free. 

Address J ^ GUILD, M/D. 

FOR SALE BY -RUPERT, VT. 

F W. BRAUN &, CO.- 



THE CALIFORNIA DRUGGIST. 



xni 



! "SEGURO" ! 



A Priceless Boon to the 
Female World of Humanity . . . 

The B est Preventive of the Age 

— ^~—^r~~ . 

The attention of the druggist is called to " SEGURO," 
as it is pronounced by thousands of married women a posi- 
tive cure for LEUCORRH(EA or WHITES ; a sure pre- 
vention for all venereal diseases, and a sure and reliable 
protection against all monthly irregularities which females 
are subject to. " SEGURO " will convince the most skep- 
tical of its efficiency. 

PRICE TO DRUGGISTS 

$12.00 and $42.00 Per Dozen 



RETAILS AT 



$1.50 and $5.00 Per Box 



BOXES CONTAIN 25 AND 100 CAPSULES EACH. 



MANUFACTURED BY 



WILBUR SAFETY PACKET COMPANY 

31 K Street, Sacramento, Cal. 

FOR SALE BY 

F. W. BRAUN & CO., Los Angeles, Cal. 



! "SEGURO" I 



PHYSICIANS SAY TH e 

w THEREISNO.,nO#/ 



/>' 



MEGA 

SYRINGES 



These Syringes are Warranted 

You run no risk in selling them. They pay a good 
profit to you, and are reliable and satisfactory. 



TAN 

SEALED 
STICKY 

FLY PAPER 

Your Jobber Sells It 




Still Further Improved 

BORDER— Stronger and more Pliable 
STICKY— Stickier and More Enduring 
DESIGN— New and Prettier 
PRICE— Lower 
PROFIT— Larger 



PRICES FOR 1897 

Regular 

35 cents a box, $2.85 per case; 10 boxes in a case 

" Little » 

13 cents a box, $1.50 per case; 15 boxes in a case 



HOLDERS, 75 cents per box of 50 



XIV 



THE CALIFORNIA DRUGGIST. 



e^* e£* e£* e^* I* ■"» m \§^g *r* ^ t &* 1 - <£* 



BEEMAN'S PEPSIN CHEWING GUM 




CURES 
INDIGESTION 




W&psv&oa'? pfpfF^xmrn&MUKFigii 




ALL OTHERS 
ARE IMITATIONS 

ALL FIRST-CLASS DRUGGISTS SELL IT 

SMAS CHBlUXCAIr CO., Sole Hffj 



aLITllrSL 



California fission Eucalyptus Lozenge 




, ^icdfe^i. , 



A valuable contribution to medicine from the Golden State. 
For Coughs, Colds, Hoarseness, Bronchial Irritation, 






Asthma, and Whooping Cough. 



Price per dozen $f-50. 



"^5^pj^=r» 



CALIlf QEIlf IA' llC41IFfllS CO. 

IOS ANGEHi;?, CALIFORNIA, 



F, W. BRAUN & CO., Sole Distributers 

LOS ANGELES and SAN DIEGO 



THE CALIFORNIA DRUGGIST. 



xv 



Antikamnia Substitution 



SPECIAL NOTICE 

All caBes of suspected substitution called to our attention 

will be investigated, and upon incriminating evidence, 

the substitutor will be reported to every physician 

and druggist in the surrounding territory. 

Honest Pharmacy Must Have Honest Competition, 




Antikamnia Powdered, Antikamnia Tablets and Combination 

Tablets are made solely by us and are put up in 

1-oz. packages only. 

NEVER, IN BULK. 

Information Eespecting Substitution Thankfully Received. 

All Correspondence Confidential. 

ADDRESS: 

THE ANTIKAMNIA CHEMICAL COMPANY St. Louis, Mo., U. S A. 




DAVOL RUBBER CO. 

The Ladies' Gem Cleanser. 



Davol Rubber Co 

PROVIDENCE, R. I. 

Manufacturers of a General Line of 

High Quality Rubber Druggists' Sundries 



The Household Syringe 
Ladies' Gem Cleanser 
Magic 



No metal to corrode or rust. 
No screw threads to strip. 
Joints perfectly tight.' 
Valves absolutely secured. 



Expands the parts — for action fluid. 
No other instrument can cleanse. 



I.. ■* 5 The leading American line 

If. flTfimi/PrN For toilet and Medicinal use. 
IU niUllllt.UIU All continuous spray. 



n..LL. , Ol— ..._ ,, Matchless for style, finish and quality. 
KllDDer blOVeS guaranteed against climate. 



Prices recently revised . 



General line for sale by all Wholesale Druggists 



Glooes bg Redington & Co., San Francisco, and 
F. W. Braun & Co., Los Angeles. 



EVERY DRUGGIST 

Should, have on hand a good 
supply of the two staples 

ALLCUCK S pKers 

AND 

Brandreth's Pills 

These goods always give the customer satisfaction, and a 

pleased customer is the best advertisement you can 

have — help us, to be sure— but not more 

than it helps you 



' Should our Plasters or Pills get damaged while in your 
store, from any cause whatever, send them back to us and we will 
make them good and pay postage both ways. 

The Porous Plaster Company 

(B. Brandreth's Sons) 
274 CANAL STREET, NEW YORK CITY 



SALVA-CEA, the new curative lubricant, 
can be safely recommended to do all 
that is claimed for it. 

MEXICAN SALVE 

(Registered Year 1887) 

THE BEST HEftLING SALVE IN THE MftRKET 

PUT UP IN 2-OUNCE TINS 

Retails at 25c per Box. Trade Price, $1.00 per doz. 

On Postal Card Request Sample Box Mailed Free 
to Any Druggist 
ADDRESS 

W. E. DEMENT, Astoria, Ore. 



FOR SALE BY 

F. W. BRAUN & CO., Los Angeles, Cal. 



ESTABLISHED IN 1876 



MA J CTR'S GEM E/N T 



MAJOR'S RUBBER CEMENT 
MAJOR'S LEATHER CEMENT 

The material we use is only found in one country of the world, 5,000 miles 
away, and is very expensive. If you recommend and sell some other, you are not 
only likely to lose a customer on Cement, but on other things. Our Rubbe r 
Cement is preferred by bicycle people for punctures and for putting tires on rims. 
We have several inducements to the trade. Send for circular. Prloe, 15 and 
25 cents per bottle. 

MAJOR CEMENT COMPANY 
461 PEARL STREET NEW YORK CITY 



XVI 



THE CALIFORNIA DRUGGIST. 




THE 



Empire ElasiiG Bandage 

Specially Adapted for Varicose Veins. 



We invite the attention of the Medical and Surgical profession to the various merits 

combined in our bandage. 
1st. Its Porosity — the greatest in the " Empire." It never causes itching, rash or 

ulceration under the bandage. 
2nd. Its Elasticity, which will enable the Surgeon or nurse to put it on at any re- 
quired tension, and which will follow a swelling up or down, as the case may be, a 

feature unknown to any other bandage. 
3rd. Its Absorbent Properties — greatest in the " Empire. " 
4th. Its Easy Application to any part of the body, not being necessary to fold over, as 

with other bandages, as it follows itself with equal uniformity around any part of the 

abdomen. 
5th. Its Self=holding Qualities. No bother with pins, needles and thread, or strings, 
s o tiresome to surgeons, as simply tucking the end under the sat fold insures its permanent stay, until its removal for purposes of cleanliness. 
6th. The only bandage that is Superior to the Elastic Stocking for varicose veins. 

Send $1.00 for Three-inch by Five-yard Bandage on Approval. 



THE EMPIRE ABDOMINAL SUPPORTER 

IS SUPERIOR TO ALL OTHERS FOR THE FOLLOWING REASONS : 

ist. It adapts itself to every movement of the body, 
giving strong and even support. 

2nd. It produces warmth without irritation or sweat- 
ing, as it is perfectly ventilated. 

3rd. In pregnancy, corpulency, tumors, or other 
cases of enlargement of the abdomen, it supports weight 
of body from the backbone, relieving the sinews of 
their overwork. 

4th. Its easy appliance (laced and drawn on over the 
head or feet). 

5th. It is cheap ; durable. It can be washed when 
soiled, proper care being taken to cleanse in lukewarm 
water, and dry in the shade. 

In ordering give the measure of the Abdomen. The 
Supporter should be from four to ten inches larger, 
according to the degree of support required. 




NET RETAIL PRICES. 



8 inches wide 
11 inches wide 
All Silk 



$ 2 50 

3 00 
10 00 



Write for Quantity Prices. 



THE 



Empire Umbilical Truss 

Is an Abdominal Supporter 

with Button Inserted 

at the Navel. 




Is made of the same material, and pos- 
sesses the same merits as the Empire 
Elastic Bandage and Empire Abdominal 
Supporter, and is pronounced by all 
who have seen it to be the best in the 
world. 

All of our goods are warranted sat- 
isfactory or money refunded. 

Truss Prices. 

Infant - - - - - $1 25 
Children ... - 2 50 

Adult 4 00 



MANUFACTURED BY 



The Empire Manufacturing: Company 

Lioekport, Ji. V., U. S. A. 



For Sale by F. W. BRAUN & CO., Los Angeles, Cal. 



THE CALIFORNIA DRUGGIST. 



xvii 



For Dispensing Purposes 

USE THE. . . 

Perfection Pump Can 




Just the thing for filling bottles and 
vials with Castor Oil, Olive Oil, Glycer- 
ine, Turpentine, Benzine, etc. 



Every Can Warranted Absolutely 
Perfect. 



Handsomely decorated and labeled to 
suit the purchaser. 

PRICE 

2 gallon size $1.00 each, net 

| 3 " 1.25 

I 5 " 1.50 " 



MANUFACTURED ONLY BY 

ARTHUR KUHNS COMPANY 

CHICHGO 



FOR SALE BY 



F. W. BRAUN & CO., Los Angeles, Cal. 



Dr. D. Jayne & Son's 



Family . . . 
Medicines 



Are recognized almost 
the world over as the 
best remedies known 
to the medical faculty 



For the Cure of the Diseases 
For which they are Recommended 



For Coughs and Colds— Jayne's Expectorant 

The Strength Giver— Jayne's Tonic Vermifug-e 

The Blood Purifier — Jayne's Alterative 

For all Bowel Troubles — Jayne's Carminative Balsam 

For Biliousness, Constipation, etc. — Jayne's Sanative 

Pills 
For Sprains, Bruises, Rheumatism, etc.— Jayne's 

Liniment 
To Cure Scalp Disease and Make the Hair Grow— Use 

Jayne's Hair Tonic 



Prepared only by DS. D. JAYNE & SON 
Philadelphia, Pa. 



FOR SALE «Y 

F=. UsL. BRAUN St CO. 

LOS ANGELES, CAL. 



' ■ . > riiiliilun ti 



TIH«iliTlilitinitTiirrrfTtTTTHTin'H»ti>inim.<g 




• ••• 



&CONE BETTER 



LARGE BOTTLES 

EFFICIENT 

AGREEABLE 

WELL INTRODUCED 

POPULAR 

GOOD SELLER 

PROFITABLE 



Cost to the Trade $4.00 per Dozen 
Retail Price $1.00 per Bottle 



T>0 YOU HANDLE IT? 



MANUFACTURED AND SOLD BY 

F. W. BRAUN & CO. 

LOS ANGELES, CAL. 




XV111 



THE CALIFORNIA DRUGGIST. 



^ ^^^^glgT^^M^g^^S^^i gS^W ^^^^^Big^^^g&i^Sr^^^^^Sa^ ^lB 



I 



u 

il 



l 



F. W. B^flU^ & CO.'S 



I 



% 



I 

! 
I 
! 

! 



I 



Large. 



Florida (Hater 



This elegant and popular perfume for the 
toilet is unexcelled by any preparation of 
the kind on the market, however high 
priced. It is one of the leading sellers of 
our list, and is growing in favor every day. 



.per doz $3.50 i Small per doz. 





$1.50 



IT IS PROFITABLE 

KEEP SUPPLIED 



F. W. BRAUN & CO., Los Angeles, Cal. 



M 



mmmmmmmmmm mMMmm^mm mmmimmiMmmmm^mmmmmmmM^ l -mmmmmm 



I 



Henry flow's Superb Gossamer 




Has stood the test of public favor for 20 years and is today 
the recognized standard and best selling Face Powder in the world. 
Henry Tetlow has no connection with any other House or 
I Company bearing the name of Tetlow. 



s^a^^^a^^SSf^SSS^ 



'.,',S.S,S.S.SS.y.s OttfSSJ?&g&ZS3§.i 



?3??gggg§e3§@e'g&gg?5g@g?§£ 



THE CALIFORNIA DRUGGIST. 



xix 




SYRACUSE" 



TRADE PRICE LIST. 



NO. 


PRICE 

PER 

DOZEN 


DESCRIPTION 




POUCH 


WAIST BAND 


LEG BAND 


TRIMMING 


10 


$l.JIO 


Cotton 


Non-Elastic 


Part Elastic 




16 


3.00 


Etemie 


" 


Elastic 




21 


4.50 


" 


Elastic 
Non-Elastic 




Silk 


23 


5.GO 


Soft Silk 




tt 


•46 


6.00 


Bolt. Silk 


Elastic 




. i 


47 


6.00 


Soft Silk 


" 




" 


31 


7.50 


Bolt. Silk 


" 




Satin & Silk 


34 


12.00 


Silk, Fine 


Silk Elastic 


Silk Elastic 


( « 


36 


18.00 


" ex. Fine 


It n 


Ex. " 



Shield over Sliding Loop. This Shield prevents pinching. No other suspensory 
has this improvement and no Suspensory is complete without it. 

The Syracuse Suspensory gives support and protection to the scrotum (testicle 
sack), and should be worn in every case where there is any dropping of the scrotum. 

It is Especially Recommended to wheelmen; equestrians; base ball, foot ball aud 
lawn tennis players; athletes; men doing heavy work, much walking or standing, etc. 

It Protects the parts from injury while horseback-riding, bicycling or in gymna- 
sium exercises. 

It Prevents development of varicocele ( enlargement of veins on spermatic cord) 
which may be brought on by sudden strain, extra or continued exertion, from costive- 
ness, from long sickness or inherited tendency. 



It Gives Relief from pain in back and hips, and the dragging sensation cause a 
by any extra exertion or strain upon the muscles in standing, walking, etc. 

Regular Sizes. Our regular sizes are Small, Medium and Large. 

Large Sizes. While our regular sizes are Small, Medium and Large, we al- 
ways have in stock Extra Large and Double Extra Large sizes in all grades, and at 
regular prices. 

Special Sizes. If you have a customer that a regular size does not fit, we will, 
without extra charge, make one specially for him, and guarantee it to be satisfactory. 

Guarantee. We will make good every Syracuse Suspensory which is returned 
to the dealer by the wearer as unsatisfactory. Return Suspensory to us by mail 
and we will send another in place of same Jrec of charge. 

No Risk to Dealer, as we guarantee every one to give satisfaction to wearer. 



We have many " imitators" but NO equals. 

A. J. WELLS MANUFACTURING CO., Syracuse, N. Y. 



5 



ARMSTRONG'S 



JliXJTJTJTJXriJ lJTJTJTJTTUTJXr UTJTJTXLTlXl^ 



Armstrong's 
Effervescent 
Granules. 

Citrate Lithia. Citrate Magnesia. 

Hunyadi. Bromide Seltzer. Vichy. 

Hydrobromate Caffeine. 



(- 
lU 

m 

01 

> 

LLI 

j_ | Pure and Properly Made. 
UJ 3 



Better than 
Tablets, or 
Bottled Waters 

I rLnjTJTTLruTn jrnjTjTjTJT-nxi TJTJxru"U"LrLn. njTXLruxnxLn. c 



None Better, none can be Better. 



C 

r 
m 



ARMSTRONG MANUFACTURING CO., 
F. W. BRAUN & CO., Los Angeles, i7-io Union Street, Boston Mass. 

Agents for Pacific Coast 

uuuuuuuu uuumnjuu isvwumAj uum/mjurj umjuumju uuin/umjuumn/uur. \m\j mi umjumjin/m/mn/in/uumn/mji/i/uTji/uumju 



CHEAP, EFFECTIVE. 



XX 



THE CALIFORNIA DRUGGIST. 




WHY t i i 



are our Soluble Hypodermic Tablets 

so much in demand — 

so satisfactory to the trade — 

so acceptable to the doctor — 

so salable without argument — 



BECAUSE i i i 



they are the most soluble- 
the most permanent — 
the least irritating — 
the best known — 



THE LOGIC 



of these facts crystallizes into an 
idea which every druggist will find 
profitable to act upon. 
Buy S. & D's Hypodermics. 
They sell themselves. 



SH2SRP & DOHME 



ESTABLISHED 1860 

Laboratories 



Western Branch 

CHICAGO 



BHLTIMORE 



General Offices 

NEW YORK 



FOR SALE BY 



F. W. BRAUN & CO. 



LOS ANGELES. CAL. 






LICORICE** 



4s 

6s 

8s 

12s 

16s 

Sticks 

to the 

Pound 

mmm 




it/VtAi) 

Packed 
in 5 lb. 
Wood 
Boxes 
25 lb. 
50 lb. 
and 
125 lb. 
Bulk 
Cases 

mmm 



Acme Licorice Pellets 



ViAi/il) 




mmm 



Packed in 5 lb. Fancy Tin Glass Front Cans 
and in 5 lb. Glass Jars. 

For Sale by F. W. BRAUN & CO., Los Anjjeles 



THE CALIFORNIA DRUGGIST. 



xxi 




READ THESE 



OFFICE OF 

AMBERG & MURPHY 
DRUGGISTS 

Battle Creek, Mich.., Nov. 28, 1897. 

KONDON MANUFACTURING- CO., 
Minneapolis, Minn. 

Express Special $3.00 offer Kondon's Catarrhal Jelly. 

Truly yours, 

AMBERG & MURPHY. 



OFFICE OF 

AMBERG & MURPHY 
DRUGGISTS 



Battle Creek, Mich., Dec. 11th, 1897. 



KONDON MANUFACTURING CO., 
Minneapolis, Minn. 

Please express three dozen Tubes Kondon's Catarrhal 
Jelly, 25 cent size. One dozen Tubes 50 cent size. All out. 

Truly yours, 

AMBERG & MURPHY. 




100% PROFIT 



ON 



S* 






V : 



Kondon's 
Catarrhal Jeliu 

READ THIS OFFER 

Invest $3.00 Realize $6.00 

SALE GUARANTEED 



Send us an order 
on your jobber for 



/2 uiii. nuiiuuu a ouiuimui uciij, out.. 

AT $4.00 PER DOZEN 






* uul iujiiuud's Caloirliol Jelly, 25c. size, 

AT $2.00 PER DOZEN 

And we will send you, all prepaid 
and free of charge, l /z doz. of the 25c. 
size Jelly and 100 Free Samples, Show 
Cards, etc. 



* t 



CORONHDO" 

High Grade Prescription Corks 





mm 



p 





KEGULAE LENGTH 




EXTRA LONG 



The Trade Supplied by F. W. BRftUN & 60. 



XX11 



THE CALIFORNIA DRUGGIST. 




California 
cMission 

Eucalyptus Plasters^ 






Remarkably Effective 



FOR 



Rheumatism, Lumbago, Sciatica, 
Pfeurisy, Couphs, Difficult Breathing, Etc, 



EXTRACT OF 

EUCALYPTUS GLOBULUS 

COMBINED WITH GUMS, BALSAMS AND AROMATICS 
ON CANTON FLANNEL. 



PREPARED By 



California Eucalyptus Co, 



Los Angeles, Cal. 



PRICE S1.50 DOZ. Sold by F. W. Braun & Go., Los Angeles, Gal. 



Hn Hrticle of merit 



ooo 




©HUMP 



nime 



(F. W. B. & CO.) 



H 



ll\/NV\|| I O't^ and effective remedy for acute and chronic affections of the 
■IT vJ.*^/V%V" *■ throat and lungs. Relieves irritating coughs and colds. It is 

made after the formula published in the National Formulary. It is not a cheap Tar 

Mixture. You can add to your reputation and 

^■llCrcaSC... by offering it to your customers. It sells readily, 

|J)OUr profits affords a good profit and always gives satisfaction. 






PRICE LIST: 



4-ounce Oval Bottle per dozen, $ 1 50 

4-ounce Oval Bottle per >£ gross, 8 00 

4-ounce Oval Bottle..... per 1 gross, 15 00 



1 pint Bottle per dozen, $5 00 

5 pint Bottle each, 1 65 

1 gallon package. each, 2 50 



F. W. BRAUN 8 CO. "£3F Los Angefes, Car. 




PO/SON 




w 



it's n 





$i.oo per doz. Packed i doz. in a box, with a decorated tin easel for counter display, one embossed tin hanger, one 
hundred circulars for distribution, four window posters and some blotters. The above attractive exhibit of artificial rats and 
mice for window display is given away with each retail order for one gross ; 5 per cent allowed on one gross orders. 



Order through your Jobber. 



NEWTON ri'F'G & CHEM'L CO., 95 Wm. St., New York 
For Sale by F. W. BRAUN & Co., Los Angeles, Cal. 



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PURITY 



AND 



EXCELLENCE 



REMEMBER THE 



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7> 



^•^•^•^•^•^•^•^•^- *-^-*-*-*-9-9-**-9-9-i*-9 : 9 7 2>-W r 9 r 2'-'^>^^^>?2i^'^ 



m 



CRESCENT 
MALT WHISKEY 









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// ze//// /z<?/ disappoint yoti 
It is a trade bitilder 
7 he package is stylish 
The contents superb 



f. w. nun & co., Los unties, cai. 

SOLE PACIFIC COAST AGENTS 



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THE CALIFORNIA DRUGGIST. 



F. W. Braun & Co.'s Druggists' Sundries Department. 



The RED STAR POMADE JARS 




Are very carefully made, with ground tops 
and ornamented screw caps 



Neatest Thing Out... 



For Cosmoline, Ointments, Powders, etc., etc. 
These come packed in Cartons of 2 dozen, and 
At the following low prices ; 



1 oz $2.50 full gross lots- 

2 oz 3.00 full gross lots- 



-per doz 25c. 

-per doz 30c. 



3 oz $3-75 full gross lots per doz. 

4 oz 4.25 full gross lots per doz. 



•35<- 
.40c. 



Squeeze it 



and it will Curl 
Your Hair 

Order Before it is Too Late 




Until Our Stock is Exhausted We Will Sell 

The Automatic Revolving, Reversible Hair 
Curling Iron for 75 cts. a dozen 



THE CALIFORNIA DRUGGIST. 



F, W. Braun & Co.'s Druggists' Sundries Department. 




SPONGES 



Every Variety 

A Full Range of Prices 



THE CALIFORNIA DRUGGIST. 



111 



F. W. Braun & Co.'s Druggists' Sundries Department. 



Drug Store Fixtures 




The Ideal Outfit— $450 



Comprising the Following: 



OAK, ASH OR GUM 



30 feet Tincture Shelving 
30 feet Patent Medicine Shelving 
10 foot Rx Case and Dispensing Counter 
6 foot Combination Cigar Case and Bevel Plate Top 
2-6 foot Show Case Counters 
2-8 foot Show Case Counters 
1-6 foot Scale Counter 
2-6 foot Show Cases 19 inches high 
2-8 foot Show Cases 19 inches high 
2 Cornice Connections 



ALL MADE UP IN FIRST-CLASS WORKMANSHIP AND FINISH 



We also quote others 



$400 $425 $475 $500 



And Upwards to the Finest 



All prices F. O. B. Cars at Factory at Quincy, 111. Cuts on Application 



IV 



THE CALIFORNIA DRUGGIST. 



F. W. Braun & Co.'s Druggists' Sundries Department. 







o 



I i. 1 i. 1 1 



A 



Lii_i.L> \y 





f~\ 




A SEASONABLE OFFER 



Send us an order, for $8.oo worth of Wrigley's Chewing Gum, and we will send you 
$10.00 worth (at retail) of Wrigley's Gum assorted, and an order on Messrs, Wrigley & Co., 
Chicago, for either a Lady's or Gentleman's Mackintosh. 

The Lady's is made in either black or navy blue, with two detachable seamless 
capes, velvet collars, and full sweep cape and skirt. The gent's is black, with velvet collar 
and detachable cape. These are all made of English Cashmere Cloth, and have lining of 
extra weight dark plaid. 



iio.oo Worth of Gum and Mackintosh, for 



.oo 





h^ 



P/Q^/G 



ANOTHER SEASONABLE OFFER 



Send us an order for $4.80 worth of Luxury Chewing Gum and we will send you $8.00 
worth of Trilby Gum and a handsome Paragon Frame, Steel Rod, Silk Umbrella. Just the 
thing for the approaching rainy weather. 

A staple, quick-selling article affording a good profit and a serviceable bonus, free. 



$8.00 Worth of Gum and an Umbrella, for $4.80 



THE CALIFORNIA DRUGGIST. 




THE 



Empire Elastic Bandage 

Specially Adapted for Varicose Veins. 



We invite the attention of the Medical and Surgical profession to the various merits 

combined in our bandage. 
1st. Its Porosity — the greatest in the "Empire." It never causes itching, rash or 

ulceration under the bandage. 
2nd. Its Elasticity, which will enable the Surgeon or nurse to put it on at any re- 
quired tension, and which will follow a swelling up or down, as the case may be, a 

feature unknown to any other bandage. 
3rd. Its Absorbent Properties — greatest in the " Empire. " 
4th. Its Easy Application to any part of the body, not being necessary to fold over, as 

with other bandages, as it follows itself with equal uniformity around any part of the 

abdomen . 
5th. Its SeIf=hoIding Qualities. No bother with pins, needles and thread, or strings, 
so tiresome to surgeons, as simply tucking the end under the sat fold insures its permanent stay, until its removal for purposes of cleanliness. 
6th. The only bandage that is Superior to the Elastic Stocking for varicose veins. 

Send $1.00 for Three-inch by Five-yard Bandage on Approval. 



THE EMPIRE ABDOMINAL SUPPORTER 

IS SUPERIOR TO ALL OTHERS FOR THE FOLLOWING REASONS : 

ist. It adapts itself to every movement of the body, 
giving strong and even support. 

2nd. It produces warmth without irritation or sweat- 
ing, as it is perfectly ventilated. 

3rd. In pregnancy, corpulency, tumors, or other 
cases of enlargement of the abdomen, it supports weight 
of body from the backbone, relieving the sinews of 
their overwork. 

4th. Its easy appliance (laced and drawn on over the 
head or feet). 

5th. It is cheap ; durable. It can be washed when 
soiled, proper care being taken to cleanse in lukewarm 
water, and dry in the shade. 

In ordering give the measure of the Abdomen. The 
Supporter should be from four to ten inches larger, 
according to the degree of support required. 




NET RETAIL PRICES. 



8 inches wide - 
11 inches wide 
All Silk 



$ 2 50 

3 00 

10 00 



Write for Quantity Prices. 



THE 



Empire Umbilical Truss 

Is an Abdominal Supporter 

with Button Inserted 

at the Navel. 




Is made of the same material, and pos- 
sesses the same merits as the Empire 
Elastic Bandage and Empire Abdominal 
Supporter, and is pronounced by all 
who have seen it to be the best in the 
world . 

All of our goods are warranted sat- 
isfactory or money refunded. 

Truss Prices. 



Infant 
Children 
Adult - 



$1 25 
2 50 
4 00 



MANUFACTURED BY 



The Empire Manufacturing Company 

liockpopt, H- V., U. S. fl. 



For Sale by F. W. BRAUN & CO., Los Angeles, Cal. 



VI 



THE CALIFORNIA DRUGGIST. 



§ 

I 

I 

I 

1 

1 

I 

I 

I 

I 

1 

I 

I 

I 



Sj gSgBjisiiaaiBisieipisi^BiBa mssii^^ 



F. m. &HRVJ4 & CO.'S 



1 



Florida (Hater 



This elegant and popular perfume for the 
toilet is unexcelled by any preparation of 
the kind on the market, however high 
priced. It is one of the leading sellers of 
our list, and is growing in favor every day. 



Large per doz $3.50 Small per doz. 





i 
i 

i 

IT 



$1.50 



IT IS PROFITABLE 

KEEP SUPPLIED 



F. W. BRAUN & CO., Los Angeles, Cal. 



ki 



^rnmsf^g^^gS^e^^^e^^^^^mm^f^^^^^sa^ggPMPa^^^^ag] 



I! 

p 
I 

I 

I 



I 



Henry Tetiow's Superb Gossamer 




Has stood the test of public favor for 20 years and is today 
the recognized standard and best selling Face Powder in the world. 
Henry Tetlow has no connection with any other House or 
I Company bearing the name of Tetlow. 



iSSSSSSSSf 



THE CALIFORNIA DRUGGIST. 



Vll 




SYRACUSE 



tt 



Shield over Sliding Loop. This Shield prevents pinching. No other suspensory 
has this improvement and no Suspensory is complete without it. 

The Syracuse Suspensory gives support and protection to the scrotum (testicle 
sack), and should be worn in every case where there is any dropping of the scrotum. 

It is Especially Recommended to wheelmen; equestrians; base ball, foot ball and 
lawn tennis players; athletes; men doing heavy work, much walking or standing, etc. 

It Protects the parts from injury while horseback-riding, bicycling or in gymna- 
sium exercises. 

It Prevents development of varicocele ( enlargement of veins on spermatic cord ) 
which may be brought on by sudden strain, extra or continued exertion, from costive- 
ness, from long sickness or inherited tendency. 



TRADE PRICE LIST. 



NO. 


PRICE 

PER 

DOZEN 


DESCRIPTION 




POUCH 


WAIST BAND 


LEG BAND 


TRIMMING 


lO 


$l.AO 

3.00 


Cotton 


Non-Elastic 


Part Elastic 




16 


Etemie 


< 1 


Elastic 




21 


4.50 


" 


Elastic 


it 


Silk 


23 


5.00 


Soft Silk 


Non-Elastic 


" 


(( 


26 


6.00 


Bolt. Silk 


Elastic 


ft 


<< 


27 


6.00 


Soft Silk 


" 


" 


a 


31 


7.50 


Bolt. Silk 


<< 


" 


Satin & Silk 


34 


12.00 


Silk, Fine 


Silk Elastic 


Silk Elastic 


" 


36 


18.00 


" ex. Fine 


<< 


" 


Ex. " 



It Gives Relief from pain in back and hips, and the dragging sensation caused 
by any extr